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  • 101. Rindlav-Westling, A.
    et al.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Gatenholm, P.
    Crystallinity and morphology in films of starch, amylose and amylopectin blends2002In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 84-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Films of potato starch, amylose, and amylopectin and blends thereof were prepared by solution casting and examined using X-ray diffraction, light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Amylose films had a relative crystallinity of about 30% whereas amylopectin films were entirely amorphous. Blending of amylose and amylopectin resulted in films with a considerably higher degree of crystallinity than could be predicted. This is explained by cocrystallization between amylose and amylopectin and possibly by crystallization of amylopectin. The crystallized material gave rise to an endotherm detected with differential scanning calorimetry. The enthalpy and peak temperature of the transition also increased as the water content decreased. When the amylose proportion in the blends was low, separate phases of amylose and amylopectin were observed by light microscopy. At higher amylose proportions, however, the phase separation was apparently prevented by amylose gelation and the formation of a continuous amylose network. The amylose network in the films, observed with transmission electron microscopy, consisted of stiff strands and open pores and became less visible as the amylose proportion decreased. The water content of the films was dependent on the microstructure and the crystallinity.

  • 102. Rindlav-Westling, A.
    et al.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Hermansson, Ann-Marie
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Gatenholm, P.
    Structure, mechanical and barrier properties of amylose and amylopectin films1998In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 36, no 42038, p. 217-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of film formation conditions on structure, mechanical properties and barrier properties of amylose and amylopectin films was studied. The films were prepared by solution-gel-casting of amylose and amylopectin from potato, with or without the addition of glycerol as plasticizer. Transmission electron micrographs showed that the network structure characteristic for the amylose gel was also found in the film state. The amylose films without glycerol plasticization exhibited a relatively high degree of B-type crystallinity, as revealed by wide-angle X-ray diffraction, whereas the unplasticized amylopectin films were amorphous. Although the addition of glycerol did not affect the crystallinity of the amylose films, glycerol-plasticized amylopectin formed B-type crystallinity, and the degree of crystallinity was dependent on the air humidity during film formation. The degree of crystallinity affected the mechanical properties of the amylopectin films, whereas the mechanical properties of the amylose films were influenced by the network microstructure. Oxygen and water vapour permeabilities were dependent neither on the degree of crystallinity in the films nor on the network structure. © 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 103.
    Sepehri, Sobhan
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Andersson, Johanna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Schaller, Vincent
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Grüttner, Cordula
    Micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, Germany.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Johansson, Christer
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Remote Sensing of the Nano-Rheological Properties of Soft Materials Using Magnetic Nanoparticles and Magnetic AC Susceptometry2023In: Nanomaterials, E-ISSN 2079-4991, Vol. 13, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have developed a nano-rheological characterization tool to extract the frequency- and scale-dependent rheological properties of soft materials during oral processing. Taking advantage of AC susceptometry, the dynamic magnetization of magnetic nanoparticles blended in the matrix material is measured. The magnetic AC susceptibility spectra of the particles are affected by the viscosity and mechanical modulus of the matrix material and provide the rheological properties of the matrix. Commercially available iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles with 80 and 100 nm particle sizes are used as tracers in the frequency range of 1 Hz–10 kHz. The AC susceptibility is measured using two differentially connected coils, and the effects of the sample temperature and distance with respect to the detection coils are investigated. The developed measurement setup shows the feasibility of remote nano-rheological measurements up to 2 cm from the coil system, which can be used to, e.g., monitor the texture of matrix materials during oral processing.

  • 104. Sharafi, Nooshin
    et al.
    Sepehri, Sobhan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Andersson, Johanna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Schaller, Vincent
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Altskär, Annika
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Grüttner, Cordula
    micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, Germany.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Johansson, Christer
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Nanorheological analysis of xanthan/water solutions using magnetic nanoparticles with different particle sizes2020In: Annual Transactions of the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 28, p. 147-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have studied nanorheological properties (viscosity and shear moduli) of aqueous xanthan solutions, in the oscillation frequency range up to 10 kHz by using magnetic particles that undergo Brownian relaxation and frequency dependent AC susceptibility (ACS). We used two magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) systems with different mean particle sizes of 80 nm and 100 nm. The determined viscosity and shear modulus of the diluted xanthan solutions from the ACS measurement of the two particle systems agree with traditional oscillatory rheological measurements. However, there is a particle size dependency that could be explained by comparing particles sizes with the xanthan microstructure

  • 105.
    Sriviriyakul, Thana
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, Acreo.
    Bogren, Sara
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, Acreo.
    Schaller, Vincent
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, Acreo. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Jonasson, Christian
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, Acreo.
    Blomgren, Jakob
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, Acreo.
    Ahrentorp, Fredrik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, Acreo.
    Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Berta, Marco
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Grüttner, Cordula
    micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, Germany.
    Zeng, Lunjie
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Johansson, Christer
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, Acreo.
    Nanorheological studies of xanthan/water solutions using magnetic nanoparticles2019In: Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials, ISSN 0304-8853, E-ISSN 1873-4766, Vol. 473, p. 268-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show results of nanorheological studies of different concentrations of xanthan (non-Newtonian fluid) in water using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) together with the AC susceptibility (ACS) vs frequency method. For comparison we also show the ACS response for different concentrations of glycerol in water (Newtonian fluid). The ACS response is measured, and the data is modelled using dynamic magnetic models and different viscoelastic models. We study the ACS response (in-phase and out-of-phase ACS components) at different concentrations of xanthan in water (up to 1 wt% xanthan) and with a constant concentration of MNPs. We use MNP systems that show Brownian relaxation (sensitive to changes in the environmental properties around the MNPs). ACS measurements are performed using the DynoMag system. The Brownian relaxation of the MNP system peak is shifting down in frequency and the ACS response is broadening and decreases due to changes in the viscoelastic properties around the MNPs in the xanthan solution. The viscosity and the storage moduli are determined at each excitation frequency and compared with traditional macroscopic small amplitude oscillatory shear rheological measurements. The results from the traditional rheological and nanorheological measurements correlate well at higher xanthan concentration.

  • 106.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Bolus rheology of texture-modified food - effect of degree of modification.2021In: Journal of texture studies, ISSN 0022-4901, E-ISSN 1745-4603, Vol. 52, no 5-6, p. 540-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swallowing disorders, or dysphagia, require an intake of texture-modified foods progressively softer, smoother and moister depending on the severity of the disorder. Bolus rheology was determined for five healthy subjects for a set of such solid foods regularly given to dysphagia patients. The softest class was gel food, then a smooth timbale which both were compared to the corresponding regular, un-modified food. The foods investigated were bread, cheese, tomato and the combination as a sandwich, all for the respective texture class: gel, timbale and regular food. The subjects chewed until ready to swallow and the expectorated bolus was immediately measured for complex shear modulus and viscosity, and moisture and saliva content were determined. Rheology show that texture-modification influenced bolus rheology with decreased viscosity and modulus for increased degree of modification. Also saliva content as well as chews-to-swallow decreased with degree of modification. Overall, the bolus saliva content was lower for the combination (sandwich) than for the individual components. Saliva content was fairly constant irrespective of food moisture content. The phase angle for all boluses was also relatively constant, indicating a similar bolus structure. All boluses of the texture-modified foods showed high extensional viscosity, which is important for bolus cohesiveness. Bolus rheology rather than food texture determines if a food is safe to swallow and the results show that the intended texture-modification is reflected in the flow properties of the respective boluses. 

  • 107.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Dynamic Mechanical Analysis of Biopolymer Films1998In: Annual Transactionof the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 6, p. 147-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 108.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Extensional rheology of biopolymer systems2011In: Annual Transactionof the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 19, p. 9-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience.
    Food Oral Design2014In: Annual Transactions of the Nordic Rheology Society, p. 45-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We all eat food and drink liquids several times per day. It is a highly unconscious process rendering the culinary experience and the pleasure of the meal. The mechanisms of the eating and the food processing in the mouth are commonly referred to as Food Oral Processing. During the relative short time we keep the food in the mouth we form our opinion of it, and by designing the properties of the food we can therefore optimise the perception to give a desirable culinary experience, which is the essence of Food Oral Design.

  • 110.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Food Rheology2010In: UNESCO Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems, Eolss Publishers Co. Ltd , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 111.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Introduction to rheology for educated beginners2021Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Physical properties of a model set of solid, texture-modified foods2021In: Journal of texture studies, ISSN 0022-4901, E-ISSN 1745-4603, Vol. 52, no 5-6, p. 578-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Those suffering from swallowing disorders, or dysphagia, require texture-modified foods for safe swallowing. The texture is modified according to the severity of the disorder, as maintained by the guidelines outlining classes of texture-modified foods, ranging from viscous soups to soft, solid foods. As a basis for studies of bolus rheology and oral response of solid texture-modified foods, a set of well-defined, solid foods has been identified and characterized regarding texture and physical properties. Gelled food is compared to both the firmer timbale class and to the corresponding regular food. Foods eaten at room temperature were chosen to avoid temperature effects: bread, cheese, tomato, and the combination into a sandwich. All foods were tested as gel, timbale, and regular food. The texture was determined by compression and penetration tests, thereby showing a decrease in strength (compression stress), stiffness (modulus), and penetration force for increased degree of modification. The moisture content increased with increased degree of modification. The structural change from room to oral temperature was monitored by the complex shear modulus that showed a decrease with increasing temperature. Cheese and the gelatine-based tomato gel showed a distinct melting when the temperature was increased to 37°C. The texture-modified foods were softer and moister in all aspects as compared to the regular foods, which follows the intended modification. The classes for the texture-modified foods were qualitatively comparable to other national classification systems with regard to solid foods, but there is a lack of objective, physics-based classification of texture, especially for solid, texture-modified foods.

  • 113.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Reologi för välutbildade nybörjare2021In: Dysfagi – Farligt, vanligt och ofta förbisett / [ed] Olle Ekberg and Ola Björgell, Svenska Läkaresällskapet , 2021Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 114.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Andersson, Johanna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Edible and sustainable hot-melt adhesive2022In: Annual Transactions - The Nordic Rheology Society, ISSN 1601-4057, Vol. 30, p. 49-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hot-melt adhesives (HMA) are used for hobby as well as in industrial applications as a fast-setting alternative without solvents. They are used for corrugated boxes and in electronic devices to affix parts and wires, as well as for bookbinding as well as a glue in hygiene products. An edible HMA can be used for e.g. food decorations, for the childcare sector as a safe alternative to other glues as well as in packagings where corrugated boxes and paperboard cartons arc glued. We have developed an edible HMA based on sugars which can be applied by the same application techniques as conventional HMAs. The rheol. properties showed a similar melting behavior as a conventional HMA. A characterization of the mech. properties of the glue showed that the edible HMA was strong but fragile as compared to the more rubbery conventional HMA.

  • 115.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Andersson, Johanna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Holmberg, Fredrik
    Animato, Sweden.
    A mechanical model of the human throat for swallowing rheology2021In: Annual Transactions of the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 29, p. 51-57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 116.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Berta, Marco
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Development of extruded high-protein alternatives to meat2017In: Annual Transactions of the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 25, p. 39-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By combining rheology, food science, materials science and creative culinary ingenuity we have developed healthy, plantbased protein foods with low carbon footprint that are equally attractive to meat. Starting from a mixture of proteins we have extrude structures with fibrous, desirable texture and chewiness. The taste and flavour is bland and an experienced chef has applied his magic to create succulent protein food dishes.

  • 117.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Bohlin, L
    Contraction flow measurements of extensional properties2000In: Annual Transactionof the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 8/9, p. 181-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 118.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Edrud, S.
    Ekman, Susanne
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Wendin, Karin
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Rheological properties of a barium sulphate contrast medium.2007In: Transactions of the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 15, p. 267-268Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 119.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Franzoni, Giovanni
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Johansson, Daniel
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    What determines foaming ability of a melt : rheology or surface tension?2012In: Annual Transactions of the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 20, p. 141-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 120.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Hermansson, Ann-Marie
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Large deformation properties of beta-lactoglobulin gel structures.1991In: Food Hydrocolloids, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 399-352Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 121.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Hermansson, Ann-Marie
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Rheological behaviour of mixed gels of kappa-carrageenan-locust bean gum1993In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 49-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mixed gels of the K, Na and Ca-forms of ?-carrageenan and locust bean gum at a total polysaccharide concentration of 1% (w/w) were studied by dynamic viscoelastic measurements. Synergistic effects were only observed for mixed gels with K-?-carrageenan in ?0·1 m KCl. The composition favouring maximum synergy shifted from 90%-?-carrageenan in distilled water down to 35% K-?-carrageenan in 0·1 m KCl. Gels of K-?-carrageenan/locust bean gum did not show synergistic effects at high potassium concentration (0·2 m KCl). The typical behaviour of K-?-carrageenan at ?50 mm KCl dominated the rheological behaviour of the mixed systems even when the locust bean gum content was high. The synergistic effects probably originate from different mechanisms at low, 0-10 mm KCl, and high, 50-100 mm KCl, concentrations because of differences in the potassium-induced microstructure. The mixed gels with the Na or Ca-form of ?-carrageenan showed no synergy. Addition of locust bean gum caused the storage modulus to decrease and the phase angle to increase. The gels were weak, with G? < 170 Pa for the Na form and G? < 350 Pa for the Ca form. The mixed gels with both the Na and Ca forms had a broken frequency dependence of G?(f). © 1993.

  • 122.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Hermansson, Ann-Marie
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Rheology and microstructure of mixed K-carrageenan-galactomannan gels.1995In: Annual Transactions of the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 3, p. 33-35Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 123.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Svenska livmedelsinstitutet.
    Hermansson, Ann-Marie
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Svenska livmedelsinstitutet.
    Viscoelastic behaviour of beta-lactoglobulin gel-structures.1990In: Food Hydrocolloids, Vol. 4, p. 121-135Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 124.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Johansson, D
    Diogo-Löfgren, C
    Christersson, C
    Viscoelastic properties of saliva from different glands2009In: Annual Transactionof the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 17, p. 109-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 125.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Johansson, D
    Wendin, K
    Rheological properties of food for patients with swallowing disorders2008In: Annual Transactionof the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 16, p. 137-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 126.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Kaunisto, Erik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Wassen, Sophia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Dahl, Leyla
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Pashazadeh, Sajjad
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Rheology and fibre formation in extruded meat analogues2023In: Annual transactionsof the Nordic rheology society, Vol. 31, p. 45-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    lant proteins such as soy, pea and wheat gluten are known to form a fibrous structures resembling chicken meat when extruded at elevated temperature with subsequent active cooling. The current hypothesis on the mechanisms responsible for the fibre formation contribute to understanding but are not sufficient to describe the full picture and cannot be used to predict fibre formation ability of protein melts thus hampering the use of more sustainable protein ... interactions between protein chains or polymer crystallites. The aim of the present study to use rheological data of protein melts combined with simulation to elucidate the fibre formation mechanisms and this paper will show an example.

  • 127.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Langer, R.
    Mechanical shear properties of cell-polymer cartilage constructs1999In: Tissue engineering, ISSN 1076-3279, E-ISSN 1557-8690, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 241-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cartilaginous constructs were created by using bovine chondrocytes on synthetic, biodegradable scaffolds made of fibrous polyglycolic acid (PGA). The constructs have previously been shown to resemble natural articular cartilage biochemically and histologically. The mechanical properties of articular cartilage mainly depend on the swollen extracellular matrix (ECM), which is a gel consisting of collagen fibers and proteoglycans in a fluid phase of water and electrolytes. The biomechanical properties of the constructs and the build-up of the ECM were studied using dynamic, nondestructive measurements in shear. A small, harmonic strain, ? ? 5 x 10-4, was applied to the sample, and the resulting stress was recorded and used for calculating the complex shear modulus G*. The applied strain was much smaller than that used in confined compression. The shear modulus G* correlated well with both the collagen and glycosaminoglycan content of the constructs but did not reach the same level as in natural cartilage. Collagen is the dominant component contributing to the shear strength of cartilage, and G* was shown to depend approximately quadratically on the collagen content of the constructs. The difference in G* between the constructs and natural cartilage was shown to depend on both the biochemical composition and the microstructure of the constructs.

  • 128.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Langer, R
    Rheological Properties and Microstructure of Tissue Engineered Cartilage1999In: The Wiley Polymer Networks Group Review Series, 2 / [ed] Stokke, B. T., 1999Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 129.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Langton, Maud
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Hermansson, Ann-Marie
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Inhomogenous biopolymer gels.1993In: Macromolekulare Chemie. Macromolecular Symposia, Vol. 76, p. 283-290Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 130.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Langton, Maud
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Hermansson, Ann-Marie
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Inhomogenous fine-stranded beta-lactoglobulin gels.1992In: Food Hydrocolloids, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 455-470Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 131.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Langton, Maud
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Hermansson, Ann-Marie
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Microstructure and rheological behaviour of particulate beta-lactoglobulin gels.1993In: Food Hydrocolloids, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 195-212Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 132.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Langton, Maud
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Hermansson, Ann-Marie
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Small and large deformation studies of protein gels.1995In: Journal of Rheology, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 1445-1450Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 133.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Levenstam Bragd, Emma
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience.
    Johansson, Daniel
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience.
    Renewable Gas Barriers for Paper Coating2013In: Annual Transactions of the Nordic Rheology Society, p. 327-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We annually produce 400 million tonnes of paper and board globally and a large part is produced in the Nordic countries. Almost all paper is coated and there is specifically a need for renewable gas barriers for packaging use. Dispersion coating is an efficient coating process, but also one with high demands on the rheological properties of the coating formulation. Dispersion coating based on cereal proteins was developed and the coatings were both strong and gas tight.

  • 134.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lopez-Sanches, Patricia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Challer, V.
    Johansson, C.
    Nano-rheometry for food oral processing2019In: Annual transactions of the nordic rheology society, 2019, Vol. 27, p. 117-120Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 135.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Miljkovic, Ana
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Bolus rheology of food for dysphagia management2021In: Annual Transactions of the Nordic Rheology Society, p. 43-45Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 136.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Miljkovic, Ana
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Andersson, Johanna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Matsuo, Koichiro
    Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.
    Bolus rheology of texture adjusted food—Effect of age2023In: Journal of texture studies, ISSN 0022-4901, E-ISSN 1745-4603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swallowing disorders, or dysphagia, affect a large part of the population due to factors such as degenerative diseases, medication side effects or simply age-related impairment of physiological oropharyngeal function. The management of dysphagia is mainly handles through texture-modified foods of progressively softer, smoother, moister textures, depending on the severity of the disorder. Rheological and physiological-related properties of boluses were determined for a group of five older persons (average age, 74) for a set of texture-modified foods: bread, cheese and tomato and the combination into a sandwich. The softest class was gel food, after which came a smooth timbale; both were compared to boluses of regular food. The subjects chewed until ready to swallow, at which point the bolus was expectorated and measured regarding saliva content, linear viscoelasticity and shear viscosity. The results were compared to those of a previously studied younger group (average age, 38). The general physiological status of the subjects was determined by hand and tongue strength, diadochokinesis and one-legged standing and showed that all subjects were as healthy and fit as the younger group. Age-related properties such as one-legged standing with closed eyes and salivary flow plus bolus saliva content were lower for the older group, but the average chews-until-swallow was surprisingly also lower. Consequently, bolus modulus and viscosity were higher than for the younger group. Overall, the intended texture modification was reflected in bolus rheological and physiological-related properties. Bolus modulus, viscosity, saliva content and chews-until-swallowed all decreased from regular food to timbale food to gel food. © 2023 The Authors.

  • 137.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Oom, A
    Pettersson, A
    Edrud, S
    Extensional rheology of cereal protein systems2006In: Annual Transactionof the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 14, p. 135-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 138.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Pettersson, A.
    Léufven, A.
    Mechanical properties and permeability of whey protein films.1996In: Annual Transactions of the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 4, p. 93-95Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Qazi, Waqas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Nyström, Magda
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Berta, Marco
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Bulow, Margareta
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Olle
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Effect of shear vs. extensional flow during swallowing2015In: Annual Transactions - The Nordic Rheology Society, ISSN 1601-4057, Vol. 23, p. 63-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When we eat the swallowing is mainly an involuntary process. However, for an increasing number of the population the actual swallowing causes problems. The effect of elasticity on swallowing was thus evaluated. Edible model fluid foods were developed and the rheological properties were evaluated. The study indicated positive effects of fluid elasticity on the ease of swallowing for patients suffering from dysphagia.

  • 140.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Rindlav-Westling, A.
    Gatenholm, P.
    Humidity-induced structural transitions in amylose and amylopectin films2001In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 209-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of humidity on the dynamic mechanical and barrier properties and on the microstructure of amylose and amylopectin films was studied. The films were solution-gel-cast, with and without glycerol as added plasticizer, and dried to equilibrium weight under various relative humidities (RH). The network microstructure of glycerol-plasticized amylose films was shown to change from dense and homogeneous to a more open structure with fluctuations in the pore size when the surrounding RH was increased. The structural change was attributed to plasticization of the amorphous areas by increased water content, leading to higher mobility in the network and subsequent inhomogeneous swelling. This structural change had a direct influence on the oxygen permeability, which drastically increased. The onset of the increase occurred at lower surrounding RH for the films containing glycerol, and these films also had higher oxygen permeability. Glycerol-plasticized amylopectin films with gradually increased crystallinity were prepared by varying the RH during film formation. Dynamic mechanical analysis at both varied temperature and RH showed that the increased crystallinity led to higher glass transition temperature, T g, and a smaller effect of the surrounding humidity on mechanical and barrier properties. The RH during the formation of glycerol-plasticized amylose films did not affect crystallinity or T g. These films formed at 70% RH were shown to have a marked heterogeneous network. © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  • 141.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Roëtynck, C
    Bohlin, L
    Contraction flow for characterization of extensional rheological properties2005In: Annual Transactionof the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 13, p. 135-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 142.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Röding, Magnus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Optimisation of applied harmonics in Fourier Transform Rheology to enablerapid acquisition of mechanical spectra of strain-sensitive,time dependent materials2020In: Annual Transactions - The Nordic Rheology Society, ISSN 1601-4057, Vol. 28, p. 25-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biological fluids such as food boluses are complex fluids which often are inhomogeneous, change over time and have a limited linear region. The rheological properties of a food bolus determine how easy it is to swallow which is crucial for those suffering from swallowing disorders. It is advantageous to use Fourier transform rheology to quickly obtain the mechanical spectrum of a bolus as it changes over time. Several harmonic strains are superimposed, and the resulting stress response is transformed into a mechanical spectrum. A novel optimisation algorithm was applied to minimise the maximal strain and strain rate applied to the sensitive bolus sample. The time to obtain a mechanical spectrum was reduced from 10 to 3.5 minutes.

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  • 143.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Sepehri, Sobhan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Andersson, Johanna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Johansson, Christer
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Nano-rheometry for non-invasive monitoring of texture during food oral processing2022In: Annual Transactions - The Nordic Rheology Society, ISSN 1601-4057, Vol. 30, p. 53-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food oral processing is the first step in the digestive process which prepares food forswallowing and digestion. The process only lasts a few seconds, yet it determines our complete perception of texture, taste and aroma of the product we are eating. This oral processing is an intricate combination ofvoluntary and involuntary actions, and it involves complex flow geometry, mass transport offluids and gases and signal processing and feedback from the brain. Any attempt of inserting measuring devices in the mouth will fail because the complete oral processing will be influenced. We have developed a remote, non-invasive determination technique using magnetic sensing of magnetic nanoparticles iron oxide particles. A small amount of these particles senses their surrounding texture through their rotation and the nano-viscoelasticity can therefore be picked up without disturbing the oral processing.

  • 144.
    Stading, Mats
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Waqas, Mohamad Qazi
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Holmberg, F
    Animato Konstruktions AB, Sweden.
    Wiklund, Johan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Kotze, Richard
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Ekberg, O.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    A Device that Models Human Swallowing2019In: Dysphagia (New York. Print), ISSN 0179-051X, E-ISSN 1432-0460, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 615-626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pharynx is critical for correct swallowing, facilitating the transport of both air and food transport in a highly coordinated manner, and aberrant co-ordination causes swallowing disorders (dysphagia). In this work, an in vitro model of swallowing was designed to investigate the role of rheology in swallowing and for use as a pre-clinical tool for simulation of different routes to dysphagia. The model is based on the geometry of the human pharynx. Manometry is used for pressure measurements and ultrasonic analysis is performed to analyze the flow profiles and determine shear rate in the bolus, the latter being vital information largely missing in literature. In the fully automated model, bolus injection, epiglottis/nasopharynx movement, and ultrasound transducer positioning can be controlled. Simulation of closing of the airways and nasal cavity is modulated by the software, as is a clamping valve that simulates the upper esophageal sphincter. The actions can be timed and valves opened to different degrees, resembling pathologic swallowing conditions. To validate measurements of the velocity profile and manometry, continuous and bolus flow was performed. The respective velocity profiles demonstrated the accuracy and validity of the flow characterization necessary for determining bolus flow. A maximum bolus shear rate of 80 s−1 was noted for syrup-consistency fluids. Similarly, the manometry data acquired compared very well with clinical studies.

  • 145.
    Thorvaldsson, K.
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Nilsson, Katarina
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Kidman, Siw
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Langton, Maud
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Rheology and structure of heat-treated pasta dough: Influence of water content and heating rate1999In: Lebensmittel-Wissenschaft + Technologie, ISSN 0023-6438, E-ISSN 1096-1127, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 154-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The migration of water and the influence of water content and heating rate on the rheological and structural formation of pasta dough were investigated. The dough used in the study had two different water contents, 39.5 and 41.0%, and was made using water and wheat flour. The samples, 15 x 15 x 2 cm in size, were heated from 25 to 80°C in a conventional oven at two different temperatures, 100 and 150°C, to achieve two different heating rates. During the heating the local water content was measured in the centre of the samples with a fibre-optic NIR instrument. The temperature was measured in the centre, halfway to the centre and at the surface. The rheology of the heat-treated samples was studied by means of tensile tests. Young's modulus, stress at maximum load and energy to break point were calculated. The micro structure of the samples was characterised by CLSM, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the microstructural parameters were quantified using image analysis. The changes in rheological properties during heating were studied by means of DMA. Untreated dough samples were heated from 25 to 90°C with a heating rate of 5° C/min and a compressing oscillation of 1 Hz. The changes in phase angle δ and storage modulus E' were measured. The most important results were that no migration of water inside the pasta dough could be found. Both the water content and the heating rate affected the structural and rhelogical properties of the pasta dough. There was a maximum in E' vs. temperature, which shifted towards higher temperatures with decreasing water content. Young's modulus was affected by both the heating rate and the water content. Energy to break point and stress at maximum load were affected by the heating rate. The pore size was affected by the water content. The swelling temperature seemed to increase as the heating rate increased

  • 146.
    Thorvaldsson, Karin
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Nilsson, Katarina
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Kidman, Siw
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Langton, Maud
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Rheology and structure of heat-treated pasta dough - influence of water content and heating rate1998Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The migration of water, and the influence of water content and heating rate on the rheological and structural formation of pasta dough were investigated. During heating, the local water content was measured in the center of the samples with a fiber optic NIR-instrument. The rheology of the heat-treated samples was studied by tensile tests. Young's modulus, the stress at maximum load and the energy to break point were calculated. The microstructure of the samples was characterized by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the parameters were quantified by image analysis. No migration of water inside the samples could be found, and both the water content and the heating rate affected the structural and rheological properties of the samples.

  • 147.
    Undeland, Ingrid
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Lingnert, Hans
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Influence of skinning on lipid oxidation in different horizontal layers of herring (Clupea harengus) during frozen storage1998In: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, ISSN 0022-5142, E-ISSN 1097-0010, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 441-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of skinning and of compositional differences on the oxidative stability of various horizontal layers from herring (Clupea harengus) during frozen storage. Herring fillets, with and without skin, were stored at -18°C for 0, 3, 9, 16 and 28 weeks. After each storage period, the fillets were divided horizontally into three layers: 'under skin', 'middle part' and 'inner part'. Each layer was then extracted for total lipids, in which peroxide value (PV), absorbance at 234 nm (A234) and 268 nm (A268) as well as lipid-soluble fluorescent oxidation products (FP) were measured. Prior to storage, the fat content, fatty acid pattern and ?-tocopherol were also analysed. During storage of skinless fillets, the under skin layer increased most in PV, A234, A268 and FP (P < 0.05), followed by the inner and middle parts. In fillets stored with skin, the high oxidation rate of the under skin layer lipids was suppressed, but this layer still gave rise to the highest responses. Firstly, these results point to the protective properties of the skin and, secondly, to the unfavourable composition of the under skin layer: a lot of dark muscle; the silver surface; the highest fat content and the lowest level of ?-tocopherol. Concerning the fatty acid pattern in the three layers, the amount of C20 : 5, C18 : 1 and C20 : 1 in the fat gradually decreased from the under skin layer towards the inner part of the fillet, whereas the opposite was true for C22 : 6.

  • 148.
    Undeland, Ingrid
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Lingnert, Hans
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Influence of skinning on lipid oxidation in different horizontal layers of herring (Clupea harengus) during frozen storage1998In: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, ISSN 0346-718X, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 441-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of skinning and of compositional differences on the oxidative stability of various horizontal layers from herring (Clupea harengus) during frozen storage. Herring fillets, with and without skin, were stored at -18 °C for 0, 3, 9, 16 and 28 weeks. After each storage period, the fillets were divided horizontally into three layers: `under skin', `middle part' and `inner part'. Each layer was then extracted for total lipids, in which peroxide value (PV), absorbance at 234 nm (A234) and 268 nm (A268) as well as lipid-soluble fluorescent oxidation products (FP) were measured. Prior to storage, the fat content, fatty acid pattern and ?-tocopherol were also analyzed. During storage of skinless fillets, the under skin layer increased most in PV, A234, A268 and FP (P<0.05), followed by the inner and middle parts. In fillets stored with skin, the high oxidation rate of the under skin layer lipids was suppressed, but this layer still gave rise to the highest responses. Firstly, these results point to the protective properties of the skin and, secondly, to the unfavourable composition of the under skin layer: a lot of dark muscle; the silver surface; the highest fat content and the lowest level of ?-tocopherol. Concerning the fatty acid pattern in the three layers, the amount of C20:5. C18:1 and C20:1 in the fat gradually decreased from the under skin layer towards the inner part of the fillet, whereas the opposite was true for C22:6.

  • 149. Wassell, P.
    et al.
    Wiklund, Johan
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Bonwick, G.
    Smith, C.
    Almiron-Roig, E.
    Ultrasound doppler based in-line viscosity and solid fat profile measurement of fat blends2010In: International journal of food science & technology, ISSN 0950-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2621, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 877-883Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 150.
    Wendin, Karin
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Ekman, Susanne
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Bulow, M.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Johansson, D.
    Rothenberg, E.
    Objective and quantitative definitions of modified food textures based on sensory and rheological methodology2010In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 54, p. 5134-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Patients who suffer from chewing and swallowing disorders, i.e. dysphagia, may have difficulties ingesting normal food and liquids. In these patients a texture modified diet may enable that the patient maintain adequate nutrition. However, there is no generally accepted definition of 'texture' that includes measurements describing different food textures. Objective: Objectively define and quantify categories of texture-modified food by conducting rheological measurements and sensory analyses. A further objective was to facilitate the communication and recommendations of appropriate food textures for patients with dysphagia. Design: About 15 food samples varying in texture qualities were characterized by descriptive sensory and rheological measurements. Results: Soups were perceived as homogenous; thickened soups were perceived as being easier to swallow, more melting and creamy compared with soups without thickener. Viscosity differed between the two types of soups. Texture descriptors for pâtés were characterized by high chewing resistance, firmness, and having larger particles compared with timbales and jellied products. Jellied products were perceived as wobbly, creamy, and easier to swallow. Concerning the rheological measurements, all solid products were more elastic than viscous (G? > G?), belonging to different G? intervals: jellied products (low G?) and timbales together with pâtés (higher G?). Conclusion: By combining sensory and rheological measurements, a system of objective, quantitative, and well-defined food textures was developed that characterizes the different texture categories. © 2010 Karin Wendin et al.

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