Change search
Refine search result
1 - 39 of 39
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aliasgari, Mahdis
    et al.
    Lighting Design Collective, Spain.
    Clark, Brendon
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Baby steps or stage dive into a critical design dialogue2017In: Interaction design & architectures Journnal IxD&A, ISSN 1826-9745, Vol. 2017, no 32, p. 38-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper puts forward the early, practical actions "in context" that can begin to sensitize, orient, expand, and constrain design dialogue at the outset of a design effort. Drawing on a case of "breaching experiments" in "non-places" we explore a "first approximation" of interventionist participation into the context of future interactive & responsive design interventions. By introducing a design journey, we have shed a light on how a human-centric approach, applied to the context of Human Building Interaction (HBI), can support an interventionist design dialogue between people and designed environment through processes of stirring up what's beyond 'norms' of interaction.

  • 2.
    Boork, Magdalena
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Engstrom, S.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Olsen, R.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Balksjo, T.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    R(e)flect: The reflective teaching material about energy, behaviour and product development2014In: CSEDU 2014 - Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Computer Supported Education, 2014, Vol. 2, p. 336-341Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    R(e)flect is a tangible curriculum kit for students age 10-15 to reflect on energy behaviour and make better informed choices about energy use. Along with web-based material, the kit includes a minicomputer, smart plugs (sensors), and an electricity visualization tool especially designed to be used in the classroom to conduct experiments and measurements, perform project work in product development, and increase the understanding of the kWh concept. The curriculum is closely connected to the new Swedish National curriculum and supplies the teachers with appropriate support for assessment of different skills. The project was initiated in 2011 and a first version of the curriculum was tested and evaluated with students and teachers. The feedback from this trial influenced the second iteration of the kit. The new version will be tested in at least 20 schools during the spring of 2014 and this second phase will continue until 2015. The physical r(e)flect material can be borrowed by teachers free of charge, and the web-based platform is open and accessible to anyone.

  • 3.
    Boork, Magdalena
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energi och Bioekonomi, Klimatisering och installationsteknik.
    Engström, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Olsen, Rebekah
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Balksjö, Therese
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    r(e)flect The Reflective Teaching Material about Energy, Behavior and Product Development2014In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Computer Supported Education (CSEDU),, 2014, , p. 6p. 336-341Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    r(e)flect is a tangible curriculum kit for students age 10-15 to reflect on energy behaviour and make better informed choices about energy use. Along with web-based material, the kit includes a minicomputer, smart plugs (sensors), and an electricity visualization tool especially designed to be used in the classroom to conduct experiments and measurements, perform project work in product development, and increase the understanding of the kWh concept. The curriculum is closely connected to the new Swedish National curriculum and supplies the teachers with appropriate support for assessment of different skills. The project was initiated in 2011 and a first version of the curriculum was tested and evaluated with students and teachers. The feedback from this trial influenced the second iteration of the kit. The new version will be tested in at least 20 schools during the spring of 2014 and this second phase will continue until 2015. The physical r(e)flect material can be borrowed by teachers free of charge, and the web-based platform is open and accessible to anyone.

  • 4.
    Carlborg, Niklas
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Tyren, Markus
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Heath, Carl
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    The Scope of Autonomy Model: Development of Teaching Materials for Computational Thinking in Primary School2018In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, 2018, p. 37-44Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 21st century there has been an increasing interest in the field of computational thinking as a consequence of the ever faster technical development. However, educating future generations inprogramming and computational thinking is not trivial. Many different platforms and teaching approaches can be used for this purpose. Inspired by the UK initiative with BBC micro:bit, this paper strives to identify what may be important to consider when designing teaching materials with the micro:bit for training Swedish primary school pupils’ computational thinking skills relating to mathematical and technical school subjects. This has been investigated in an iterative process, by conducting 21 workshops with the goal to support primary school teachers in developing micro:bit teaching materials. The contribution of this paper is the Scope of autonomy model, which is based on the relation between pupils learning potential, their risk of feeling overwhelmed and the amount of choices provided in exercises. The model aim to support teachers in developing material for teaching programming and computational thinking in accordance with the new curriculum. 

  • 5.
    Carlborg, Niklas
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Tyren, Markus
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Heath, Carl
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Aarhus University, Denmark: Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    The scope of autonomy when teaching computational thinking in primary school2019In: International Journal of Child-Computer Interaction, ISSN 2212-8689, E-ISSN 2212-8697, Vol. 21, p. 130-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 21st century, there has been an increased interest in the field of computational thinking as a consequence of the ever faster technical development. However, educating future generations in programming and computational thinking is not trivial. Many different platforms and teaching approaches can be used for this purpose. Inspired by the UK initiative with BBC micro:bit, this paper strives to identify what may be important to consider when designing teaching materials with the BBC micro:bit for training Swedish primary school learners’ computational thinking skills relating to mathematical and technical school subjects. This has been investigated in an iterative process, by conducting 21 workshops with the goal to support primary school teachers in developing BBC micro:bit teaching materials. The contribution of this paper is the Scope of autonomy model, which is based on the relation between learning potential, the risk of feeling overwhelmed, and the amount of choices provided in exercises. The model aim to support teachers in developing and appropriating material for teaching programming and computational thinking with individual progression in accordance with the new curriculum.

  • 6.
    Chow, Joyce
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Törnros, Martin
    Interaktiva Rum Sverige, Sweden.
    Waltersson, Marie
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Richard, Helen
    Linköping University Hospital, Sweden.
    Kusoffsky, Madeleine
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Lundström, Claes
    Sectra AB, Sweden; Linköping University, Sweden.
    Kurti, Arianit
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    A design study investigating augmented reality and photograph annotation in a digitalized grossing workstation2017In: Journal of Pathology Informatics, ISSN 2229-5089, E-ISSN 2153-3539, Vol. 8, no 1, article id A12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Within digital pathology, digitalization of the grossing procedure has been relatively underexplored in comparison to digitalization of pathology slides. Aims: Our investigation focuses on the interaction design of an augmented reality gross pathology workstation and refining the interface so that information and visualizations are easily recorded and displayed in a thoughtful view. Settings and Design: The work in this project occurred in two phases: The first phase focused on implementation of an augmented reality grossing workstation prototype while the second phase focused on the implementation of an incremental prototype in parallel with a deeper design study. Subjects and Methods: Our research institute focused on an experimental and 'designerly' approach to create a digital gross pathology prototype as opposed to focusing on developing a system for immediate clinical deployment. Statistical Analysis Used: Evaluation has not been limited to user tests and interviews, but rather key insights were uncovered through design methods such as 'rapid ethnography' and 'conversation with materials'. Results: We developed an augmented reality enhanced digital grossing station prototype to assist pathology technicians in capturing data during examination. The prototype uses a magnetically tracked scalpel to annotate planned cuts and dimensions onto photographs taken of the work surface. This article focuses on the use of qualitative design methods to evaluate and refine the prototype. Our aims were to build on the strengths of the prototype's technology, improve the ergonomics of the digital/physical workstation by considering numerous alternative design directions, and to consider the effects of digitalization on personnel and the pathology diagnostics information flow from a wider perspective. A proposed interface design allows the pathology technician to place images in relation to its orientation, annotate directly on the image, and create linked information. Conclusions: The augmented reality magnetically tracked scalpel reduces tool switching though limitations in today's augmented reality technology fall short of creating an ideal immersive workflow by requiring the use of a monitor. While this technology catches up, we recommend focusing efforts on enabling the easy creation of layered, complex reports, linking, and viewing information across systems. Reflecting upon our results, we argue for digitalization to focus not only on how to record increasing amounts of data but also how these data can be accessed in a more thoughtful way that draws upon the expertise and creativity of pathology professionals using the systems.

  • 7.
    Dalipi, Fisnik
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden ; University College of Southeast Norway, Norway.
    Ferati, Mexhid
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Kurti, Arianit
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Integrating MOOCs in regular higher education: Challenges and opportunities from a scandinavian perspective2018In: Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10924), 2018, p. 193-204Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MOOCs are increasingly being considered by universities as an integral part of their curriculum. Nevertheless, there are several challenges that to some extent slow this process, where the most important one is the accreditation challenges and financing. These challenges are particularly important in the context of universities in Scandinavian countries where education is mostly free. In order to gain more insights on the status of proliferation of MOOCs in Scandinavian universities and understand any specific challenges, we conducted a study by analyzing two sources of data: research publications and university websites. Further on, these data have been analyzed using a framework that differentiates and categorizes MOOCs in terms of accreditation and scalability. As a result of this analysis, we have identified the remaining challenges as well as a number of opportunities regarding the full integration of MOOCs in the educational system of the Scandinavian Higher Education Institutions. .

  • 8.
    Dalipi, Fisnik
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden ; Tetovo University, Macedonia.
    Idrizi, Florin
    Tetovo University, Macedonia.
    Kurti, Arianit
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Linnaeus University, Sweden .
    Exploring the impact of social learning networks in M-learning: A case study in a University environment2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high penetration of Internet, advances in mobile computing and the rise of smartphone usage has largely enhanced the use of social media in education. Moreover, nowadays social learning network (SLN) platforms have become an important educational technology component in higher education. Despite the fact that SLN are becoming ubiquitous in the higher education, there is relatively not much empirical work done investigating their purposefulness when integrated into the learning activities. This paper aims at exploring the impact of SLN in mobile assisted learning and to provide empirical evidence as to what extent SLN and mobile learning (M-learning) can improve the learning experiences. For this purpose, a quantitative experimental approach is used, and two survey questionnaires were conducted. The data is collected from 120 participants. In this study, we focus our intention on Edmodo and Kahoot platforms, which represent social media based tools that aid and support collaboration, knowledge sharing and group activities among students. Computer science students of the Tetovo University (TU) used these tools throughout one semester. From this study, there is significant evidence that students are very interested to use this SLN in a M-learning setting, indicating that SLN can be one of the promising pedagogical technologies that could contribute effectively to learning process.

  • 9.
    Dalipi, Fisnik
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Kurti, Arianit
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Zdravkova, Katerina S.
    Cyril and Methodius University, Macedonia.
    Ahmedi, Lule
    University of Prishtina, Serbia.
    Rethinking the conventional learning paradigm towards MOOC based flipped classroom learning2017In: 2017 16th International Conference on Information Technology Based Higher Education and Training, ITHET 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent proliferation of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) has initiated a plethora of research endeavors revolving around new pedagogical methods in higher education. Integrating MOOCs in blended learning can be beneficial in different ways for both learners and instructors. In this position paper, we aim to provide a brief and comprehensive review about the challenges that higher education institutions in Macedonia and Kosovo face while coping with the new trends of flexible or blended learning. Moreover, after describing some real cases of MOOC based flipped classroom learning, we also provide some recommendations in order to enhance and enrich learning experience by employing innovative pedagogies.

  • 10.
    de Jong, Annelise
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Mazé, Ramia
    Aalto University, Finland.
    How about dinner?: Concepts and methods in designing for sustainable lifestyles. Chapter 282017In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainable Product Design / [ed] edited by Jonathan Chapman, 2017, p. 423-442Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Consumption is increasingly in focus within approaches to sustainable development, with the notion of sustainable consumption raising new issues for design. In designing to reduce the consumption of energy, water and other resources, for example, we need to consider the socio-cultural complexity of consumers’ perceptions, actions and routines. Pointing to two such projects in the areas of domestic electricity use and bathing practices, we reflect here upon limitations in concepts and methods common in user centered and sustainable design and, consequently, how we have been further developing our conceptual and methodological frames of reference as design researchers to include these social aspects. We also report on an additional project that draws on these new frames of reference to study ways of doing cooking within diverse households, in which we gained insights into how the many resources, products and artefacts involved in food management are deeply embedded in traditions, meanings and aspirations. Issues of environmental sustainability, such as water, energy and waste, are at stake in such design research but, as we argue, so is attention and sensitivity to how these are interwoven in meaningful socio-cultural practices. Through this chapter, we discuss implications of further incorporating approaches to the social from other fields into design research and education and vice versa what the social sciences might learn from design for sustainable consumption.

  • 11.
    Eriksson, Eva
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark ; Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Heath, Carl
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Ljungstrand, Peter
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Parnes, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Makerspace in school—Considerations from a large-scale national testbed2018In: International Journal of Child-Computer Interaction, ISSN 2212-8689, E-ISSN 2212-8697, Vol. 16, p. 9-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital fabrication and making has received a growing interest in formal and informal learning environments. However, many of these initiatives often start from a grassroots perspective, with little coordination on a national level. This paper illustrates and discusses a study from an ongoing large-scale national testbed in Sweden named Makerspace in schools (Makerskola). The project embodies a series of considerations that arise when a maker approach is applied to a geographically widespread national education context. The results of this study are based on an analysis of the extensive project documentation and first-hand experiences from initiating and running a large-scale national testbed in Sweden, involving more than 30 formal actors and more than one thousand active partners in a national educational setting. The main contribution of this paper is the identification and discussion of five different considerations that have emerged during the project, and include Procurement practices, The teacher and leader perspective, Informing national policy making, Creating equal opportunities, and Progression in digital fabrication.

  • 12.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Hammarberg, Kristina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Sirkka, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Larsson, Sofia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Designing a multimodal warning display for an industrial control room2017In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the development of a multimodal warning display for a paper mill control room. In previous work, an informative auditory display for control room warnings was proposed. The proposed auditory solution conveys information about urgent events by using a combination of auditory icons and tonal components. The main aim of the present study was to investigate if a complementary visual display could increase the effectiveness and acceptance of the existing auditory solution. The visual display was designed in a user-driven design process with operators. An evaluation was conducted both before and after the implementation. Subjective ratings showed that operators found it easier to identify the alarming section using the multimodal display. These results can be useful for any designer intending to implement a multimodal display for warnings in an industrial context. © 2017 Copyright is held by the owner/author(s).

  • 13.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Sirkka, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Johnsson, Roger
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden .
    Lindberg, Stefan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Acoustic vehicle alerting systems: Will they affect the acceptance of electric vehicles?2018In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vehicles powered by electric motors can be very quiet at low speeds, which can lead to new road safety issues. The European Parliament has decided that quiet vehicles should be equipped with an Acoustic Vehicle Alerting System (AVAS). The main purpose of the studies presented in this paper was to investigate whether future requirements could affect people's acceptance of electric vehicles (EVs). The strategy in the first study was to create an immersive, simulated auditory environment where people could experience the sounds of future traffic situations. The second study was conducted with a car on a test track. The results suggest that the requirements are not likely to have a major negative effect on people's experience of EVs or willingness to buy an EV. However, the sounds can have a certain negative effect on emotional response and acceptance, which should be considered by manufacturers. The results of the test track study indicate that unprotected road users may appreciate the function of an AVAS sound. The work did not reveal any large differences between AVAS sounds. But in the simulated environment, sounds designed to resemble an internal combustion engine tended to receive more positive scores. © 2018 Copyright is held by the owner/author(s).

  • 14.
    Gottlieb, Halina
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Henningsson, Paul
    Digitala medier för besökare på museer2004 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Gottlieb, Halina
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Insulander, Eva
    Simonsson, Helen
    Access in Mind - Enhancing the Relationship to Contemporary Art2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Habibovic, Azra
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Andersson, Jonas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Klingegård, Maria
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Malmsten-Lundgren, Victor
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Larsson, Sofia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Let’s communicate: How to operate in harmony with automated vehicles2017Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With autonomous cars on the road, not only will occupants need to communicate with their cars: pedestrians and autonomous vehicles will need to understand each other too. This article examines the vehicle HMI for road users other than the driver and passengers. 

  • 17.
    Habibovic, Azra
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Andersson, Jonas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Malmsten Lundgren, Victor
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Klingegård, Maria
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Englund, Cristofer
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Larsson, Sofia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    External Vehicle Interfaces for Communication with Other Road Users?2019In: Road Vehicle Automation 5 / [ed] Gereon Meyer, Sven Beiker, 2019, p. 91-102Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How to ensure trust and societal acceptance of automated vehicles (AVs) is a widely-discussed topic today. While trust and acceptance could be influenced by a range of factors, one thing is sure: the ability of AVs to safely and smoothly interact with other road users will play a key role. Based on our experiences from a series of studies, this paper elaborates on issues that AVs may face in interactions with other road users and whether external vehicle interfaces could support these interactions. Our overall conclusion is that such interfaces may be beneficial in situations where negotiation is needed. However, these benefits, and potential drawbacks, need to be further explored to create a common language, or standard, for how AVs should communicate with other road users.

  • 18.
    Habibovic, Azra
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Malmsten Lundgren, Victor
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Andersson, Jonas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Klingegård, Maria
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Lagström, Tobias
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Sirkka, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Edgren, Claes
    Volvo Cars Group, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, Rikard
    Autoliv AB, Sweden.
    Krupenia, Stas
    Scania AB, Sweden.
    Saluäär, Dennis
    Volvo Group AB, Sweden.
    Larsson, Pontus
    Volvo Group AB, Sweden.
    Communicating Intent of Automated Vehicles to Pedestrians.2018In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, article id 1336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While traffic signals, signs, and road markings provide explicit guidelines for those operating in and around the roadways, some decisions, such as determinations of "who will go first," are made by implicit negotiations between road users. In such situations, pedestrians are today often dependent on cues in drivers' behavior such as eye contact, postures, and gestures. With the introduction of more automated functions and the transfer of control from the driver to the vehicle, pedestrians cannot rely on such non-verbal cues anymore. To study how the interaction between pedestrians and automated vehicles (AVs) might look like in the future, and how this might be affected if AVs were to communicate their intent to pedestrians, we designed an external vehicle interface called automated vehicle interaction principle (AVIP) that communicates vehicles' mode and intent to pedestrians. The interaction was explored in two experiments using a Wizard of Oz approach to simulate automated driving. The first experiment was carried out at a zebra crossing and involved nine pedestrians. While it focused mainly on assessing the usability of the interface, it also revealed initial indications related to pedestrians' emotions and perceived safety when encountering an AV with/without the interface. The second experiment was carried out in a parking lot and involved 24 pedestrians, which enabled a more detailed assessment of pedestrians' perceived safety when encountering an AV, both with and without the interface. For comparison purposes, these pedestrians also encountered a conventional vehicle. After a short training course, the interface was deemed easy for the pedestrians to interpret. The pedestrians stated that they felt significantly less safe when they encountered the AV without the interface, compared to the conventional vehicle and the AV with the interface. This suggests that the interface could contribute to a positive experience and improved perceived safety in pedestrian encounters with AVs - something that might be important for general acceptance of AVs. As such, this topic should be further investigated in future studies involving a larger sample and more dynamic conditions.

  • 19.
    Hummels, Caroline
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Levy, Pierre
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Alves Lino, Jorge
    Fontys University, Netherlands.
    Klooster, Sietske
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Design Research and Innovation Framework for Transformative Practices2018In: Strategies for Change / [ed] Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow: Glasgow Caledonian University , 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, the concept of Transformative Practices is introduced, i.e. shared relative steady ways of living and working with others (Wittgenstein, 1993), including specific configurations of actions, norms and knowledge (Freeman et al., 2011) and related tools and environments, focused at addressing our societal challenges, by transforming (elevating) our personal and social ethics and related behaviour through designing new ways of interaction with each other and the world. Through design research and innovation within these practices, we work together towards social-cul- turally, environmentally and economically sustainable communities.

  • 20.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Hummels, Caroline
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Isbister, Katherine
    University of California, USA.
    Marti, Patrizia
    University of Siena, Italy.
    Segura, Elena M.
    University of California, USA.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Mueller, Florian
    RMIT University, Australia.
    Sanches, Pedro A. N.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Schiphorst, Thecia
    Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Svanaes, Dag
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Petersen, Marianne Graves
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Lim, Youn-Kyung
    Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea.
    Soma-based design theory2017In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, 2017, p. 550-557Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Movement-based interaction design is increasingly popular, with application domains ranging from dance, sport, gaming to physical rehabilitation. In a workshop at CHI 2016, a set of prominent artists, game design-ers, and interaction designers embarked on a research journey to explore what we came to refer to as "aesthetics in soma-based design". In this follow-up work-shop, we would like to take the next step, shifting from discussing the philosophical underpinnings we draw upon to explain and substantiate our practice, to form our own interaction design theory and conceptualisations. We propose that soma-based design theory needs practical, pragmatic as well as analytical study -- otherwise the felt dimension will be missing. We will consider how such tacit knowledge can be articulated, documented and shared. To ground the discussion firmly in the felt experience of our own practice, the work-shop is organised as a joint practical design work session, supported by analytical study.

  • 21.
    Jaasma, Philemonne
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Smit, Dorothe
    University of Salzburg, Austria.
    Van Dijk, Jelle
    University of Twente, Netherlands.
    Latcham, Thomas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hummels, Caroline C.M.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    The Blue Studio: Designing an Interactive Environmentfor Embodied Multi-Stakeholder Ideation Processes2017In: TEI 2017 - Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the process of designing the Blue Studio: An interactive space for embodied multi-stakeholder ideation processes. Inspired by embodied sensemaking - the way people make sense of things through external expression and interaction with other people - we iteratively designed material, interactive and spatial interventions in the Blue Studio and evaluated them with multi-stakeholder participants in various studies. Thereupon, we analyzed the impact of the design interventions, based on the seven principles to design for embodied sensemaking and highlighted opportunities for refining our interactive space for embodied ideation. Based on the insights gained, a final design of the Blue Studio was realized and evaluated on functionality.

  • 22.
    James, Alana
    et al.
    Northumbria University, Newcastle.
    Reitsma, Lizette
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Aftab, Mersha
    Northumbria University, Newcastle.
    Bridging the double-gap in circularity. Addressing the intention-behaviour disparity in fashion2019In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 22, no sup1, p. 901-914Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contemporary fashion industry is a broken system in need of reform,moving away from a dated linear model to adopt principles reflective of modernsocietal challenges. Through initial explorative studies and a thorough literaturesearch, a fundamental engagement gap with principles of circularity has beenidentified, which continues to challenge the application of sustainable innovationmethods. This paper focuses on the role design can play in the application of a circularmodel through product-life extension strategies. A multiple-stakeholder perspectivewas adopted during data collection, with a range of qualitative methods utilisedthrough the engagement with both consumers and companies. Conclusions supportthe need to consider design as a key tool for change, with methods such as cocreationand participatory design facilitating greater awareness levels in consumers.A holistic approach to responsible action and an increase in product value canfacilitate a move towards a circular model for fashion

  • 23.
    Lönnermark, Anders
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Safety.
    Persson, Henry
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Safety.
    Trella, Fredrik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Blomqvist, Per
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Safety.
    Boström, Sara
    Sweco, Sweden.
    Bergérus Rensvik, Åsa
    Sweco, Sweden.
    Brandsäkerhet vid lagring av avfallsbränslen2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med detta projekt har varit att ge ökad kunskap kring olika förekommande brandrisker och råd om hur dessa kan reduceras med olika åtgärder, primärt baserat på praktiska erfarenheter från genomfört säkerhetsarbete samt uppkomna bränder ute i olika anläggningar. Målet är att de samlade kunskaperna och erfarenheterna kan komma till nytta för hela branschen, övriga berörda intressenter och myndigheter och på sikt ligga till grund för t.ex. framtida branschrekommendationer.

    Projektet kan delas in metodmässigt i; statistik, workshoppar samt analys av anläggningsspecifik information.

    Analysen av insatsstatistik från Myndigheten för samhällsskydd och beredskap (MSB) pekar på att det inträffar i storleksordningen 60–70 bränder årligen i avfallsanläggningar och att brandorsaken i de flesta fall är självantändning eller okänd anledning. Tittar man på "brand ej i byggnad" med relevanta bränder för avfallsanläggningar så ser man en svagt ökande trend i antal bränder 2012–2015. 

    De vanligaste materialfraktionerna som enligt statistik från MSB är kopplade till bränder i avfallsanläggningar är sopor, kompost, fluff, papper, trädgårdsavfall, däckgranulat, annat, skrot, återvinningscontainrar. Även en del av flisbränderna kan vara relaterade till RT-trä.

    Från avfallsindustrins sida ansågs bark, returträ, flisat material och GROT (grenar och toppar) kunna ge problem med självuppvärmning. Även krossning av avfall angavs som ett generellt problem av flera deltagare.

    Många incidenter och bränder anses bero på felsorterat eller feldeklarerat avfall och kontrollen av inkommande gods är därför väldigt viktig. Det är också viktigt att kommunicera uppströms i leveranskedjan för att öka chanserna att komma tillrätta med problemen. Många deltagare identifierade batterier (speciellt litiumbatterier) som ett växande problem.

    Hanteringen av förorenat släckvatten varierar mycket. Man påpekar att samma krav över hela landet vore bra. Man önskar tydligare riktlinjer för släckvattenanalyser, kunskap om vad vattnet kan innehålla och information om reningsmetoder för släckvatten.

    Det påpekas att det finns många standarder och normer att förhålla sig till så det vore därför bra att ha en lägsta nivå av krav som bestäms i samarbete med branschen som man kan förhålla sig till och någon form av vägledning från myndigheterna för göra hanteringen mer lik över riket.

    Diskussionerna under workshopparna och tillsammans med projektets referensgrupp har lett fram till 33 rekommendationer uppdelade på olika områden. För varje rekommendation ges i rapporten ytterligare förklaringar. Dessa rekommendationer kan ligga till grund för framtida riktlinjer.

  • 24.
    Malmsten Lundgren, Victor
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Habibovic, Azra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Andersson, Jonas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Lagström, Tobias
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Nilsson, Maria
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Sirkka, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Fredriksson, Rikard
    Autoliv Research, Sweden.
    Edgren, Claes
    Volvo Car Corporation, Sweden.
    Krupenia, Stas
    Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Saluäär, Dennis
    Volvo Group, Sweden.
    Will There Be New Communication Needs When Introducing Automated Vehicles to the Urban Context?2017In: Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, 2017, Vol. 484, p. 485-497Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s encounters with vehicles, pedestrians are often dependent on cues in drivers’ behavior such as eye contact, postures, and gestures. With an increased level of automation, and the transfer of control from the driver to the vehicle, the pedestrians cannot rely on such cues anymore. The question is: will there be new communication needs to warrant safe interactions with automated vehicles? This question is addressed by exploring pedestrians’ willingness to cross the street and their emotional state in encounters with a seemingly automated vehicle. The results show that pedestrians’ willingness to cross the street decrease with an inattentive driver. Eye contact with the driver on the other hand leads to calm interaction between vehicle and pedestrian. In conclusion, to sustain perceived safety when eye contact is discarded due to vehicle automation, it could be beneficial to provide pedestrians with the corresponding information in some other way (e.g., by means of an external vehicle interface).

  • 25.
    Nyström, Sofie
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Barriers for sustainable waste management practices in grocery stores: Exploration by Research-through-Design2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since natural resources are limited, we need to ensure that materials are reused and recycled to the highest degree possible. Information and feedback as well as incentives may encourage people to alter their behavior. In this paper, we explore waste practices within grocery stores and how feedback through visualizations may help stores improve their waste management. We have studied the gap between current waste data and waste data that is both meaningful and can be acted upon as well as barriers between actionable data and organizational change. Nine interviews were conducted with a central facilities manager, store managers, employees and a representative from the waste collection company. Based on the results from these interviews, two mockups of web visualizations were designed and later evaluated in two additional stores. The initial interviews highlighted knowledge about waste, economic and environmental incentives for recycling and current modes of feedback and comparisons between stores. The mockups also reveal structural tensions between economic and environmental goals that wouldn’t be affected solely by better visualization of data. We conclude by discussing obstacles that needs to be overcome to reach organizational change in terms of more sustainable waste management practices in grocery stores.

  • 26.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Kuenen, Christoffel
    Umeå Institute of Design, Sweden.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Chapter 23: Unveiling the Expressivity of Complexity: Drifting in Design Research2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design research is regarded to be a mode of inquiry particularly suited to engage with complex topics. In our work, we are interested in unpacking the complexity at the heart of an embodied aesthetic experience. In this article, through our digital and physical artefacts and a methodological reflection, we illustrate an ongoing design research project that a multi-disciplinary team of interaction designers, professional dancers, software developers, artists and 3D modelling experts are carrying out to develop insights on how to understand this complexity and how to use such insights as inspiration for interaction design-related projects. By embracing combinations of design, new technologies and simple visualisation tools, the project investigates the complex and hidden expressivity embedded in the skills of dancers in a programmatic design research approach. This investigation leads to insights on different levels. Firstly, cycles of formulation, realisation and reflection on design programs express parts of this complexity and this lets new research interests emerge. Secondly, as a body of work, reflecting on these cycles exposes how our “drifting” within this programmatic approach has started to unveil the complexities inherent in our research program. In this article we aim at contributing to the growing understanding of what designerly ways of knowing might be and how a practice aimed at expanding and contributing such knowledge unfolds.

  • 27.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Papworth, Nigel
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Glaser, Pernilla
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Collevecchio, Carla
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Betancour, Ana
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    No Man is an Island. Situated Design Research and Wicked Impact2017In: The Design Journal, ISSN S3354-S3367, p. S3354-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     In this paper, we describe the research-through-design process that led to the realization of the interactive exhibition Charged Utopia that took place in August 2016 at the Norrbyskärs Museum. The design leveraged embodiment and active perception: visitors could activate the content by physically engaging with the space. These interactions were intended to trigger personal reflections on social coexistence, its paradoxes and challenges. The paper guides through the researchthrough-design process, from initial design direction and their theoretical grounding, to the design process and final event. The paper contributes with a reflection on the “wicked impact” of the event, suggesting that it is of relevance for design researchers that deal with societal issues, to discuss and expose the effects of their practice beyond immediate results.

  • 28.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Peeters, Marlies
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Exploring active perception in disseminating design research2017In: DIS 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, 2017, p. 1395-1407Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pictorial track exemplifies how the field of interaction design research explores more designerly ways of communicating knowledge in an academic context. In this pictorial, we present the Interactive Dissertation project that explores how the design of a Ph.D. dissertation may embody the experiential qualities of interactive systems that are presented in its (textual) content by leveraging active perception. We report on the research-through-design process and present results from the project's first iteration. We conclude with a visual reflection on the potential of active perception in communicating interactive experiences in print as well as wider implications for the field.

  • 29.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Designing Expressions of Movement Qualities2018In: Proceedings of the 2018 Designing Interactive Systems Conference, 2018, p. 679-690Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tango is a form of partner dancing in which two bodies sense one another, and move accordingly, in a dynamic, physical dialogue that is known for its subtle complexities, beauty and intimate experience. In MoCap Tango, we explore how we can build on our skills as designers to highlight and unravel these embedded qualities and use them as inspiration in designing interactions. In this pictorial, we invite the reader to actively participate in the designerly engagement that turns objective data into subjective expressions; highlighting the qualities embedded in the movements of professional dancers.

  • 30.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Reflections on Designing for Aesthetic Engagement2015In: Proceedings of the 2nd Biennial Research Through Design Conference, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there has been a clear shift in the Interaction Design community towards the design for engagement as opposed to more traditional ideals of efficiency and functionality. Our work explores how to design for aesthetic engagement in interaction; building on an approach founded on phenomenology, embodiment, pragmatist aesthetics and embodied cognition. In this paper, we present four different research through design projects we have undertaken, in which we leveraged this approach. These designs cover a wide range of contexts, scales and use. Together, they describe and open up a design space: each of the projects provides rich, aesthetic experiences that respect complexity and ambiguity. They entice people to engage with body and mind, where meaning arises in dialogue with the artifact. We present and critically reflect on these projects in the form of an annotated portfolio. Comparing and contrasting the project results reveals insights into our overall approach and research interest regarding how to design for engagement. We conclude with opportunities that these reflections offer for the design of engaging interactions. Furthermore, we expand on the implications that these reflections suggest towards further trajectories of practice-based research into such experiences.

  • 31.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Van Der Veen, Rosa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Hybrid ways of disseminating interaction design research2019In: TEI 2019 - Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2019, p. 699-702Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This studio will constructively explore hybrid publication formats for the dissemination of interaction design research in an academic context. We start from the premise that there is a gap between the richness of the artefacts created in interaction design research and the formal publication formats that exist today. Interactive artefacts and the experiences they elicit in use, possess a richness that is difficult to communicate in text and images alone. Through prototyping, we will explore this gap: what are key elements of artefact based research, that might benefit from alternative media, and how might we design such media to become useful supplements to existing dissemination formats? By bringing together a diverse group of participants from the TEI community to explore this topic, we aim at bringing forth a discussion on how we might stretch the boundaries of academic publication of interaction design research. © 2019 Copyright is held by the owner/author(s).

  • 32.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    van der Veen, Rosa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Helgers, Ronald
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Långström, Olov
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Bambi, Martina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Universita di Bologna, Italy.
    Papworth, Nigel
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Umeå School of Architecture, Sweden.
    Resisting Plastics for Ambiguous Results2019In: Proceedings of the 4th BiennialResearch Through Design Conference, 19-22 March 2019, Delft and Rotterdam, TheNetherlands,, Delft, 2019, article id 22Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper illustrates present a constructive design research process centred around 3D printing with a wood-based material. This process was highly explorative: it involves the development of a new material and the use and hacking of a machine to materialize a design intention. Along the way, elements of craft emerge, as the designers develop skills in navigating the tensions that exist between material, machine and design intention.We present the process of navigating this design space by unpacking the act of making, using a digital fabrication technique, through a lens of craftsmanship. We employ the notions of ambiguity and resistance, to understand the factors and forces at play that may not typically be considered to be part of a highly automated digital fabrication method, such as 3D printing.As a result of this detailed reflection, new parts of the design space were articulated. All resistances appear as a result of the tension between and designer’s skills and intention, capabilities of the machine and possibilities of the material, all materialised in the Printed Future Vase.This publication contributes to the development of a new additive manufacturing method, and increases our awareness of what factors and forces are at play in this new additive manufacturing method, in which the development of the designer’s tacit skills have been articulated more explicitly.

  • 33.
    Reitsma, Lizette
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Light, Ann
    University of Sussex, UK; Malmö University, Sweden.
    Zaman, Tariq
    CECOS University of IT & Emerging Sciences, Pakistan.
    Rodgers, Paul
    Lancaster University, UK.
    A Respectful Design Framework Incorporating indigenous knowledge in the design process2019In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 22, no sup1, p. 1555-1570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To stay within the planetary boundaries, we have to take responsibility, andthis includes designers. This requires new perspectives on design. In this work, wefocus on a co-design project with indigenous communities. Within such communities,indigenous knowledge is central. Indigenous knowledge acknowledges that the worldis alive and that we, as humans, are merely a small part. Central in our approach isSheehan’s respectful design, which ensures a central place for indigenous knowledgein the design process. However, Sheehan’s approach does not state in pragmaticterms how such a design approach can be achieved. Some of the co-design processeswe engaged in led to respectful design spaces, others did not. This helped us toidentify patterns of dynamics that are essential for respectful design. At the core ofour findings lies the observation that in order to reach a respectful design space, inwhich indigenous knowledge is embedded, a shared dialogical space betweencommunity and designer is essential.

  • 34.
    Reitsma, Lizette
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Wessman, Stina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Nyström, Sofie
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Spilltime: Designing for the relationship between QS, CO2e and climate goals2019In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 22, no sup1, p. 1087-1100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to deal with major climate challenges, different climate goals havebeen set. These goals are on an abstract, political level, making them difficult tounderstand for citizens. This is a problem, since in order to reach a sustainablesociety, all layers in society should be involved. We present a design process, in whichwe made invisible carbon emission goals tangible so that citizens can relate to them.By extracting different modes of carbon footprint feedback and translating those intoa network of objects, we have provided an alternative viewpoint on how to involvepeople into understanding complex data. By giving different modes of feedback,people can find different ways to relate to the data. This way, the designer providesthe tools, but people can use it to shape their own understanding. We consider thisapproach relevant in empowering citizens to voice their concerns in the climatedebate.

  • 35.
    Sirkka, Anna
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Frimalm, Ronja
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    An Auditory Display to Convey Urgency Information in Industrial Control Rooms2014In: Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics, 11th International Conference, EPCE 2014, Held as Part of HCI International 2014, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, June 22-27, 2014. ProceedingsArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Auditory warning signals are common features in industrial control rooms. Finding sound signals that convey higher degrees of urgency while keeping the potential for annoyance low is challenging. In the present study, evaluations were performed on four different types of auditory displays. The displays were all designed to convey three levels of urgency. The examination focused on the following questions: (1) “How reliably can the operators identify the three levels of urgency?” and (2) “How annoying do the operators find the sound signals?”. Fourteen operators participated in the study. For every signal within each auditory display, the participants were asked to rate the level of urgency and annoyance. The results show that one can design auditory displays that employ appropriate urgency mapping while the perceived annoyance is kept at a low level. The work also suggests that involving the end users in the design process could be advantageous.

  • 36.
    Tyren, Markus
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Carlborg, Niklas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Heath, Carl
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Considerations and Technical Pitfalls for Teaching Computational Thinking with BBC micro:bit2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As many countries are about to make changes in the primary school curriculum by introducing computational thinking, new methods and support for teachers is needed in order help them develop and adapt teaching materials. In this paper, technical pitfalls and other considerations for designing teaching materials with the microcontroller BBC micro:bit are presented. The results are based on a series of 21 workshops in different parts of Sweden aiming to investigate what is important to consider when designing teaching materials with the BBC micro:bit for training Swedish primary schools students computational thinking skills. The contribution of the paper are a number of identified considerations that can be helpful for teachers when designing exercises and planning for teaching computational thinking with the BBC micro:bit.Considerations and Technical Pitfalls for Teaching Computational Thinking with BBC micro:bit | Request PDF. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/326026189_Considerations_and_Technical_Pitfalls_for_Teaching_Computational_Thinking_with_BBC_microbit [accessed Aug 21 2018].

  • 37.
    van der Veen, Rosa
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Hakkerainen, Viola
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Sweden.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Umeå School of Architecture, Sweden.
    Understanding Transformations through Design2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction design community increasingly addresses how digital technologies may contribute to societal transformations. This paper aims at understanding transformation ignited by a particular constructive design research project. This transformation will be discussed and analysed using resilience thinking, an established approach within sustainability science. By creating a common language between these two disciplines, we start to identify what kind of transformation took place, what factors played a role in the transformation, and which transformative qualities played a role in creating these factors. Our intention is to set out how the notion of resilience might provide a new perspective to understand how constructive design research may produce results that have a sustainable social impact. The findings point towards ways in which these two different perspectives on transformation the analytical perspective of resilience thinking and the generative perspective of constructive design research - may become complementary in both igniting and understanding transformations.

  • 38.
    Van Der Veen, Rosa
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Långström, Olov
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Helgers, Ronald
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Papworth, Nigel
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Umeå School of Architecture, Sweden.
    Exploring craft in the context of digital fabrication2019In: TEI 2019 - Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2019, p. 237-242Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work in progress, we start to unpack the act of making in a digital fabrication process. In particular, one kind of digital fabrication - 3D printing - that is typically considered to be highly automated but in this case is not. In this process, a tension exists between our skills, the properties of a novel material and the capabilities of a novel machine. As design researchers, we navigated through the design space that emerged in this tension and explored how to 3D print in wood. In unpacking this tension between machine, material and designer, we pay attention to how the embodied nature of this process was essential for its development. We start to explore how we might explain the embodied act of making in the context of digital fabrication through the lense of ambiguity and resistance, notions previously used to unravel craftsmanship. © 2019 Copyright is held by the owner/author(s).

  • 39.
    Van der Veen, Rosa
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Charged Utopia VR: Exploring Embodied Sense-Making in the Virtual Space2018In: Proceedings of TEI '18: 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction (TEI '18). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2018, p. 292-298Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on preliminary results of a design research project that explores how spaces in virtual reality may be designed to build on qualities of embodied sensemaking. The project forms a basis for the exploration of an ethical dimension to interactions in virtual reality. This publication focuses on identifying qualities of embodied sense-making in an existing physical space, the interactive exhibition Charged Utopia. These qualities are transposed into a virtual interactive space. The translation of the qualities is done through the three main themes: Physical Movement, Resistance and Ambiguity. We present the design research process to describe how these themes were identified and transposed. We conclude with reflections that sketch ways in which we might capitalise on the opportunities offered by a virtual space, while respecting human skills in embodied sensemaking.

1 - 39 of 39
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.7