Change search
Refine search result
12 51 - 58 of 58
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Williams, Helen
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Lindström, Annika
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Trischler, Jakob
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Wikström, Fredrik
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Rowe, Zane
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Avoiding food becoming waste in households: The role of packaging in consumers’ practices across different food categories2020In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 265, article id 121775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food wastage in households remains a sustainability challenge that poses both environmental and social problems. Among the many factors contributing to this problem, the packaging, including its design and functions, can either leverage or reduce food waste. Yet packaging is often considered an environmental villain, which can lead to missed opportunities for reducing food waste. Against this background, this study explored and quantified the packaging–food waste relationship in households. To explore this relationship, a multi-step method was applied to grasp the role of packaging in consumers’ everyday practices and routines. The method incorporated a questionnaire, food waste diary and in-depth interview to measure food waste across different food categories and explore the underlying reasons for food wastage. According to an analysis of 37 households, packaging played a significant role especially in bread, dairy, meat and staple food wastage. For countering this problem, the most important factors related to packaging are its size and display of detailed information about product safety and storage. This study's theoretical contribution lies in offering a service lens and an ‘outside-in’ approach for exploring the consumer's value creation process and providing a context for better understanding why food wastage occurs in households. For policymakers and packaging designers, this study provides new insights into the relationship between consumer food practices and packaging, thus informing future food waste reduction initiatives.

  • 52.
    Ylmen, Peter
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Building Technology.
    Berlin, Johanna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Mjörnell, Kristina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Arfvidsson, Jesper
    Lund University, Sweden.
    The importance of including secondary effects when defining the system boundary with life cycle perspective: Case study for design of an external wall2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 143, p. 1105-1113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Life cycle assessment and life cycle cost analysis are suitable tools in trying to minimize environmental impact and cost. To get reliable results it is crucial to set up correct system boundaries for the investigation, but it is often difficult to understand a complex products system because of the cascade effects of consequences that can be induced even by small changes. In this paper the effects and consequences evaluation (ECE) method is introduced to systematically identify and organize the effects and consequences for a design change of parts of a complex system. The method is applied in a case study of external wall insulation for a new building to investigate the importance of correct system boundaries. Using the methodical approach in identifying all significant consequences showed that unexpected unit processes can be important when deciding on the relevant system boundary. We also conclude that such processes can have a significant impact on the final results by calculating the change in global warming potential and life cycle cost for the processes affected by the design option.

  • 53.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Environmental aspects when manufacturing products mainly out of metals and/or polymers2005In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 43-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most fundamental aspect in the ISO 14001 standard Environmental management systems—Specification with guidance for use is to find out ways by which an organisation influences environment to a significant degree. This paper examines environmental data from companies manufacturing products mainly from metals and/or polymers. The data were collected in a uniform way by use of special guidelines. Weighting or valuation methods often used in life cycle assessments were used to quantitatively compare and rank environmental aspects. The study results suggest that, in general, the largest environmental impact in the investigated manufacturing sub-sector can be associated with product use and/or disposal phases. This in turn shows a need for more attention on environmental work on the design for environment than what the ISO 14001 standard requires. It is further suggested that weighting or valuation methods can aid in determining the significance of environmental impacts and aspects in the context of ISO 14001.

  • 54.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Avellán, Lars
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Orlenius, Jessica
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Life cycle assessment of lithium-ion batteries for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles-Critical issues2010In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 18, no 15, p. 1517-1527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of the study was to explore how LCA can be used to optimize the design of lithium-ion batteries for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Two lithium-ion batteries, both based on lithium iron phosphate, but using different solvents during cell manufacturing, were studied by means of life cycle assessment, LCA. The general conclusions are limited to results showing robustness against variation in critical data. The study showed that it is environmentally preferable to use water as a solvent instead of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, NMP, in the slurry for casting the cathode and anode of lithium-ion batteries. Recent years' improvements in battery technology, especially related to cycle life, have decreased production phase environmental impacts almost to the level of use phase impacts. In the use phase, environmental impacts related to internal battery efficiency are two to six times larger than the impact from losses due to battery weight in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, assuming 90% internal battery efficiency. Thus, internal battery efficiency is a very important parameter; at least as important as battery weight. Areas, in which data is missing or inadequate and the environmental impact is or may be significant, include: production of binders, production of lithium salts, cell manufacturing and assembly, the relationship between weight of vehicle and vehicle energy consumption, information about internal battery efficiency and recycling of lithium-ion batteries based on lithium iron phosphate. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 55.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Fransson, Kristin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Hildenbrand, Jutta
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Lampic, Gorazd
    Elaphe Ltd, Slovenia.
    O’Dwyer, Colm
    University College Cork, Ireland.
    Life cycle assessment of lithium-air battery cells2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 135, p. 299-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lithium-air batteries are investigated for propulsion aggregates in vehicles as they theoretically offer at least 10 times better energy density than the best battery technology (lithium-ion) of today. A possible input to guide development is expected from Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of the manufacture, use and recycling of the lithium-air battery. For this purpose, lithium-air cells are analyzed from cradle to grave, i.e., from raw material production, cathode manufacturing, electrolyte preparation, cell assembly, use in a typical vehicle to end-of-life treatment and recycling. The aim of this investigation is highlighting environmental hotspots of lithium-air batteries to facilitate their improvement, in addition to scrutinizing anticipated environmental benefits compared to other battery technologies. Life cycle impacts are quantified in terms of climate impact, abiotic resource depletion and toxicity. Data is partly based on assumptions and estimates guided from similar materials and processes common to lithium-ion technologies. Laboratory scale results for lithium-air systems are considered, which include expectations in their future development for efficiency gains. At the present level of lithium-air cell performance, production-related impacts dominate all environmental impact categories. However, as the performance of the lithium-air cell develops (and less cells are needed), battery-related losses during operation become the major source of environmental impacts. The battery internal electricity losses become heat that may need considerable amounts of additional energy for its transportation out of the battery. It is recommended that future battery cell development projects already at the design stage consider suitable methods and processes for efficient and environmentally benign cell-level recycling. LCA could provide additional arguments and a quantitative basis for lithium battery recycling. This emphasizes the need to develop LCA toxicity impact methods in order to properly assess lithium.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 56.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Rocha, C.
    INETI.
    Christiansen, K.
    2.-0 LCA Consultants.
    Jarnehammar, A.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute Ltd.
    Stepwise environmental product declarations: ten SME case studies2008In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 16, no 17, p. 1872-1886Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lack of reliable communication tools is anticipated to become an important barrier to design and sell products with improved environmental performance. In this paper, environmental product declarations, EPDs, and in particular a Stepwise EPD approach is investigated as a means to overcome the communication barrier. The experiences of ten European SMEs who have tried to use Stepwise EPDs for market communication and as a basis for eco-design are described and discussed. The experiences suggest that Stepwise EPDs based on life cycle assessment can be a cost-efficient tool to improve the environmental performance of products. For normal marketing activities the Stepwise EPDs were disappointing. Using the underlying LCA as a platform for in-depth communication with selected parties in the supply chain showed more promise. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 57.
    Zamani, Bahareh
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Sandin, Gustav
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Peters, Greg
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; UNSW University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Life cycle assessment of clothing libraries: can collaborative consumption reduce the environmental impact of fast fashion?2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 162, p. 1368-1375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fast fashion is a clothing supply chain model that is intended to respond quickly to the latest fashion trends by frequently updating the clothing products available in stores. The shift towards fast fashion leads to shorter practical service lives for garments. Collaborative consumption is an alternative way of doing business to the conventional model of ownership-based consumption, and one that can potentially reduce the environmental impacts of fashion by prolonging the practical service life of clothes. In this study, we used life cycle assessment to explore the environmental performance of clothing libraries, as one of the possible ways in which collaborative consumption can be implemented, and compared the advantages and disadvantages in relation to conventional business models. Furthermore, the key factors influencing the environmental impact of clothing libraries were investigated. We based our assessment on three key popular garments that are stocked in clothing libraries: jeans, T-shirts and dresses. The results showed the benefits of implementing clothing libraries associated with the garments’ prolonged service lives. Therefore to achieve environmental gains, it is important to substantially increase garment service life. Moreover, the results quantitatively demonstrated the potential risk of problem shifting: increased customer transportation can completely offset the benefits gained from reduced production. This highlighted the need to account for the logistics when implementing collaborative consumption business models.

  • 58.
    Ziegler, Friederike
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Hansson, P.-A.
    Emissions from fuel combustion in Swedish cod fishery2003In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 303-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents emission data (CO2, NOx, CO, HC and SOx) for fishing vessels, calculated per kg of cod landed by Swedish fishermen. Three scenarios are included; one reflecting the fishery and fleet of 1999, one assuming modern engine technology and, finally, a future scenario assuming a slight increase in the use of passive gear (seines and long-lines) and pair trawls instead of single trawls, lower fishing effort and lower emission levels. The effects on the results of different allocation strategies for landed by-catches are evaluated. Data was gathered from official fishery statistics and engine emission data from one of the major manufacturers of marine diesels. Fuel consumption data for otter trawling and gillnet fishing was obtained by having fishermen fill out a questionnaire. The results include emission calculations for gillnet fishing and trawling, and indicate lower emissions per kg of cod caught for gillnet fishing, due to lower fuel consumption. Considerable options for decreasing fuel consumption and emissions produced in cod fisheries through changes in technology and fisheries policy were concluded from this work. Choosing allocation method was shown to be important for the final results, especially in mixed, high-value target fisheries. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

12 51 - 58 of 58
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.10