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  • 251.
    Hermans, Frederik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    McNamara, Liam
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Gabor, Soros
    ETH Zurich, Switzerland.
    Rohner, Christian
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Voigt, Thiemo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ngai, Edith
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    FOCUS: Robust Visual Codes for Everyone2016In: Proceedings of the 14th Annual International Conference on Mobile Systems, Applications, and Services (MobiSys 2016), 2016, 28, p. 319-332Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual codes are used to embed digital data in physical objects, or they are shown in video sequences to transfer data over screen/camera links. Existing codes either carry limited data to make them robust against a range of channel conditions (e.g., low camera quality or long distances), or they support a high data capacity but only work over a narrow range of channel conditions. We present Focus, a new code design that does not require this explicit trade-off between code capacity and the reader’s channel quality. Instead,Focus builds on concepts from OFDM to encode data at different levels of spatial detail. This enables each reader to decode as much data from a code as its channel quality allows. We build a prototype of Focus devices and evaluate it experimentally. Our results show that Focus gracefully adapts to the reader’s channel, and that it provides a significant performance improvement over recently proposed designs, including Strata and PixNet.

  • 252.
    Hermans, Frederik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    McNamara, Liam
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Voigt, Thiemo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Demo: Scalable Visual Codes for Embedding Digital Data in the Physical World2015In: Proceedings of the 13th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems (SenSys '15), 2015, 9, p. 457-458Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual codes, such as QR codes, offer a low-cost alternative to RF technology when digital data needs to be embedded in objects in the physical world. However, in order to sup- port receivers with a poor visual channel, e.g. low-resolution cameras, most visual codes are designed for low data capacity and short reading distances. We present our work-in-progress on Focus, a visual code that avoids earlier work’s explicit trade-off between code capacity and channel quality. Rather than encoding the pay- load directly into individual pixels, Focus encodes the pay- load over a range of spatial frequencies. As a result, even a receiver with a very poor channel (e.g., with low-resolution camera or motion blur) can still partly decode a Focus code, because the code’s low-frequency components are robust to common channel impairments. A receiver with a good channel can decode all data from the same code. In our demo, we will present a prototype of Focus for smartphones and showcase how it deals with common impairments of the visual channel.

  • 253.
    Hermans, Frederik
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet, Sweden.
    McNamara, Liam
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Voigt, Thiemo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Rohner, Christian
    Uppsala Universitet, Sweden.
    Ngai, Edith
    Uppsala Universitet, Sweden.
    Gunningberg, Per
    Uppsala Universitet, Sweden.
    Poster Abstract:Supporting Heterogeneous LCD/Camera Links2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visible light communication over LCD/camera links offers a potential complement to traditional RF communication technology such as WiFi or cellular networks. However, the heterogeneity in receivers (e.g., mobile phone cameras) presents a challenge because the receivers differ widely in resolution, distance to the transmitter (LCD), and other factors, and therefore they differ in channel quality. We are researching a communication scheme in which each receiver can decode as much data from an LCD's transmission as the receiver's channel supports. The core idea is to encode the payload into an image's frequency representation rather than directly into pixels. We have successfully transmitted data using a prototype implementation and are currently investigating appropriate channel models.

  • 254. Hermans, Frederik
    et al.
    Rensfelt, Olof
    Voigt, Thiemo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Ngai, Edith
    Norden, Lars-Åke
    Gunningberg, Per
    SoNIC: Classifying Interference in 802.15.4 Sensor Networks2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 255.
    Hewage, Kasun
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Duquennoy, Simon
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Iyer, Venkatraman
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Voigt, Thiemo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Enabling TCP in Mobile Cyber-physical Systems2015In: 2015 IEEE 12th International Conference on Mobile Ad Hoc and Sensor Systems, 2015, 7, p. 289-297, article id 7366943Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyber-physical systems consist of several wirelessly connected components such as sensors that monitor physical phenomena, computational entities that make decisions based on sensed information and actuators that interact with physical processes. Connecting cyber-physical systems to the Internet using IP protocols increases interoperability by avoiding the need for protocol translation gateways. Unfortunately, in this context TCP has been disregarded since it is known to perform poorly in wireless scenarios as it treats packet loss as an indicator for network congestion rather than poor link quality. In this paper, we use the Low-power Wireless Bus (LWB) as a link layer for TCP/IP, taking advantage of its reliability and its routing-free communication. We design a system that integrates LWB with a low-power IP stack and includes TCP-aware schedulers for LWB. We evaluate our system with experiments on real hardware using uIP, a popular embedded Internet protocol stack. Our results demonstrate high TCP throughput in mobile and static scenarios and, furthermore, show that mobility does not decrease TCP performance.

  • 256.
    Hewage, Kasun
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Raza, Shahid
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Security Lab.
    Voigt, Thiemo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Gomez, F.
    An Experimental Study of Attacks on the Availability of Glossy2014In: Computers & electrical engineering, ISSN 0045-7906, E-ISSN 1879-0755, p. 115-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glossy is a reliable and low latency flooding mechanism designed primarily for distributed communication in wireless sensor networks (WSN). Glossy achieves its superior performance over tree-based wireless sensor networks by exploiting identical concurrent transmissions. WSNs are subject to wireless attacks aimed to disrupt the legitimate network operations. Real-world deployments require security and the current Glossy implementation has no built-in security mechanisms. In this paper, we explore the effectiveness of several attacks that attempt to break constructive interference in Glossy. Our results show that Glossy is quite robust to approaches where attackers do not respect the timing constraints necessary to create constructive interference. Changing the packet content, however, has a severe effect on the packet reception rate that is even more detrimental than other physical layer denial-of-service attacks such as jamming. We also discuss potential countermeasures to address these security threats and vulnerabilities.

  • 257. Hewage, Kasun
    et al.
    Voigt, Thiemo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Poster Abstract: An Experimental Study of Attacks on the Availability of Glossy2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 258. Hewage, Kasun
    et al.
    Voigt, Thiemo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Poster Abstract: Towards TCP Communication with the Low Power Wireless Bus2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 259.
    Hithnawi, Anwar
    et al.
    ETH Zurich, Switzerland.
    Li, Su
    ETH Zurich, Switzerland.
    Shafagh, Hossein
    ETH Zurich, Switzerland.
    Duquennoy, Simon
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Gross, James
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Poster Abstract: Cross-Layer Optimization for Low-power Wireless Coexistence2015In: Proceedings of the 13th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems (SenSys '15), 2015, 10, p. 443-444Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a system that leverages physical layer features to combat Cross-Technology Interference (CTI) in low-power wireless networks. Our system incorporates: (i) a lightweight interference detection mechanism for low-power radios that recognizes the type of interference in the received signal, (ii) a lightweight error detection mechanism to estimate and characterize error patterns within interfered packets, and (iii) a CTI-aware protocol that dynamically adapts transmission and recovery mode to the current interference patterns. We implement a prototype of our system for the lowpower IEEE 802.15.4 in software defined radios (SDR). Our early results of the system components demonstrate that we can achieve a high accuracy in error detection and interference type identification. Moreover, we observed a significant performance improvement compared to the standard 802.15.4 systems without interference-awareness.

  • 260.
    Hithnawi, Anwar
    et al.
    ETH Zurich, Switzerland.
    Li, Su
    EPFL Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Shafagh, Hossein
    ETH Zurich, Switzerland.
    Gross, James
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Duquennoy, Simon
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory. Inria, France.
    CrossZig: Combating Cross-Technology Interference in Low-power Wireless Networks2016In: 2016 15th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Information Processing in Sensor Networks, IPSN 2016 - Proceedings, 2016, article id 7460663Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low-power wireless devices suffer notoriously from Cross- Technology Interference (CTI). To enable co-existence, researchers have proposed a variety of interference mitigation strategies. Existing solutions, however, are designed to work with the limitations of currently available radio chips. In this paper, we investigate how to exploit physical layer properties of 802.15.4 signals to better address CTI. We present CrossZig, a cross-layer solution that takes advantage of physical layer information and processing to improve low-power communication under CTI. To this end, CrossZig utilizes physical layer information to detect presence of CTI in a corrupted packet and to apply an adaptive packet recovery which incorporates a novel cross-layer based packet merging and an adaptive FEC coding. We implement a prototype of CrossZig for the low-power IEEE 802.15.4 in a software-defined radio platform. We show the adaptability and the performance gain of CrossZig through experimental evaluation considering both micro-benchmarking and system performance under various interference patterns. Our results demonstrate that CrossZig can achieve a high accuracy in error localization (94.3% accuracy) and interference type identification (less than 5% error rate for SINR ranges below 3 dB). Moreover, our system shows consistent performance improvements under interference from various interfering technologies.

  • 261. Hithnawi, Anwar
    et al.
    Shafagh, Hossein
    Duquennoy, Simon
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Poster Abstract: Low-Power Wireless Channel Quality Estimation in the Presence of RF Smog2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low-power wireless networks deployed in indoor environments inevitably encounter high-power Cross Technology Interference (CTI) from a wide range of wireless devices operating in the shared RF spectrum bands. This severely reduces the performance of such networks and possibly causes loss of connectivity, which affects their availability and drains their resources. In this work, to address the channel uncertainty, a consequence of CTI, we propose a novel channel metric that (i) harnesses the local knowledge of a node about the wireless channel to discern the presence of persistent high-power interferers, and (ii) assists the node in inferring its proximity to the dominant interference sources in the physical space. In order to motivate and validate the necessity of such a metric, we empirically characterize the impact of the interaction between high/low-power cross technology interferers and IEEE 802.15.4.

  • 262. Hithnawi, Anwar
    et al.
    Shafagh, Hossein
    Duquennoy, Simon
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Understanding the Impact of Cross Technology Interference on IEEE 802.15.42014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last few decades, we witnessed notable progress in wireless communication. This has led to rapid emergence of heterogeneous wireless technologies that share the RF spectrum in an un-coordinated way. Such a coexistence introduces high uncertainty and complexity to the medium, affecting reliability and availability of wireless networks. This problem aggravates for technologies operating in the lightly regulated, yet crowded ISM bands. To address coexistence of different technologies in the scarce RF spectrum, provide proper interference-aware protocols, and mitigation schemes, we need to develop a good understanding of the interaction patterns of these technologies. In this paper, we provide a thorough study of the implications of Cross Technology Interference (CTI) on the particularly vulnerable low-power IEEE 802.15.4 wireless networks. We identify the underlying vulnerabilities that hamper 802.15.4 to withstand CTI. We show that the uncertainty that CTI induces on the wireless channel is not completely stochastic; CTI exhibits distinct patterns that can be exploited by interference-aware protocols.

  • 263.
    Hjort Blindell, Gabriel
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Castaneda Lozano, Roberto
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Mats
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Schulte, Christian
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Modeling Universal Instruction Selection2015In: Principles and Practice of Constraint Programming, 2015, 7, Vol. 9255, p. 609-626Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Instruction selection implements a program under compilation by selecting processor instructions and has tremendous impact on the performance of the code generated by a compiler. This paper introduces a graph-based universal representation that unifiees data and control flow for both programs and processor instructions. The representation is the essential prerequisite for a constraint model for instruction selection introduced in this paper. The model is demonstrated to be expressive in that it supports many processor features that are out of reach of state-of-the-art approaches, such as advanced branching instructions, multiple register banks, and SIMD instructions. The resulting model can be solved for small to medium size input programs and sophisticated processor instructions and is competitive with LLVM in code quality. Model and representation are significant due to their expressiveness and their potential to be combined with models for other code generation tasks.

  • 264.
    Holmgren, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Janson, Sverker
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Interactive Visual Analysis of Networked Systems: Workflows for Two Industrial Domains2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on a first study of interactive visual analysis of networked systems. Working with ABB Corporate Research and Ericsson Research, we have created workflows which demonstrate the potential of visualization in the domains of industrial automation and telecommunications. By a workflow in this context, we mean a sequence of visualizations and the actions for generating them. Visualizations can be any images that represent properties of the data sets analyzed, and actions typically either change the selection of data visualized or change the visualization by choice of technique or change of parameters.

  • 265. Hong, Minyan
    et al.
    Björnemo, Erik
    Voigt, Thiemo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    A Mote-in-the-Loop Approach for Exploring Communication Strategies for Sensor Networks2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 266. Hong, Minyan
    et al.
    Björnemo, Erik
    Voigt, Thiemo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Exploring Sensor Network Communication Strategies with the Mote-in-the-Loop Approach2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 267.
    Hummen, René
    et al.
    RWTH Aachen University, Germany.
    Shafagh, Hossein
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Raza, Shahid
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Security Lab.
    Voigt, Thiemo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Wehrle, Klaus
    RWTH Aachen University, Germany.
    Delegation-based Authentication and Authorization for the IP-based Internet of Things2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IP technology for resource-constrained devices enables transparent end-to-end connections between a vast variety of devices and services in the Internet of Things (IoT). To protect these connections, several variants of traditional IP security protocols have recently been proposed for standardization, most notably the DTLS protocol. In this paper, we identify significant resource requirements for the DTLS handshake when employing public-key cryptography for peer authentication and key agreement purposes. These overheads particularly hamper secure communication for memory-constrained devices. To alleviate these limitations, we propose a delegation architecture that offloads the expensive DTLS connection establishment to a delegation server. By handing over the established security context to the constrained device, our delegation architecture significantly reduces the resource requirements of DTLS-protected communication for constrained devices. Additionally, our delegation architecture naturally provides authorization functionality when leveraging the central role of the delegation server in the initial connection establishment. Hence, in this paper, we present a comprehensive, yet compact solution for authentication, authorization, and secure data transmission in the IP-based IoT. The evaluation results show that compared to a public-key-based DTLS handshake our delegation architecture reduces the memory overhead by 64 %, computations by 97 %, network transmissions by 68 %.

  • 268.
    Håkansson, Maria
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Rost, Mattias
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Facilitating Mobile Music Sharing and Social Interaction with Push!Music2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Push!Music is a novel mobile music listening and sharing system, where users automatically receive songs that have autonomously recommended themselves from nearby players depending on similar listening behaviour and music history. Push!Music also enables users to wirelessly send songs between each other as personal recommendations. We conducted a two-week preliminary user study of Push!Music, where a group of five friends used the application in their everyday life. We learned for example that the shared music in Push!Music became a start for social interaction and that received songs in general were highly appreciated and could be looked upon as ‘treats’.

  • 269.
    Höglund, Joel
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Finne, Niclas
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Joakim
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Tsiftes, Nicolas
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Dunkels, Adam
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Chauvenet, Cedric
    Pouillot, Mathieu
    Goudet, Pierre-Emmanuel
    Tourancheau, Bernard
    Genon-Catalot, Denis
    Poster Abstract: Interconnecting Low-Power Wireless and Power-Line Communications using IPv62010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wireless sensor networks for building automation and energy management has made great progress in recent years, but the inherent indoor radio range limitations can make communication unpredictable and system deployments difficult. Low-power radio can be combined with low-power Power-Line Communication (PLC) to extend the range and predictability of indoor communication for building management and automation systems. We take the first steps towards exploring the system implications for integration of low-power wireless and PLC in the same network. We leverage IPv6, which allow networks to exist over multiple physical communication media as well as the RPL routing protocol for low-power lossy networks.

  • 270.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Isbister, Katherine
    Westerman, Steve
    Gardner, Peter
    Sutherland, Ed
    Vasalou, Asimina
    Sundström, Petra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Kaye, Joseph 'Jofish'
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Evaluation of Affective Interactive Applications2011In: Emotion-Oriented Systems: The Humaine Handbook, Springer , 2011, 10, p. 687-703Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods are developed for different audiences and purposes. HCI researchers develop methods to shape the future through pure, applied and blue sky research – as is still the case with most affective interactive applications. Unsurprisingly, practitioners will be more concerned that the methods they use not only are tractable but produce better and more innovative results in terms of the systems they ultimately release into the world. Researchers, on the other hand, may have other concerns, such as the novelty of their techniques. Up until recently, most HCI methods (both for researchers and practitioners) were developed for work applications and desktop situations. They focused on efficiency, learnability, transparency, control and other work-related values. They were developed in response to a theoretical orientation which viewed the user as an information processing system not so dissimilar to the computer itself. But now that HCI is concerned with technologies that enter all aspects of life, our methods have begun to change and will need to continue to change. In keeping with our changing conception of what a “user” is and a wider concern with their experience of use of new technologies, a key challenge will be to develop and expand methods for analyzing not just what people do with the technology but how it makes them feel, and not just how people understand technology but how they make sense of it as part of their lives. Methods must be concerned, not only with issues of usefulness and usability, but also with issues of aesthetics, expression, and emotion. In addition we need to focus on evaluating technology not just in the short term under controlled conditions but also in the longer term and in broader social and cultural contexts. In this section, we will therefore provide two strands of evaluation methods. The first concerns what we might see as more traditional usability evaluation: is my system usable for the purpose it was designed for? The second strand tries to get at what we have named “third wave of HCI” in the previous chapters: does my system provide for the kind of (emotional) experience that it aimed to do?

  • 271.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Jonsson, Martin
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Mercurio, Johanna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Somaesthetic Appreciation Design2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2016, 10, p. 3131-3142Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a strong concept we name Somaesthetic Appreciation based on three different enquiries. First, our own autobiographical design enquiry, using Feldenkrais as a resource in our design process, bringing out the Soma Carpet and Breathing Light applications. Second, through bringing in others to experience our systems, engaging with and qualitatively analysing their experiences of our applications. In our third enquiry, we try to pin down what characterizes and sets Somaesthetic Appreciation designs apart through comparing with and analysing others’ design inquiries as well as grounding them in the somaesthetic theories. We propose that the Somaesthetic Appreciation designs share a subtleness in how they encourage and spur bodily inquiry in their choice of interaction modalities, they require an intimate correspondence – feedback and interactions that follow the rhythm of the body, they entail a distinct manner of making space shutting out the outside world – metaphorically and literally – to allow users to turn their attention inwards, and they rely on articulation of bodily experiences to encourage learning and increased somatic awareness.

  • 272.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Martin
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Robertson, Toni
    University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
    Marti, Patrizia
    University of Siena, Italy; Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Dag, Svanaes
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Graves Petersen, Marianne
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Forlizzi, Jodi
    Carnegie Mellon University, US.
    Schiphorst, Thecla
    Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Isbister, Katherine
    University of California, US.
    Hummels, Caroline
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Klooster, Sietske
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Loke, Lian
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Poonkhin Khut, George
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Move to be moved2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2016, p. 3301-3308Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Movement-based design is reaching critical mass in HCI, and we can start to identify strategies, similarities and differences in how it is approached. Similarities may include, for example, a strong first person perspective on design, emphasising movement, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, as well as starting from the premise that our bodily ways of being in the world are shaped by the ecologies of people, cultural practices and the artefacts we create and use. Different classes of systems are starting to emerge, such as spurring somaesthetic appreciation processes using biofeedback loops or carefully nudging us to interact with our own movements; engaging us in affective loops where the technology takes on a stronger agency, attempting to pull participants into particular experiences; extending on our senses and perception – even creating new senses through technology; social interactions, engaging us to jointly explore movement or touch; even endowing machines with their own ‘somatics’, exploring our relationship to technology; as well as engaging in larger political issues around the body, such as gender perspectives, or challenging the mind-body divide.

  • 273.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Svensson, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Waern, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Designing for Social Navigation of Food Recipes2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 274.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Svensson, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Waern, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Individual Differences in Social Navigation2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 275.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Jonsson, Martin
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Mercurio, Johanna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Boris Design, Hong Kong.
    Banka Johnson, Eva-Carin
    IKEA, UK.
    Somaesthetic Design2015In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 26-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Somaesthetics is an interdisciplinary field, originally proposed by the philosopher Richard Shusterman and grounded in pragmatist philosophy and phenomenology. An interesting result of engaging in Feldenkrais exercises was the effect on the whole beings. After a lesson, all students felt they had become more honest, more grounded in themselves, more reflective, and a bit slower in their movements and reactions. When bringing out three designs, researchers repeatedly had to try different digital and physical materials, faking interactions and testing them in situ to find the ones that would make sense. The interactions had to be simulated and acted out in order for them to really feel their impact on their bodily experiences. Simply imagining what they would be like was not enough to qualify the experience.

  • 276.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Sundström, Petra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Interactional Empowerment2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 277. Isbister, Katherine
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Sharp, Michael
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    The Sensual Evaluation Instrument: Developing an Affective Evaluation Tool2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe the development and initial testing of a tool for self-assessment of affect while interacting with computer systems: the Sensual Evaluation Instrument. We discuss our research approach within the context of existing affective and HCI theory, and describe stages of evolution of the tool, and initial testing of its effectiveness.

  • 278. Isbister, Katherine
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Sundström, Petra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Generating Ideas and Building Prototypes2011In: Emotion-Oriented Systems: The Humaine Handbook, Springer , 2011, 6, p. 671-685Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design always involves the difficult step from seeing users and their activities to inventing something new that will make sense to them. In this chapter we turn to framing of the problem in such a way that the design process can start and the first prototypes can be constructed. Following a prototype-driven approach, we first provide a discussion of how to frame a problem, drawing on information gathered by methods presented in the previous chapter. We then show not only how to generate ideas for prototypes that would aid to validate a potential solution to that problem, but also methods to actually build and validate such prototypes. Finally, we discuss specific challenges related to affective interaction. The intention pursued with a prototype-driven approach is not to design a product, but a research vehicle for exploring a specific research idea. However, for one to say something of how successful a solution has been, a scenario for such prototype needs to be as realistic as possible, almost as if one was to design a product.

  • 279.
    Iyer, Venkatraman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hermans, Frederik
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Voigt, Thiemo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Detecting and Avoiding Multiple Sources of Interference in the 2.4 GHz Spectrum2015In: Wireless Sensor Networks / [ed] Tarek Abdelzaher, Nuno Pereira, Eduardo Tovar, 2015, 12, Vol. 8965, p. 35-51Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensor networks operating in the 2.4 GHz band often face cross-technology interference from co-located WiFi and Bluetooth devices. To enable effective interference mitigation, a sensor network needs to know the type of interference it is exposed to. However, existing approaches to interference detection are not able to handle multiple concurrent sources of interference. In this paper, we address the problem of identifying multiple channel activities impairing a sensor network’s communication, such as simultaneous WiFi traffic and Bluetooth data transfers. We present SpeckSense, an interference detector that distinguishes between different types of interference using a unsupervised learning technique. Additionally, SpeckSense features a classifier that distinguishes between moderate and heavy channel traffic, and also identifies WiFi beacons. In doing so, it facilitates interference avoidance through channel blacklisting. We evaluate SpeckSense on common mote hardware and show how it classifies concurrent interference under real-world settings. We also show how SpeckSense improves the performance of an existing multichannel data collection protocol by 30%.

  • 280.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Fragments of Companionship – Design Insights From a Blog Study2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing robots, virtual creatures, artificial companions and social artifacts can really be rather challenging sometimes. Forms and shapes that people are familiar with seems to inevitably correlate with their interpretation and interaction. For instance - Paro's inventor, Takanori Shibata, proposed an idea that people's acceptance towards the therapeutic robot seal would be higher than compared to e.g. a robotic cat, as people has less prior experiences with seals than with cats.

  • 281.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Play, Belief and Stories about Robots: A Case Study of a Pleo Blogging Community2009In: RO-MAN 2009, 18th International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, IEEE Computer Society , 2009, 16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an analysis based on user-provided content collected from online blogs and forums about the robotic artifact Pleo. Our primary goal is to explore stories about how human-robot interaction would manifest themselves in actual real-world contexts. To be able to assess these types of communicative media we are using a method based on virtual ethnography that specifically addresses underlying issues in how the data is produced and should be interpreted. Results indicate that generally people are staging, performing and have a playful approach to the interaction. This is further emphasized by the way people communicate their stories through the blogging practice. Finally we argue that these resources are indeed essential for understanding and designing long-term human-robot relationships.

  • 282.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Tinkering With Interactive Materials - Studies, Concepts and Prototypes2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of tinkering is a central practice within research in the field of Human Computer Interaction, dealing with new interactive forms and technologies. In this thesis, tinkering is discussed not only as a practice for interaction design in general, but as an attitude that calls for a deeper reflection over research practices, knowledge generation and the recent movements in the direction of materials and materiality within the field. The presented research exemplifies practices and studies in relation to interactive technology through a number of projects, all revolving around the design and interaction with physical interactive artifacts. In particular, nearly all projects are focused around robotic artifacts for consumer settings. Three main contributions are presented in terms of studies, prototypes and concepts, together with a conceptual discussion around tinkering framed as an attitude within interaction design. The results from this research revolve around how grounding is achieved, partly through studies of existing interaction and partly through how tinkering-oriented activities generates knowledge in relation to design concepts, built prototypes and real world interaction.

  • 283.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Bodin, Johan
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    The see-Puck: a platform for exploring human-robot relationships2008In: ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2008, 1, , p. 4Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the see-Puck, a round display module that extends an open robot platform, the e-Puck. It holds 148 LEDs (light emitting diodes) to enable the presentation of eye-catching visual animated patterns, while keeping hardware costs and energy consumption at a minimum. The see-Puck was a result of a study of future robot applications, where relationship and interaction qualities found in owners of unusual pets (e.g. spiders, snakes, and lizards) were transferred to the robotic domain. In our first proof-of-concept application, humans and robots can engage in a playful open ended interaction. We argue that open interactive robot platforms such as the see-Puck point to opportunities not only in robotics but also future user interfaces and ubiquitous computing.

  • 284.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Cramer, Henriette
    Universal Robots as ‘Solutions’ to Wicked Problems: Debunking a Robotic Myth, Late breaking abstract, HRI’11, Lausanne, Switzerland.2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 285.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    GlowBots: designing and implementing engaging human robot interaction2008In: Journal of Physical Agents, ISSN 1888-0258, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    GlowBots are small tangible, communicating and interactive robots that show eye-catching visual patterns on a round LED display. This paper details the development of the GlowBots from the early user-oriented design phase, through hardware and software development and onto preliminary user studies. In the design phase we outlined a robot application based on a study of how owners relate with unusual pets, such as snakes and lizards. This led to an application concept of a set of ”hobby robots” which would communicate with each other and the user through dynamic patterns. Based on these requirements, we developed a LED display called see-Puck, which together with an open robot platform was used for the GlowBots application itself. One particular issue is dealing with energy consumption problems, as resources in embedded systems often limit the potential time for user interaction. We conclude with a report on early user experiences from demonstrating GlowBots and a preliminary user study in a home environment as well as remarks about future directions.

  • 286.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Tieben, Rob
    The Look, the Feel and the Action: Making Sets of ActDresses for Robotic Movement2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a series of design explorations for controlling autonomous robotic movement based on a metaphor of clothing and accessorising. From working with various sketches, scenarios and prototypes we identify a number of particular features of this form of interaction, as well potential challenges for designers of other systems based on this design concept. Finally we conclude with a few general implications, especially concerning the inert properties of visibility, physicality and modularity with respect to the particular case of interaction and robotic movement.

  • 287.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Ljungblad, Sara
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Bodin, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Knurek, Jeffrey
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    GlowBots: Robots that Evolve Relationships2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    GlowBots are small wheeled robots that develop complex relationships between each other and with their owner. They develop attractive patterns which are affected both by user interaction and communication between the robots. The project shows how robots can interact with humans in subtle and sustainable ways for entertainment and enjoyment.

  • 288.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Nylander, Stina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Software and Systems Engineering Laboratory.
    Always-On + Adoption – a method for longitudinal studies2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We will discuss an approach for conducting long term studies of companionship technologies – technologies intended for more intimate relationships with people. We draw from our work of conducting several qualitative long-term user studies of people’s relationship with robotic companions and mobile devices in order to develop a methodology where the initial bond with the artifact is based on a more intense experience. After this initial phase referred to as Always On the relationship will fade over to the adoption phase where the more traditional long-term use can be studied. Most recently we are trying out this approach for studying people’s experience of an online social game that features virtual agents.

  • 289.
    Janson, Sverker
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Smartare e-handel med intelligenta agenter2000In: Forskning & Framsteg, no 7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 290.
    Janson, Sverker
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Haridi, Seif
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Programming paradigms of the Andorra Kernel Language1991Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Andorra Kernel Language (AKL) is introduced. It is shown how AKL provides the programming paradigms of both Prolog and GHC. This is the original goal of the design. However, it has also been possible to provide capabilities beyond that of Prolog and GHC. There are means to structure search, more powerful than plain backtracking. It is possible to encapsulate search in concurrent reactiveprocesses. It is also possible to write a multi-way merger with constant delay.In these respects AKL is quite original. Although AKL is an instance of our previously introduced Kernel Andorra Prolog framework, this exposition contains important extensions, and a considerable amount of unnecessary formal overhead has been stripped away.

  • 291.
    Janson, Sverker
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Rayner, Manny
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Finding out = Achieving Decidability1989Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a framework for reasoning about the concepts of "knowing what" and "finding out", in which the key concept is to identify "finding out the answer to question Q" with "achieving a situation in which Q is decidable" . We give examples of how the framework can be used to formulate non-trivial problems involving the construction of plans to acquire and use information, and go on to demonstrate that these problems can often be solved by systematic application of a small set of goal-directed backward-chaining rules. In conclusion, it is suggested that systems of this kind are potentially implementable in l-Prolog, a logic programming language based on higher-order logic.

  • 292. Jhumka, Arshad
    et al.
    Mottola, Luca
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    On Consistent Neighborhood Views in Wireless Sensor Networks2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 293.
    Jonsson, Martin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Sweden; KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Mercurio, Johanna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Boris Design Studio, Hong Kong.
    Naveen, Ramani
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    The Aesthetics of Heat: Guiding Awareness with Thermal Stimuli2016In: Proceedings of the TEI '16: Tenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, 2016, 10, p. 109-117Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss the design process and results from a design exploration on the use of thermal stimuli in body awareness exercises. A user-study was performed on an interactive prototype in the form of an interactive heat mat. The paper brings forth an alternative understanding of heat as a design material that extends the common understanding of thermal stimuli in HCI as a communication modality to instead bring the aesthetic and experiential properties to the fore. Findings account for felt body experiences of thermal stimuli and a number of design qualities related to heat as a design material are formulated, pointing to experiential qualities concerning the felt body, subjectivity and subtleness as well as material qualities concerning materiality, inertia and heat transfer

  • 294. Kavassalis, Petros
    et al.
    Stelios, Lelis
    Rafea, Mahmoud
    Haridi, Seif
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    What makes a Web site popular?2004In: Communications of the ACM, ISSN 0001-0782, E-ISSN 1557-7317, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 50-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 295. Kaye, Joseph 'Jofish'
    et al.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Isbister, Katherine
    The Design and Evaluation Process2010In: Emotion-Oriented Systems: The Humaine Handbook, Springer , 2010, 8, p. 641-656Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this chapter is to describe the design and evaluation process in the light of affective interaction. With a starting point in user-centred design we will explore what additional problems or opportunities become important when designing for affective interaction with computer systems. This chapter also provides a historical background to HCI ending with what is sometimes named the third wave of HCI – that is, designing for aesthetic, emotional experiences with and through technology.

  • 296.
    Keppitiyagama, Chamath
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Tsiftes, Nicolas
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Boano, Carlo Alberto
    Voigt, Thiemo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Poster Abstract: Temperature Hints for Sensornet Routing2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Real-world experiments have shown that the transmission power and the received signal strength of low-power radio transceivers used in sensornets decrease when temperature increases. We analyze how this phenomenon affects the network layer, and find that temperature fluctuations may cause undesirable behavior by sensornet routing protocols such as CTP and RPL. Furthermore, we present an approach to make these protocols robust to temperature fluctuations by augmenting the ETX link metric with temperature hints.

  • 297.
    Klintskog, Erik
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    El Banna, Zacharias
    Brand, Per
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Haridi, Seif
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    The design and evaluation of a middleware library for distribution of language entities2003In: Advances in Computing Science: Proceedings of the 8th Asian Computing Conference (ASIAN'03), 2003, 1, , p. 17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents a modular design of a distribution middleware that supports the wide variety of entities that exist in high level languages. Such entities are classified into mutables, immutables and transients. The design is factorized in order to allow multiple consistency protocols for the same entity type, and multiple coordination strategies for implementing the protocols that differ in their failure behavior. The design is implemented and evaluated. It shows a very competitive performance.

  • 298.
    Klintskog, Erik
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    El Banna, Zacharias
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Brand, Per
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Haridi, Seif
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    The DSS, a middleware library for efficient and transparent distribution of language entities.2004In: Proceedings of the 37th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS-37): Software Technology Track: Distributed Object and Component-based Software Systems Minitrack, 2004, 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a novel language independent model for distribution of language entities, which allows for fine-grained instrumentation of entity consistency protocols on a per-entity basis. The model is implemented as a middleware component, designed to enhance arbitrary high-level programming languages with distribution support on the language entity level. The middleware library is extendable using internal interfaces to add new protocols over three different aspects of distribution.

  • 299.
    Klintskog, Erik
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    El Banna, Zacharias
    Brand, Per
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Haridi, Seif
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Mesaros, Valentin
    A peer-to-peer approach to enhance middleware connectivity2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the problems of middleware for shared state is that they are designed, explicitly or implicitly, for symmetric networks. However, since the Internet is not symmetric, end-to-end process connectivity cannot be guaranteed. Our solution to this is to provide the middleware with a network abstraction layer that masks the asymmetry of the network and provides the illusion of a symmetric network. We describe the communication service of our middleware, the Distribution Subsystem~(DSS), which carefully separates connections to remote processes from the protocols that communicate over them. This separation is used to plug-in a peer-to-peer module to provide symmetric and persistent connectivity. The P2P module can provide both up-to-date addresses for mobile processes as well as route discovery to overcome asymmetric links.

  • 300.
    Klintskog, Erik
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Neiderud, Anna
    Brand, Per
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Haridi, Seif
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Fractional weighted reference counting2001In: Proceedings of the 7th International Euro-Par Conference Manchester on Parallel Processing, 28-31 Aug 2001, Manchester, UK, 2001, 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduce a scheme for distributed garbage collection that is an extension of Weighted Reference Counting. This scheme represents weights as fractions. It solves the problem of limited weight, preserves the property of third-party independence, and does not induce extra messages for reference merging.

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