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  • 1.
    Bennion, Douglas M
    et al.
    University of Florida, USA.
    Jones, Chad H
    University of Florida, USA.
    Dang, Alex N
    University of Florida, USA.
    Isenberg, Jacob
    University of Florida, USA.
    Graham, Justin T
    University of Florida, USA.
    Lindblad, Lena
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Certification.
    Domenig, Oliver
    Attoquant Diagnostics GmbH, Austria.
    Waters, Michael F
    Barrow Neurological Institute, USA.
    Poglitsch, Marko
    Attoquant Diagnostics GmbH, Austria.
    Sumners, Colin
    University of Florida, USA.
    Steckelings, Ulrike Muscha
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Protective effects of the angiotensin II AT2 receptor agonist compound 21 in ischemic stroke: a nose-to-brain delivery approach.2018In: Clinical Science, ISSN 0143-5221, E-ISSN 1470-8736, Vol. 132, no 5, p. 581-593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Significant neuroprotective effects of angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor (AT2 receptor) agonists in ischemic stroke have been previously demonstrated in multiple studies. However, the routes of agonist application used in these pre-clinical studies, direct intracerebroventricular (ICV) and systemic administration, are unsuitable for translation into humans; in the latter case because AT2 receptor agonists are blood-brain barrier (BBB) impermeable. To circumvent this problem, in the current study we utilized the nose-to-brain (N2B) route of administration to bypass the BBB and deliver the selective AT2 receptor agonist Compound 21 (C21) to naïve rats or rats that had undergone endothelin 1 (ET-1)-induced ischemic stroke. The results obtained from the present study indicated that C21 applied N2B entered the cerebral cortex and striatum within 30 min in amounts that are therapeutically relevant (8.4-9 nM), regardless of whether BBB was intact or disintegrated. C21 was first applied N2B at 1.5 h after stroke indeed provided neuroprotection, as evidenced by a highly significant, 57% reduction in cerebral infarct size and significant improvements in Bederson and Garcia neurological scores. N2B-administered C21 did not affect blood pressure or heart rate. Thus, these data provide proof-of-principle for the idea that N2B application of an AT2 receptor agonist can exert neuroprotective actions when administered following ischemic stroke. Since N2B delivery of other agents has been shown to be effective in certain human central nervous system diseases, the N2B application of AT2 receptor agonists may become a viable mode of delivering these neuroprotective agents for human ischemic stroke patients

  • 2.
    Kraft, Lars
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, CBI Swedish Cement and Concrete Research Institute.
    Eriksson Brändels, Alexander
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, CBI Swedish Cement and Concrete Research Institute.
    McCarthy, Richard
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Certification, Certification.
    Litteraturstudie - Ökad användning av SKB för minskning av arbetsskador från vibrationer2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thepurpose of this study is to highlight the possibility of a better workingenvironment through an increased use of Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC). Suchconcrete is denser and more durable, has higher compressive strength and abetter filling capacity. The main advantage of SCC is that it doesn’t requirevibration for proper compaction and therefore is better to work with. Despiteinitial higher cost to order, it becomes cheaper in a life cycle analysis. Ofall industries, the construction industry has the highest number of workersaffected by vibrations. According to statistics 2016, vibration damage totaled 36% of all approved occupational diseases. The resulting damage can rarely becured and often leads to reduced working capacity and to severe life-longproblems. A study showed that exposure increase of vibrations of just 1 m/s2increases the risk of white fingers (9%), Raynaud’s phenomenon (6.9%),neurosensory injury (7.4%) and carpal tunnel syndrome (2.9%). Most of thevarious activities with elements of vibration on the construction site, such assawing, grinding, screwing with machine etc., are difficult to replace withvibration-free methods. But for concrete casting, it is now possible to almostcompletely exclude vibrations by using SCC. The increased knowledge of theimportance of a healthy workplace for the economic performance of constructioncompanies has played a key role for work environment work. One study comparedthe benefits of accident prevention initiatives with the costs of the same. Itwas revealed that the benefit surpasses the costs with the relationship 3:1. Improvementsfor a healthier workplace can be achieved by: New innovations, both mechanicaland material innovations, making work easier. Studies using modern portablesensors from which information can play an important role in the possibility ofreducing work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

    Encouragingworkers to use wearable sensors that can alert when ergonomically dangerousmovements are carried out. Changing of an often reluctant culture at theworkplace. Better risk assessment at the design stage. Better planning inproject design in the early stages using new digital tools such as BIM. Betterinformation about risks and safety in order to affect the safety behaviour ofworkers. We recommend a larger working environment study that will show how apositive workplace development with SCC is possible and how much can be savedin this way. Here, medical expertise must be involved to increase reliability.In addition, there is a desire in medical research, on the working environmentand on vibration-related injuries, to fill in the gaps in previous researchthat remain, such as how cold weather and individual risk factors, such assmoking, affect the risk of vibration-related work injuries.  Improved working environment is the mainreason for increased use of SCC. Increased use should provide a moresustainable society.

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