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  • 1.
    Fortes Brollo, Maria Eugenia
    et al.
    Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Spain.
    Domínguez-Bajo, Ana
    Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Spain.
    Tabero, Andrea
    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain.
    Domínguez-Arca, Vicente
    Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Gisbert, Victor
    Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Spain.
    Prieto, Gerardo
    Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Johansson, Christer
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Garcia, Ricardo
    Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Spain.
    Villanueva, Angeles
    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain.
    Serrano, María Concepción
    Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Spain.
    Morales, María Del Puerto
    Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Spain; IMDEA-Nanociencia, Spain.
    Combined Magnetoliposome Formation and Drug Loading in One Step for Efficient Alternating Current-Magnetic Field Remote-Controlled Drug Release.2020In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 4295-4307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have developed a reproducible and facile one step strategy for the synthesis of doxorubicin loaded magnetoliposomes by using a thin-layer evaporation method. Liposomes of around 200 nm were made of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) with negative, positive, and hydrophobic surfaces that were incorporated outside, inside, or between the lipid bilayers, respectively. To characterize how NPs are incorporated in liposomes, advanced cryoTEM and atomic force microscope (AFM) techniques have been used. It was observed that only when the NPs are attached outside the liposomes, the membrane integrity is preserved (lipid melt transition shifts to 38.7 °C with high enthalpy 34.8 J/g) avoiding the leakage of the encapsulated drug while having good colloidal properties and the best heating efficiency under an alternating magnetic field (AMF). These magnetoliposomes were tested with two cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and HeLa cells. First, 100% of cellular uptake was achieved with a high cell survival (above 80%), which is preserved (83%) for doxorubicin-loaded magnetoliposomes. Then, we demonstrate that doxorubicin release can be triggered by remote control, using a noninvasive external AMF for 1 h, leading to a cell survival reduction of 20%. Magnetic field conditions of 202 kHz and 30 mT seem to be enough to produce an effective heating to avoid drug degradation. In conclusion, these drug-loaded magnetoliposomes prepared in one step could be used for drug release on demand at a specific time and place, efficiently using an external AMF to reduce or even eliminate side effects.

  • 2.
    Jafari Jam, Reza
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Persson, Axel
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Barrigón, Enrique
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Heurlin, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Geijselaers, Irene
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Gómez, Victor
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hultin, Olof
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Samuelson, Lars
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Borgström, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Håkan
    Lund University, Sweden; Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Template-assisted vapour-liquid-solid growth of InP nanowires on (001) InP and Si substrates2020In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 888-894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the synthesis of vertical InP nanowire arrays on (001) InP and Si substrates using template-assisted vapour-liquid-solid growth. A thick silicon oxide layer was first deposited on the substrates. The samples were then patterned by electron beam lithography and deep dry etching through the oxide layer down to the substrate surface. Gold seed particles were subsequently deposited in the holes of the pattern by the use of pulse electrodeposition. The subsequent growth of nanowires by the vapour-liquid-solid method was guided towards the [001] direction by the patterned oxide template, and displayed a high growth yield with respect to the array of holes in the template. In order to confirm the versatility and robustness of the process, we have also demonstrated guided growth of InP nanowire p-n junctions and InP/InAs/InP nanowire heterostructures on (001) InP substrates. Our results show a promising route to monolithically integrate III-V nanowire heterostructure devices with commercially viable (001) silicon platforms.

  • 3.
    Méhes, Gabor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Mulla, Mohammad
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Pulp, Paper and Packaging.
    Che, Canyan
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Beni, Valerio
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Solar Heat-Enhanced Energy Conversion in Devices Based on Photosynthetic Membranes and PEDOT:PSS-Nanocellulose Electrodes2020In: Advanced Sustainable Systems, ISSN 2366-7486, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 1900100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy harvesting from photosynthetic membranes, proteins, or bacteria through bio-photovoltaic or bio-electrochemical approaches has been proposed as a new route to clean energy. A major shortcoming of these and solar cell technologies is the underutilization of solar irradiation wavelengths in the IR region, especially those in the far IR region. Here, a biohybrid energy-harvesting device is demonstrated that exploits IR radiation, via convection and thermoelectric effects, to improve the resulting energy conversion performance. A composite of nanocellulose and the conducting polymer system poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) is used as the anode in biohybrid cells that includes thylakoid membranes (TMs) and redox mediators (RMs) in solution. By irradiating the conducting polymer electrode by an IR light-emitting diode, a sixfold enhancement in the harvested bio-photovoltaic power is achieved, without compromising stability of operation. Investigation of the output currents reveals that IR irradiation generates convective heat transfer in the electrolyte bulk, which enhances the redox reactions of RMs at the anode by suppressing diffusion limitations. In addition, a fast-transient thermoelectric component, originating from the PEDOT:PSS-nanocellulose-electrolyte interphase, further increases the bio-photocurrent. These results pave the way for the development of energy-harvesting biohybrids that make use of heat, via IR absorption, to enhance energy conversion efficiency. 

  • 4.
    Schier, P.
    et al.
    UMIT Private University for Health Sciences, Austria.
    Barton, C.
    National Physics Laboratory, UK.
    Spassov, S.
    Institut Royal Meteorologique De Belgique, Belgium.
    Johansson, Christer
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Baumgarten, D.
    UMIT Private University for Health Sciences, Austria.
    Kazakova, O.
    National Physics Laboratory, UK.
    Southern, P.
    University College London, UK.
    Pankhurst, Q.
    University College London, UK.
    Coisson, M.
    Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Italy.
    Grüttner, C.
    micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, Germany.
    Price, A.
    BSI Standards Limited, UK.
    Rüttinger, R.
    DIN Deutsches Institut für Normung e. V., Germany.
    Wiekhorst, F.
    PTB Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany.
    Wells, J.
    PTB Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany.
    Steinhoff, U.
    PTB Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany.
    European Research on Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications: Standardisation Aspects2020In: 21st Polish Conference on Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering, PCBBE 2019, Springer Verlag , 2020, p. 316-326Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Magnetic nanoparticles have many applications in biomedicine and other technical areas. Despite their huge economic impact, there are no standardised procedures available to measure their basic magnetic properties. The International Organization for Standardization is working on a series of documents on the definition of characteristics of magnetic nanomaterials. We review previous and ongoing European research projects on characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles and present results of an online survey among European researchers.

  • 5.
    Tagle, Matias
    et al.
    Centro Mario Molina Chile, Chile.
    Rojas, Francisca
    Centro Mario Molina Chile, Chile.
    Reyes, Filipe
    Centro Mario Molina Chile, Chile.
    Vásquez, Yeanice
    Centro Mario Molina Chile, Chile.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Lindén, Jenny
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Kolev, Dimitar
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Watne, Ågot
    City of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Oyola, Pedro
    Centro Mario Molina Chile, Chile.
    Field performance of a low-cost sensor in the monitoring of particulate matter in Santiago, Chile2020In: Environmental Monitoring & Assessment, ISSN 0167-6369, E-ISSN 1573-2959, Vol. 192, no 3, article id 171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integration of low-cost air quality sensors with the internet of things (IoT) has become a feasible approach towards the development of smart cities. Several studies have assessed the performance of low-cost air quality sensors by comparing their measurements with reference instruments. We examined the performance of a low-cost IoT particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) sensor in the urban environment of Santiago, Chile. The prototype was assembled from a PM10–PM2.5 sensor (SDS011), a temperature and relative humidity sensor (BME280) and an IoT board (ESP8266/Node MCU). Field tests were conducted at three regulatory monitoring stations during the 2018 austral winter and spring seasons. The sensors at each site were operated in parallel with continuous reference air quality monitors (BAM 1020 and TEOM 1400) and a filter-based sampler (Partisol 2000i). Variability between sensor units (n = 7) and the correlation between the sensor and reference instruments were examined. Moderate inter-unit variability was observed between sensors for PM2.5 (normalized root-mean-square error 9–24%) and PM10 (10–37%). The correlations between the 1-h average concentrations reported by the sensors and continuous monitors were higher for PM2.5 (R2 0.47–0.86) than PM10 (0.24–0.56). The correlations (R2) between the 24-h PM2.5 averages from the sensors and reference instruments were 0.63–0.87 for continuous monitoring and 0.69–0.93 for filter-based samplers. Correlation analysis revealed that sensors tended to overestimate PM concentrations in high relative humidity (RH > 75%) and underestimate when RH was below 50%. Overall, the prototype evaluated exhibited adequate performance and may be potentially suitable for monitoring daily PM2.5 averages after correcting for RH. 

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