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  • 1.
    Altskär, Annika
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Wallin, M.
    Nordstierna, L.
    Andersson, M.
    Meso-ordered PEG-based particles2015In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 31, p. 13-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the formation of meso-ordered hydrogel particles by cross-linking poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) in the presence of surfactants in a confined environment. The results demonstrated that well-ordered mesoporous hydrogel particles having a pore size of about 5 nm could be formed. It is suggested that these meso-ordered hydrogel particles might have unique drug-delivery capabilities

  • 2.
    Andersson, H.
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience. Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Häbel, H.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olsson, A.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sandhagen, S.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience. Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    von Corswant, C.
    AstraZeneca R&D Mölndal, Sweden.
    Hjärtstam, J.
    AstarZeneca R&D Mölndal, Sweden.
    Persson, M.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stading, M.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design. Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, A.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The influence of the molecular weight of the water-soluble polymer on phase-separated films for controlled release2016In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics, ISSN 0378-5173, E-ISSN 1873-3476, Vol. 511, no 1, p. 223-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) and ethyl cellulose (EC) can be used for extended release coatings, where the water-soluble HPC may act as a pore former. The aim was to investigate the effect of the molecular weight of HPC on the microstructure and mass transport in phase-separated freestanding EC/HPC films with 30% w/w HPC. Four different HPC grades were used, with weight averaged molecular weights (Mw) of 30.0 (SSL), 55.0 (SL), 83.5 (L) and 365 (M) kg/mol. Results showed that the phase-separated structure changed from HPC-discontinuous to bicontinuous with increasing Mw of HPC. The film with the lowest Mw HPC (SSL) had unconnected oval-shaped HPC-rich domains, leaked almost no HPC and had the lowest water permeability. The remaining higher Mw films had connected complex-shaped pores, which resulted in higher permeabilities. The highest Mw film (M) had the smallest pores and very slow HPC leakage, which led to a slow increase in permeability. Films with grade L and SL released most of their HPC, yet the permeability of the L film was three times higher due to greater pore connectivity. It was concluded that the phase-separated microstructure, the level of pore percolation and the leakage rate of HPC will be affected by the choice of HPC Mw grade used in the film and this will in turn have strong impact on the film permeability. © 2016

  • 3.
    Berta, Marco
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Gmoser, Rebecca
    Krona, Annika
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Effect of viscoelasticity on foam development in zein-starch dough2015In: LWT - Food Science and Technology, Vol. 63, no 2, p. 1229-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Above the zein glass transition temperature (~40°C), the viscoelasticity of zein-starch dough is similar to that of gluten. This is of interest because this dough might be used to develop gluten-free products, although it has certain limitations such as workability and aging at room temperature. The most effective way to decrease the dough glass transition temperature is to use a plasticizer, which also influences the viscosity. In this study, viscoelastic zein-starch dough samples were prepared with several concentrations of citric acid as the plasticizer, and the effect of viscoelasticity on crumb structure formation during baking was investigated. Extensional viscosity was correlated with the average bubble size after baking. We found that viscosity could be predicted for this system by measuring the shear viscosity, whereby the Trouton ratio was near-constant for the range of plasticizer concentrations investigated. In addition, our dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) revealed that bubble growth occurs mainly when the dough reaches 100°C, due to a combination of steam formation and thermal softening of the matrix. At higher temperatures, hardening occurs due to drying and zein crosslinking.

  • 4.
    Berta, Marco
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Martín-Alfonso, J.E.
    Valencia, C.
    Shear and extensional rheology of xanthan and guar gum solutions2015In: IBEREO 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Filli, Kalep
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design. Moddibo Adama Univ., Yoal Nigeria.
    Nkama, I
    Univ. of Nigeria, Nigeria.
    Rheological Properties of Extruded Fura from blends of Millet and Cowpea2016In: Transactions in the Nordic Rheology Society, 2016, Vol. 24, p. 209-216Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rheological properties of fura

    extrudates with different pearl millet and

    cowpea ratios (80:20, 70:30 and 100% pearl

    millet flours) were studied. Extrusion cooking

    was performed in a single screw extruder.

    Gelatinization temperatures (Tg) were 72 oC

    for Millet: Cowpea (70:30) and 71 oC for

    100% pearl millet flour indicating that the Tg

    increased with inclusion of cowpea flour. The

    time taken to reach gelatinization temperature

    (Mg) was 27 minutes for 100% pearl millet

    flour higher than Millet: Cowpea 80:20 and

    70:30 flour blends which recorded 25.3

    minutes. Gelatinization temperatures for fura

    extrudates were 62, 64.7, 65 and 66.8 oC for

    millet: Cowpea 80:20, 100% traditional fura,

    millet: Cowpea 70:30 and 100% extruded fura

    respectively. There was general decrease in

    gelatinization temperature of all products,

    which can be attributed to previous

    gelatinization of their starches. There were

    significant differences in the viscosities of

    samples at each of the temperature considered

    from (30o - 90oC). At 30oC the viscosities

    ranged from (4.2-17.6 Nsm-2). Traditional fura

    indicated the highest viscosity at all

    temperatures. The k values increased as the

    temperature of fura samples decreased

    generally. Flow behaviour for all fura samples

    exhibited non-Newtonian types of fluids at the

    test conditions since flow behaviour index (n)

    for each fura sample were found to be different

    from one. Traditional fura recorded the highest

    value for yield stress 18.67 Nm-2, with millet:

    cowpea 80:20 fura recording 8.6 Nm-2 as the

    least value.

     

  • 6. Gårdebjer, S.
    et al.
    Gebäck, T.
    Andersson, T.
    Fratini, E.
    Baglioni, P.
    Bordes, R.
    Viridén, A.
    Nicholas, M.
    Lorén, N.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Larsson, A.
    The impact of interfaces in laminated packaging on transport of carboxylic acids2016In: Journal of Membrane Science, ISSN 0376-7388, E-ISSN 1873-3123, Vol. 518, p. 305-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The permeability of oleic and acetic acid through low density polyethylene (LDPE) and ethylene acrylic acid (EAA) have been measured using diffusion cells. In addition, the permeability through combinations of LDPE and EAA in the form of laminates with different numbers of layers has been determined. Oleic acid shows an almost 30 times higher permeability compared to acetic acid, which was partly explained by the adsorption of oleic acid to the film surface during the permeability experiment. In addition, the permeability is lower for both oleic and acetic acid in the laminates compared to the pure films. The decreased permeability can be explained by the presence of crystalline domains close to the interface. This is supported by SAXS data which suggests an ordering of polymer chains in the EAA film close to the interface. In summary, the results show that it is possible to create barrier materials with decreased permeability, which is interesting for example in the packaging industry. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  • 7.
    Hermansson, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Altskär, Annika
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Loren, Niklas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Hamngren, Charlotte
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Abrahamsson, Christoffer
    Gebäck, Tobias
    Nyden, Magnus
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Olsson, Eva
    Pore size effects on convective flow and diffusion through nanoporous silica gels2015In: Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, Vol. 484, p. 288-96Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Hermansson, E.
    et al.
    Schuster, E.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Lindgren, L.
    Altskär, A.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Ström, A.
    Impact of solvent quality on the network strength and structure of alginate gels2016In: Carbohydrate Polymers, Vol. 144, p. 289-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of the mixture of water and alcohols on the solubility and properties of alginate and its calcium-induced gels is of interest for the food, wound care and pharmaceutical industries. The solvent quality of water with increasing amounts of ethanol (0-20%) on alginate was studied using intrinsic viscosity. The effect of ethanol addition on the rheological and mechanical properties of calcium alginate gels was determined. Small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy were used to study the network structure. It is shown that the addition of ethanol up to 15% (wt) increases the extension of the alginate chain, which correlates with increased moduli and stress being required to fracture the gels. The extension of the polymer chain is reduced at 20% (wt) ethanol, which is followed by reduced moduli and stress at breakage of the gels. The network structure of gels at high ethanol concentrations (24%) is characterized by thick and poorly connected network strands. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 9.
    Hussein, JB
    et al.
    Modibbo Adama University of Technology Yola, Nigeria..
    Sanusi, MS
    University of Ibadan, Nigeria..
    Filli, Kalep
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Evaluation of drying methods on the content of some bio-actives (lycopene, β-carotene and ascorbic acid) of tomato slices2016In: African Journal of Food Science, ISSN 1996-0794, E-ISSN 1996-0794, Vol. 10, no 12, p. 359-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersycum L.) is one of the most important vegetables worldwide. As it is a relatively short duration crop and gives a high yield, it is economically attractive. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of drying method on the quality of the dried tomatoes based on three parameters viz; lycopene, ß-carotene and ascorbic acid contents. Thirty-six kilograms of tomatoes were sorted, cleaned, blanched and divided into three equal portions of 12 kg each. The tomatoes were sliced into 4, 6 and 8 mm, then sun, solar and hybrid dried, respectively. The value of lycopene content obtained for sun dried tomatoes ranged from 23.89 to 18.77 mg/100 g, solar dried ranged from 24.51 to 22.56 mg/100 g and hybrid dried ranged from 25.12 to 24.65 mg/100 g. The average value of β-carotene content obtained for sun dried tomatoes ranged from 4.12 to 3.72 mg/100 g, solar dried ranged from 4.94 to 4.25 mg/100 g and hybrid dried ranged from 4.98 to 4.65 mg/100 g. The values of ascorbic acid obtained for sun dried tomatoes ranged from 17.04 to 5.60 mg/100 g, solar dried ranged from 23.73 to 13.37 mg/100 g and hybrid dried ranged from 29.20 to 24.82 mg/100 g. Hybrid dried tomatoes slice showed higher retention of lycopene, ß-Carotene and ascorbic acid than both the solar and open sun dried methods.

  • 10. Kotzé, R.
    et al.
    Ricci, S.
    Birkhofer, B.
    Wiklund, J.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Performance tests of a new non-invasive sensor unit and ultrasound electronics2016In: Flow Measurement and Instrumentation, Vol. 48, p. 104-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial applications involving pulsed ultrasound instrumentation require complete non-invasive setups due to high temperatures, pressures and possible abrasive fluids. Recently, new pulser-receiver electronics and a new sensor unit were developed by Flow-Viz. The complete sensor unit setup enables non-invasive Doppler measurements through high grade stainless steel. In this work a non-invasive sensor unit developed for one inch pipes (22.5 mm ID) and two inch pipes (48.4 mm ID) were evaluated. Performance tests were conducted using a Doppler string phantom setup and the Doppler velocity results were compared to the moving string target velocities. Eight different positions along the pipe internal diameter (22.5 mm) were investigated and at each position six speeds (0.1-0.6 m/s) were tested. Error differences ranged from 0.18 to 7.8% for the tested velocity range. The average accuracy of Doppler measurements for the 22.5 mm sensor unit decreased slightly from 1.3 to 2.3% across the ultrasound beam axis. Eleven positions were tested along the diameter of the 48.4 mm pipe (eight positions covered the pipe radius) and five speeds were tested (0.2-0.6 m/s). The average accuracy of Doppler measurements for the 48.4 mm sensor unit was between 2.4 and 5.9%, with the lowest accuracy at the point furthest away from the sensor unit. Error differences varied between 0.07 and 11.85% for the tested velocity range, where mostly overestimated velocities were recorded. This systematic error explains the higher average error difference percentage when comparing the 48.4 mm (2.4-5.9%) and 22.5 mm (1.3-2.3%) sensor unit performance. The overall performance of the combined Flow-Viz system (electronics, software, sensor) was excellent as similar or higher errors were typically reported in the medical field. This study has for the first time validated non-invasive Doppler measurements through high grade stainless steel pipes by using an advanced string phantom setup. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 11.
    Lopez Sanchez, Patricia
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience.
    Schuster, Erich
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Ström, Anna
    Diffusion of macromolecules in self-assembled cellulose/hemicellulose hydrogels2015In: Soft Matter, Vol. 11, no 20, p. 4002-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose hydrogels are extensively applied in many biotechnological fields and are also used as models for plant cell walls. We synthesised model cellulosic hydrogels containing hemicelluloses, as a biomimetic of plant cell walls, in order to study the role of hemicelluloses on their mass transport properties. Microbial cellulose is able to self-assemble into composites when hemicelluloses, such as xyloglucan and arabinoxylan, are present in the incubation media, leading to hydrogels with different nano and microstructures. We investigated the diffusivities of a series of fluorescently labelled dextrans, of different molecular weight, and proteins, including a plant pectin methyl esterase (PME), using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The presence of xyloglucan, known to be able to crosslink cellulose fibres, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and 13C NMR, reduced mobility of macromolecules of molecular weight higher than 10 kDa, reflected in lower diffusion coefficients. Furthermore PME diffusion was reduced in composites containing xyloglucan, despite the lack of a particular binding motif in PME for this polysaccharide, suggesting possible non-specific interactions between PME and this hemicellulose. In contrast, hydrogels containing arabinoxylan coating cellulose fibres showed enhanced diffusivity of the molecules studied. The different diffusivities were related to the architectural features found in the composites as a function of polysaccharide composition. Our results show the effect of model hemicelluloses in the mass transport properties of cellulose networks in highly hydrated environments relevant to understanding the role of hemicelluloses in the permeability of plant cell walls and aiding design of plant based materials with tailored properties.

  • 12.
    Loren, Niklas
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Hermansson, Anne-Marie
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Hagman, Joel
    Jonasson, Jenny K
    Deschout, Hendrik
    Bernin, Diana
    Cella-Zanacchi, Francesca
    Diaspro, Alberto
    McNally, James G
    Ameloot, Marcel
    Smisdom, Nick
    Nyden, Magnus
    Rudemo, Mats
    Braeckmans, Kevin
    Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in material and life sciences: putting theory into practice.2015In: Quarterly Reviews of Biophysics, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 323-87Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Malafronte, Loredana
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Processing.
    Ahrné, Lilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Processing.
    Schuster, Erich
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Exploring drying kinetics and morphology of commercial dairy powders2015In: Journal of Food Engineering, ISSN 0260-8774, E-ISSN 1873-5770, Vol. 158, no Aug, p. 58-65Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Nyström, M.
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Tamaddon Jahromi, H. R.
    Stading, M.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Webster, M. F.
    Extracting extensional properties through excess pressure drop estimation in axisymmetric contraction and expansion flows for constant shear viscosity, extension strain-hardening fluids2016In: Rheologica Acta, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 373-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, hyperbolic contraction–expansion flow (HCF) devices have been investigated with the specific aim of devising new experimental measuring systems for extensional rheological properties. To this end, a hyperbolic contraction–expansion configuration has been designed to minimize the influence of shear in the flow. Experiments have been conducted using well-characterized model fluids, alongside simulations using a viscoelastic White–Metzner/FENE-CR model and finite element/finite volume analysis. Here, the application of appropriate rheological models to reproduce quantitative pressure drop predictions for constant shear viscosity fluids has been investigated, in order to extract the relevant extensional properties for the various test fluids in question. Accordingly, experimental evaluation of the hyperbolic contraction–expansion configuration has shown rising corrected pressure drops with increasing elastic behaviour (De=0∼16), evidence which has been corroborated through numerical prediction. Moreover, theoretical to predicted solution correspondence has been established between extensional viscosity and first normal stress difference. This leads to a practical means to measure extensional viscosity for elastic fluids, obtained through the derived pressure drop data in these HCF devices. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  • 15.
    Nyström, Magda
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Qazi, Waqas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Bulow, Margareta
    Ekberg, Olle
    Effects of rheological factors on perceived ease of swallowing2015In: Appl. Rheol., Vol. 25, p. 63876-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Nyström, Magda
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Qazi, Waqas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Ekberg, Olle
    Edible Boger fluid and its rheology at human physiological conditions2015In: Transactions of the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 23, p. 195-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Ovaska, S. -S
    et al.
    Hiltunen, S.
    Ernstsson, Marie
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Material och ytteknik.
    Schuster, E.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Altskär, A.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Backfolk, K.
    Characterization of rapeseed oil/coconut oil mixtures and their penetration into hydroxypropylated-starch-based barrier coatings containing an oleophilic mineral2016In: Progress in organic coatings, ISSN 0300-9440, E-ISSN 1873-331X, Vol. 101, p. 569-576Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Qazi, W
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Stading, M
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Rheological modification of fluid foods for patients with dysphagia2016In: Annual Transactions - The Nordic Rheology Society, ISSN 1601-4057, Vol. 24, p. 75-76Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Qazi, Waqas Muhammad
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design. Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wiklund, Johan
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Ekberg, Olle
    Lund University, Malmo, Sweden.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design. Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A swallowing model for efficient food product development2016In: The Materials Science Graduate Student Days 2016, 2016, p. 38-38, article id P20Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dysphagia refers to difficulties in swallowing, caused by conditions ranging from trauma to neurological disorders such as dementia. People suffering from dysphagia cannot adequately transfer food from the mouth to the stomach especially low viscosity, fluid foods. Texture modification is imperative to ensure safe passage of food from mouth into the stomach. Food products with elastic properties, i.e. high extensional viscosity, have been identified as helpful in promoting safe swallowing. However, this hypothesis is difficult to prove by clinical studies due to ethical issues and availability of suitable patients. Moreover, the problems of individual patients vary largely in nature and extent which further complicates the matter as identified in our previous research (1). We are currently constructing an in vitro human swallowing apparatus mimicking swallowing through the pharynx to the esophagus. The apparatus will have the pressure and ultrasound sensors to monitor real time flow properties of the bolus as it travels along the swallowing tract. This will enable us to measure relevant parameters during swallowing such as residence times and bolus velocity along the way. The model can be adjusted to different dysphagic conditions such as abnormal epiglottis closure. The goal of the project is to develop food products for safe swallowing and currently we are determining the rheological properties of commercial dysphagia thickeners, as well as model fluids. Two companies active in dysphagia foods are contributing (Fresenius Kabi and Findus). The shear and extensional properties have been shown to vary significantly, which has been correlated with fluid microstructure.

  • 20.
    Qazi, Waqas
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design. Chalmers, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wiklund, Johan
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Ekberg, Olle
    Lunds university, Malmo, Sweden.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design. Chalmers, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    VALIDATION OF INLINE RHEOMETRY WITH THICKENER BASED LIQUIDS FOR DYSPHAGIA2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    RÖDING, M.
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Del Castillo, L. A.
    NYDÉN, M.
    Follink, B.
    Microstructure of a granular amorphous silica ceramic synthesized by spark plasma sintering2016In: Journal of Microscopy, ISSN 0022-2720, E-ISSN 1365-2818, Vol. 264, no 3, p. 298-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the microstructure of a granular amorphous silica ceramic material synthesized by spark plasma sintering. Using monodisperse spherical silica particles as precursor, spark plasma sintering yields a dense granular material with distinct granule boundaries. We use selective etching to obtain nanoscopic pores along the granule borders. We interrogate this highly interesting material structure by combining scanning electron microscopy, X-ray computed nanotomography and simulations based on random close packed spherical particles. We determine the degree of anisotropy caused by the uni-axial force applied during sintering, and our analysis shows that our synthesis method provides a means to avoid significant granule growth and to fabricate a material with well-controlled microstructure. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society

  • 22.
    Röding, M.
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Schuster, E.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Logg, K.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Lundman, M.
    Bergström, P.
    Hanson, C.
    Gebäck, T.
    Lorén, N.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Computational high-throughput screening of fluid permeability in heterogeneous fiber materials2016In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 12, no 29, p. 6293-6299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore computational high-throughput screening as a design strategy for heterogeneous, isotropic fiber materials. Fluid permeability, a key property in the design of soft porous materials, is systematically studied using a multi-scale lattice Boltzmann framework. After characterizing microscopic permeability as a function of solid volume fraction in the microstructure, we perform high-throughput computational screening of in excess of 35000 macrostructures consisting of a continuous bulk interrupted by spherical/elliptical domains with either lower or higher microscopic permeability (hence with two distinct microscopic solid volume fractions and therefore two distinct microscopic permeabilities) to assess which parameters determine macroscopic permeability for a fixed average solid volume fraction. We conclude that the fractions of bulk and domains and the distribution of solid volume fraction between them are the primary determinants of macroscopic permeability, and that a substantial increase in permeability compared to the corresponding homogenous material is attainable. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  • 23.
    Schuster, E.
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Sott, K.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Ström, A.
    Altskär, A.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Smisdom, N.
    Gebäck, T.
    Lorén, N.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Hermansson, A. M.
    Interplay between flow and diffusion in capillary alginate hydrogels2016In: Soft Matter, Vol. 12, no 17, p. 3897-3907Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alginate gels with naturally occurring macroscopic capillaries have been used as a model system to study the interplay between laminar flow and diffusion of nanometer-sized solutes in real time. Calcium alginate gels that contain homogeneously distributed parallel-aligned capillary structures were formed by external addition of crosslinking ions to an alginate sol. The effects of different flow rates (0, 1, 10, 50 and 100 μl min-1) and three different probes (fluorescein, 10 kDa and 500 kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran) on the diffusion rates of the solutes across the capillary wall and in the bulk gel in between the capillaries were investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The flow in the capillaries was produced using a syringe pump that was connected to the capillaries via a tube. Transmission electron microscopy revealed an open aggregated structure close to the capillary wall, followed by an aligned network layer and the isotropic network of the bulk gel. The most pronounced effect was observed for the 1 nm-diameter fluorescein probe, for which an increase in flow rate increased the mobility of the probe in the gel. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching confirmed increased mobility close to the channel, with increasing flow rate. Mobility maps derived using raster image correlation spectroscopy showed that the layer with the lowest mobility corresponded to the anisotropic layer of ordered network chains. The combination of microscopy techniques used in the present study elucidates the flow and diffusion behaviors visually, qualitatively and quantitatively, and represents a promising tool for future studies of mass transport in non-equilibrium systems. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  • 24.
    Schuster, Erich
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Holmberg, Krister
    Craig, Marina
    Biodegradable Nanofilms on Microcapsules for Controlled Release of Drugs to Infected Chronic Wounds2015In: Materials Today, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 118-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Schuster, Erich
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Loren, Niklas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Longfils, Marco
    Särkkä, Aila
    Rudemo, Mats
    Single particle raster image diffusion analysis2015In: 14th International Congress for Stereology and Image Analysis Liège,, 2015, , p. 3Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Qazi, Waqas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Nyström, Magda
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Berta, Marco
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Bulow, Margareta
    Ekberg, Olle
    Effect of shear vs. extensional flow during swallowing2015In: Transaction of the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 23, p. 63-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Schuster, Erich
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Karlsson, Kristina
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Rigdahl, Mikael
    Foaming behavior of water-soluble cellulose derivatives: hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and ethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose2015In: Cellulose, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 2651-64Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Thadavathi, Yogesh
    et al.
    Chalmers, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wassen, Sophia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Kadar, Roland
    Chalmers, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Feed compositional effects on rheological and microstructural characteristics of high protein vegetable extrudates2016In: Transaction in the Nordic Rheology Society., 2016, Vol. 24, p. 63-70Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Wiklund, J
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Håkansson, U
    Flow-Viz – Ultrasound based in-line characterization and real-time control of the flow properties of cementitious material2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Wiklund, Johan
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Rahman, Mashuqur
    Håkansson, Ulf
    In-line rheological measurements of cement grouts: Effects of water/cement ratio and hydration2015In: Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology, ISSN 0886-7798, E-ISSN 1878-4364, Vol. 45, p. 34-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rheological properties of cement based grouts change with water/cement ratio and time, during the course of hydration. For this reason, it is desirable to be able to measure this change continuously, in-line, with a robust instrument during the entire grouting operation in the field.The rheological properties of commonly used cement grouts were determined using the Ultrasound Velocity Profiling combined with the Pressure Difference (UVP. +. PD) method. A non-model approach was used that directly provides the properties, and the results were compared with the properties obtained using the Bingham and Herschel-Bulkley rheological models. The results show that it is possible to determine the rheological properties, as well as variations with concentration and time, with this method.The UVP. +. PD method has been found to be an effective measuring device for velocity profile visualization, volumetric flow determination and the characteristics of the grout pump used.

  • 31.
    Öhgren, C.
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Fabregat, N.
    Langton, M.
    Quality of bread baked from frozen dough - effects of rye, and sugar content, kneading time and proofing profile2016In: LWT - Food Science and Technology, Vol. 68, p. 626-633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate whether proofing profile influences volume and crumb firmness in bread baked from frozen dough, and whether rye or sugar content and different kneading times affect the microstructure of the frozen dough. Microscopy was used to explain the differences.Wheat doughs mixed with rye ("rye") and with sugar ("sweet") were frozen after 3 different proofing times (0, 18, and 38 min) and visualized with confocal laser scanning microscopy and 3-dimensional micro-computed tomography. The baked breads were evaluated for volume and texture. Breads from un-proofed frozen dough allowed to proof after thawing showed the highest volume (4.0 cm3/g) and the softest crumb texture. The pre-proofed sweet bread had firmer crumbs and lower volume (2.5-3.0 cm3/g) than the pre-proofed rye bread (2.7-3.7 cm3/g). Reasons for the differences in quality parameters between the rye and sweet breads were investigated by studying the different influences of kneading time and sugar content on fresh and frozen dough. The gluten network was found to be more homogeneously distributed in doughs with longer kneading times and lower sugar content, and less well distributed and more lumped in frozen than in fresh dough. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

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