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  • 51.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Broms, Loove
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Becoming The Energy Aware Clock - Revisiting The Design Process Through A Feminist Gaze2013In: Experiments in Design Research, 2013, Vol. 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the border between technology and design (form giving) from a feminist perspective. Looking at the energy system and how it has been integrated in the household, we want to address the underlying structures that have been built into the ecology of electrical appliances used in daily life, preserving certain norms that could be questioned from both a gender and a sustainability perspective. We have created an alternative electricity meter, the Energy AWARE Clock, addressing design issues uncovered in an initial field study. In this paper, we will make parallels to these issues. We also use feminist technoscience studies scholar Donna Haraway’s theory of the cyborg in order to clarify useful concepts that can be derived from feminist theory and that can act as important tools for designers engaged in creative processes. From our own experience with the Energy AWARE Clock this approach has great potential for questioning and rethinking present norms within sustainability and gender, from the viewpoints of design research and design practice.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 52. Ericson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mazé, RamiaRISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    DESIGN ACT Socially and politically engaged design today — critical roles and emerging tactics2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    DESIGN ACT Socially and politically engaged design today — critical roles and emerging tactics is a book that presents and discusses contemporary design practices that engage with political and societal issues. Since 2009, the Iaspis project DESIGN ACT has been highlighting and discussing practices in which designers have been engaging critically as well as practically in such issues. Itself an example of applied critical thinking and experimental tactics, the process behind the DESIGN ACT project is considered as a curatorial, participatory and open-ended activity. DESIGN ACT has developed through an online archive, public events and an international network. This book complements the project, presenting historical and contemporary perspectives, a discussion of emerging themes and tactics, and platforms discussing the role of designers today. The book is produced by Iaspis in collaboration with the Interactive Institute, co-published by Sternberg Press in 2011, and edited by the initiators of the DESIGN ACT project, Magnus Ericson and Ramia Mazé. Texts featuring: Ana Betancour, Otto von Busch, Mauricio Corbalan, Pelin Derviş, Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby, Magnus Ericson, Joseph Grima, Peter Lang, Yanki Lee, Tor Lindstrand, Natasha Marie Llorens, Helena Mattsson, Ramia Mazé, Ou Ning, Doina Petrescu, Meike Schalk, Christina Zetterlund ; Projects by: A+URL, Camilla Andersson, Anti-Advertising Agency, Jon Ardern and Benedict Singleton, atelier d’architecture autogérée, Otto von Busch, Constant in collaboration with Recyclart, City Mine(d) and Speculoos, Dunne & Raby, eskyiu, Fantastic Norway, Aslı Kıyak İngin and Teike Asselbergs, International Festival with Front, Natalie Jeremijenko and the xClinic staff, Yanki Lee with Paula Dib, live|work, m7red, MINE, muf, New Beauty Council, Josh On, Marjetica Potrč and STEALTH in collaboration with A5 Arkitekter, Michael Rakowitz, Raumlaborberlin, Hannah le Roux, School of Missing Studies / Centrala – Foundation for Future Cities, Stalker, Think Public, UnSworn Industries, Zoom Architecture

  • 53.
    Ericson, Magnus
    et al.
    Forms of Sustainability.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    'Introduction', 6-11, 'Reflection', 277-297, 'About', 11-15 and 298-327, 'WHAT', 16-18, 'HOW', 102-109, and 'WHERE', 156-162.2011In: DESIGN ACT: Socially and politically engaged design today, Berlin: Iaspis / Sternberg Press , 2011, 8Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Eriksson, Daniel
    et al.
    IT+Textiles.
    Ernevi, Anders
    IT+Textiles.
    Jacobs, Margot
    IT+Textiles.
    Löfgren, Ulrika
    IT+Textiles.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Redström, Johan
    IT+Textiles.
    Thoresson, Johan
    IT+Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    IT+Textiles.
    Tic-Tac-Textiles: A waiting game2010In: IT+Textiles, (2010 reprint) Borås, Sweden: Centre for Textile Research. (2005 first edition) Helsinki: IT Press/Edita: . , 2010, 11, p. 66-75Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of the imminent arrival of ambient intelligence and smart textiles, the design of computational and textile things are rapidly converging. Substantial attention is directed towards the new technical possibilities of these new materials, but less effort seems to be put into the challenging task of re-thinking the use of textiles and computational technology as design materials on the basis of the complex mixture of traditions, perspectives, concepts and methods that result from such convergence. These challenges and opportunities inspired the IT+Textiles design research program. Trying to dissolve the distinction between technologies and design materials, we have combined textile and interaction design, textile and electrical engineering, philosophy and the behavioural sciences to find new approaches to issues of use and context, form and aesthetics, practice and theory. In this book, we describe the collection of materials, examples, methods and concepts we have developed in our investigation of this emerging design space.

  • 55.
    Eriksson, Magnus
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Elite Sports Training as Model for Future Internet Practices?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reflects on the experience of using ethnographic and experimental research at a high-performance athletic training center as model for drawing conclusion about the future everyday use of ICT and Internet technologies. The research project has consisted of field studies of training session and everyday life at an elite training center where athletes live and train as well as experimental design processes where new internet and media technologies has been explored within elite sports training. While in some aspects the research has been sports specific (such as using advanced video technology to analyze precise movements), in other aspects the training center has seemed like a more intense, extreme and streamlined version of our contemporary technological everyday. The training center has been a laboratory where issues of quantification of self, goal-orientation vs. creativity, and individual vs. community has been displayed in a more clear, isolated and focused way than observations of everyday life can glean. The conclusion is that studying the intense environments of elite athletes can be a fruitful approach to studying the sociology of Information technology. However, this is only the case as long as our societies are dominated by the same values as elite sports such as competitiveness, goal-orientation, specialization and efficiency through technology and discipline.

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    fulltext
  • 56.
    Ernevi, Anders
    et al.
    IT + Textiles.
    Jacobs, Margot
    IT + Textiles.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Müller, Carolin
    IT + Textiles.
    Redström, Johan
    IT + Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    IT + Textiles.
    The Energy Curtain: Energy Awareness2010In: IT+Textiles, (2010 reprint) Borås, Sweden: Centre for Textile Research. (2005 first edition) Helsinki: IT Press/Edita , 2010, 11, p. 91-96Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a chapter in a book with the overall description: In light of the imminent arrival of ambient intelligence and smart textiles, the design of computational and textile things are rapidly converging. Substantial attention is directed towards the new technical possibilities of these new materials, but less effort seems to be put into the challenging task of re-thinking the use of textiles and computational technology as design materials on the basis of the complex mixture of traditions, perspectives, concepts and methods that result from such convergence. These challenges and opportunities inspired the IT+Textiles design research program. Trying to dissolve the distinction between technologies and design materials, we have combined textile and interaction design, textile and electrical engineering, philosophy and the behavioural sciences to find new approaches to issues of use and context, form and aesthetics, practice and theory. In this book, we describe the collection of materials, examples, methods and concepts we have developed in our investigation of this emerging design space.

  • 57.
    Ernevi, Anders
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Palm, Samuel
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Erratic Appliances and Energy Awareness2005In: Proceedings of the First Nordic Design Research Conference ~ In the Making ~, 2005, 1, , p. 7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We are exploring how to increase energy awareness through critical interaction design by creating objects that in various ways expose issues related to energy consumption. To raise energy from not only being a technical solution in everyday life, we try to find new ways of relating to energy in design and to uncover the properties of energy as design material. To learn more about how energy can be made more present in product design, we have been redesigning a series of everyday objects around the theme of 'Erratic Appliances'. As household energy consumption increases, the appliances start to behave strangely. These appliances are also meant to embody relations between one's actions and often rather negative global effects of energy consumption.

  • 58.
    Ernevi, Anders
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Palm, Samuel
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Erratic Appliances and Energy Awareness2007In: Knowledge, Technology & Policy, ISSN 1946-4789, E-ISSN 1874-6314, Vol. 20, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We are exploring how to increase energy awareness through critical interaction design, creating objects that expose issues related to energy consumption in various ways. To draw attention to energy beyond ordinary conceptions as a technical solution in everyday life, we inquire into other ways of relating to energy in design and to uncover the properties of energy as a design material. To learn more about how energy can be made more present in product design, we have been redesigning a series of everyday objects around the theme of ‘erratic appliances’. As household energy consumption increases, these appliances start to behave strangely. The aim was to use designerly and experience-based means to make people aware of their energy consumption instead of measuring energy consumption solely with meters and numeric displays.

  • 59.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    BodyResT - A prototype using music responding to heart rate for stress reduction2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The growing problem of stress in our society has provided greater motivation to seek stress solutions. This health threat demands a fresh thinking and exploration of new ways to find solutions. Music has in several studies been suggested to have a stress reducing effect. This report describes the development of a prototype that uses music to step by step help an individual to reduce stress. This is done by a combination of relaxing music and the biofeedback principle. The prototype estimates the individuals stress level by monitoring heart rate. On the basis of senor readings music is composed in real time to match the stress level. In that way a feedback loop is created where the individuals current stress level is reflected in the music. The music does not change from one song to the other; rather different parameters in the music are continuously changed such as tempo and instrumentation. The report also includes a literature study examining heart rate as a valid stress indicator. This literature study is also complemented with an experimental study. In this study 14 participants, 7 males and 7 females, age between 21 and 54, were exposed to three different mental stressors separated with three minutes of relaxation. A version of Stroop color word test, a mental arithmetic task and a talk preparation. Heart rate was measured and the subjective estimation of stress level was given by the subjects before the first stressor, after each stressor and after each period of relaxation. A significant increase of heart rate (~10 bpm in mean) was detected in the end of each stressor compared to the periods of relaxation. The important conclusion with the studies is that heart rate is a valid mental stress indicator, but the reliability is low since heart rate is influenced by many other factors than mental stress. In future development of BodyResT heart rate must be complemented with one or several other physiological parameters such as heart rate variability and skin conductance.

  • 60.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Designing Auditory Warning Signals to Improve the Safety of Commercial Vehicles2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on four studies, this thesis aims to explore how to design auditory warning signals that can facilitate safer driving by operators of heavy goods vehicles. The first three studies focus on the relationships between certain characteristics of auditory warnings and various indicators of traffic safety. A deeper understanding of these relationships would allow system developers to design auditory signals that are better optimised for safety. The fourth study examines the opinions of both vehicle developers and professional drivers regarding warning attributes. One major conclusion is that meaningful warning sounds that are related to the critical event can improve safety. As compared with arbitrarily mapped sounds, meaningful sounds are easier to learn, can improve drivers’ situation awareness, and generate less interference and less annoyance. The present thesis also supports the view that commercial drivers’ initial acceptance of these sounds may be very high. Annoyance is an especially important aspect of warning design to consider; it can negatively influence driving performance and may lead drivers to turn off their warning systems. This research supports the notion that drivers do not consider that negative experience is an appropriate attribute of auditory warnings designed to increase their situation awareness. Also, commercial drivers seem to report, significantly more than vehicle developers, that having less-annoying auditory warnings is important in high-urgency driving situations. Furthermore, the studies presented in this thesis indicate that annoyance cannot be predicted based on the physical properties of the warning alone. Learned meaning, appropriateness of the mapping between a warning and a critical event, and individual differences between drivers may also significantly influence levels of annoyance. Arousal has been identified as an important component of driver reactions to auditory warnings. However, high levels of arousal can lead to a narrowing of attention, which would be suboptimal for critical situations during which drivers need to focus on several ongoing traffic events. The present work supports the notion that high-urgency warnings can influence commercial drivers’ responses to unexpected peripheral events (i.e., those that are unrelated to the warning) in terms of response force, but not necessarily in terms of response time. The types of auditory warnings that will be developed for future vehicles depend not only on advances in research, but also on the opinions of developers and drivers. The present research shows that both vehicle developers and drivers are aware of several of the potentially important characteristics of auditory warnings. For example, they both recognise that warnings should be easy to understand. However, they do disagree regarding certain attributes of warnings, and, furthermore, developers may tend to employ a “better safe than sorry” strategy (by neglecting factors concerning annoyance and the elicitation of severe startled responses) when designing high-urgency warnings. Developers’ recognition of the potentially important attributes of auditory warnings should positively influence the future development of in-vehicle systems. However, considering the current state of research regarding in-vehicle warnings, it remains challenging to predict the most suitable sounds for specific warning functions. One recommendation is to develop a design process that examines the appropriateness of in-vehicle auditory warnings. This thesis suggests an initial version of such a process, which in this case was produced in collaboration with system designers working in the automotive industry.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 61.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Distracting effects of auditory warnings on experienced drivers2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A range of In-Vehicle Information Systems are currently developed and implemented in trucks to warn drivers about road dangers and vehicle failures. Systems often make use of conventional repetitive auditory warnings to catch attention. In a critical driving situation it might be tempting to use signals that express very high levels of urgency. However, previous studies have shown that more urgent alerts can have a negative impact on the listeners’ affective state. A simulator experiment was conducted to examine how urgent warnings could impact the affective state of experienced truck drivers, and their response performance to an unpredictable situation. As predicted, the more urgent warning was rated more annoying and startling. The drivers who received an urgent warning braked significantly harder to the unpredictable event (a bus pulling out in front of the truck). The drivers also tended to brake later after the urgent warning, but no significant effect on response time or time to collision was found. A concluding recommendation for future research is to investigate distracting effects of urgent auditory warnings on less experienced drivers.

  • 62.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Expressive Musical Warning Signals2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Warning signals are often very simple and monotone sounds.This paper focuses on taking a more musical approach to the design of warnings and alarms than has been the case in the past. We present an experimental pilot study in which we explore the possibilities of using short musical pieces as warning signals in a vehicle cab. In the study, 18 experienced drivers experienced five different driving scenarios with different levels of urgency. Each scenario was presented together with an auditory icon, a traditional abstract warning sound, and a musical warning sound designed in collaboration with a composer. The test was carried out in an “audio-only” environment. Drivers were required to rate the perceived urgency, annoyance and appropriateness for every sound. They also had a chance to talk freely about the different warning signals. The results indicate interestingly that drivers may be able to understand the intended meaning of musical warning signals. It seems like the musical warning signals may prove useful primarily in situations of low and medium levels of urgency.

  • 63.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    "Informative auditory warning signals": a review of published material within the HCI and Auditory Display communities2007In: Proceedings of the 39th Nordic Ergonomics Society Conference, 2007, 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Warning signals are used in a variety of settings to convey critical information, user environments are no exception. A clear trend for auditory warning signals in is that they become more and more informative. Their intention is not only to alert, but also to inform users about the nature of a critical incident. In this paper we focus on current research within this branch of sound design. A literature study has been conducted with the intention to map the progress which has taken place within the area of auditory display research, identify issues related to this research, and to point out new potential ways to design warning signals for user environments. The main results of this literature study are presented and discussed.

  • 64.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Ljud som informationsbärare2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Making Auditory Warning Signals Informative: Examining the Acceptance of Auditory Icons as Warning Signals in Trucks2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Auditory icons have the potential to enhance a driver’s situation awareness, to reduce his or her visual load, and to improve his or her response time in an emergency situation. However, the level of acceptance of this type of auditory signal as a warning signal is not well understood. The present study was carried out to investigate truck drivers’ initial acceptances of auditory icons as warnings. The drivers selected warning signals for a number of dangerous driving situations. A method that was based on subjective ratings was also used to assess the drivers’ acceptances of the sounds and to gain a better understanding of the factors that influence the drivers’ selections. The results showed that the level of acceptance can be high, but it varied significantly among the auditory icons that were encountered in five driving situations. Perceived “usefulness” and “satisfaction” may be used to determine whether the drivers prefer an auditory icon in specific situations. However, the subjective ratings related to the satisfaction should be complemented with a deeper qualitative investigation in future investigations.

  • 66.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Urgent alarms in trucks: effects on annoyance and subsequent driving performance2011In: IET Intelligent Transport Systems, ISSN 1751-956X, E-ISSN 1751-9578, Vol. 5, p. 252-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown that urgent auditory warnings are likely to annoy drivers. Increased urgency could also raise drivers’ stress levels, which in turn could impact their ability to detect and react to subsequent changes in the traffic environment. We conducted a simulator experiment with 24 truck drivers to investigate the potential of urgent alarms to raise annoyance and negatively affect drivers’ subsequent responses to unrelated, critical events on the road. The drivers received two types of warnings that were designed to significantly differ in perceived urgency. Several times in the trial, an unexpected event occurred just seconds after drivers were presented with an unrelated warning, and the drivers had to brake immediately to avoid a collision. The results indicate that acoustic characteristics and semantic meaning may impact the perceived annoyance of in-vehicle warnings. Interestingly, we found a significant, negative correlation between the drivers’ experience (years of truck driving experience) and the rated annoyance for both types of warnings. Also, the drivers who received the high-urgency warning braked significantly harder and tended to brake later than the drivers who received a low-urgency warning. These results have implications for ITS systems for heavy vehicles that intend to implement auditory warning signals.

  • 67.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Alm, H.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Auditory signs to support traffic awareness2010In: IET Intelligent Transport Systems, Vol. 4, p. 262-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In-vehicle information systems (IVIS) may contribute to increased levels of cognitive workload, which in turn can lead to a more dangerous driving behaviour. An experiment was conducted to examine the use of auditory signs to support drivers' traffic situation awareness. Eighteen experienced truck drivers identified traffic situations based on information conveyed by brief sounds. Aspects of learning, cognitive demand and pleasantness were monitored and rated by the drivers. Differences in cognitive effort was estimated using a dual-task set-up, in which drivers responded to auditory signs while simultaneously performing a simulated driving task. As expected, arbitrary sounds required significantly longer learning times compared to sounds that have a natural meaning in the driving context. The arbitrary sounds also resulted in a significant degradation in response performance, even after the drivers got a chance to learn the sounds. Finally, the results indicate that the use of arbitrary sounds can negatively impact driver satisfaction. These results have implications for a broad range of developing intelligent transport systems designed to assist drivers in absence of fundamental visual information or in visually demanding traffic situations.

  • 68.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Sonic Studio.
    Alm, Håkan
    Sound Design for Information.
    Auditory signs to support traffic awareness2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Andersson, Anders
    VTI, Sweden.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Advanced Driving Simulator to Evaluate Sound Design Strategies for Intelligent Transport Systems2011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Additional sound capabilities in visually advanced simulators may offer researchers and practitioners better resources to evaluate in-vehicle auditory signals and advanced auditory displays. In the first part of the present report, the implementation of a new audio system in the Scania truck cabin for the VTI driving simulator 2 and 3 at the Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI) is described. The new system is designed to make it easier to use the advanced driving simulator to study the effects of in-vehicle auditory signals on drivers and traffic safety. The system includes both new software and hardware. The new audio software is based on the Open Audio Library (OpenAL) implementation for the Macintosh Operating System OS X. It communicates with the existing simulator software using the Open Sound Control (OSC) standard. The remaining program code is open, which offers the possibility of adapting the system for the future demands and specific needs of members within Virtual Prototyping and Assessment by Simulation (ViP). The new audio software contains a simple visual interface that can be used to set up, test and calibrate auditory cues inside the cabin at an early stage of a project. In terms of hardware, six new loudspeakers have been installed in the truck cabin. This speaker setup can be used to simulate sound sources in various spatial positions around the driver. Special consideration was taken regarding the placement of the loudspeakers inside the cabin in order not to make them disturbing to the drivers. Additionally, even though the system was especially designed for the simulation of ADASs, the functionality was implemented to prepare the system for presentation of other sound sources in the driver environment. Another aim for the present project was to investigate the potential of urgent alarms to raise annoyance and negatively affect drivers’ subsequent responses to unrelated, critical events on the road. While performing a simulated driving task, truck drivers received two types of warnings that were designed to significantly differ in perceived urgency. Several times in the trial, an unexpected event occurred just seconds after drivers were presented with an unrelated warning, and the drivers had to brake immediately to avoid a collision. The results indicate that acoustic characteristics and semantic meaning may impact the perceived annoyance of in-vehicle warnings. Furthermore, the participants who received the high-urgency warning braked significantly harder and tended to brake later than the drivers who received a low-urgency warning. The simulator study was also used to validate the reliability of the new audio system. In summary, the new audio system worked reliably during all 24 trials. However, more extended validations should be carried out in the future to investigate the exact accuracy of the system in representing signals in specific spatial directions.

  • 70.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Delsing, Katarina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Designing auditory displays for visually dominant user environments2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Lefford, Nyssim
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Music, Physicality and the Physiology of Listeners2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Sonic Studio.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Sonic Studio.
    Awesome sound design tool: a web based utility that invites end users into the audio design process2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous auditory display research has shown how fundamental aspects of an auditory signal may influence perception and impact the emotional state of the listener. However, a challenge for designers is how to find signals that correspond to user situations and make sense within a user context. In this article we present a web based application called AWESOME Sound Design Tool; a tool that invites users to take part in the design process of auditory signals. The basic idea is to give users control over some aspects of the auditory stimuli and encourage them to manipulate the sound with a specific user scenario in mind. The software may help developers working with applied design to find more appropriate sounds for user situations. It might also help researchers to better understand correlations between the properties of a sound and characteristics of a user situation. A pilot study has been conducted in which car drivers designed warning signals for critical traffic situations. The pilot study illustrated how the tool could be useful for applied audio design.

  • 73.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Sonic Studio.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Sonic Studio.
    Designing a web-based tool that inform the audio design process2009In: CMMR 2009 "Auditory Display" post-symposium proceedings, Springer Verlag , 2009, 14Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Sirkka, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Graded Auditory Warnings During In-Vehicle Use: Using Sound to Guide Drivers Without Additional Noise2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Auditory signals have proven useful to guide and inform drivers in dangerous situations. Sounds can become annoying, however, thereby negatively affecting consumer acceptance of an interface or system. Auditory warnings are typically salient sounds such as sudden beeps or repetitive tones. But adding sound to the environment is not necessarily the only way to aurally alert people to a change in the environment. The present study explored the usefulness of three alternative strategies to notify drivers in early stages of a threatening situation using sound: 1. panning the radio sound from the driver’s position (equal sound level in both ears) to one side; 2. reducing the sound level of the radio; and 3. a mild auditory warning signal (i.e., an added sound). The participants responded to the early warnings in a simple reaction task while performing a simulated driving task. After each condition, the drivers completed a questionnaire concerning their opinions of the early warnings. Interestingly, the results show that manipulating the sound of the radio can be a useful way to notify drivers. Panning the sound of the radio may be especially effective and tolerable. Potential benefits and issues with the investigated warning strategies are discussed.

  • 75.
    Forssén, Jens
    et al.
    Listen.
    Kaczmarek, Tomasz
    Listen.
    Alvarsson, Jesper
    Listen.
    Lundén, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Sonic Studio.
    Nilsson, Mats E.
    Listen.
    Auralization of traffic noise within the LISTEN project – preliminary results for passenger car pass-by2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Auralization of future traffic noise scenarios would be a valuable tool for city planners, noise consultants and decision makers, since it would make it possible to evaluate various noise mitigation solutions already at the planning stage. The main goal of the Swedish multi- disciplinary research project LISTEN is to develop such a tool. In the present paper, auralizations of a single pass-by of a passenger car are investigated with respect to different simulation approaches, and the methodologies behind the approaches are described. Three listening experiments were conducted in order to perceptually evaluate the auralizations. The results showed a high degree of perceptual agreement between real and auralized sounds. However, slight differences between real and auralized sounds were found for perceived realism, annoyance and speed of vehicles, which calls for further improvements of the auralizations.

  • 76. Frimalm, Ronja
    et al.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Sirkka, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    How Many Auditory Icons, in a Control Room Environment, Can You Learn?2014In: Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD2014)Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown that auditory icons can be effective warnings. The aim of this study was to determine the number of auditory icons that can be learned, in a control room context. The participants in the study consisted of 14 control room operators and 15 people who were not control room operators. The participants were divided into three groups. Prior to the testing the three groups practiced on 10, 20 and 30 different sounds. Each group was tested using the sounds that they had practiced. The results support the potential for learning and recalling a large number of auditory icons, as many as 30. The results also show that sounds with similar characteristics are easily confused.

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  • 77.
    Gaye, Lalya
    et al.
    Public Play Spaces.
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Göteborg.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Göteborg.
    Sonic City: merging urban walkabouts with electronic music making2002In: Proceedings of UIST, 2002, 7, , p. 2Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe a first implementation of the technology used in Sonic City, an on-going project aiming to transform the experience of a user walking through an urban environment into a dynamic and real time music creation process.

  • 78. Gaye, Lalya
    et al.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Göteborg.
    Sonic City2003In: Proceedings of Cybersonica, 2003, 7, , p. 6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sonic City is a wearable system for creating electronic music based on sensing bodily and environmental parameters. Context and user action are mapped to sound processing parameters and turn live concrete sounds into music. Thus, a personal soundscape is co-produced by a user’s body, local activity and urban ambiance simply by walking through the city. Encounters, events, architecture, weather, (mis)behaviours – all become means of interacting with, appropriating, or ‘playing the city’.

  • 79.
    Gaye, Lalya
    et al.
    Public Play Spaces.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute, Interactive Institute Stockholm. Design Göteborg.
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute, Interactive Institute Stockholm. Design Göteborg.
    Sonic City: the urban environment as a musical interface2003In: Proceedings of NIME 03, 2003, 7, , p. 7p. 109-115Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the project Sonic City, we have developed a system that enables users to create electronic music in real time by walking through and interacting with the urban environment. We explore the use of public space and everyday behaviours for creative purposes, in particular the city as an interface and mobility as an interaction model for electronic music making. A multi-disciplinary design process resulted in the implementation of a wearable, context-aware prototype. The system produces music by retrieving information about context and user action and mapping it to real-time processing of urban sounds. Potentials, constraints, and implications of this type of music creation are discussed.

  • 80.
    Gustafsson, Anton
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Energy Design.
    Bång, Magnus
    Young Energy II.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Energy Design.
    Evaluation of a Pervasive Game for Domestic Energy Engagement Among Teenagers2009In: Computers in Entertainment, ISSN 1544-3574, E-ISSN 1544-3981, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we present Power Agent—a pervasive game designed to encourage teenagers and their families to reduce energy consumption in the home. The ideas behind this mobile phonebased game are twofold; to transform the home environment and its devices into a learning arena for hands-on experience with electricity usage and to promote engagement via a team competition scheme. We report on the game’s evaluation with six teenagers and their families who played the game for ten days in two cities in Sweden. Data collection consisted of home energy measurements before, during, and after a game trial, in addition to interviews with participants at the end of the evaluation. The results suggest that the game concept was highly efficient in motivating and engaging the players and their families to change their daily energy-consumption patterns during the game trial. Although the evaluation does not permit any conclusions as to whether the game had any postgame effects on behavior, we can conclude that the pervasive persuasive game approach appears to be highly promising in regard to energy conservation and similar fields or issues.

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  • 81.
    Gustafsson, Anton
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Energy Design.
    Bång, Magnus
    Power Explorer.
    Svahn, Mattias
    Power Explorer.
    Power Explorer – a casual game style for encouraging long term behavior change among teenagers2009In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Advances in Computer Enterntainment Technology, ACM New York, NY, USA , 2009, 10, p. 182-189Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When it comes to motivating teenagers towards energy awareness, new approaches need to be considered. One such is the use of pervasive games connected to the players own energy consumption. Earlier work has confirmed this to be a highly effective approach. The question however remains if post game effects on behavior can be achieved. In this paper we try to answer this by trying out a slightly different design compared to previous work. The hypothesis is that a more casual game play and a richer learning interaction enabled by building the game on a real time sensor system could stimulate more lasting effects. Electric consumption data after the 7 days evaluation on a test group of 15 players shows tentative indications for a persistent post game effect compared to the control group of 20 households. Findings also show a statistically significant positive change in the players’ attitude towards saving energy compared to the same group. Findings, at the same time, also indicate a negative effect on the player’s attitude toward environmental questions in general.

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  • 82.
    Gustafsson, Anton
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Energy Design.
    Gyllenswärd, Magnus
    STATIC!.
    The Power-Aware Cord: Energy Awareness through Ambient Information Display2005In: CHI '05 extended abstracts on human factors in computing systems, p. 1423-1426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to support increased consumer awareness regarding energy consumption, we have been developing new ways of representing and interacting with energy in electric products intended for domestic environments. The ‘Power-Aware Cord’ is a re-design of a common electrical power strip that displays the amount of energy passing through it at any given moment. This is done by dynamic glowing patterns produced by electroluminescent wires molded into the transparent electrical cord. Using this fully functional prototype, we have been investigating how such ambient displays can be used to increase energy awareness. An initial user study indicates that the Power-Aware Cord is a very accessible and intuitive mean for better understanding energy consumption. Future work includes further development of the mapping between load and visual pattern and in-depth studies of user perception and learning over time.

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  • 83.
    Gyllenswärd, Magnus
    et al.
    STATIC!.
    Gustafsson, Anton
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Energy Design.
    Bång, Magnus
    STATIC!.
    Visualizing Energy Consumption of Radiators2006In: Persuasive Technology, First International Conference on Persuasive Technology for Human Well-Being, PERSUASIVE 2006, Eindhoven, The Netherlands, May 18-19, 2006, Proceedings., Springer , 2006, 11, p. 167-170Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heating is a significant expenditure of many households today but the actual power consumption of the heating devices are seldom recognized. To help people understand and reflect upon their domestic energy consumption, we have designed an electrical radiator that emits heat entirely from light bulbs. This appliance responds to temperature changes in the room via sensors. The idea was to combine the product semantics of lamps and radiators and direct focus on the latter neglected product category. We argue that by re-designing domestic appliances adding means to visualize energy consumption in engaging and interesting ways it is possible to make energy utilization less abstract and easier to comprehend.

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  • 84. Hallnäs, Lars
    et al.
    Jaksetic, Patricija
    Ljungstrand, Peter
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Skog, Tobias
    Expressions: Towards a Design Practice of Slow Technology2001In: Proceedings of Interact 2001, IFIP , 2001, 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As computer use increasingly influence everyday life, we need to complement our knowledge of the computer as a technology for creating fast and efficient tools, with other perspectives on information technology. We describe Slow Technology, technology aimed at promoting moments of reflection and mental rest. Taking the design programme of Slow Technology as our starting point, we have explored expressions of the acts of reading and writing information using computers in everyday life. A number of design examples including the Fan House, the Chest of Drawers, the Lamp Foot and the Fabric Door, have been created. The purpose with these examples has not been to create new information displays, interaction devices, artworks or products, but to create a basic collection of examples that can support systematic investigation of the aesthetics of computational technology as material for the design of everyday things. Experiences from the design and exhibition of these examples are presented as design leitmotifs for future work with Slow Technology.

  • 85.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Melin, Linda
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    A Design Research Program for Textiles and Computational Technology2002In: Nordic Textile Journal, ISSN 1404-2487, Vol. 2002, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Textiles and computational technology share a common background in the early days of automation and industrial production. Today, we see a new opportunity for these two, by now, rather disparate areas to be joined in the search for new design spaces for everyday things. It is the ambition of this paper to outline this new design space and to sketch a design and research program for investigating it. We propose a research program motivated by the need for an aeshetics of, and design methods for, the use of new textiles and computational technology in design for everyday life. The three themes of the program all call for an integration of textile and computational materials, but from different perspectives. They aim at deepening our understanding of i) computational technology as design material, ii) textile as design material and of iii) the more general question of the interplay between spatial and temporal form elements in design.

  • 86.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Melin, Linda
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Textile Displays; Using Textiles to Investigate Computational Technology as Design Material2002In: Proceedings of the second Nordic conference on Human-computer interaction, New York: ACM Press , 2002, 1, , p. 10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As we face an increasingly heterogeneous collection of computational devices, there is a need to develop a general approach to what it is that we design as we create computational things. One such basic approach is to consider computational technology to be a design material. In the present paper, we describe how a traditional material --- textiles --- can be used to investigate aspects of the expressiveness and aesthetics of computational technology as design material. As an example of this approach, we use an experimental design project made for an art museum. We describe a series of conceptual sketches of how textile artefacts can be used to re-interpret elementary acts of information technology use and the experiences from working with the final installation of one of them. Finally, we discuss properties of textiles and computational technology, such as expressions related to vagueness, unpredictability and slowness.

  • 87.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Abstract information appliances: methodological exercises in conceptual design of computational things2002In: Proceedings of the 4th conference on Designing interactive systems: processes, practices, methods, and techniques, New York: ACM Press , 2002, 1, , p. 12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The decisions we make when designing computational things cannot all be reduced to questions about functionality, usability testing, user requirements, etc. In HCI-related research and design, other fundamental aspects of design, such as the basic aesthetical choices involved, have a tendency to be hidden and seemingly forgotten. To support awareness and understanding of such basic aesthetical choices, we propose two methodological exercises that take the expressions of computational things in use as their starting points: i) to discover functionality in given expressions; and ii) to rediscover "expressionals" in given appliances. The aim with i) is to encourage reflection on the way in which functionality explains the expressions of things. With ii), the aim is to expose the more or less hidden aesthetical choices by means of re-interpreting them in given appliances. We present examples of the exercises and discuss more general issues, such as the central role of temporal gestalts and the art of using computational things.

  • 88.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    From Use to Presence; On the Expressions and Aesthetics of Everyday Computational Things2002In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The coming ubiquity of computational things urges us to consider what it means for something to be present in someone's life, in contrast to being just used for something. "Use" and "presence" represent two perspectives on what a thing is. While "use" refers to a general description of a thing in terms of what it is used for, "presence" refers to existential definitions of a thing based on how we invite and accept it as a part of our lifeworld. Searching for a basis on which these existential definitions are formed, we argue that the expressions of things are central for accepting them as present in our lives. We introduce the notion of an expressional, referring to a thing designed to be the bearer of certain expressions, just as an appliance is designed to be the bearer of a certain functionality. Aesthetics, as a logic of expressions, can provide a proper foundation for design for presence. We discuss the expressiveness of computational things as depending both on time structures and space structures. An aesthetical leitmotif for the design of computational things---a leitmotif that may be used to guide a normative design philosophy, or a design style---is described. Finally, we describe a practical example of what designing a mobile phone as an "expressional" might be like.

  • 89.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Interaction Design: Foundations, Experiments2006 (ed. 2)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction Design: Foundations, Experiments is the result of a series of projects, experiments and curricula aimed at investigating the foundations of interaction design in particular and design research in general. The first part of the book - Foundations - deals with foundational theoretical issues in interaction design. An analysis of two categorical mistakes -the empirical and interactive fallacies- forms a background to a discussion of interaction design as act design and of computational technology as material in design. The second part of the book - Experiments - describes a range of design methods, programs and examples that have been used to probe foundational issues through systematic questioning of what is given. Based on experimental design work such as Slow Technology, Abstract Information Displays, Design for Sound Hiders, Zero Expression Fashion, and IT+Textiles, this section also explores how design experiments can play a central role when developing new design theory.

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  • 90.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Slow Technology: Designing for Reflection2001In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 5, p. 201-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: As computers are increasingly woven into the fabric of everyday life, interaction design may have to change - from creating only fast and efficient tools to be used during a limited time in specific situations, to creating technology that surrounds us and therefore is a part of our activities for long periods of time. We present slow technology: a design agenda for technology aimed at reflection and moments of mental rest rather than efficiency in performance. The aim of this paper is to develop a design philosophy for slow technology, to discuss general design principles and to revisit some basic issues in interaction design from a more philosophical point of view. We discuss examples of soniture and informative art as instances of slow technology and as examples on how the design principles can be applied in practice.

  • 91. Halse, Joachim
    et al.
    Brandt, Eva
    Clark, Brendon
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute, Interactive Institute Stockholm. Design Research Unit.
    Binder, Thomas
    Rehearsing the Future2010 (ed. 8)Book (Refereed)
  • 92. Halse, Joachim
    et al.
    Clark, Brendon
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Design Rituals and Performative Ethnography2008In: Ethnographic Praxis Industry Conference Proceedings (EPIC 2008):, Copenhagen University,Copenhagen, Denmark. , 2008, 10, p. 128-146Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a course for ethnography in design that problematizes the implied authenticity of “people out there,” and rather favors a performative worldview where people, things and business opportunities are continuously and reciprocally in the making, and where anthropological analysis is only one competence among others relevant for understanding how this making unfolds. In contrast to perpetuating the “real people” discourse that often masks the analytic work of the anthropologist relegating the role of the ethnographer to that of data collector (Nafus and Anderson 2006), this paper advocates a performative ethnography that relocates the inescapable creative aspects of analysis from the anthropologist's solitary working office into a collaborative project space. The authors have explored the use of video clips, descriptions and quotes detached from their “real” context, not to claim how it really is out there, but to subject them to a range of diverse competencies, each with different interests in making sense of them. Hereby the realness of the ethnographic fragments lie as much in their ability to prompt meaningful re-interpretations here-and-now as in how precisely they correspond to the imagined real world out there-and-then. We propose that it is precisely the investment of one self and one's own desires and agendas that lifts an ethnographic field inquiry out of its everydayness and into something of value to further-reaching processes of change and development of attractive alternatives.

  • 93.
    Hellström, Björn
    et al.
    SoundSpace.
    Nilsson, Mats
    SoundSpace.
    Becker, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Sonic Studio.
    Lundén, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Sonic Studio.
    Acoustic Design Artifacts and Methods for Urban Soundscapes2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research question is: “How to develop and apply acoustic artifacts and design methodologies for improving soundscapes in urban outdoor spaces?” In the project, this research question is limited to two specific types of urban outdoor spaces – city-park and city-square – and to two types of acoustic design artifacts. These are: I. Dynamic promotion of qualitative site specific sounds (e.g., the overall site specific sonic atmosphere, sounds from human activities, birds and fountains), which creates an improved soundscape. II. Sound-art installations, that creates delimited auditory sub-spaces within the park/square. The purpose and method is: 1. To provide two case-studies of artistic soundscape improvement, one in a noise polluted city-park and one in a city-square. The case-studies will serve as models for future applications of the new acoustic design artifacts. 2. To create and validate an innovative acoustic design methodology based on state-of-the-art real-time acoustic simulation tools integrated into the design process. The methodology will be validated in psychoacoustic listening experiments and field studies. 3. To determine the potential of the two acoustic design artifacts (I Dynamic promotion of qualitative site specific sounds, and II Sound-art installations) for providing pleasant and restorative soundscapes, in order to strengthening the social interaction as well as the spatial and aesthetical qualities in noise polluted city parks/squares. The present project beats a new track by combining acoustic design with sound art research, integrating methodologies based on real-time acoustic simulation and application of psychoacoustic methodology for validating simulations and for evaluating perceptual, emotional and behavioural effects on visitors to public open spaces. The ongoing research project, financed by the Swedish Research Council, is executed by the University College of Arts, Crafts and Design (Konstfack), Gösta Ekman Laboratory – Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet and the Interactive Institute, all in Stockholm, Sweden.

  • 94.
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Göteborg.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Göteborg.
    Ljungblad, Sara
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Göteborg.
    Designing tomorrow's smart products - experience with the Smart-Its platform2003In: Proceedings of DUX, 2003, 7, , p. 4Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designers will increasingly be facing the challenge of creating context-aware or ì smartî productsóeveryda y objects that have embedded computation, sensing, and communication capabilities. Smart-Its is a prototyping platform for creating such objects, that is being developed in a European Union research project. A Smart-It is a very small computer equipped with wireless communication and a set of sensors. We describe how we approached the design of future user experiences and interactions based on the Smart-Its platform. Using scenario-based methods to support collaboration within a multi-disciplinary working group, we developed innovative demonstrators of how ì smartî objects support dynamic usage situations and new interactions in a restaurant setting. A group of designers were invited to provide feedback on design aspects of prototyping with Smart-Its. We found that our prototypes and design materials stimulated creative speculation about future interactive products.

  • 95.
    Hummels, C. C. M.
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Hephaestus and the senses2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 96. Hummels, Caroline
    et al.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Koskinen, Ilpo
    Design Research for Social Scientists: Reading Instructions for This Issue2007In: Knowledge, Technology & Policy, ISSN 1946-4789, E-ISSN 1874-6314, Vol. 20, p. 11-17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 97.
    Jacobs, M.
    et al.
    IT + Textiles.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Göteborg.
    Design-by-doing: workshops for designing interaction2004In: Proceedings of the eighth conference on Participatory design, 2004, 4, , p. 4Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have been developing methods that will support us, as designers, in approaching the complex and indeterminate factors that come into play in the design of new computational things for everyday life. In our investigation, we have involved students from diverse design educations in workshops inspired by participatory methods. Through hands-on and situated activity formats, these workshops have provided examples and perspectives on working with computation as a design material in combination with experiential notions of materials, use and context.

  • 98.
    Jacobs, Margot
    et al.
    STATIC!.
    Löfgren, Ulrika
    STATIC!.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Göteborg.
    Free energy: alternative designs for awareness and choice2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy is an invisible and increasingly valuable resource. However in the design of everyday environments and things, electricity and energy use is not often made explicit – wiring, electrical meters, outlets and batteries are hidden away in boxes, inside walls and in distant basements. We have been investigating design as both a means of enquiry into perceptions of energy and as a vehicle for making energy more explicit in everyday environments. In the Interactive Institute’s ‘Static!’ project, we investigate ‘energy as design material’. Taking energy as a design problem from the point of view of human and personal experience, our approach is to examine design as a means for increasing the visibility – and thus choices available – with regards to personal energy use.

  • 99.
    Jönsson, Li
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Energy Design.
    Broms, Loove
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Energy Design.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Energy Design.
    Watt-Lite; Energy Statistics Made Tangible2010In: DIS 2010, ACM , 2010, 9, p. 240-243Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing our knowledge of how design affects behaviour in the workplace has a large potential for reducing electricity consumption. This would be beneficial for the environment as well as for industry and society at large. In Western society energy use is hidden and for the great mass of consumers its consequences are poorly understood. In order to better understand how we can use design to increase awareness of electricity consumption in everyday life, we will discuss the design of Watt-Lite, a set of three oversized torches projecting real time energy statistics of a factory in the physical environments of its employees. The design of Watt-Lite is meant to explore ways of representing, understanding and interacting with electricity in industrial workspaces. We discuss three design inquiries and their implications for the design of Watt-Lite: the use of tangible statistics; exploratory interaction and transferred connotations.

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  • 100.
    Kajastila, Raine
    et al.
    Uni-verse.
    Siltanen, Samuel
    Uni-verse.
    Lundén, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Lokki, Tapio
    Uni-verse.
    Savioja, Lauri
    Uni-verse.
    A distributed real-time virtual acoustic rendering system for dynamic geometries2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel room acoustic simulation system capable of producing interactive sound environments in dynamic and complex 3D geometries is introduced. The system is distributed to several modules that share the same 3D geometry. All changes made by one module are updated in all the other modules in real time. The auralization tools of the system include a geometry reduction tool, a beam tracing algorithm, and a sound rendering application. The geometry reduction simplifies 3D models for beam tracing module that forwards direct sound and early reflection paths for sound rendering. The sound rendering application contains a automatic estimation of late reverberation parameters, based on early reflections.

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