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  • 1.
    Aliasgari, Mahdis
    et al.
    Lighting Design Collective, Spain.
    Clark, Brendon
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Baby steps or stage dive into a critical design dialogue2017In: Interaction design & architectures Journnal IxD&A, ISSN 1826-9745, Vol. 2017, no 32, p. 38-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper puts forward the early, practical actions "in context" that can begin to sensitize, orient, expand, and constrain design dialogue at the outset of a design effort. Drawing on a case of "breaching experiments" in "non-places" we explore a "first approximation" of interventionist participation into the context of future interactive & responsive design interventions. By introducing a design journey, we have shed a light on how a human-centric approach, applied to the context of Human Building Interaction (HBI), can support an interventionist design dialogue between people and designed environment through processes of stirring up what's beyond 'norms' of interaction.

  • 2.
    Carlborg, Niklas
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Tyren, Markus
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Heath, Carl
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    The Scope of Autonomy Model: Development of Teaching Materials for Computational Thinking in Primary School2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Dalipi, Fisnik
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden ; University College of Southeast Norway, Norway.
    Ferati, Mexhid
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Kurti, Arianit
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Integrating MOOCs in regular higher education: Challenges and opportunities from a scandinavian perspective2018In: Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10924), 2018, p. 193-204Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MOOCs are increasingly being considered by universities as an integral part of their curriculum. Nevertheless, there are several challenges that to some extent slow this process, where the most important one is the accreditation challenges and financing. These challenges are particularly important in the context of universities in Scandinavian countries where education is mostly free. In order to gain more insights on the status of proliferation of MOOCs in Scandinavian universities and understand any specific challenges, we conducted a study by analyzing two sources of data: research publications and university websites. Further on, these data have been analyzed using a framework that differentiates and categorizes MOOCs in terms of accreditation and scalability. As a result of this analysis, we have identified the remaining challenges as well as a number of opportunities regarding the full integration of MOOCs in the educational system of the Scandinavian Higher Education Institutions. .

  • 4.
    Dalipi, Fisnik
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden ; Tetovo University, Macedonia.
    Idrizi, Florin
    Tetovo University, Macedonia.
    Kurti, Arianit
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Linnaeus University, Sweden .
    Exploring the impact of social learning networks in M-learning: A case study in a University environment2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high penetration of Internet, advances in mobile computing and the rise of smartphone usage has largely enhanced the use of social media in education. Moreover, nowadays social learning network (SLN) platforms have become an important educational technology component in higher education. Despite the fact that SLN are becoming ubiquitous in the higher education, there is relatively not much empirical work done investigating their purposefulness when integrated into the learning activities. This paper aims at exploring the impact of SLN in mobile assisted learning and to provide empirical evidence as to what extent SLN and mobile learning (M-learning) can improve the learning experiences. For this purpose, a quantitative experimental approach is used, and two survey questionnaires were conducted. The data is collected from 120 participants. In this study, we focus our intention on Edmodo and Kahoot platforms, which represent social media based tools that aid and support collaboration, knowledge sharing and group activities among students. Computer science students of the Tetovo University (TU) used these tools throughout one semester. From this study, there is significant evidence that students are very interested to use this SLN in a M-learning setting, indicating that SLN can be one of the promising pedagogical technologies that could contribute effectively to learning process.

  • 5.
    de Jong, Annelise
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Mazé, Ramia
    Aalto University, Finland.
    How about dinner?: Concepts and methods in designing for sustainable lifestyles. Chapter 282017In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainable Product Design / [ed] edited by Jonathan Chapman, 2017, p. 423-442Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Consumption is increasingly in focus within approaches to sustainable development, with the notion of sustainable consumption raising new issues for design. In designing to reduce the consumption of energy, water and other resources, for example, we need to consider the socio-cultural complexity of consumers’ perceptions, actions and routines. Pointing to two such projects in the areas of domestic electricity use and bathing practices, we reflect here upon limitations in concepts and methods common in user centered and sustainable design and, consequently, how we have been further developing our conceptual and methodological frames of reference as design researchers to include these social aspects. We also report on an additional project that draws on these new frames of reference to study ways of doing cooking within diverse households, in which we gained insights into how the many resources, products and artefacts involved in food management are deeply embedded in traditions, meanings and aspirations. Issues of environmental sustainability, such as water, energy and waste, are at stake in such design research but, as we argue, so is attention and sensitivity to how these are interwoven in meaningful socio-cultural practices. Through this chapter, we discuss implications of further incorporating approaches to the social from other fields into design research and education and vice versa what the social sciences might learn from design for sustainable consumption.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Eva
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark ; Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Heath, Carl
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Ljungstrand, Peter
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Parnes, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Makerspace in school—Considerations from a large-scale national testbed2018In: International Journal of Child-Computer Interaction, ISSN 2212-8689, E-ISSN 2212-8697, Vol. 16, p. 9-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital fabrication and making has received a growing interest in formal and informal learning environments. However, many of these initiatives often start from a grassroots perspective, with little coordination on a national level. This paper illustrates and discusses a study from an ongoing large-scale national testbed in Sweden named Makerspace in schools (Makerskola). The project embodies a series of considerations that arise when a maker approach is applied to a geographically widespread national education context. The results of this study are based on an analysis of the extensive project documentation and first-hand experiences from initiating and running a large-scale national testbed in Sweden, involving more than 30 formal actors and more than one thousand active partners in a national educational setting. The main contribution of this paper is the identification and discussion of five different considerations that have emerged during the project, and include Procurement practices, The teacher and leader perspective, Informing national policy making, Creating equal opportunities, and Progression in digital fabrication.

  • 7.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Hammarberg, Kristina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Sirkka, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Larsson, Sofia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Designing a multimodal warning display for an industrial control room2017In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the development of a multimodal warning display for a paper mill control room. In previous work, an informative auditory display for control room warnings was proposed. The proposed auditory solution conveys information about urgent events by using a combination of auditory icons and tonal components. The main aim of the present study was to investigate if a complementary visual display could increase the effectiveness and acceptance of the existing auditory solution. The visual display was designed in a user-driven design process with operators. An evaluation was conducted both before and after the implementation. Subjective ratings showed that operators found it easier to identify the alarming section using the multimodal display. These results can be useful for any designer intending to implement a multimodal display for warnings in an industrial context. © 2017 Copyright is held by the owner/author(s).

  • 8.
    Gottlieb, Halina
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Henningsson, Paul
    Digitala medier för besökare på museer2004 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Gottlieb, Halina
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Insulander, Eva
    Simonsson, Helen
    Access in Mind - Enhancing the Relationship to Contemporary Art2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Habibovic, Azra
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Andersson, Jonas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Klingegård, Maria
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Malmsten-Lundgren, Victor
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Larsson, Sofia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Let’s communicate: How to operate in harmony with automated vehicles2017Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With autonomous cars on the road, not only will occupants need to communicate with their cars: pedestrians and autonomous vehicles will need to understand each other too. This article examines the vehicle HMI for road users other than the driver and passengers. 

  • 11.
    Habibovic, Azra
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Malmsten Lundgren, Victor
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Andersson, Jonas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Klingegård, Maria
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Lagström, Tobias
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Sirkka, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Edgren, Claes
    Volvo Cars Group, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, Rikard
    Autoliv AB, Sweden.
    Krupenia, Stas
    Scania AB, Sweden.
    Saluäär, Dennis
    Volvo Group AB, Sweden.
    Larsson, Pontus
    Volvo Group AB, Sweden.
    Communicating Intent of Automated Vehicles to Pedestrians.2018In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, article id 1336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While traffic signals, signs, and road markings provide explicit guidelines for those operating in and around the roadways, some decisions, such as determinations of "who will go first," are made by implicit negotiations between road users. In such situations, pedestrians are today often dependent on cues in drivers' behavior such as eye contact, postures, and gestures. With the introduction of more automated functions and the transfer of control from the driver to the vehicle, pedestrians cannot rely on such non-verbal cues anymore. To study how the interaction between pedestrians and automated vehicles (AVs) might look like in the future, and how this might be affected if AVs were to communicate their intent to pedestrians, we designed an external vehicle interface called automated vehicle interaction principle (AVIP) that communicates vehicles' mode and intent to pedestrians. The interaction was explored in two experiments using a Wizard of Oz approach to simulate automated driving. The first experiment was carried out at a zebra crossing and involved nine pedestrians. While it focused mainly on assessing the usability of the interface, it also revealed initial indications related to pedestrians' emotions and perceived safety when encountering an AV with/without the interface. The second experiment was carried out in a parking lot and involved 24 pedestrians, which enabled a more detailed assessment of pedestrians' perceived safety when encountering an AV, both with and without the interface. For comparison purposes, these pedestrians also encountered a conventional vehicle. After a short training course, the interface was deemed easy for the pedestrians to interpret. The pedestrians stated that they felt significantly less safe when they encountered the AV without the interface, compared to the conventional vehicle and the AV with the interface. This suggests that the interface could contribute to a positive experience and improved perceived safety in pedestrian encounters with AVs - something that might be important for general acceptance of AVs. As such, this topic should be further investigated in future studies involving a larger sample and more dynamic conditions.

  • 12.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Hummels, Caroline
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Isbister, Katherine
    University of California, US.
    Marti, Patrizia
    University of Siena, Italy.
    Segura, Elena M.
    University of California, US.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Mueller, Florian
    RMIT University, Australia.
    Sanches, Pedro A. N.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Schiphorst, Thecia
    Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Svanaes, Dag
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Petersen, Marianne Graves
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Lim, Youn-Kyung
    Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Republic of Korea.
    Soma-based design theory2017In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, 2017, p. 550-557Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Movement-based interaction design is increasingly popular, with application domains ranging from dance, sport, gaming to physical rehabilitation. In a workshop at CHI 2016, a set of prominent artists, game design-ers, and interaction designers embarked on a research journey to explore what we came to refer to as "aesthetics in soma-based design". In this follow-up work-shop, we would like to take the next step, shifting from discussing the philosophical underpinnings we draw upon to explain and substantiate our practice, to form our own interaction design theory and conceptualisations. We propose that soma-based design theory needs practical, pragmatic as well as analytical study -- otherwise the felt dimension will be missing. We will consider how such tacit knowledge can be articulated, documented and shared. To ground the discussion firmly in the felt experience of our own practice, the work-shop is organised as a joint practical design work session, supported by analytical study.

  • 13.
    Malmsten Lundgren, Victor
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Habibovic, Azra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Andersson, Jonas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Lagström, Tobias
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Nilsson, Maria
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Sirkka, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Fredriksson, Rikard
    Autoliv Research, Sweden.
    Edgren, Claes
    Volvo Car Corporation, Sweden.
    Krupenia, Stas
    Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Saluäär, Dennis
    Volvo Group, Sweden.
    Will There Be New Communication Needs When Introducing Automated Vehicles to the Urban Context?2016In: Advances in Human Aspects of Transportation, p. 485-497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s encounters with vehicles, pedestrians are often dependent on cues in drivers’ behavior such as eye contact, postures, and gestures. With an increased level of automation, and the transfer of control from the driver to the vehicle, the pedestrians cannot rely on such cues anymore. The question is: will there be new communication needs to warrant safe interactions with automated vehicles? This question is addressed by exploring pedestrians’ willingness to cross the street and their emotional state in encounters with a seemingly automated vehicle. The results show that pedestrians’ willingness to cross the street decrease with an inattentive driver. Eye contact with the driver on the other hand leads to calm interaction between vehicle and pedestrian. In conclusion, to sustain perceived safety when eye contact is discarded due to vehicle automation, it could be beneficial to provide pedestrians with the corresponding information in some other way (e.g., by means of an external vehicle interface).

  • 14.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Kuenen, Christoffel
    Umeå Institute of Design, Sweden.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Chapter 23: Unveiling the Expressivity of Complexity: Drifting in Design Research2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design research is regarded to be a mode of inquiry particularly suited to engage with complex topics. In our work, we are interested in unpacking the complexity at the heart of an embodied aesthetic experience. In this article, through our digital and physical artefacts and a methodological reflection, we illustrate an ongoing design research project that a multi-disciplinary team of interaction designers, professional dancers, software developers, artists and 3D modelling experts are carrying out to develop insights on how to understand this complexity and how to use such insights as inspiration for interaction design-related projects. By embracing combinations of design, new technologies and simple visualisation tools, the project investigates the complex and hidden expressivity embedded in the skills of dancers in a programmatic design research approach. This investigation leads to insights on different levels. Firstly, cycles of formulation, realisation and reflection on design programs express parts of this complexity and this lets new research interests emerge. Secondly, as a body of work, reflecting on these cycles exposes how our “drifting” within this programmatic approach has started to unveil the complexities inherent in our research program. In this article we aim at contributing to the growing understanding of what designerly ways of knowing might be and how a practice aimed at expanding and contributing such knowledge unfolds.

  • 15.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Papworth, Nigel
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Glaser, Pernilla
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Collevecchio, Carla
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Betancour, Ana
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    No Man is an Island. Situated Design Research and Wicked Impact2017In: The Design Journal, ISSN S3354-S3367, p. S3354-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     In this paper, we describe the research-through-design process that led to the realization of the interactive exhibition Charged Utopia that took place in August 2016 at the Norrbyskärs Museum. The design leveraged embodiment and active perception: visitors could activate the content by physically engaging with the space. These interactions were intended to trigger personal reflections on social coexistence, its paradoxes and challenges. The paper guides through the researchthrough-design process, from initial design direction and their theoretical grounding, to the design process and final event. The paper contributes with a reflection on the “wicked impact” of the event, suggesting that it is of relevance for design researchers that deal with societal issues, to discuss and expose the effects of their practice beyond immediate results.

  • 16.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Peeters, Marlies
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Exploring active perception in disseminating design research2017In: DIS 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, 2017, p. 1395-1407Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pictorial track exemplifies how the field of interaction design research explores more designerly ways of communicating knowledge in an academic context. In this pictorial, we present the Interactive Dissertation project that explores how the design of a Ph.D. dissertation may embody the experiential qualities of interactive systems that are presented in its (textual) content by leveraging active perception. We report on the research-through-design process and present results from the project's first iteration. We conclude with a visual reflection on the potential of active perception in communicating interactive experiences in print as well as wider implications for the field.

  • 17.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Designing Expressions of Movement Qualities2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Department of Informatics, Umeå University.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå School of Architecture, Umeå University.
    Reflections on Designing for Aesthetic Engagement2015In: Proceedings of the 2nd Biennial Research Through Design Conference, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Recently, there has been a clear shift in the Interaction Design community towards the design for engagement as opposed to more traditional ideals of efficiency and functionality. Our work explores how to design for aesthetic engagement in interaction; building on an approach founded on phenomenology, embodiment, pragmatist aesthetics and embodied cognition. In this paper, we present four different research through design projects we have undertaken, in which we leveraged this approach. These designs cover a wide range of contexts, scales and use. Together, they describe and open up a design space: each of the projects provides rich, aesthetic experiences that respect complexity and ambiguity. They entice people to engage with body and mind, where meaning arises in dialogue with the artifact. We present and critically reflect on these projects in the form of an annotated portfolio. Comparing and contrasting the project results reveals insights into our overall approach and research interest regarding how to design for engagement. We conclude with opportunities that these reflections offer for the design of engaging interactions. Furthermore, we expand on the implications that these reflections suggest towards further trajectories of practice-based research into such experiences.

  • 19.
    Tyren, Markus
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Carlborg, Niklas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Heath, Carl
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Considerations and Technical Pitfalls for Teaching Computational Thinking with BBC micro:bit2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As many countries are about to make changes in the primary school curriculum by introducing computational thinking, new methods and support for teachers is needed in order help them develop and adapt teaching materials. In this paper, technical pitfalls and other considerations for designing teaching materials with the microcontroller BBC micro:bit are presented. The results are based on a series of 21 workshops in different parts of Sweden aiming to investigate what is important to consider when designing teaching materials with the BBC micro:bit for training Swedish primary schools students computational thinking skills. The contribution of the paper are a number of identified considerations that can be helpful for teachers when designing exercises and planning for teaching computational thinking with the BBC micro:bit.Considerations and Technical Pitfalls for Teaching Computational Thinking with BBC micro:bit | Request PDF. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/326026189_Considerations_and_Technical_Pitfalls_for_Teaching_Computational_Thinking_with_BBC_microbit [accessed Aug 21 2018].

  • 20.
    van der Veen, Rosa
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Hakkerainen, Viola
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Sweden.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Understanding Transformations through Design2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction design community increasingly addresses how digital technologies may contribute to societal transformations. This paper aims at understanding transformation ignited by a particular constructive design research project. This transformation will be discussed and analysed using resilience thinking, an established approach within sustainability science. By creating a common language between these two disciplines, we start to identify what kind of transformation took place, what factors played a role in the transformation, and which transformative qualities played a role in creating these factors. Our intention is to set out how the notion of resilience might provide a new perspective to understand how constructive design research may produce results that have a sustainable social impact. The findings point towards ways in which these two different perspectives on transformation the analytical perspective of resilience thinking and the generative perspective of constructive design research - may become complementary in both igniting and understanding transformations.

  • 21.
    Van der Veen, Rosa
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Charged Utopia VR: Exploring Embodied Sense-Making in the Virtual Space2018In: Proceedings of TEI '18: 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction (TEI '18). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on preliminary results of a design research project that explores how spaces in virtual reality may be designed to build on qualities of embodied sensemaking. The project forms a basis for the exploration of an ethical dimension to interactions in virtual reality. This publication focuses on identifying qualities of embodied sense-making in an existing physical space, the interactive exhibition Charged Utopia. These qualities are transposed into a virtual interactive space. The translation of the qualities is done through the three main themes: Physical Movement, Resistance and Ambiguity. We present the design research process to describe how these themes were identified and transposed. We conclude with reflections that sketch ways in which we might capitalise on the opportunities offered by a virtual space, while respecting human skills in embodied sensemaking.

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