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  • 151.
    Ye, Guozhu
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea MEFOS.
    Larsson, Mikael
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea MEFOS.
    Ångström, Sten
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea MEFOS.
    Lindvall, Mikael
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea MEFOS.
    Development of innovative environmental technologies for treatment of wastes and residues from metal industry and MSW-pilot experiences of Swerea MEFOS2011In: Proceedings - European Metallurgical Conference, EMC 2011, 2011, Vol. 5, p. 1699-1710Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The metallurgical industry generates annually huge amount of by-products and wastes in terms of slags, dust, sludge, millscale etc. In addition to these our industry also consumes a lot of energy and release a large quantity of green house gases such as CO2 and NOx. A large number of environmental technologies have been pilot tested at Swerea MEFOS in the past 20 years for the metal and energy industry. These include the long term projects for CO2-reduction and energy saving technologies, control of dioxin emission and various pyrometallurgical processes for treatment of wastes and by-products generated by the metal industry. Also MSW has been treated. The principle of efficient use of metallurgical reactors for treatment of various wastes and residue will be described and discussed. Some of the open pilot and demonstration projects carried out by Swerea MEFOS will be used as examples. These projects include • Processing slag, dust and sludge for recovery of valuable metals such as V, Cr, Ni, Mo, Pb and Zn • Recovery and efficient use of other important resources such as CaF2 and CaO from metallurgical slag and sludge • Using metallurgical reactors for energy production • Use of ASR as heat source for preheating and zinc removal of scrap. The experiences at Swerea MEFOS have shown that pilot testing is one of the most essential parts of the development of advanced green technologies for the metal industry.

  • 152.
    Ye, Guozhu
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Swerea, Swerea MEFOS.
    Magnusson, Marcel
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Swerea, Swerea MEFOS.
    Väänänen, Pekka
    IsoLogistic, Sweden.
    Tian, Yang
    Kunming University of Science and Technolog, China.
    Recovery of Zn and Mn from spent alkaline batteries2018In: Part of the The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series book series (MMMS), 2018, p. 329-341Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most used technology for recycling of spent alkaline batteries consists of crushing, magnetic separation and processing of the nonmagnetic fraction, black mass, using a rotary kiln. In the process only zinc is recovered and all manganese in the black mass is lost. According to the EU regulation for recycling of batteries, more than 50% of batteries should be recovered. To meet the demand, Swerea MEFOS has together with a major battery recycler IsoLogistics in Finland and Sweden developed technologies for efficient recovery of zinc and manganese aiming for >50% recovery. This paper will focus on a treatment process using a DC furnace to produce a ZnO- and a MnO-product. The process has been demonstrated in pilot scale, 1, ton/h. The major outcomes will be highlighted. Another approach by using thermal vacuum technology for distillation of zinc metal has also been demonstrated in laboratory scale which is also reported in this paper.

  • 153.
    Ye, Guozhu
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea MEFOS.
    Viklund-White, Christina
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea MEFOS.
    The utilization of metallurgical reactors for the processing of wastes1999In: Proceedings of the TMS Fall Extraction and Processing Conference, 1999, Vol. 1, p. 213-222Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recycling of waste streams saves resources as well as land space. It is however important to find the most suitable treatment solution in order to optimize the conversion of the waste into useful products and maximize the energy yield, while minimizing secondary waste generation. The processing conditions applied in pyrometallurgical reactors are commonly most suitable for treating various types of inorganic as well as organic wastes. The article discusses the treatment of various types of wastes such as residues from the metallurgical industry and plastics. The available recycling technologies and practices as well as potential pyrometallurgical solutions will be reviewed. The experiences of some non-confidential pilot and demonstration projects carried out by MEFOS in the past 10 years using various kinds of reactors for waste treatment will be highlighted. These projects include: - treatment and recycling of EAF and BOF dust - reduction of valuable metals such as V and Cr from steelmaking slags - stabilization of fly and bottom ashes by a DC furnace with a hollow electrode - destruction of hazardous liquid chemical wastes by injection them in a metal bath.

  • 154.
    Ye, Guozhu.
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea MEFOS.
    White, Jesse
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea MEFOS.
    Wei, L.-Y.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Association of halogens in electric arc furnace dust and zinc oxide fume before and after leaching1999In: Proceedings of the TMS Fall Extraction and Processing Conference, 1999, Vol. 2, p. 1503-1510Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pilot-scale tests were conducted at MEFOS for the production of zinc oxide from Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) dust using a DC arc furnace with a hollow electrode suitable for the processing of fine-grained materials. The association of halides in Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) dust and zinc oxide fume before and after water leaching was investigated by XRD, SEM, and TEM analysis. In EAF dust, chlorine and fluorine were found to exist primarily as NaCl, KCl, and CaF2. After water leaching of the zinc oxide fume the halide concentrations were reduced to about 200 ppm Cl and 200 ppm F, mostly in the form of CaF2 and chlorine-containing silicate phases.

  • 155.
    Zetterholm, Jonas
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, MEFOS. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Ji, Xiaoyan
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Sundelin, Bo
    SSAB Special Steels, Sweden.
    Martin, Peter M.
    Siemens VAI Metals Technologies, USA.
    Wang, Chuan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, MEFOS.
    Dynamic modelling for the hot blast stove2017In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 185, p. 2142-2150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large amount of energy is required in the production of steel where the preheating of blast in the hot blast stoves for iron-making is one of the most energy-intensive processes. To improve the energy efficiency of the steelmaking it is necessary to investigate how to improve the hot blast stove operation. In this work a mathematic model for evaluating the performance of the hot blast stove was developed using a finite difference approximation for the heat transfer inside the stove during operation. The developed model was calibrated and validated by using the process data from hot blast stove V26 at SSABs plant in Oxelösund, Sweden. The investigation shows a good agreement between the measured and modelled data. As a case study, the developed model was used to simulate the effect of a new concept of OxyFuel technique to hot blast stoves. The investigation shows that, by using this OxyFuel technique, it is possible to maintain the blast temperature while removing the usage of coke oven gas (COG). The saved COG can be used to replace some fossil fuel, such as oil and LPG. Furthermore, the effect of the cycle time on the single stove was studied. As expected, both the hot blast and flue gas temperatures are increased when increasing the cycle time. This shows that it is a good strategy for the hot blast stove to increase the blast temperature if the stove is currently not operated with the maximum allowed flue-gas temperature.

  • 156.
    Åström, Elin
    et al.
    LKAB, Sweden.
    Björkvall, Johan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, MEFOS.
    Björkman, Bo M.T.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Dan
    LKAB, Sweden.
    Vanadium oxide solubility in CaO–SiO2–VOX system2017In: Ironmaking & steelmaking, ISSN 0301-9233, E-ISSN 1743-2812, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 42-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The solubility of vanadium oxide in the SiO2–CaO–VOX system was investigated as a function of basicity (CaO/SiO2) at a fixed temperature of 1600°C and oxygen partial pressure of 10−10 atm. Formed phases and microstructures of saturated samples were identified with SEM–EDS analysis and XRD. Maximum solubility of vanadium oxide was between 15 and 20% independent of basicity. Pure karelianite (V2O3) was formed in all samples at saturation of vanadium oxide. The morphology of karelianite changed with the change in basicity in the slag, where needles or threads were formed for slags with basicity B2 = 0.54 and B2 = 0.67 and stars or dendritic patterns were formed with basicity B2 = 1.0 and B2 = 1.22. Wollastonite (CaSiO3) was also formed in the slags with star or dendritic patterns.

  • 157.
    Ökvist, Lena Sundqvist .
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, MEFOS.
    Hyllander, Gunilla
    LKAB Luossavaara-Kiirunavaara AB, Sweden.
    Olsson, Erik T.
    SSAB EMEA AB, Sweden.
    Wikström, Jan-Olov
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, MEFOS.
    Lundgren, Maria
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, MEFOS.
    Injection of pulverized materials into the blast furnace raceway2012In: 6th Int. Congress on the Science and Technology of Ironmaking 2012, ICSTI 2012 - Including Proceedings from the 42nd Ironmaking and Raw Materials Seminar, and the 13th Brazilian Symp. on Iron Ore, 2012, Vol. 3, p. 1721-1731Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of injection trials carried out over the years at the LKAB experimental blast furnace (LKAB EBF®) and in industrial BFs shows that tuyere injection is a feasible method for supply of various types of pulverized materials as different types of PC, BOF slag and BF dust to the BF. In this study, the effect on process, raceway conditions, hot metal quality, reductant agent consumption and slag formation due to the selection of injection materials are discussed based on trial data. A special attention is paid on the injection of alternative carbon containing residual material. Based on recent trials the efficiency in use of carbon in injected residual materials are discussed and pilot scale results compared with industrial trial results.

  • 158.
    Ökvist, Lena Sundqvist
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, MEFOS.
    Brandell, Carina
    LKAB, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Maria
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, MEFOS.
    Impact of activated nut coke on energy efficiency in the blast furnace2014In: AISTech - Iron and Steel Technology Conference Proceedings, Association for Iron and Steel Technology, AISTECH , 2014, Vol. 1, p. 663-672Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 159.
    Ökvist, Lena Sundqvist.
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea MEFOS.
    E., Nicklas
    LKAB.
    Wikström, Jan-Olov
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea MEFOS.
    Characterization of the state of LKAB experimental BF hearth2010In: AISTech - Iron and Steel Technology Conference Proceedings, 2010, p. 701-710Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 160.
    Ökvist, Lena Sundqvist
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Swerea MEFOS. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Lagerwall, Per
    SSAB Europe, Sweden.
    Sundelin, Bo
    SSAB Europe, Sweden.
    Orre, Joel
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Swerea MEFOS. SSAB Special Steels, Sweden.
    Brämming, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Swerea MEFOS.
    Lundgren, Maria
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Swerea MEFOS.
    Low-CO2 iornmaking in the blast furnace2017In: AISTech - Iron and Steel Technology Conference Proceedings, 2017, p. 455-463Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 161.
    Ökvist, Lena Sundqvist.
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea MEFOS.
    Lundgren, Maria
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea MEFOS.
    Hyllander, G.
    Luossavaara-Kiirunavaara AB (LKAB).
    Hensmann, M.
    VDEh-Betriebsforschungsinstitut GmbH (BFI).
    Olsson, E.
    SSAB EMEA AB.
    Antila, O.
    SSAB EMEA AB.
    Schuster, S.
    Voestalpine Stahl GmbH Linz.
    Injection of alternative carbon containing materials into the blast furnace2012In: TMS Annual Meeting, 2012, p. 161-169Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Residual materials from the integrated steel plant itself or other sources often contain valuable compounds of e.g. C and Fe. Dust and sludge have to be agglomerated to be able to recycle to the blast furnace (BF) via top-charging. By injection of the materials, preparation methods in terms of e.g. drying and/or screening only, can be used. Alternative carbon materials (ACM) in terms of BF dust and sludge have been successfully injected up to levels of 60 kg/tHM in the LKAB Experimental Blast Furnace (LKAB EBF®). Efficiency in recovery of valuable compounds as well as the behavior of undesired elements have been evaluated and are discussed.

1234 151 - 161 of 161
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