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  • 1.
    Abi Nassif, L.
    et al.
    University Brest, France; Université Saint Joseph, France.
    Rioual, S.
    University Brest, France.
    Farah, W.
    Université Saint Joseph, France.
    Hellio, C.
    University Brest, France.
    Fauchon, M.
    University Brest, France.
    Trepos, R.
    University Brest, France.
    Abboud, M.
    Université Saint Joseph, France.
    Diler, Erwan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Corrosion.
    Thierry, Dominique
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Corrosion.
    Lescop, B.
    University Brest, France.
    Reduction of potential ennoblement of stainless steel in natural seawater by an ecofriendly biopolymer2020In: Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering, ISSN 2160-6544, E-ISSN 2213-3437, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 103609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of biofilm formation on passive stainless steel in seawater environments is of primary importance since it leads to potential ennoblement of surfaces and subsequently to localized corrosion such as pitting and crevice corrosion. This study aims at developing an ecofriendly alginate biopolymer containing both non-toxic calcium and a limited amount of biocidal zinc ions which inhibits this effect. For this purpose, calcium alginate containing less than 1 % of zinc ions localized in the vicinity of the steel surface in natural and renewed seawater is demonstrated to reduce significantly the ennoblement process of steel. After 1 month of immersion, a mass loss of only 4 % of the active material is observed authorizing thereby long-term protection of steel in real environment. 

  • 2.
    Pallon, Love K. H.
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Corrosion.
    Persson, Olle
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Infrastructure and concrete technology.
    Marklund, Erik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Polymeric Materials and Composites.
    Malm, A
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Johansson, T.
    RenoveraVA, Sweden.
    Condition monitoring of excavated CIPP-liners to ensure lifespan2020In: 37th International NO-DIG Conference and Exhibition 2019, International Society for Trenchless Technology , 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden there is a lack of knowledge on the expected service life of installed CIPP-liners and a general aim to request CIPP-liners with a 100-year lifespan. In cooperation with Swedish water utilities a national project has been launched for condition monitoring of used CIPP-liners. A large number of CIPP-liners installed in sewage pipes will be excavated and analyzed in order to evaluate material degradation and estimating remaining service life. The CIPP-liners are all between 5-35 years old. The material performance of the CIPP-liners are either compared with the reference data provided from the installation, or in some case compared to pieces of corresponding CIPP-liners that have been kept in a storage. These pieces becomes especially valuable when looking at possible changes in mechanical properties that may have occurred during the time in use. The materials will be assessed by e.g. bending modulus to investigate material integrity and e.g. FT-IR for chemical stability in the environment of the sewage system. In total the results will give a valuable tool in assessing the expected lifetime of the installed CIPP-liners. The knowledge acquired will help Swedish water utilities to predict service life of installed CIPP-liners and to set sufficient quality demands on new installations for pipe renovation. At an initial stage two excavated CIPP-liners that have been in use for 12 and 16 years have been analyzed and compared with reference data from the time of installation.

  • 3.
    Persson, Daniel
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Heydari, G
    SSAB Europe, Sweden.
    Edvinsson, Camilla
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Corrosion.
    Sundell, P. E.
    SSAB Europe, Sweden.
    Depth-resolved FTIR focal plane array (FPA) spectroscopic imaging of the loss of melamine functionality of polyester melamine coating after accelerated and natural weathering2020In: Polymer testing, ISSN 0142-9418, E-ISSN 1873-2348, Vol. 86, article id 106500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    FTIR-ATR (Focal Plane Array) FPA spectroscopic imaging was used to obtain depth resolved information about degradation of a polyester melamine coating by performing measurements on drilled conical holes. The results of the FTIR-FPA imaging show that combined effect of UV and moisture resulted in larger degradation effects in the outermost parts of the coatings but loss of melamine functionality was detected to the depth of approximately 8–10 μm after 2163 h weathering in QUVA accelerated test and after 4 years exposure in a marine environment. Longer periods of accelerated weathering, up to 4000 h, resulted in degradation through the whole coating outer layer.

  • 4.
    Saarimaa, Ville J.
    et al.
    Top Analytica, Finland.
    Fuertes, Nuria
    Swerim AB, Sweden.
    Persson, Daniel
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production.
    Zavalis, Tommy
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Corrosion.
    Kaleva, Aaretti
    Tampere University, Finland.
    Nikkanen, Juha Pekka
    Tampere University, Finland.
    Levänen, Erkki
    Tampere University, Finland.
    Heydari, Golrokh
    SSAB, Sweden.
    Assessment of pitting corrosion in bare and passivated (wet scCO2-induced patination and chemical passivation) hot-dip galvanized steel samples with SVET, FTIR, and SEM (EDS)2020In: Materials and corrosion - Werkstoffe und Korrosion, ISSN 0947-5117, E-ISSN 1521-4176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the local electrochemical activity of untreated and passivated (natural or chemical passivation) zinc specimens was observed during immersion in a 0.1-M NaCl solution. The localized anodic activity during the exposure, measured with the scanning vibrating electrode technique, was linked to zinc dissolution by the pitting corrosion mechanism. It was correlated to specific corrosion products characterized by Fourier transmission infrared (FTIR) microscopy. FTIR molecule maps were produced from individual pitting corrosion sites (100–200 µm in width). With argon ion beam milling and latest energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) technology, element maps with a high spatial resolution (≪100 nm) were recorded from abrasion- and beam-sensitive corrosion products, showing a residual layer structure. This study demonstrates the capability of FTIR mapping, cross-section polishing, and state-of-the-art scanning electron microscopy imaging, and EDS element mapping to produce high-resolution elemental, molecular, and visual information about pitting corrosion mechanisms on a hot-dip galvanized steel sample.

  • 5.
    Thierry, Dominique
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Corrosion.
    Le Bozec, Nathalie
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Corrosion.
    Persson, Dan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Corrosion.
    Corrosion of hot-dip-galvanised steel and zinc alloy-coated steel in ammonia and ammonium chloride2020In: Materials and corrosion - Werkstoffe und Korrosion, ISSN 0947-5117, E-ISSN 1521-4176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are many potential causes of corrosion in animal buildings. Animals exhale large quantities of moisture into the air creating high relative humidity in the building if the moisture is not properly vented. High humidity increases the potential for condensation. In addition, ammonia may be found in large quantities in animal buildings. Ammonia is released from manure and urine. In addition, ammonium chloride is used as a nitrogen source in fertilisers. In this study, the atmospheric corrosion of hot-dip-galvanised steel and zinc alloy-coated steel such as zinc–aluminium and zinc–aluminium–magnesium has been studied in atmospheres containing different levels of ammonia. Investigations have also been conducted at different levels of ammonium chloride. The results are discussed in view of the mechanisms of corrosion of zinc and zinc alloy-coated steel in ammonia and ammonium chloride-containing environments.

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