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  • 151.
    Mazé, Ramia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Gregory, Judith
    designing social innovation, forms of sustainability.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Social Sustainability: A design research approach to sustainable development2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While issues such as clean production and energy efficiency are still central in sustainable development discourse, attention is increasingly on patterns of consumption at multiple levels in society. This opens new opportunities and responsibilities for design research, as we shift from a focus on product lifecycles to people’s lifestyles. It also requires further understanding the ‘social sustainability’ aspects of the environment and development, including the complexity of problematics characterized by uncertainties, contradictions and controversies. In response, we propose a programmatic approach, in which a tentative assemblage of theoretical and experimental strategies frame a common ground for a collaborative and practice-led inquiry. We present a design research program based on two propositions: socio-cultural practices are the basic unit for design, and; transitions, and transition management, are the basic points of design intervention. Rather than affirming the status quo or the prevailing discourse, we argue for design research as a ‘critical practice’, in which cultural diversity, non-humans and multiple futures are considered.

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  • 152.
    Mazé, Ramia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Göteborg.
    Jacobs, M.
    IT + Textiles.
    Sonic City: Prototyping a wearable experience2003In: Proceedings of ISWC'03, 2003, 10, , p. 6p. 160-166Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sonic City is a project exploring mobile interaction and wearable technology for everyday music creation. A wearable system has been developed that creates electronic music in real-time based on sensing bodily and environmental factors - thus, a personal soundscape is co-produced by physical movement, local activity, and urban ambiance simply by walking through the city. Applying multi-disciplinary methods, we have developed the wearable from a scenario-driven, aesthetic and lifestyle perspective. A garment has been crafted for 'trying on' interaction and wearabilty options with users on-site in the city. With this prototype, we have been able to expore and rapidly iterate context and content, social and human factors of the wearable application.

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  • 153.
    Mazé, Ramia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Göteborg.
    Jacobs, M.
    Public Play Spaces.
    Underdogs and superheroes: Designing for new players in public space2003In: Proceedings of COST, 2003, 13, , p. 14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We are exploring methods for participatory and public involvement of new 'players' in the design space. Underdogs & Superheroes involves a game-based methodology – a series of creative activities or games – in order to engage people experientially, creatively, and personally throughout the design process. We have found that games help engage users’ imaginations by representing reality without limiting expectations to what's possible here and now; engaging experiential and personal perspectives (the 'whole' person); and opening the creative process to hands-on user participation through low/no-tech materials and a widely-understood approach. The methods are currently being applied in the project Underdogs & Superheroes, which aims to evolve technological interventions for personal and community presence in local public spaces.

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  • 154.
    Mazé, Ramia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Messager, Aude
    Thwaites, Thomas
    Önal, Başar
    Energy Futures2013In: SWITCH! Design and everyday energy ecologies, Stockholm, Sweden: Interactive Institute Swedish ICT , 2013, 12, p. 6-44Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on energy forecasts and social trends drawn from futures studies, 'Energy Futures' revisits familiar urban and domestic artifacts in light of potentially emerging behaviors, beliefs and politics. Countering both the incremental reforms of user-centered design and the utopias and dystopias of visionary architecture, the project investigates the design of transitions between the familiar now and extreme futures. The project takes the form of fictional scenarios in which a series of redesigned artifacts (fore)tell stories of transformed lifestyles and urban life. Presented as a (super)fictive reality, Energy Futures operates as a platform for hosting a debate with stakeholders about probable and preferred futures of electricity consumption.

  • 155.
    Mazé, Ramia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Olausson, LisaForms of Sustainability.Plöjel, MatildaForms of Sustainability.Redström, JohanRISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.Zetterlund, ChristinaForms of Sustainability.
    Share This Book: Critical perspectives and dialogues about design and sustainability2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a critical time in design. Concepts and practices of design are changing in response to historical developments in the modes of industrial design production and consumption. Indeed, the imperative of more sustainable development requires profound reconsideration of design today. Theoretical foundations and professional definitions are are at stake, with consequences for institutions such as museums and educations as well as for future practitioners. This is ‘critical’ on many levels, from the urgency need to address societal and environmental issues and the reflexivity required to think and do design differently. This book traces the consequences of sustainability for concepts and practices of design. Our basic questions concern how fundamental concepts that have become institutionalized in design may (or may not) be adequate for addressing contemporary challenges. The book is composed of three main, authored sections, which present different trajectories through a shared inquiry into notions of ‘form’ and ‘critical practice’ in design. In each section, there is a dialogue between text and image – theory and practice, argument and experiment – in which photographic, graphic, facsimile, or other materials act not as illustrations but as arguments in another (designed) form. Each argument interweaves theoretical, historical and practical perspectives that, cumulatively, critique and reconfigure design as we see it.

  • 156.
    Mazé, Ramia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Redström, Johan
    Slow Technology.
    Difficult forms: critical practices of design and research2007In: IASDR 2007 Proceedings: Emerging Trends in Design Research., Hong Kong, China: IASDR / The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, School of Design , 2007, 2, , p. 18Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a kind of 'criticism from within', conceptual and critical design inquire into what design is about – how the market operates, what is considered 'good design', and how the design and development of technology typically works. Tracing relations of conceptual and critical design to (post-)critical architecture and anti-design, we discuss a series of issues related to the operational and intellectual basis for 'critical practice', and how these might open up for a new kind of development of the conceptual and theoretical frameworks of design. Rather than prescribing a practice on the basis of theoretical considerations, these critical practices seem to build an intellectual basis for design on the basis of its own modes of operation, a kind of theoretical development that happens through, and from within, design practice and not by means of external descriptions or analyses of its practices and products.

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  • 157.
    Mazé, Ramia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    DIFFICULT FORMS: Critical practices of design and research2009In: Research Design Journal, ISSN 2000-639X, E-ISSN 2000-3080, Vol. 1, p. 12p. 28-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a kind of ‘criticism from within’, conceptual and critical design inquire into what design is about – how the market operates, what is considered ‘good design’, and how the design and development of technology typically works. Tracing relations of conceptual and critical design to (post-)critical architecture and anti-design, we discuss a series of issues related to the operational and intellectual basis for ‘critical practice’, and how these might open up for a new kind of development of the conceptual and theoretical frameworks of design. Rather than prescribing a practice on the basis of theoretical considerations, these critical practices seem to build an intellectual basis for design on the basis of its own modes of operation, a kind of theoretical development that happens through, and from within, design practice and not by means of external descriptions or analyses of its practices and products.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 158.
    Mazé, Ramia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Explanation2013In: SWITCH! Design and everyday energy ecologies, Stockholm, Sweden: Interactive Institute Swedish ICT , 2013, 14, p. 201-223Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Design has historically been employed in service to expanding industrial production and consumer culture – perhaps it is no wonder that design has often been seen as part of the problem within sustainability discourse. Sustainability requires fundamentally rethinking the organization of everyday life in terms such as ecological complexity, social responsibility and risky futures. A role for design in this is to question the status quo, to critically reframe the issues at hand by materializing alternatives within the here and now. Such a role for design increases its agency within social processes, in which the materials and methods of design mobilize critical reflection and influence public discourse. Critical practices of design do not produce the traditional ‘objects’ of design, intended to be built or lived in, industrially produced or mass-consumed – though such practices are deeply rooted in design skills, processes and materiality. Such practices practices provide vivid reformulations – and urgently needed visions – of what design could be and what society could look like. This book embodies our inquiry as the story of SWITCH!, a design research program carried out since 2008 by an international team of designers, artists, architects, computer and social scientists at the Interactive Institute in Sweden. This chapter, ‘Explanation’, discusses the contexts and motivations for this work, along with the research themes ‘energy ecologies’ and ‘critical practices’. The project set-up and contributors are also described.

  • 159.
    Mazé, Ramia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute, Interactive Institute Stockholm. Design Göteborg.
    Redström, Johan
    IT + Textiles.
    Form and the computational object.2004In: Proceedings of CADE, 2004, 5, , p. 10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Interaction Design, we are presented with an opportunity to return to the designed object as a subject of enquiry with a new perspective. We suggest a reconsideration of form as the starting point for developing a deep understanding of computational things and an approach to dealing with their inherent complexity. Understanding the object as composed of both spatial and temporal form, we can use materials to design a ‘surface’ for experience that extends beyond the three-dimensional object. Presenting both theoretical consideration and design examples, we aim to discuss the potentials of a new perspective on form as a basis for design research and education.

  • 160.
    Mazé, Ramia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Redström, Johan
    Form and the Computational Object2005In: Digital Creativity, ISSN 1462-6268, E-ISSN 1744-3806, Vol. 16, p. 7-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Interaction Design, we are presented with an opportunity to return to the designed object as a subject of enquiry with a new perspective. We suggest a reconsideration of form as the starting point for developing a deep understanding of computational things and an approach to dealing with their inherent complexity. Understanding the object as composed of both spatial and temporal form, we can use materials to design a 'surface' for experience that extends beyond the three-dimensional object. Presenting both theoretical considerations and design examples, we discuss the potentials of a new perspective on form as a basis for design research and education.

  • 161.
    Mazé, Ramia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Redström, Johan
    Forms of Sustainability.
    Switch! Energy ecologies in everyday life2008In: International Journal of Design, Vol. 2, p. 16p. 55-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is no single answer to the question of how people should live, nor any silver bullet for solving current ecological problems—and yet, contemporary design must seek ways to think and act in light of emerging environmental challenges. We present here an overview of the Switch! design research program, a continuation of our previous work on how interaction and product design can promote awareness of energy use in everyday life. Extending this approach to a larger architectural and urban scale, Switch! was set up to explore the possibilities of design as an intervention into multiple and interpenetrating technical, material and social systems—or ecologies. In addition to designing materials, objects, and interfaces, Switch! also examines how design can be engaged in staging potential scenarios, narratives and debates. The design of interventions into energy ecologies and the use of design methods become a platform for exposing existing habits and hidden norms as well as for proposing alternative actions and views. These propositions have been developed through practical experimentation and the materialization of design examples. Central to our investigation is how critical practice enables us to examine and discuss the concepts, strategies and ideologies underlying sustainable design.

  • 162.
    Mazé, Ramia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Zetterlund, Christina
    Forms of Sustainability.
    Introductions2013In: Share This Book: Critical perspectives and dialogues about design and sustainability, Stockholm, Sweden: Axl Books , 2013, 15, p. 5-17Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the introduction to the book with the overall description: This is a critical time in design. Concepts and practices of design are changing in response to historical developments in the modes of industrial design production and consumption. Indeed, the imperative of more sustainable development requires profound reconsideration of design today. Theoretical foundations and professional definitions are at stake, with consequences for institutions such as museums and universities as well as for future practitioners. This is ‘critical’ on many levels, from the urgent need to address societal and environmental issues to the reflexivity required to think and do design differently.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 163.
    Mazé, Ramia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Zetterlund, Christina
    Plöjel, Matilda
    Concluding dialogue2013In: Share This Book: Critical perspectives and dialogues about design and sustainability, Stockholm, Sweden: Axl Books , 2013, 16, p. 125-128Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a chapter in a book with the overall description: This is a critical time in design. Concepts and practices of design are changing in response to historical developments in the modes of industrial design production and consumption. Indeed, the imperative of more sustainable development requires profound reconsideration of design today. Theoretical foundations and professional definitions are at stake, with consequences for institutions such as museums and universities as well as for future practitioners. This is ‘critical’ on many levels, from the urgent need to address societal and environmental issues to the reflexivity required to think and do design differently.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 164.
    Mazé, Ramia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Önal, Başar
    Switch!.
    Hands on the Future2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design is a powerful and persuasive force in shaping society, and has been part of driving and developing many of the values and practices in our contemporary consumer culture and daily lifestyles. As we try to better understand the effects of design – especially how it relates to effecting more sustainable ways of living – design research has incorporated theories and methods from the social sciences and the humanities. Human-centered design, for example, incorporates methods for understanding social, cultural and human experience, in order to design products and systems that satisfy needs and solve problems. However, these approaches are limited in some significant ways, for example with respect to considering aspects of 'futurity'. Furthermore, if sustainable design requires us to anticipate radically different futures, then it may also requires different approaches to thinking and doing research... ...In this paper, we reflect upon such limits through examples of our practice-based design research in the area of sustainability. The 'Energy Futures' project is presented as a case study that points to the capacity of design materials and methods to enable 'hands on' experience of possible futures and participatory debate about radical change. We argue that design is fundamentally about the future – about the future use, effects and risks of designed things – which implies common concerns and substantial synergies between the fields of futures studies and design research.

  • 165.
    Nemer, D.
    et al.
    Indiana University, USA.
    Gross, S.
    Indiana University, USA.
    True, N.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Materializing digital inequalities: the digital artifacts of the marginalized in Brazil2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a predominantly social phenomenon, many examinations around issues caused by digital inequalities appropriately focus on the policies, attitudes, and other cultural elements that pertain to the adoption, use, and proliferation of digital technology. As a compliment to these analyses, this paper will examine the materiality as a component of the digital inequalities in Brazil's urban poor areas, known as favelas. We specifically look at the material aspects of the digital artifacts used in LAN Houses and state-supported Telecenters located inside the favelas in the city of Vitoria, Brazil. This study is driven by qualitative exploration - using critical ethnographic methods such as observation and interviews - designed to focus on the perspective of the local users of LAN Houses and Telecenters. We apply critical ethnography to give voices to the locals and allow them to understand the material issues and conflicts on their terms. Through examples from keyboard layout to power unit supplies, we will describe how the materiality of digital artifacts contributes to digital inequalities and how unique social conventions are formed in this context. Shedding light on people's experiences with such materials broadens our view of different ways that technology and internet is used, and perhaps thereby do a better job of developing appropriate technologies for these people.

  • 166.
    Nilsson, Mats E.
    et al.
    SoundSpace.
    Rådsten-Ekman, Maria
    SoundSpace.
    Lundén, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Sonic Studio.
    Becker, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Sonic Studio.
    Perceptual evaluation of a real time auralization tool2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper illustrates the use of psychoacoustic methods and multivariate statistics for perceptual evaluation of auralizations. In four experiments, listeners assessed binaural recordings and auralizations of the same sound sources, using a newly developed tool for real time auralization of room acoustics. The recorded signals were music and speech reproduced by a loudspeaker in a classroom and an auditorium. Listeners assessed (a) perceived realism of recorded versus auralized sounds, (b) perceived similarity of pair wise presented sounds, (c) perceived intelligibility of spoken words, and (d) a set of perceptual attributes of sounds, using eight semantic differential scales. The results showed that listeners could discriminate between recorded and auralized sounds, although they were perceived as equally realistic. Analysis showed that auralized sounds were perceived as less full and more metallic than recorded sounds, and auralized speech were easier to catch (hear, understand) than the recorded speech. The next step of this ongoing research is to conduct psychoacoustic analysis in order to identify acoustic differences between recorded and auralized sounds that may explain their perceptual differences.

  • 167.
    Nordlinder, Martin
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    The Lair of Beowulf, a study of 3D positional sound in an audio mostly game2006Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Multimedia capabilities of mobile phones increases all the time, today it is possible to develop games with advanced sounds and graphics. Games with 3D graphics are developing fast. But sounds are seldom used to enhance the experience. The sounds in mobile phone games are often one short midi music piece, under a minute long and only a few short samples are used. The sounds often become repetitive; it is common that people disable the music and sounds when playing on mobile phones. This Master of Science thesis in Media technology describes the development of a prototype and the experimental study that was conducted on it. The prototype is developed together with Interactive Institute, Sonic studio. The prototype is called The lair of Beowulf, Beowulf was a hero in a story which is the oldest written story in old-English. The game starts were Beowulf enters a cave, in the cave there are several unknown sounds to the gamer. The player of the game has no other cues of the game world than the sounds, which are played through a sound engine, called OpenAL. The game was then used in an experimental study. The study was conducted on 11 participants. This study had two parts; in the first part the participant was asked how they experienced the sound on seven given points. Experienced sound in this case was how they thought each location looked and the feeling they got from it. In the second part of the test questions about the whole game were asked. How easy it was to navigate, if it was fun to play and similar questions. The conclusion of the study was that it is very important to carefully select sounds. The illusion of the game world is more fragile when only sounds are used. It is more important to the context the sounds make the user experience in a sound mostly game, than in a game with where graphic describes the world.

  • 168.
    Papworth, Nigel
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    iSpooks: an audio focused game design2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is an attempt to analyse and explain the ‘design decision making’ behind iSpooks, an audio based adventure game for the iPhone. The game utilizes audio as its principle mechanism for driving the gameplay. The design and production team were therefore forced to look at and reconsider the ways in which a mobile phone game works. This resulted in some innovative and previously untried techniques in the design process and technical solutions developed for the project. It also, and perhaps more importantly, addressed and analysed aspects of mobile phone users behaviour in relation to these innovations. This paper covers the research and conclusions that lead to the final game design, and describes aspects such as, sound design, designing for the casual gamer, finding appropriate narrative forms and creating non-visual immersion.

  • 169.
    Papworth, Nigel
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Designing Audio-based networked games to maximize player immersion2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a description of a practical experiment in alternative game design, intended to test and define a new kind of player experience in mobile/net gaming. This ‘Audio-mostly’ concept is created as a test-bed and prototype for sound-based game applications. The underlying principle lies in expanding the imagination of the user, rather than the graphic capabilities of the platform. It should be noted that this research project was principally concerned with defining the design parameters and aesthetics needed for the creation of effective audio based games, it was never intended as a purely academic investigation of the subject’s reactions to the test bed. To this end, we have chosen to use a less rigid style in presenting this project It should also be noted that an audio-mostly game should not be confused with a game specifically designed for the visually impaired, instead it is a game intended for normally sighted people to be used in situations where audio-based gameplay has an advantage over traditional visual based games (Mobile phones in transit for example).

  • 170.
    Papworth, Nigel
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Beowulf - An Audio Mostly Game2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper stresses the importance and benefits of developing technique that let people use, reflect on and develop their capabilities to move, to imagine and to feel, and not only replace these abilities with computer technology. This paper describes a project that shifts focus from eye to ear in a computer game application in order to start answering questions about sound’s ability to help users create inner, mental pictures and emotional responses to a game world. Can removing components from a computer game concept enhance the experience? Is less more?

  • 171.
    Papworth, Nigel
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Beowulf: A Game Experience Built On Sound Effects2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A computer game with most of the traditional graphics removed and replaced with a detailed and realistic soundscape, can give immersive gaming experiences. By reducing the graphical, explicit output of information from the game, the player becomes free to concentrate on interpreting the implicit information from a rich sound scape. This process of interpretation seems to have the power to invoke clear inner, mental images in the player, which in turn gives strong and immersive experiences. This paper describes a project that explores some of these mechanisms and points out some new potential directions for computer games and game play design.

  • 172.
    Papworth, Nigel
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Effective interactive design through quick and flexible prototyping2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the problems with designing new and untried applications, is the sheer effort needed to produce a testable prototype. Many projects get bogged down with production problems and hardware/software issues before they can even be tested for their basic functionality. This creates delays and frustrations within the project structure as well as creating unnecessary pressures on the project structure itself. This is equally true for the two main types of prototype/application created in design research: 1. a potential new product 2. a viable test bed to test an hypothosis. This paper investigates approaches, both practical and philosophical, to design processes and construction techniques that endeavour to bypass the most common pitfalls and stumbling blocks to a working prototype. In the main, the paper focuses on designing with ’Audio’ as an effective tool for quick, effective and emotive prototyping. Practical examples, both successful and catastrophic, are used to illustrate these aspects. In specific we will be comparing two audio based games, Journey and Beowulf, looking at their respective weaknesses and strengths. These prototyping techniques are realised, in the main, through easily available tools and recording techniques, based on standard audio-visual techniques. This provides a neat fast-track to developing ideas into viable applications. However while we can utilize a vast array of existing technologies to enable fast proto-typing, the most crucial element in successfully creating testbeds and bringing them before a test group is the intellectual approach to experiment design. Understanding the fundamental processes and isolating the essential questions the application is intended to answer has a direct bearing on our ability to channel available creative and productive energies with the maximum focus. Audio provides us with emotive tools highly suited to performing these kinds of functions. The advantage of taking this approach is a quick, flexible and, not least, economic route to getting vital early answers to practical research problems in IT user-based projects.

  • 173.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Umeå University, Sweden.
    The Aesthetic Experience in Interactive Lighting Design2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 174.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Kuenen, Stoffel
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Hummels, Caroline
    DiffractMe - Using A Skills-Based Approach in Design Practice2014In: The Proceedings of the Kansei Engineering and Emotion Research International Conference 2014 KEER2014, 2014, 9Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential of skills in design is intriguing; as skills open up new perceptions of the world they allow meaning to arise as we engage with the world. Several skills-based techniques that leverage this potential have been developed, and integrated into the Designing in Skills framework. The framework builds on personal engagement of designers in their practice, and promotes them to take a first-person perspective, enabling designs to be enriched with meaning. In this paper, we present the most recent workshop based on this approach, which specifically focuses on employing the Designing in Skills framework as a starting point and catalyst for design practice. We briefly introduce the Designing in Skills framework and present the DiffractMe! project in which we built on this approach to explore its potential for design practice. We conclude with reflections on the process and result by the involved designers. These reflections offer insights into the value of this approach for enriching interactive design with experiential qualities.

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    fulltext
  • 175.
    Ramia, Mazé
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Cape Town – (Majority) World Design Capital2013In: Quietly Enraged, a blog edited by Allan Chochinov, Carl DiSalvo, Cennydd Bowles, Jon Kolko, Mariana Amatullo, Ramia Mazé, and Tad Hirsch.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I’ve arrived to Cape Town, South Africa, the city designated as the 2014 World Design Capital. I am intrigued – how is design defined and done here? What can I learn about design from Cape Town? (Complete text is available on blog website)

  • 176.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Aesthetic Concerns2007In: Pervasive Information Systems, Armonk,, New York: M.E. Sharpe , 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aesthetics is a subject receiving increasing attention in the design of pervasive information systems. One reason is the realisation that existing approaches centred on usability and utility do not seem to cover aspects of use essential to the realm of the everyday. Another reason aesthetics enters the picture is that by leaving the established domain of personal computing, pervasive information technology comes in close contact with other design traditions engaged in the design of everyday things, and thus also a very different set of perspectives, values and approaches. As we position pervasive information systems in relation to design traditions such as architecture and industrial design, it becomes apparent that we often lack even a rudimentary understanding of the expressiveness and aesthetics of the technology we are working with. This chapter attempts to raise aesthetics as an issue that needs to be addressed in pervasive information systems: the motivations behind it; examples of what is being proposed, and; a critical discussion of its prospects. By taking a broader look at some of the key issues, and what general development strategies are evident, the chapter tries to present, if not a coherent picture, then at least an illustration that there indeed is something of an aesthetics of pervasive information systems emerging.

  • 177.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Designing Everyday Computational Things2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The prospect of ubiquitous computing in everyday life urges us to raise basic design issues pertaining to how we will live with, and not only use, computers. To design for everyday life involves much more than enabling people to accomplish certain tasks more effectively, and therefore, traditional approaches to human-computer interaction that focus on usability are not sufficient. To support critical discussion of, and reflection upon, the design of everyday computational things, both new design philosophies and a richer collection of design examples are needed. This thesis reports on the development of a design philosophy based on investigations of the design space of everyday computational things. Using experimental design, a collection of design examples illustrating how computational things can become integral parts of everyday environments has been developed. These investigations have been centred on: amplification of things and environments using computational technology; different forms of information presentation; the use of everyday materials in the design of computational things; and the aesthetics of computational things in use. The specific results are a number of design examples, including support for local interaction, access to digital information using physical objects as tokens, information displays such as the ChatterBox and Informative Art, and examples of Slow Technology. The general results are presented as a design philosophy for everyday computational things. This design philosophy is aimed at design for meaningful presence, rather than efficient use, and states that computational technology is a design material, that time is the central design parameter and that aesthetics is the basis for design for presence.

  • 178.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Disruptions2009In: (Re)Searching the Digital Bauhaus, London: Springer , 2009, , p. 27p. 191-217Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There seems to be something about the expressiveness of digital technologies that has to do with disruptions. Consider analogue to digital signal conversion as an example. Whereas it might be the goal of such processes to hide the resulting artefacts, it is nevertheless a matter of cutting a continuous flow up into sequences of discrete events. The same of course holds for how a computer tracks what the user does. If we look to the expressions of such processes, the issue of how these discrete events and pieces are created is central, that is, how disruptions are introduced through sensor systems, sampling procedures, compression algorithms, etc. Also in more high-level discourses on how technology presents itself to us, we find that disruptions play a rather central role. As in phenomenology: the notion of breakdown, when a tool reveals itself to us not as an instrumental extension of our intentions but as thing in itself. As in art: the use of poetic devices such as estrangement to disrupt normal conduct and expose aspects of how we relate to things and situations. And in between: everything from waiting for the traffic signals to turn green and dishwashers to finish, to conversations being disrupted by calling mobile phones. In what follows I will look into how we deal with disruptions in interaction design. The basic reason for doing so is the somewhat paradoxical situation that while disruptions seem to be something intrinsic to the digital, they are typically something interaction design aims to eliminate. I will argue that the idea – or ideal – of a continuous interaction between man and machine is one out of several options and thus perhaps not the “natural” strategy we typically seem to think.

  • 179.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    En experimenterande designforskning2007In: Under ytan: en antologi om designforsknin, Stockholm, Sweden: Raster Förlag , 2007, 2, , p. 14Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här texten består av två relativt fristående delar. Den första (Program) syftar till att ge en mer övergripande bild av en experimenterande designforskning; en sorts programförklaring. Den andra (Experiment) består av fragment av program och experiment från vårt eget arbete; ett slags exempel på hur experiment i enlighet med en sådan programförklaring kan te sig.

  • 180.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Left to our Own Devices2007In: Artifact, ISSN 1749-3463, E-ISSN 1749-3471, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 26-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 181.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    On Technology as Material in Design2005In: Design Philosophy Papers, E-ISSN 1448-7136, no 2, p. 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    And what is the purpose of writing music? One is, of course, not dealing with purposes but dealing with sounds. John Cage Silence In many ways, design has been moving away from the physical object. Emerging practices such as interaction, experience and service design, often utilising new technologies with almost 'immaterial' properties, seem to point to a situation where the material 'thing' as we used to know it is replaced by communication, information, systems and infrastructures. From another perspective, however, the importance of the things themselves is being re-discovered, and perhaps these new 'immaterial' technologies play a role in this. A central reason for this shift is that though technical objects are often characterised by their practical functionality, their everyday lives seem a bit more complicated than these official functions might suggest. Thus, the predominant focus on practical functionality in the design of technical objects need to reconsidered and above all complemented. As we turn to these things, we do not only have to re-locate the functions of technical objects within a rich context of use; to understand the presence of technical objects, we also need to consider the materials that build them. In what follows, I will present some ideas on how the properties of technologies (such as information technology) seem to influence the way we think about the design of technical objects. Further, I will try to challenge the instrumental perspective on technology by considering it to be design material, asking question about it such as: what are its expressions as material? What are its form elements?

  • 182.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Persuasive Design; Fringes and Foundations2006In: Persuasive Technology, First International Conference on Persuasive Technology for Human Well-Being, PERSUASIVE 2006, Berlin / Heidelberg: Springer , 2006, 2Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To understand what it means to design 'persuasive technology', one probably needs to understand it in relation to design in general. Using examples from a variety of areas of design discourse, the first part of the paper presents the idea that design is inherently persuasive. Following a discussion of what this might imply to the identification of 'persuasive design' as an emerging research area, the idea of objects as persuasive arguments in material form is presented. Suggesting that this notion could be used as basis for working with persuasion in design, the paper finally presents a practical example of how this might work in a design research project.

  • 183.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    RE: Definitions of use2008In: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909, Vol. 29, p. 14p. 410-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What does it mean to use something from a design point of view? As an alternative to role-based accounts of designers and users, this paper presents an act-based account that centres on what it is we do rather than who we are. More specifically, the paper analyses relations between design and use with focus on how open a design (process) is with respect to definitions of use through use; from well-defined influence from specific user tests on design decisions, via extensive user participation in the design process, to open-ended design processes that extends into what we otherwise understand as use. Thus, it transforms the relation between design and use into a question not of who, but of how.

  • 184.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Tangled interaction: on the expressiveness of tangible user interfaces2008In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 15, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is an analysis and exploration of a basic aesthetic issue in interaction design: how an ambition to design strong and persistent relations between appearance and functionality, evident in approaches such as tangible user interfaces, in crucial ways in which conflicts with the ways miniaturization of technology have changed the relation between the object's surface and its internal complexity. To further investigate this issue, four conceptual design experiments are presented exploring the expressiveness and aesthetic potential of overloading the object's surface by adding several layers of interaction, thus creating a kind of tangled interaction.

  • 185.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Towards user design? On the shift from object to user as the subject of design2006In: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909, Vol. 27, p. 123-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    If design used to be a matter of physical form, its subject the material object, it now increasingly seems to be about the user and her experiences. A central problem with this development is the confusion between what we are designing and who is going to use it—the shift towards user design. Trying to optimise fit on basis of knowledge about use and users, we risk trapping people in a situation where the use of our designs has been over-determined and where there is not enough space left to act and improvise.

  • 186.
    Redström, Johan
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Ljungstrand, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Jaksetic, Patricija
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    The ChatterBox: Using Text Manipulation in an Entertaining Information Display2000In: Proceedings of Graphics Interface 2000, 2000, 1, , p. 8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ChatterBox is an attempt to make use of the electronic "buzz" that exists in a modern workplace: the endless stream of e-mails, web pages, and electronic documents which fills the local ether(-net). The ChatterBox “listens” to this noise, transforms and recombines the texts in various ways, and presents the results in a public place. The goal is to provide a subtle reflection of the local activities and provide inspiration for new, unexpected combinations and thoughts. With the ChatterBox, we have tried to create something in between a traditional application and a piece of art: an entertaining and inspiring resource in the workplace. This poses several interesting questions concerning human-computer interaction design, e.g., information and display design. In this paper, we present the ChatterBox, its current implementation and experiences of its use.

  • 187. Redström, Johan
    et al.
    Redström, MariaMazé, RamiaRISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    IT+Textiles2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of the imminent arrival of ambient intelligence and smart textiles, the design of computational and textile things are rapidly converging. Substantial attention is directed towards the new technical possibilities of these new materials, but less effort seems to be put into the challenging task of re-thinking the use of textiles and computational technology as design materials on the basis of the complex mixture of traditions, perspectives, concepts and methods that result from such convergence. These challenges and opportunities inspired the IT+Textiles design research program. Trying to dissolve the distinction between technologies and design materials, we have combined textile and interaction design, textile and electrical engineering, philosophy and the behavioural sciences to find new approaches to issues of use and context, form and aesthetics, practice and theory. In this book, we describe the collection of materials, examples, methods and concepts we have developed in our investigation of this emerging design space. IT+Textiles is a design research program led by the Interactive Institute and Newmad Technologies in collaboration with academic and industrial partners in Sweden, and is funded by VINNOVA (the Swedish Agency for Innovation Systems). This is a reprint of the book published in 2005 by IT Press/Edita.

  • 188.
    Redström, Johan
    et al.
    IT + Textiles.
    Redström, MariaIT + Textiles.Mazé, RamiaRISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Göteborg.
    IT+Textiles2005Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of the imminent arrival of ambient intelligence and smart textiles, the design of computational and textile things are rapidly converging. Substantial attention is directed towards the new technical possibilities of these new materials, but less effort seems to be put into the challenging task of re-thinking the use of textiles and computational technology as design materials on the basis of the complex mixture of traditions, perspectives, concepts and methods that result from such convergence. These challenges and opportunities inspired the IT+Textiles design research program. Trying to dissolve the distinction between technologies and design materials, we have combined textile and interaction design, textile and electrical engineering, philosophy and the behavioural sciences to find new approaches to issues of use and context, form and aesthetics, practice and theory. In this book, we describe the collection of materials, examples, methods and concepts we have developed in our investigation of this emerging design space. IT+Textiles is a design research program led by the Interactive Institute and Newmad Technologies in collaboration with academic and industrial partners in Sweden, and is funded by VINNOVA (the Swedish Agency for Innovation Systems).

  • 189.
    Redström, Johan
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Skog, Tobias
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    Informative art: using amplified artworks as information displays2000In: Proceedings of DARE 2000 on Designing augmented reality environments, New York: ACM Press , 2000, 1, , p. 12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Informative art is computer augmented, or amplified, works of art that not only are aesthetical objects but also information displays, in as much as they dynamically reflect information about their environment. Informative art can be seen as a kind of slow technology, i.e. a technology that promotes moments of concentration and reflection. Our aim is to present the design space of informative art. We do so by discussing its properties and possibilities in relation to work on information visualisation, novel information display strategies, as well as art. A number of examples based on different kinds of mapping relations between information and the properties of the composition of an artwork are described.

  • 190.
    Redström, Maria
    et al.
    IT + Textiles.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Methods (and Madness)2010In: IT+Textiles, (2010 reprint) Borås, Sweden: Centre for Textile Research. (2005 first edition) Helsinki: IT Press/Edita , 2010, 12, p. 30-45Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a chapter in a book with the overall description: In the light of the imminent arrival of ambient intelligence and smart textiles, the design of computational and textile things are rapidly converging. Substantial attention is directed towards the new technical possibilities of these new materials, but less effort seems to be put into the challenging task of re-thinking the use of textiles and computational technology as design materials on the basis of the complex mixture of traditions, perspectives, concepts and methods that result from such convergence. These challenges and opportunities inspired the IT+Textiles design research program. Trying to dissolve the distinction between technologies and design materials, we have combined textile and interaction design, textile and electrical engineering, philosophy and the behavioural sciences to find new approaches to issues of use and context, form and aesthetics, practice and theory. In this book, we describe the collection of materials, examples, methods and concepts we have developed in our investigation of this emerging design space.

  • 191. Sangiorgi, Daniela
    et al.
    Clark, Brendon
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Toward a Participatory Design Approach to Service Design2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces service design as a potential Participatory Design (PD) theme. It proposes that the success of designing good services can be increased by including the perspectives and practices of the future service participants into the design process. Through the description of an action-research project, the paper explores the potentials and limitations of using an ethnographic approach and Activity Theory to frame the service design process and interpret the complexity of services.

  • 192.
    Schneidler, Tobi
    et al.
    SWITCH!.
    Ballhatchet, Tom
    SWITCH!.
    Sasson, Solon
    SWITCH!.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute, Interactive Institute Stockholm. Design Research Unit.
    Green Memes2013In: SWITCH! Design and everyday energy ecologies, Stockholm, Sweden: Interactive Institute Swedish ICT , 2013, 14, p. 81-100Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    'Green Memes' proposes an online social network and local kiosks for people to learn about energy consumption. Based on electricity data collected from smart grids, meters and sensors, data visualizations depict consumption per building, per person and at many other scales. A social networking function is attached to these — text messages, or ‘green memes’, invite users to engage with energy-savings advice, current events and sustainability research. Accessible online, through mobile devices, or installed locally, Green Memes combines ‘hard data’ with the ‘soft power’ of personalized information, public opinion and face- to-face communication. The project is currently seeking partners to further develop the system and interface design.

  • 193.
    Sirkka, Anna
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Piteå.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Piteå.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Piteå.
    Delsing, Katarina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Piteå.
    Designing auditory alarms for an industrial control room2014In: Proceedings of the 46th Annual Nordic Ergonomics Society ConferenceArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Constantly increasing and more complex information flows in industrial control rooms raise the risk that operators will become distracted, confused and visually overloaded in demanding situations. New multimodal interfaces may offer better solutions. In this work we focus on alarm sound design. Alarms serve to alert operators to deviations from normal conditions and enable them to react appropriately. The speed and accuracy with which operators can identify alarms are crucial to effectiveness. Additionally, auditory alarms should not be too annoying or distracting. Salient auditory stimuli effectively catch and guide attention, regardless of operators’ visual focus. Research has established that auditory signals can be designed to express different levels of urgency. Sound can also convey detailed information. However auditory alarms are often implemented carelessly, using sounds that are too loud, too many and too confusing.The aim of this work was to develop a concept to enhance the auditory alarms in a control room of a paper mill. The goals were to improve operator effectiveness and acceptance. Before concept development a pretest involving 21 operators evaluated the state of the alarm sounds. The results indicated poor design and confirmed some well-known issues. The developed concept consists of new alarm sounds, spatial presentation of the sounds and alarm repetition intervals. The sounds convey urgency information and information associated with the production sections. The user-centred design process involved 24 operators and ontained iterations in which the concept was refined and feedback incorporated. An evaluation involving operators then studied the effects of the new concept. Operator acceptance was assessed using the Van der Laan acceptance scale, rating the usefulness and satisfaction of alarm sounds. There was a considerable increase in both usefulness and satisfaction scores between the pretest and posttest. These results support that the developed concept increases operator effectiveness and acceptance.

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  • 194.
    Sirkka, Anna
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Piteå.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Piteå.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Piteå.
    Delsing, Katarina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Piteå.
    The Design of an Auditory Alarm Concept for a Paper Mill Control Room2014In: Advances in Ergonomics In Design, Usability & Special Populations: Part III, Volym 18 of Advances in Human Factors and Ergonomics 2014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Auditory alarms are common in industrial control rooms. Sound has certain advantages over other alarm modes. Salient auditory stimuli effectively capture and guide attention, regardless of the operators’ visual focus. Sound can also convey detailed information. However, auditory alarms are often carelessly implemented, utilising sounds that are too loud, too numerous, and too confusing. The aim of this work was to develop a concept to enhance the auditory alarms in a control room. Before the concept was developed, a study involving 21 operators evaluated the state of the alarm sounds. The results indicated a poor design and confirmed certain well-known issues with alarm sounds. The concept included new alarm sounds, spatial presentation of the sounds, and alarm repetition intervals. The sounds are based on a new design principle in which each alarm sound composes two parts. One conveys urgency information, and the other contains information associated with the section in question. The design process involved 24 control-room operators and 13 design iterations, which were used to refine the concept. An evaluation involving 20 operators was conducted to examine the appropriateness of the concept. The results demonstrate that the developed concept increases operator effectiveness and acceptance as well as the overall sound environment.

  • 195.
    Sirkka, Anna
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Frimalm, Ronja
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, Interactive.
    An Auditory Display to Convey Urgency Information in Industrial Control Rooms2014In: Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics, 11th International Conference, EPCE 2014, Held as Part of HCI International 2014, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, June 22-27, 2014. ProceedingsArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Auditory warning signals are common features in industrial control rooms. Finding sound signals that convey higher degrees of urgency while keeping the potential for annoyance low is challenging. In the present study, evaluations were performed on four different types of auditory displays. The displays were all designed to convey three levels of urgency. The examination focused on the following questions: (1) “How reliably can the operators identify the three levels of urgency?” and (2) “How annoying do the operators find the sound signals?”. Fourteen operators participated in the study. For every signal within each auditory display, the participants were asked to rate the level of urgency and annoyance. The results show that one can design auditory displays that employ appropriate urgency mapping while the perceived annoyance is kept at a low level. The work also suggests that involving the end users in the design process could be advantageous.

  • 196.
    Sjömark, Cecilia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Biofeedback Music2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 197.
    Sjömark, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Berg, Jan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Musical Parameters for Promoting Relaxation And Stress-Reduction in Listeners2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 198.
    Spengemann, Pauline
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Reducing Food Waste in the Household through Behaviour Change.2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
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  • 199. Stenström, Christopher Dristig
    et al.
    Björk, Staffan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. GAME.
    Understanding Computer Role-Playing Games: A Genre Analysis Based on Gameplay Features in Combat Systems2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A game genre as diverse as that of computer role-playing games is difficult to overview. This poses challenges or both developers and researchers to position their work clearly within the genre. We present an overview of the genre based on clustering games with similar gameplay features. This allows a tracing of relations between subgenres through their gameplay, and connecting this to concrete game examples. The analysis was done through using gameplay design patterns to identify gameplay features and focused upon the combat systems in the games. The resulting cluster structure makes use of 321 patterns to create 37 different subgenre classifications based solely on gameplay features. In addition to the clusters, we identify four categories of patterns that help designers and researchers understand the combat systems in computer role-playing games.

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  • 200. Svahn, Mattias
    et al.
    Wahlund, R
    Denward, Marie
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Rademaker, C
    Nilsson, P
    A model for evaluating converged media for advertising purposes2013In: Convergent Divergence? - Cross-Disciplinary Viewpoint on Media Convergence, Germany: Springer - Verlag , 2013, 11Chapter in book (Refereed)
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