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  • 1.
    Ahlgren, Serina
    et al.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ekman, Anna
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment. Lund University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Hanna
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Berlin, Johanna
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energi och Bioekonomi, Systemanalys.
    Börjesson, Pål
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ekvall, Tomas
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Janssen, Matty
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Strid, Ingrid
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Review of methodological choices in LCA of biorefinery systems - key issues and recommendations2015In: Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining, ISSN 1932-104X, E-ISSN 1932-1031, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 606-619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current trend in biomass conversion technologies is toward more efficient utilization of biomass feedstock in multiproduct biorefineries. Many life-cycle assessment (LCA) studies of biorefinery systems have been performed but differ in how they use the LCA methodology. Based on a review of existing LCA standards and guidelines, this paper provides recommendations on how to handle key methodological issues when performing LCA studies of biorefinery systems. Six key issues were identified: (i) goal definition, (ii) functional unit, (iii) allocation of biorefinery outputs, (iv) allocation of biomass feedstock, (v) land use, and (vi) biogenic carbon and timing of emissions. Many of the standards and guidelines reviewed here provide only general methodological recommendations. Some make more specific methodological recommendations, but these often differ between standards. In this paper we present some clarifications (e.g. examples of research questions and suitable functional units) and methodological recommendations (e.g. on allocation).

  • 2.
    Almeida, Cheila
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment. New University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Vaz, Sofia Guedes
    Portuguese Government, Portugal.
    Sevilla Ziegler, Friederike
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of a Canned Sardine Product from Portugal2015In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 607-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to assess the environmental impacts of canned sardines in olive oil, by considering fishing, processing, and packaging, using life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. The case study concerns a product of a canning factory based in Portugal and packed in aluminum cans. It is the first LCA of a processed seafood product made with the traditional canning method. The production of both cans and olive oil are the most important process in the considered impact categories. The production of olives contributes to the high environmental load of olive oil, related to cultivation and harvesting phases. The production of aluminum cans is the most significant process for all impact categories, except ozone depletion potential and eutrophication potential, resulting from the high energy demand and the extraction of raw materials. To compare to other sardine products consumed in Portugal, such as frozen and fresh sardines, transport to the wholesaler and store was added. The environmental cost of canned sardines is almost seven times higher per kilogram of edible product. The main action to optimize the environmental performance of canned sardines is therefore to replace the packaging and diminish the olive oil losses as much as possible. Greenhouse gas emissions are reduced by half when plastic packaging is considered rather than aluminum. Frozen and fresh sardines represent much lower environmental impacts than canned sardines. Nevertheless, when other sardine products are not possible, it becomes feasible to use sardines for human consumption, preventing them from being wasted or used suboptimally as feed.

  • 3.
    Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    de Hooge, Ilona
    Wageningen University, Netherlands.
    Amani, Pegah
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Bech-Larsen, Tino
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Oostindjer, Marije
    Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway.
    Consumer-Related Food Waste: Causes and Potential for Action2015In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 6457-6477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past decade, food waste has received increased attention on both academic and societal levels. As a cause of negative economic, environmental and social effects, food waste is considered to be one of the sustainability issues that needs to be addressed. In developed countries, consumers are one of the biggest sources of food waste. To successfully reduce consumer-related food waste, it is necessary to have a clear understanding of the factors influencing food waste-related consumer perceptions and behaviors. The present paper presents the results of a literature review and expert interviews on factors causing consumer-related food waste in households and supply chains. Results show that consumers’ motivation to avoid food waste, their management skills of food provisioning and food handling and their trade-offs between priorities have an extensive influence on their food waste behaviors. We identify actions that governments, societal stakeholders and retailers can undertake to reduce consumer-related food waste, highlighting that synergistic actions between all parties are most promising. Further research should focus on exploring specific food waste contexts and interactions more in-depth. Experiments and interventions in particular can contribute to a shift from analysis to solutions.

  • 4.
    Barr, Ulla-Karin
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Minska överproduktionen i storkök: Laga mat till gästen- inte till komposten eller fjärrvärmeverket (SJV projekt - Dnr 19-698/11/ SX20103)2015Report (Refereed)
  • 5. Bengtsson, Kenneth
    et al.
    Kristoffer, Gunnartz
    Bergman, Annika
    Domeij, Åsa
    Eksvärd, Jan
    Larshans, Per
    Lindroth, Erik
    Lindvall, Kerstin
    Sonesson, Ulf
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Throne Holst, Alexander
    Nilsson, Björn O
    Ankarcrona, Carolina
    Ökad hållbarhet i hela livsmedelskedjan, Debattartikel SvD2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Cashion, Tim
    et al.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Hornborg, Sara
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Ziegler, Friederike
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Skontorp Hognes, Erik
    SINTEF, Norway.
    Tyedmers, Peter
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Review and advancement of the marine biotic resource use metric in seafood LCAs: a case study of Norwegian salmon feed2016In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 1106-1120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Seafood life cycle assessment (LCA) studies have adopted the primary production required (PPR) indicator to account for the impact of these production systems (e.g., capture fisheries or aquaculture) on the ecosystems they harvest wild inputs from. However, there exists a large diversity in the application of methods to calculate PPR, and current practice often does not consider species- and ecosystem-specific factors. Here, we critically examine current practice and propose a refined method for applying the PPR metric in seafood LCAs. Methods: We surveyed seafood LCAs that quantify PPR, or its derivatives, to examine the diversity of practice. We then defined and applied a refined method to a case study of the average Norwegian salmon feed in 2012. This refined method incorporates species-specific fishmeal and oil yields, source ecosystem-specific transfer efficiencies and expresses results as a percentage of total ecosystem production that PPR represents. Results were compared to those using previously applied methods based on the literature review, and the impact of uncertainty and natural variability of key input parameters was also assessed using Monte Carlo simulation. Results and discussion: From the literature review, most studies do not incorporate species-specific fishmeal and oil yields or ecosystem-specific transfer efficiencies when calculating PPR. Our proposed method, which incorporated source species- and ecosystem-specific values for these parameters, provides far greater resolution of PPR than when employing global average values. When alternative methods to calculate PPR were applied to marine inputs to Norwegian salmon feeds, resulting PPR values were similar for some sources of fishmeal and oil. For other species, such as Atlantic herring from ecosystems with low transfer efficiencies, there was a large divergence in resulting PPR values. For combined inputs to Norwegian salmon feeds in 2012, the refined method resulted in a total PPR value that is three times higher than would result using the currently standard method signaling that previous LCA research may have substantially underestimated the marine biotic impacts of fishery products. Conclusions: While there exists a great diversity of practice in the application of the PPR indicator in seafood LCA, the refined method should be adopted for future LCA studies to be more specific to the context of the study.

  • 7.
    Cederberg, Christel
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Landquist, Birgit
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Molander, Sverker
    Tidåker, Pernilla
    SP - Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut / Energiteknik (ET).
    Jordbrukets ekosystemtjänster: från koncept till gårdsbaserade indikatorer2016Report (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Florén, Britta
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Amani, Pegah
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Davis, Jennifer
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Climate Database Facilitating Climate Smart Meal Planning for the Public Sector in Sweden2016In: Proceedings in System Dynamics and Innovation in Food Networks 2016, 2016, p. 122-128Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The climate impact of food consumption corresponds to about 2 tons of CO2eq. per capita, representing around 25 % of the total consumption-driven climate change impact in Sweden. There are several diverse ongoing trends of food consumption in Sweden, and their primary drivers are environmental and health considerations. The results of a market research carried out by YouGov (2010) indicated that nearly 75 percent of respondents would buy climate-labeled food, and nearly 50 percent of the respondents would be willing to pay a higher price for such a product.The climate impact from meals could be significantly decreased through small changes in recipes by reducing the amount of ingredients with high carbon footprints or substituting them with other ingredients with the same function but lower carbon footprints. By making more climate-conscious choices, e.g. eating more vegetables as well as poultry, egg and seafood instead of red meat, the climate impact per person and year could be reduced by half.Several recent studies suggest that dietary changes can reduce food-related environmental impacts significantly (e.g. Tilman and Clark, 2014; Hallström et al., 2015; Stehfest, 2014; Röös et al., 2015; Bryngelsson et al., 2016). These studies have mainly explored theoretical dietary scenarios, and not what people actually eat; for example, in one study a model-based theoretical diet, which reduced GHGs by 90%, included unrealistic amounts of only seven food items (Macdiarmid, 2012). Still, this information is important when aiming to guide food producers, public authorities and consumers towards more sustainable and healthy options. The national food agency Sweden updated their dietary advice in 2015, which now also takes environmental consideration into account, besides health impact (SLV, 2015).To combat climate change, recommendations need to be realized and incorporated into applications in daily practices. There has been an optimistic belief that the availability of information could boost environmentally sound behavior among the general public, but there is a rather weak link between knowing and doing. Feedback directly tied to people's own behavior has been shown to be more effective than general information (Lundgren, 2000), for example by making the information available directly in the decision making moment e.g. when shopping food or planning a meal. If such information is timely communicated, it can have considerable contribution to more sustainable consumption. In a field experiment conducted by Matsdotter et al. (2014) in 17 food stores in Sweden, the results show that climate labeling increased demand for climate-labeled milk by 7%. In another recent research project (Kamb et al, 2015), households in Uppsala were able to reduce their climate footprint by 31% by having access to climate friendly information and inspiration, e.g. the participants could get direct feedback on GHGs for certain products and services via a mobile application. This project was conducted at a very small scale, but still proves the potential of influencing behavioral change by using interactive applications at the point of decision making.

  • 9.
    Florén, Britta
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Sund, Veronica
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Krewer, Christoffer
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Sonesson, Ulf
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Berglund, Maria
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Lätt att välja rätt – Klimatdata för medvetna val av livsmedelsråvaror i storkök2015Report (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Gadde, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Amani, Pegah
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Food supply in a network context: An alternative framing and managerial consequences in efforts to prevent food waste2016In: British Food Journal, ISSN 0007-070X, E-ISSN 1758-4108, Vol. 118, no 6, p. 1407-1421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present a “network” framing of food supply arrangements. Such frameworks have been asked for in previous research as supplements to prevailing supply chain conceptualizations.

    Design/methodology/approach – The framework builds on industrial network theory. According to this approach, business reality is analyzed in three inter-related dimensions: the activities undertaken, the resources used for this undertaking, and the actors controlling resources and activities. For each dimension, relevant concepts are derived for analysis of the features of food supply and food waste.

    Findings – The network framing was useful for analyzing the prerequisites and consequences for two approaches to reduce food waste: one based on extension of shelf-life, the other relying on enhanced responsiveness in the supply arrangement. The framework was then used for suggesting managerial actions to reduce food waste through increasing activity coordination, resource combining, and actor interaction with consideration of potential consequences of such actions.

    Practical implications – Managerial issues in food supply are discussed with regard to the role of activity coordination, the role of resource combining, and the role of actor interaction in efforts to prevent food waste.

    Originality/value – The paper suggests a novel approach for analyzing food supply networks with particular focus on food waste reduction. Such framings are applied in other supply systems, and requested by food supply researchers.

  • 11.
    Hornborg, S
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Bergman, K
    Ziegler, F
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    The role of seafood in healthy and sustainable diets: drivers of European seafood production2016Report (Other academic)
  • 12. Karheiding, C
    et al.
    Palander, S
    Tivander, J
    Krewer, C
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Livscykeldata - en förutsättning för hållbar innovation2016Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Landquist, Birgit
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Nordborg, Maria
    Hornborg, Sara
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Litteraturstudie av miljöpåverkan från konventionellt och ekologiskt producerade livsmedel: Fokus på studier utförda med livscykelanalysmetodik2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    De nya kostråd som Livsmedelsverket publicerade i april 2015 tog även hänsyn till miljöaspekter, förutom närings- och hälsoaspekter. Den här rapporten sammanställer skillnaderna i miljöpåverkan mellan ekologiskt och konventionellt producerade livsmedel och är ett kunskapsunderlag som Livsmedelsverket kan använda för att belysa frågan om det finns några livsmedelsgrupper där ekologiskt alternativt konventionellt bör lyftas fram. Arbetet har fokuserat på ett antal större livsmedelsgrupper och prioriterat studier som har använt livscykelanalys, LCA. Den senare är en miljösystemanalysmetod som kartlägger den potentiella miljöpåverkan en produkt ger upphov till under sin livscykel, från ”vaggan till graven” (eller en väl avgränsad del av livscykeln, till exempel primärproduktionen).

  • 14.
    Landquist, Birgit
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Nordborg, Maria
    Hornborg, Sara
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Slutsatsen saknar stöd i vår rapport, Debattreplik i DN2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Longo, Catherine S.
    et al.
    University of California, US; Marine Stewardship Council, UK.
    Hornborg, Sara
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Bartolino, Valerio
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Tomczak, Maciej T.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ciannelli, Lorenzo
    Oregon State University, US.
    Libralato, Simone
    OGS National Institute of Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics, Italy.
    Belgrano, Andrea
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; SIME Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment, Sweden.
    Role of trophic models and indicators in current marine fisheries management2015In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, ISSN 0171-8630, E-ISSN 1616-1599, Vol. 538, p. 257-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The previous decade has witnessed a flourishing of studies on how fisheries and marine food webs interact, and how trophicmodels and indicators can be used for assessment and management purposes. Acknowledging the importance of complex interactions among species, fishermen and the environment has led to a shift from single species to an ecosystem-wide approach in the science supporting fisheries management (e.g. Johannesburg Declaration, Magnuson-Stevens Act). Moreover, fisheries managers today acknowledge that fishing activities are linked to a range of societal benefits and services, and their work is necessarily amulti-objective practice (i.e. ecosystem-based management). We argue that the knowledge accumulated thus far points to tropho-dynamic models and indicators as key tools for such multi-dimensional assessments. Nevertheless, trophodynamic approaches are still underutilised in fisheriesmanagement. More specifically,most management decisions continue to rely on single species and sector-specific models. Here we review examples of applications of trophodynamic indicators within fisheries assessments in wellstudied ecosystems, and discuss progressmade (as well as lack thereof) towards increased integration of these metrics into marine resource management. Having clarified how trophic indicators fit within current policy and management contexts, we propose ways forward to increase their use in view of futuremanagement challenges.

  • 16.
    Rex, Emma
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energi och Bioekonomi, Systemanalys.
    Brunklaus, Birgit
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energi och Bioekonomi, Systemanalys.
    Lorentzon, Katarina
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Energy efficiency along the value chain Ways of working for increased competitiveness2015Report (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Rolfsman, Lennart
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energi och Bioekonomi, Klimatisering och installationsteknik.
    Pettersson, Ulrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energi och Bioekonomi, Klimatisering och installationsteknik.
    Barr, Ulla-Karin
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Sund, Veronica
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Storkök: förstudie av energiförbrukning och livsmedelssvinn2010Report (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.
    et al.
    Irstea, France; DTU Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Anton, Assumpció
    IRTA Institute for Food and Agricultural Research and Technology, Spain.
    Bengoa, Xavier
    Quantis, Switzerland.
    Bjørn, Anders
    DTU Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Brain, Richard
    Syngenta Crop Protection LLC, US.
    Bulle, Cécile
    Polytechnique Montréal, Canada.
    Cosme, Nuno
    DTU Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Dijkman, Teunis J.
    DTU Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Fantke, Peter
    DTU Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Felix, Mwema
    Tropical Pesticides Research Institute, Tanzania.
    Geoghegan, Trudyanne S.
    University of Otago, New Zealand.
    Gottesbüren, Bernhard
    BASF SE, Germany.
    Hammer, Carolyn
    Environmental Resources Management Ltd, UK.
    Humbert, Sebastien
    Quantis, Switzerland.
    Jolliet, Olivier
    University of Michigan, US.
    Juraske, Ronnie
    ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Dr. Knoell Consult GmbH, Germany.
    Lewis, Fraser
    Syngenta, UK.
    Maxime, Dominique
    Polytechnique Montréal, Canada.
    Nemecek, Thomas
    Agroscope, Switzerland.
    Payet, Jérôme
    Cycleco, France.
    Räsänen, Kati
    MTT Agrifood Research Finland, Finland.
    Roux, Philippe
    Irstea, France.
    Schau, Erwin M.
    European Commission, Italy.
    Sourisseau, Sandrine
    Veolia Environnement Recherche & Innovation, France.
    van Zelm, Rosalie
    Radboud University Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    von Streit, Bettina
    Bayer Technology Services GmbH, Germany.
    Wallman, Magdalena
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    The Glasgow consensus on the delineation between pesticide emission inventory and impact assessment for LCA2015In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 765-776Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Pesticides are applied to agricultural fields to optimise crop yield and their global use is substantial. Their consideration in life cycle assessment (LCA) is affected by important inconsistencies between the emission inventory and impact assessment phases of LCA. A clear definition of the delineation between the product system model (life cycle inventory—LCI, technosphere) and the natural environment (life cycle impact assessment—LCIA, ecosphere) is missing and could be established via consensus building.

    Methods: A workshop held in 2013 in Glasgow, UK, had the goal of establishing consensus and creating clear guidelines in the following topics: (1) boundary between emission inventory and impact characterisation model, (2) spatial dimensions and the time periods assumed for the application of substances to open agricultural fields or in greenhouses and (3) emissions to the natural environment and their potential impacts. More than 30 specialists in agrifood LCI, LCIA, risk assessment and ecotoxicology, representing industry, government and academia from 15 countries and four continents, met to discuss and reach consensus. The resulting guidelines target LCA practitioners, data (base) and characterisation method developers, and decision makers.

    Results and discussion: The focus was on defining a clear interface between LCI and LCIA, capable of supporting any goal and scope requirements while avoiding double counting or exclusion of important emission flows/impacts. Consensus was reached accordingly on distinct sets of recommendations for LCI and LCIA, respectively, recommending, for example, that buffer zones should be considered as part of the crop production system and the change in yield be considered. While the spatial dimensions of the field were not fixed, the temporal boundary between dynamic LCI fate modelling and steady-state LCIA fate modelling needs to be defined.

    Conclusions and recommendations: For pesticide application, the inventory should report pesticide identification, crop, mass applied per active ingredient, application method or formulation type, presence of buffer zones, location/country, application time before harvest and crop growth stage during application, adherence with Good Agricultural Practice, and whether the field is considered part of the technosphere or the ecosphere. Additionally, emission fractions to environmental media on-field and off-field should be reported. For LCIA, the directly concerned impact categories and a list of relevant fate and exposure processes were identified. Next steps were identified: (1) establishing default emission fractions to environmental media for integration into LCI databases and (2) interaction among impact model developers to extend current methods with new elements/processes mentioned in the recommendations.

  • 19.
    Sjons, Josefin
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Livscykelanalys av hallonsylt, lingonsylt och äppelmos2016Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Sonesson, Ulf
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Protein quality as functional unit – a methodological framework for inclusion in LCA2015In: Proceeding of “LCA for feeding the planet, energy for life, a conference within EXPO 2015”, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Sonesson, Ulf
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Lorentzon, Katarina
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Addressing the complexity in LCM of food systems – an integrated approach2015In: Life Cycle Management Conference 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22. Stenmarck, Å
    et al.
    Jensen, C
    Quested, T
    Moates, G
    Buksti, M
    Cseh, B
    Jull, S
    Parr, A
    Politano, A
    Redlingshöfer, B
    Scherhaufer, S
    Silvennoinen, K
    Soethoudt, H
    Zübert, C
    Östergren, K
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Estimates of European food waste levels2016Report (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Svedäng, Henrik
    et al.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Hornborg, Sara
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Waiting for a flourishing Baltic cod (Gadus morhua) fishery that never comes: old truths and new perspectives2015In: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 72, no 8, p. 2197-2208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contrary to the declared recovery of the stock, the density-dependent growth of Eastern Baltic cod (Gadus morhua, Gadidae), probably related to increased gear selectivity, may have disrupted the size structure and substantially lowered the productivity of the stock. This naturally affects the profitability and future development of industry as well as ecosystem objectives in relation to policies such as the Marine Strategy Framework Directive. As a result, current management frameworks need to be reconsidered with a clear priority on setting objectives related to both socio-economic and ecosystem considerations. We explore various management options, using bioeconomic modelling to visualize potential trade-offs, and form an integrated decision support to inform managers regarding potential yield in biomass, revenue at both the fleet and individual levels, and environmental impact of fishing. We also investigate the consequences of preventing density-dependence by lowering selectivity, Lc, while optimizing for economic revenue and minimizing ecosystem impacts. Our findings indicate that new strategies need to be adopted by reducing Lc as well as fishing mortality, F, to restore individual growth and, hence, stock productivity. We also note that these more risk-averting strategies are positively linked to better profitability at both the individual and fleet levels as well as with enhanced ecosystem functioning and lower ecological stress.

  • 24. Tostivint, C
    et al.
    Östergren, K
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Quested, T
    Soethoudt, H
    Stenmarck, Å
    Svanes, E
    O’Connor, C
    Food Waste Quantification Manual2016Report (Other academic)
  • 25. Unger, N
    et al.
    Davis, J
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Loubiere, M
    Östergren, K
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Methodology for evaluating environmental sustainability2016Report (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Willquist, Karin
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energi och Bioekonomi, Förbrännings- och aerosolteknik.
    Ekman, Anna
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Landquist, Birgit
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Lantz, Mikael
    Bioraffinaderi i Skåne: en pusselbit för hållbar regional utveckling2014Report (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Ziegler, Friederike
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Groen, Evelyne
    Wageningen University, Netherlands.
    Hornborg, Sara
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Bokkers, Eddie
    Wageningen University, Netherlands.
    Karlsen, Tine
    Nofima, Norway.
    de Boer, Imke
    Wageningen University, Netherlands.
    Life cycle environmental impacts of a northeast Atlantic trawler on a fishing trip basis, including a novel approach to assess biotic impacts of fishing2016In: 10th International Conference on Life Cycle Assessment of Food 2016: Book of Abstracts, 2016, article id 118Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Capture fisheries is the only industrial-scale harvesting of a wild resource for food. Temporal variability in environmental performance of fisheries has only recently begun to be explored, but only between years, not within a year. Our aim was to better understand the causes of temporal variability within and between years and to identify improvement options through management at a company level and in fisheries management

  • 28.
    Ziegler, Friederike
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Hornborg, Sara
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Valentinsson, Daniel
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Skontorp Hognes, Erik
    SINTEF, Norway.
    Sövik, Guldborg
    Institute of Marine Research, Norway.
    Ritzau Eigaard, Ole
    DTU Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Same stock, different management: Quantifying the sustainability of Skagerrak shrimp fisheries from a product perspective2016In: LCA Food 2016: 10th International Conference on Life Cycle Assessment of Food 2016, 2016, article id 119Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Ziegler, Friederike
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Hornborg, Sara
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Valentinsson, Daniel
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Skontorp Hognes, Erik
    SINTEF, Norway.
    Søvik, Guldborg
    Institute of Marine Research, Norway.
    Ritzau Eigaard, Ole
    DTU Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Same stock, different management: Quantifying the sustainability of three shrimp fisheries in the Skagerrak from a product perspective2016In: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 73, no 7, p. 1806-1814Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The northern shrimp (Pandalus borealis L.) stock in the Skagerrak is shared by Sweden, Norway, and Denmark. Although the fishery is regulated by an annual agreement between the EU and Norway, there are also national regulations as well as differences in fleet composition and shrimp markets. In early 2014, the World Wildlife Fund gave all Skagerrak shrimp a red light in their seafood consumer guide, which led to an extensive debate, especially in Sweden, about the sustainability of this fishery. The aim of this study was to quantify a set of indicators that together give a broad picture of the sustainability of the three fisheries to provide an objective basis for a discussion on needed measures. The different indicators concerned environmental, economic or social aspects of sustainability and were quantified per tonne of shrimp landed by each country in 2012. The Danish fishery was most efficient in terms of environmental and economic indicators, while the Swedish fishery provided most employment per tonne of shrimp landed. Fuel use in all fisheries was high, also when compared with other shrimp fisheries. Interesting patterns emerged, with smaller vessels being more fuel efficient than larger ones in Sweden and Norway, with the opposite trend in Denmark. The study also demonstrated major data gaps and differences between the countries in how data are collected and made available. Various improvement options in the areas data collection and publication, allocation of quotas and enforcement of regulations resulted. Product-oriented studies could be useful to follow-up performance of fisheries over time and to identify how to best utilize the Skagerrak shrimp stock. This could involve evaluating novel solutions in terms of technology and management, based on current and future scenarios aiming to maximize societal benefits generated from this limited resource, at minimized environmental impacts.

  • 30.
    Östergren, K
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Normann, A
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Flavour.
    Matsvinn och Matavfall2016Report (Other academic)
1 - 30 of 30
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