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  • 101.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Energy Design.
    Engaging Design for Energy Conservation in Households2010In: Metering International MagazineArticle in journal (Refereed)
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  • 102.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Studio Eskilstuna.
    de Jong, Annelise
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Studio Eskilstuna.
    A social practice perspective on the smart grid2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract—This is a summary of the workshop that was held as part of the ICT4S conference with a focus on the topic of social practices and smart grids. Here we present an overview of the five invited paper contributions to the workshop, as well as a summary of the plenary discussion, and our final conclusions.

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  • 103.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    et al.
    Clockwise.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Energy Design.
    Öhman, Christina
    Clockwise.
    Sjögren, Jan-Ulric
    Clockwise.
    Andersson, Jonas
    Clockwise.
    CLOCKWISE – Smarta lösningar till stöd för energieffektiva beteenden Slutrapport för forskningsprojekt 24, CERBOF 2:2 Beteende, processer och styrmedel2009Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Människans beteende spelar en avgörande roll vid energibesparing och energieffektivisering. Interaktiv teknik har potential att visualisera energi och därmed göra användningen mera begriplig för gemene man. I projektet CLOCKWISE utrustades hushåll under en period med en prototyp, Energy Aware Clock, som ger en grafisk återgivning av hushållselen i realtid. Studien syftade till att undersöka prototypens inverkan på beteende både kvalitativt och kvantitativt. Teman för den kvalitativa studien var användningsmönster, medvetenhet om användningen av el samt nyttogörandet av återkoppling (feedback). I den kvantitativa delen har olika eldata och inomhustemperaturer loggats med fokus på minskning och temperatur variationer. Resultaten visar att hushållen har lärt sig om sin normala vardagsanvändning av el och de har upptäckt och kartlagt utrustning som drar mycket el. Under de tre månadernas testperiod har två tydliga faser identifierats, den första upptäckande och den andra bekräftande. Resultat från mätningar, projektets kvantitativa del, visar på hög komplexitet med många osäkerhetsfaktorer och gör det svårt att sammanfatta några säkra slutsatser. Trots rådande osäkerheter i underlaget finns indikationer på att de deltagande hushållen reducerat användningen av hushållsel med upp till ca 10%. Inomhustemperaturerna har inte påverkats under projektets gång. En koppling till utomhustemperaturen vid snabba förändringar kan dock iakttagas.

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  • 104.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Energy Design.
    Ware, Vanessa
    LIFE.
    The aesthetic zone of interaction. How are aesthetic design qualities experienced?2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present position paper is to raise issues concerning aesthetic experience in relation to an ongoing work of designing an artefact encouraging video reporting of personal experiences. The work serves as an example of a design experiment where aesthetic qualities are emphasized, but where the resulting interactions have not yet been analyzed in relation to these qualities. Our position is that the aesthetics of an interactive artefact evolves in the interactive zone between people who use it and the artefact itself. The aesthetic qualities are, thus, crystallized in the use of the artefact – whether it ranks high on a usability scale or not. Just as usability qualities, the aesthetic qualities contain contextual factors of its users, such as their pre-comprehension of the artefact, their cultural background and their emotional states. Furthermore, they include the context of the artefact, such as its physical design and the environment of its use. Our standpoint is consistent with Shusterman’s pragmatist approach to aesthetics, as related by Petersen et al. [2]. This approach promotes aesthetics of use rather than aesthetics of appearance. The experience of aesthetics lies in the interaction with the artefact rather than merely in the visual perception of it.

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  • 105.
    Keshavarz, Mahmoud
    et al.
    Forms of Sustainability.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Design and Dissensus: Framing and staging participation in design research2013In: Design Philosophy Papers, E-ISSN 1448-7136, Vol. 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Addressing social issues and operating in the public realm, contemporary design engages with the problematics of relating to more diverse people, groups and ‘others’ than those traditionally served by design. Tracing some related concerns within the early Participatory Design movements, we query approaches based on ‘consensus’ and explore an alternative based on ‘dissensus’, as theorized within political philosophy. To discuss critical-political aspects of participation in design, dissensus is a lens applied retrospectively to reflect on an example of our own practice-based research. Carried out with groups of women activists in Iran and Sweden, ‘Forms of Resistance’ was a project in which a design researcher engaged a series of socio-material activities to recognize the experiences and subjectivities of those otherwise excluded from a prevailing political order. Alternative communication and aesthetic practices were developed in response to issues of equity, power and difference within and across research situations and sites, which are discussed in relation to concepts of ‘indisciplinarity’ and ‘free translation’. This paper discusses alternative approaches to framing and staging participation in design, elucidating a series of terms and concepts relevant to social and critical practices of design and design research.

  • 106. Kocher, Mela
    et al.
    Denward, Marie
    Waern, Annika
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Sanningen om Marika – The Interplay of Reality and Fiction. Analysis of a Crossmedia Production2009In: Erzählformen im Computerspiel. Zur Medienmorphologie digitaler Spiele, Bielefeld: Transcript , 2009, 9Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 107. Koskinen, Ilpo
    et al.
    Binder, Thomas
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    LAB, FIELD, GALLERY, AND BEYOND2009In: Artifact, Vol. 2, p. 12p. 46-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last 10 years we have seen a growing number of researchers integrating design experiments in their research inquiries. Initially, this work borrowed heavily from neighboring fields, employing a dual strategy in which design experiments and their evaluation were largely treated as separate processes that were often carried out by different people. More recently, design researchers have developed several approaches that integrate design-specific work methods into research. This paper takes a methodological look at three such established approaches that the authors call Lab, Field, and Gallery. They are described and their similarities and differences analyzed. In conclusion, whether design research today needs foundations based on the standards established for other disciplines is discussed.

  • 108. Koskinen, Ilpo
    et al.
    Härkäsalmi, TiinaLee, J-J.Mazé, RamiaRISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.Matthews, Ben
    Proceedings of the Nordic Design Research Conference (Nordes)2011Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 109. Kuijer, Lenneke
    et al.
    de Jong, Annelise
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Studio Stockholm.
    van Eijk, Daan
    Practices as a unit for design: an exploration of theoretical guidelines in a study on bathing2013In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, Vol. 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sustainability challenges facing society today require approaches that look beyond single product- user interactions. Focusing on socially shared practices—e.g. cooking, laundering—has been identified as a promising direction. Building on a growing body of research in sustainable HCI that takes practices as unit of analysis, this article explores what it means to take practices as a unit of design. Drawing on theories of practice, it proposes that practice-oriented design approaches should: involve bodily performance, create crises of routine and generate a variety of performances. These guidelines were integrated into a Generative Improv Performances (GIP) approach, entailing a series of performances by improvisation actors with low- fidelity prototypes in a lab environment. The approach was implemented in an empirical study on bathing. Although the empirical example does not deal with common types of interactive technologies, the guidelines and GIP approach offer sustainable HCI a way to think beyond immediate interactions and to conceptualize change on a practice level.

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  • 110.
    Kursu, Sami
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute, Interactive Institute Piteå.
    Adaptiv nivåreglering: Dynamisk expansion av ljudsignaler i en reell arbetsmiljö2013Student thesis
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  • 111. Laurier, E.
    et al.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Lundin, J.
    Putting the dog back in the park: animal and human mind-in-action.2006In: Mind, culture and activity, ISSN 1074-9039, E-ISSN 1532-7884, Vol. 13, p. 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we use actual instances of human conduct with animals to reflect on the debates about animal agency in human activities. Where much of psychology, philosophy, and sociology begin with a fundamental scepticism over animal mind as the grounds for its inquiries, we join with a growing body of work that examines the continuities between animals and humans, and accepts the positive possibilities of anthropomorphising animals. We are interested in the reason and intelligence that animals display in their activities with humans. Inverting the typical approach of explaining canine reason by reference to the behaviour of their wild counterparts, we describe human–canine action as it occurs in the widespread, historically assembled, and spatially situated activity of dog walking in parks. We treat dog walking as a living accomplishment of owner and dog methodically displaying intent and producing social objects.

  • 112.
    Lefford, Nyssim
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Generation of Musical Patterns and Perceptions of Similarity2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 113.
    Lefford, Nyssim
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Investigating Composers' Perceptions and Style through Musical Composition Games2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 114.
    Lefford, Nyssim
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    The Structure, Perception and Generation of Musical Patterns2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 115.
    Lefford, Nyssim
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Sjömark, Cecilia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Context, Individuality and Music's Affect on Listeners2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 116.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Awesome - a tool for simulating sound environments2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sounds are (almost) always heard and perceived as parts of greater contexts. How we hear a sound depends on things like other sounds present, acoustic properties of the place where the sound is heard, the distance and direction to the sound source etc. Moreover, if the sound bear any meaning to us or not and what the meaning is, if any, depends largely on the listener’s interpretation of the sound, based on memories, previous experiences etc. When working with the design of sounds for all sorts of applications, it is crucial to not only evaluate the sound isolated in the design environment, but to also test the sound in possible greater contexts where it will be used and heard. One way to do this is to sonically simulate one or more environments and use these simulations as contexts to test designed sounds against. In this paper we report on a project in which we have developed a system for simulating the sounding dimension of physical environments. The system consists of a software application, a 5.1 surround sound system and a set of guidelines and methods for use. We also report on a first test of the system and the results from this test.

  • 117.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    II City Audio Guide2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, navigating the physical world has been a matter of primarily cognitive efforts – interpreting maps with signs and various levels of abstract visual representations of the physical world. With the advent of new and more powerful mobile technologies for GPS navigation, electronic compasses, possibilities for sound playback and DSP comes new opportunities to design and develop a wide range of applications for navigation. These new applications can potentially encompass and utilize more of man’s skills, such as hearing, sensing, intuition, perceptual and motor skills, emotions etc. More over, these applications can potentially support other modes of navigation than for pure efficiency. For example “stumbling” and “serendipitous discovery” are modes proposed by McGookin et al. When it comes to navigational services for mobile users, safety is an issue. Keeping the eyes firmly an a small screen displaying a map that shows current position and best route to a target destination, can potentially distract the user and put her in hazardous situations. The development of user interfaces that requires minimal attention, that does not distract the user but instead frees for example her eyes while at the same time guiding her in unknown territories is vital. These interfaces must support the user, not distract. In addition to the above mentioned, the project described in this paper also work with what Djajadiningrat et al. calls “aesthetics of interaction” and the “respect for all of man’s skills”.

  • 118.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Sound for Fantasy and Freedom2011In: Game Sound Technology and Player Interaction: Concepts and Developments, Hershey, New York: IGI Global , 2011, 6, p. 22-43Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sound is an integral part of our everyday lives. Sound tells us about physical events in the environ- ment, and we use our voices to share ideas and emotions through sound. When navigating the world on a day-to-day basis, most of us use a balanced mix of stimuli from our eyes, ears and other senses to get along. We do this totally naturally and without effort. In the design of computer game experiences, traditionally, most attention has been given to vision rather than the balanced mix of stimuli from our eyes, ears and other senses most of us use to navigate the world on a day to day basis. The risk is that this emphasis neglects types of interaction with the game needed to create an immersive experience. This chapter summarizes the relationship between sound properties, GameFlow and immersive experience and discusses two projects in which Interactive Institute, Sonic Studio has balanced perceptual stimuli and game mechanics to inspire and create new game concepts that liberate users and their imagination.

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  • 119.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Delsing, Katarina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Sound for enhanced experiences in mobile applications2012In: SMC Sweden 2012, Sound and Music Computing, Understanding and Particing in Sweden, p. 10-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When visiting new places you want information about restaurants, shopping, places of historic in- terest etc. Smartphones are perfect tools for de- livering such location-based information, but the risk is that users get absorbed by texts, maps, videos etc. on the device screen and get a second- hand experience of the environment they are vis- iting rather than the sought-after first-hand expe- rience. One problem is that the users’ eyes often are directed to the device screen, rather than to the surrounding environment. Another problem is that interpreting more or less abstract informa- tion on maps, texts, images etc. may take up sig- nificant shares of the users’ overall cognitive re- sources. The work presented here tried to overcome these two problems by studying design for human-computer interaction based on the users’ everyday abilities such as directional hearing and point and sweep gestures. Today’s smartphones know where you are, in what direction you are pointing the device and they have systems for ren- dering spatial audio. These readily available tech- nologies hold the potential to make information more easy to interpret and use, demand less cog- nitive resources and free the users from having to look more or less constantly on a device screen.

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  • 120.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Methods for Sound Design: A Review and Implications for Research and Practice2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sound design can be described as an inherently complex task, demanding the designer to understand, master and balance technology, human perception, aesthetics and semiotics. Given this complexity, there are surprisingly few tools available that meet the needs of the general designer or developer incorporating sound as design material. To attend to this situation, two software systems are being developed. The purpose with these is to inform and support general design projects where sound is one part. The first system is intended to inform early stages of sound design projects. The second system is intended to simulate the sounding dimension of physical environments. Together these tools can be used to support designers and developers when searching for, testing and evaluating sounds suitable for interfaces, products and environments. To further complement these systems, a number of methods and guidelines are being developed in tandem. Tests to verify the systems have been conducted with very promising results.

  • 121.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Sonic Studio.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Sonic Studio.
    Tapping into effective emotional reactions via a user driven audio design tool.2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major problem when tackling any audio design problem aimed at conveying important and informative content, is the imposing of the designer’s own emotion, taste and value systems on the finished design choices, rather than reflecting those of the end user. In the past the problem has been routed in the tendency to use passive test subjects in rigid environments. Subjects react to sounds without no means of controlling what they hear. This paper suggests a system for participatory sound design that generates results by activating test subjects and giving them significant control of the sounding experience under test. The audio design tool application described here, the AWESOME (Auditory Work Environment Simulation Machine) Sound Design Tool, sets out to enable the end user to have direct influence on the design process through a simple yet innovative technical applications This web based device allows the end users to make emotive decisions about the kinds of audio signals they find most appropriate for given situations. The results can be used to both generate general knowledge about listening experiences and more importantly, as direct user input in actual sound design processes.

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  • 122.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    DigiWall - an audio mostly game2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DigiWall is a hybrid between a climbing wall and a computer game. The climbing grips are equipped with touch sensors and lights. The interface has no computer screen. Instead sound and music are principle drivers of DigiWall interaction models. The gaming experience combines sound and music with physical movement and the sparse visuals of the climbing grips. The DigiWall soundscape carries both verbal and nonverbal information. Verbal information includes instructions on how to play a game, scores, level numbers etc. Non-verbal information is about speed, position, direction, events etc. Many different types of interaction models are possible: competitions, collaboration exercises and aesthetic experiences.

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  • 123.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Sound Parameters for Expressing Geographic Distance in a Mobile Navigation Application2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents work on finding acoustic parameters suitable to convey a sense of difference in geographic distance through the concepts of “near”, “middle” and “far”. The context for use is a mobile application for navigation services. A set of acoustic parameters was selected based on how sound naturally travels through and is dispersed by the atmosphere. One parameter without direct acoustic connection to distance was also selected. Previous works corroborate the choice of parameters in the context of the project. Results show that modulating multiple parameters simultaneously to express distance gives a more robust experience of difference in distance compared to modulating single parameters. The ecological parameters low-pass filter and reverb gave the test’s subjects the most reliable and consistent experience of difference in distance. Modulating the parameter pitch alone was seen to be an unreliable method. Combining the pitch parameter with the reverb parameter gave more robust results.

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  • 124.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Berg, Jan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Digiwall - an Interactive Climbing Wall2005In: Proceedings of the 2005 ACM SIGCHI International Conference on Advances in computer entertainment technology, 2005, 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digiwall is a climbing wall enhanced with hardware and software. It combines the computer game with sport climbing, and extends both concepts with new features. Digiwall frees the user from focusing on a computer screen. Instead sound and music are used to convey the gaming experience. The Digiwall concept is designed to support a large number of games, competitions, challenges and even aesthetic experiences. It is an example of how technology can promote physical activity and engage people's senses and capabilities in a way that traditional computer gaming and sport climbing do not.

  • 125.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Delsing, Katarina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Polojärvi, Mikko
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Saloranta, Timo
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Alakärppä, Ismo
    University of Lapland, Finland.
    Testing Two Tools for Multimodal Navigation2012In: Advances in Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 1687-5893, E-ISSN 1687-5907, Vol. 2012, article id 251384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The latest smartphones with GPS, electronic compasses, directional audio, touch screens, and so forth, hold a potential for location-based services that are easier to use and that let users focus on their activities and the environment around them. Rather than interpreting maps, users can search for information by pointing in a direction and database queries can be created from GPS location and compass data. Users can also get guidance to locations through point and sweep gestures, spatial sound, and simple graphics. This paper describes two studies testing two applications with multimodal user interfaces for navigation and information retrieval. The applications allow users to search for information and get navigation support using combinations of point and sweep gestures, nonspeech audio, graphics, and text. Tests show that users appreciated both applications for their ease of use and for allowing users to interact directly with the surrounding environment.

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  • 126.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Papworth, Nigel
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Digiwall: Breaking the Bounds of the Conventional Interface2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 127.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Papworth, Nigel
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Beowulf field test paper2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A practical field test, covering some of the parameters governing audio based games, designed for mobile applications utilizing new techniques with the intention of allowing greater interpretive freedom for the player. The tests are realised through an audio-based, simple game application: ‘Beowulf’.

  • 128.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Papworth, Nigel
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Using Sound to Enhance Users’ Experiences of Mobile Applications2012In: Proceedings from Audio Mostly 2012, ACM , 2012, 6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The latest smartphones with GPS, electronic compass, directional audio, touch screens etc. hold potentials for location based services that are easier to use compared to traditional tools. Rather than interpreting maps, users may focus on their activities and the environment around them. Interfaces may be designed that let users search for information by simply pointing in a direction. Database queries can be created from GPS location and compass direction data. Users can get guidance to locations through pointing gestures, spatial sound and simple graphics. This article describes two studies testing prototypic applications with multimodal user interfaces built on spatial audio, graphics and text. Tests show that users appreciated the applications for their ease of use, for being fun and effective to use and for allowing users to interact directly with the environment rather than with abstractions of the same. The multimodal user interfaces contributed significantly to the overall user experience.

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  • 129.
    Llorens, Natasha Marie
    et al.
    Forms of Sustainability.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    HOW does it happen and what does it take2011In: DESIGN ACT Socially and politically engaged design today – critical roles and emerging tactics, Berlin: Iaspis / Sternberg Press , 2011, 7, p. 110-155Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This section discusses tactics of social and political engagement in design. HOW do socially and politically engaged designers operate? HOW do design practices relate to and change the status quo? HOW do designers participate in social processes and political issues? The term ‘tactic’ refers to a logic (and politic) of action, as Doina Petrescu points out in her interview in the previous section. Formulated here as verbs, tactics are suggestive of design acts, activities, actions – and activism. Tactics are not presented here as recipes for revolution, however, but as openings for discussing how ethics, power and otherwise critical issues are enacted within design practice. This section proposes a series of tactics that connect across project examples featured in DESIGN ACT.

  • 130.
    Lundén, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Sonic Studio.
    Uni-Verse Acoustic Simulation System: interactive real-time room acoustic simulation in dynamic 3D environments2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uni-Verse Acoustic Simulation System (UVAS) is a newly developed interactive room acoustic simulation system that can handle dynamically changing 3D geometric models in real-time. The system can share such models with other application, such as visual renderers or 3D modelling tools, over a network using the Verse protocol. UVAS is implemented using the beam-tracing method. It is build as two separate but highly integrated parts. The first part is handling the geometry, it's responsibility is to find audible sound sources and relevant reflection paths in the simulated environment. The second part is handling the audio rendering, producing the audible result of the simulation based on information given by the first part. This paper will focusing on the first part

  • 131.
    Lundén, Peter
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Sonic Studio.
    Becker, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Sonic Studio.
    The Design of Tools for Auralization and Acoustic Simulation Targeted for Architects and City Planners2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acoustic design is a relatively new discipline of design, viewing sound environmental questions in a qualitative perspective rather than the prevailing quantitative perspective. A difficult question the acoustic designer has to face is how to communicate the qualities of a sound environment. One of the few possible solutions is to use auralizations and audible simulations. Therefore the acoustic designer has great need of an auralization system in his toolbox. This raises a number of questions. Available auralization systems are targeted towards the expert user such as acousticians, are this systems directly usable for the acoustic designer. What are the special requirements of auralization tools targeted towards designers such as architects and city planners? What is feasible with the current technology and what are the research challenges to fulfil the requirements of such a toolbox. Another important question is: what are the demands of the quality of the listening experience and the listening space where the auralizations and simulations are perceived.

  • 132.
    Lundén, Peter
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Gustin, Marja
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Mats E.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Forssén, Jens
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Hellström, Björn
    Konstfack University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Sweden.
    Psychoacoustic evaluation as a tool for optimization in the development of an urban soundscape simulator2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will discuss the use of psychoacoustic evaluation as a tool for optimization of the soundscape simulator developed in the Listen project. The listen project is a three-year research project focused around developing a demonstrator, which auralizes the sound environment produced by road and railway traffic. The resolution of the parameter space of the simulator heavily influences the performance of the simulator. The perceptual resolution of the parameter space is investigated and the resolution is adjusted accordingly. The most important parameter is velocity. Adjustments of the resolution of this parameter alone gives a 60% reduction of the usage of memory.

  • 133.
    Marti, P.
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands; University of Seina, Italy.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hummels, C. C. M.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Peeters, J.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Instilling cultural values through bodily engagement with human rights2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents vision, approach and outcomes of "Light through Culture", an international design school that aims at weaving, through design, innovative technologies and culture into a new canvas for making and thinking [6]. In this paper we present in particular the second edition of the school that explored the theme of human rights and designed ways of eliciting the exposure of their violation, with the realization of an experiential path through five interactive spaces, in an exhibition called "Experiencing Human Rights". The students built this interactive path to elicit a rich experience and unfold new opportunities for meaning to be elaborated by visitors. Story telling was used, as a way of creating a holistic experience that was not just based on the narration of facts but also exploited feelings and deep cultural values through embodied interaction. Based on the student's craftsmanship and their different cultural and educational backgrounds, they opened up a reflection on human rights, both in their own process, as well as for the visitors during the exhibition. The students' learning activity held Making in its core, and students were encouraged, through cycles of reflection-on-action, to develop their personal point of view, to take responsibility for it and present the designed exhibition to the visitors, inviting them to be bodily engaged and to reflection. 

  • 134.
    Marti, Patrizia
    et al.
    University of Siena, Italy; Eindhoven Technical University, The Netherlands.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Tittarelli, Michele
    University of Siena, Italy; University of Florence, Italy.
    True, Nicholas
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Papworth, Nigel
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Hummels, Caroline
    Eindhoven Technical University, The Netherlands.
    Embodying Culture: Interactive Installation on Women's Rights2015In: First Monday, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 4, article id 5897Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper describes an interactive installation exploring perspectives on women’s rights, triggering visitors’ personal reflections through an immersive experience. Starting from the life histories of the women depicted in three paintings from fifteenth, sixteenth and seventeenth century, we explored three themes: emancipation, self-determination and violence. In the installation, representations of these three paintings were fragmented into panels, floating in the space suspended from a self-standing structure. On these elements, both the original painting and a writhing of visual material were dynamically displayed using a projector. The presence and movement of visitors in the room was tracked by means of a Kinect™ camera and influenced both the position and movements of the panels. A software crawler monitored discussions and debates on social networks. The intensity of these discussions was reflected in the movements of the panels and the content of the projections. The purpose of this interactive installation is to engage visitors in composing a harmonious picture of the complex domain of women’s rights. The experiential form confronts visitors with the opinions of other people debating the theme worldwide. The installation was the outcome of a craft-inspired learning module, grounded on constructivism and reflective practice.

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  • 135. Matthews, Ben
    et al.
    Clark, Brendon
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Practical Action as Inquiry: Facilitating Appropriation in a Design Handover Event2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we introduce a perspective informed by the social phenomenology of Alfred Schutz, emphasising the inherently practical nature of action in the social world. We detail several important respects in which this view stands in contrast to other (notably social-scientific) perspectives that seek to account for social action. We briefly present a case from our own design practice of a ‘handover’ meeting where we staged a boardroom activity intended to facilitate the client’s appropriation of the design proposal. This provides a concrete illustration for a discussion that articulates the utilities of adopting Schutz’s distinction between practical and scientific ‘attitudes’ for the study of design, opening avenues for practical action as a revealing form of inquiry into design practice.

  • 136.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute, Interactive Institute Stockholm. Design Research Unit.
    A Critical Practice2012In: The Swedish Museum of Architecture: A fifty year perspective., Stockholm: The Swedish Museum of Architecture , 2012, 7, p. 158-160Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainablility poses profound challenges to society – and to the architecture and design disciplines. Design has conventionally been applied to expand the market for things that (over)consume material and natural resources. For those that consume design – that is, for all of us – environmental sustainability requires us to question what we produce and consume as a society, and how we impact others and future generations. For those of us that are designers – and often seen as part of the problem within discussions of sustainable development – we need to query what and how we design. This was the question at stake nearly half a century ago for a number of movements within design. Various names for such movements, such as ‘Anti-Design’, ‘Non-Plan’ and ‘Radical Design’ indicate a critique of design, planning and architecture. Radical designers mounted a critique of their own design discipline and of a societal status quo. However, rather than debate articles or academic analyses, their critique took the form of design. The contemporary challenges of sustainable development require just such criticality. Mainstream approaches, predominately based on cleaning up production processes and incentivizing ‘green’ consumption, help to mitigate the negative environmental effects of behaviors entrenched in industrialized Western societies. However, besides incremental improvements to our lives in these societies – and looking ahead to the next 50 years – we need to be able to relate to others, alternatives and futures that may be radically different than us, here and now. Today, a multitude of socially and politically-engaged designers are taking on such issues, rapidly growing beyond a minority within architectural and design disciplines – and the questions raised are relevant to the 99% of society. As in Radical Design, criticality does not have to end in polemics, in utopias or dystopias, but in giving form to critical questions: Which – or who’s – interests should be represented in design and society? Who benefits – and who profits? What might be alternatives and futures? Who designs these futures, for whom?

  • 137.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Critical form(ations): a case study2009In: Proceedings of Communicating (by) Design, 2009, 4, , p. 13Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design is a powerful force in shaping material reality, human behavior, and cultural values. Inevitably ideological, there are tendencies in contemporary design toward ‘criticism from within’, in which design arguments, processes and products are a basis for engaging with disciplinary and societal problematics. In our practice-based research, we deploy related tactics, aesthetics and modes of production to (de)construct issues of energy in (sustainable) design. This paper outlines a notion of ‘critical practice’ to situate a case study from our work. Three design examples are a basis for discussing the potential for the products of research through (critical) practice to effect adebate about social processes and societal issues.

  • 138.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Critical of What? / Kritiska mot vad?2009In: Iaspis Forum on Design and Critical Practice – The Reader, Berlin: Sternberg Press , 2009, 10, , p. 448p. 378-397Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Criticality meets sustainability: Constructing critical practices in design research for sustainability2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability requires a wider awareness of the changing conditions for design today – rather than focused solely on preserving nature or conserving energy, per se, this opens up for challenging assumptions about relations between design and society and for constructing new forms of critical practice. Tracing tendencies in conceptual and (post)critical design, this paper argues for further developing the critical discourse within design today and design research as an important arena for extending the ideological and artifactual production of such discourse to users and stakeholders. In relation to my own experiences within the Static! and Switch! design research programs, these perspective are anchored in conceptual, operational, and practical examples of critical practices applied in the area of energy awareness.

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  • 140.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Design Practices and the Micropolitics of Sustainability2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development involves multiple discourses and practices at multiple levels in society, in which there are competing and conflicting formulations of what constitutes ‘sustainability.’ Sustainability involves struggles around definitions and priorities, among those maintaining or gaining influence, struggles set within a pluricentric society in which interests are often in competition at a time of rapid globalization, conflicts over diminishing resources, and rising risk factors. These struggles trickle down into policies, regulations, taxes – and designs – which embody particular discourses, ideals and priorities, implying profound changes to how we live and how we live together. Sustainable development, on a variety of levels, is and essentially, a matter of the political. Design is increasingly taking on roles in sustainable development – and, thus, in its politics. At the macropolitical level, design may be commissioned for the UN Environment Program, a Green Party, or grassroots political action; by companies implementing corporate social responsibility, product developers applying environmental certification standards, or cities implementing Rio Local Agenda programs. Micropolitical roles of design, the focus here, involve instituting discourses and practices of sustainability deeply in the everyday life of consumers and citizens. Embedded in the intimate spaces and embodied routines of everyday life, design mediates access to and control over resources, and it shapes how people identify and comply with particular ideals and ways of living. Here, I evoke two general areas in which the design role is growing – ‘sustainable consumption’ and ‘sustainable communities’. In these roles, design is engaged in mediating how and by whom resources are accessed and controlled, and which or whose interests are made visible in sustainable development. In reducing domestic energy consumption and steering sustainable processes in communities, profound changes to the social organization of everyday life are at stake. Just as sustainable development is a political matter, so is design.

  • 141.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute, Interactive Institute Stockholm. Design Research Unit.
    Formes Critiques: Pour une pratique critique du design2013In: Les Cahiers du Musée National d'Art Moderne, édition spéciale 'Design & Prospective Industrielle', p. 46-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comment articuler une pensée critique avec les pratiques du design? Comment, à partir de pratiques critiques, forger des alternatives présentes et futures pour les métiers du design? Dans cet article, j'évoquerai quelques aspects propres aux pratiques critiques du design. Je rapellerai brièvement comment sont explorés idéaux et alternatives dans les catégories du ‘design-concept’, du ‘design conceptuel’ et du ‘design critique’. Étroitement liées aux idées du design, ces pratiques éclairent la façon dont les questionnements intellectuels et idéologiques peuvent se construire de l’intérieur au lieu d’être prescrits de l’extérieur. Ceci témoigne d’une évolution importante dans les rapports entre théorie et pratique du design: la critique ne doit pas simplement s’effectuer à côté ou en dehors, elle doit être incorporée aux pratiques et aux formes du design. Cette évolution se manifeste égalment dans la sphère universitaire, où se multiplient les approches d’une recherche sur le design fondée sur la pratique. J’illustrerai quelques-unes de ces approches grâce à des exemples tirés de Switch!, un programme de recherche qui fut mené en Suède a l’Interactive Institute. Suivra un commentaire portant sur les formes à donner à ces pratiques critiques, ainsi que sur les raisons pour lesquelles elles sont appelées à jouer un rôle majeur vis-à-vis d’une discipline en mutation. (The article is written in French, abstract in English: How may criticality take form in relation to design practices? How may critical practices articulate alternatives or futures for the design profession? In this article, I discuss some aspects of critical practices of design. I briefly trace how ideals and alternatives are explored within genres of ‘concept’, ‘conceptual’ or ‘critical’ design. Engaging with the ideas expressed through design practice, such practices illustrate how intellectual and ideological issues might be constructed from within, rather than prescribed from outside. This represents an important shift in relations between theory and practice in design – criticism is not something merely to be done apart from and outside of design but is incorporated within design practices and forms. This shift is also reflected in academia, in which practice-based approaches to design research are expanding. To illustrate some approaches, I present examples from Switch!, a practice-based design research program at the Interactive Institute in Sweden. This anchors a discussion of how critical practices may take form today, and how, or why, they have important role for a discipline in transition.)

  • 142.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Göteborg.
    Joining tradition and innovation in design research projects2005In: Proceedings of Joining Forces, 2005, 4, , p. 7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary political, economic, social and technical developments have fundamentally altered the conditions for traditional industry and for design practice. While emerging technologies have brought problems and challenges, there are also new possibilities for renewal and innovation. In doing design research projects at the Interactive Institute, we have explored emerging issues in design practice, research and strategic questions at project and institutional levels, and the wider ‘use’ of design research in joining tradition and innovation. Two research projects and a design example are presented in relation to their organizational and methodological aspects and their wider significance in order to discuss connections made between strategic, research and design values.

  • 143.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute, Interactive Institute Stockholm. Design Göteborg.
    Occupying Time: Design, Time, and the Form of Interaction2007 (ed. 5)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As technology pervades our everyday life and material culture, new possibilities and problematics are raised for design. Attention in contemporary design discourse is shifting ‘beyond the object’, to the qualities of processes and experiences. The boxes and screens typically the ‘object’ of interaction and interface design are miniaturizing, even disappearing, as computation is integrated into familiar materials and ordinary objects. This opens possibilities – for example, as computer and materials science converge with fashion and architecture in smart textiles and intelligent environments – even as it turns us back, in new ways, to traditional design disciplines and practices. In this context, design is not only about the spatial or physical form of objects, but the form of interactions that take place – and occupy time – in people’s relations with and through computational and interactive objects. As argued in this thesis, a central, and particular, concern of interaction design must therefore be the ‘temporal form’ of such objects and the ‘form of interaction’ as they are used over time. Furthermore, increasingly pervasive technology means that the temporality of form and interaction is implicated in more widespread changes to the material conditions of design and of society. Challenging conventions – of ‘formalism’ and ‘functionalism’, ‘good’ and ‘total’ design – temporal concerns and implications require new ways of thinking about and working with the materiality, users, and effects of design. Located at an intersection between emerging technologies and design traditions, interaction design is approached in Occupying Time through diverse disciplinary frames and scales of consideration. If focus in interaction design is typically on proximate ‘Use’, here, a discussion of ‘Materials’ scales down to reconsider the more basic spatial and temporal composition of form, and ‘Change’ scales up to examine large-scale and long-term effects. To anchor these themes in established discourse and practice, architecture is a primary frame of reference throughout. Accounts of ‘event’, ‘vernacular’, and ‘non-design’, and concepts of ‘becoming’, ‘in the making’, and ‘futurity’, as treated in architecture, extend a theoretical and practical basis for approaching time in (interaction) design discourse. Implications for practice also emerge and are discussed. Basic to the materiality of interaction design, technology puts time central to ‘Material practice’. ‘Participatory practice’ moves beyond user involvement in design processes to active participation in ongoing formation. Since temporal form extends design more deeply and further into future use, ‘Critical practice’ queries accountability. More specific reflections are situated in relation to my experience in the design research programs ‘IT+Textiles’, ‘Public Play Spaces’, and ‘Static! Energy Awareness’. Drawing from architecture and from my own practice, this thesis maps out and builds up a territory of ideas, relations, and examples as an inquiry into issues of time in interaction design.

  • 144.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    RE: Thinking sustainability – Critical thinking and design practice2010In: Designing for Sustainable Living & Working, Delft, The Netherlands: VSSD , 2010, 10, p. 29-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the new challenges presented by climate and energy issues, design must reexamine its role in shaping and changing values – values within the sustainability discourse, implicit in the design practices that impact production and embedded in the products that shape practices of consumption. Recognizing that design has a profound power to influence consumer and societal values, we need to renew this role today. We might rethink how products influence beliefs and behaviors, and how the design of systems and interactions has the power to shape people's perceptions, experiences and values over time. This article reflects on a series of research projects developed at the Interactive Institute and suggests implications for rethinking the objects – and objectives – of design today.

  • 145.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Socio-Ecological Innovation: Cases of sustainable urban development and design2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent decades have seen a significant shift in how profound and intractable problems such as poverty, disease, violence or environmental deterioration are handled. While such problems have traditionally been handled through national social and spatial policies in European welfare states such as Sweden, there has been a substantial redistribution to the market, regions and communities. This is embodied in the term ‘social innovation’, which marks a critical shift in how, where, and by whom societal problems are handled. Practices of social innovation involve a reconfiguration of relations between the state and citizens, relations that are may be (co-)produced in ways that are regionally, socially, and spatially specific. This paper (in the short form of ‘preliminary findings’) explores the ‘how’ of social innovation through three case studies concerning urban resources issues such as food, water, waste and land use. Building on arguments that design has become central to the (co-)production of social innovation, I examine the role of designers and design artifacts in framing and staging (co-)production within households, neighborhoods and civic arenas. Locating social innovation as the reconfiguration of society from within, I discuss these as examples through which wider social practices and systems, beliefs and authority, may be profoundly altered.

  • 146.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Static! Designing for Energy Awareness.2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    From the boost of the first cup of coffee in the morning to the glow of a nightlight that keeps a child company after dark, much of our contemporary lifestyles is powered by electricity. Today, however, the economic and environmental costs of energy require us to think again. While recognizing the complex social functions and cultural forms of electricity in everyday life, the current challenge for design is to change practices and patterns of (over)consumption. Static! explores design as a basis for increasing awareness of energy. Familiar furnishings and products have been reinterpreted to materialize electricity, to make it more visible and tangible for people. The resulting series of conceptual design examples express the poetics – and politics – of everyday electricity consumption. A design research project at the Interactive Institute funded by the Swedish Energy Agency, Static! has proved to be a pioneer in opening a current and critical research area at the intersection of design, energy and information technology. This book presents the Static! design examples and perspectives on issues in (sustainable) design today. Grounded in passion and humor, as well as rigor and research, the book asks designers and consumers – that is, all of us – to rethink the form, and future, of electricity in the world around us. 

  • 147.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    SWITCH! Design and everyday energy ecologies2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is no single answer to the question of how people should live nor any silver bullet to solve current ecological problems — and yet, we must seek new ways to think and act in light of emerging environmental challenges. Given the power of design to influence consumer and societal values, its role must be questioned and renewed in relation to current problematics of mass-production and (over)consumption. Switch! develops design artifacts and methods to influence perceptions and values around energy use in everyday life. Within the collaborative design research program, a conceptual and practical inquiry focused on critical interventions into sustainable design discourse.

  • 148.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    What is the Use?2005In: Extra Ordinary, Stockholm: Kulturhuset , 2005, 7, p. 31-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ...Reflecting on basic notions of ‘What is [design]’ in such venues opens up a new space for proposing ‘This could be...’. These exhibitions feature not (or not only) familiar mass-produced design objects, but often those produced as ‘one-offs’ or in limited editions, perhaps with the specific intention to be exhibited. Many of the objects have thus been crafted to make explicit certain unique or speculative ideas, often with the intention of reflecting or countering mainstream or traditional design practice. Collected and carefully related to one another in an exhibition, the objects may suggest new or aggregate possibilities – in Extra Ordinary, for instance, the exhibition is carefully curated to suggest a different sort of everyday living environment. Thus, ‘What is...’ may be posed as a dialog between emerging and established practices, the object and the collection, the contributors to the exhibition and its audience...

  • 149.
    Mazé, Ramia
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Design Research Unit.
    Who is sustainable? Querying the politics of sustainable design practices2013In: Share This Book: Critical perspectives and dialogues about design and sustainability, Stockholm, Sweden: Axl Books , 2013, 17, p. 83-124Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design, formulated as a discipline concerned with form and problem-solving, may seem preoccupied with matters other than those of politics and the political. Traced through a history of the fine arts, for example, the concerns of design include aesthetic expression and material form. As a liberal art, design is arguably a discipline that synthesizes knowledge from across the natural and social sciences and applies it to solving complex technical and social problems. These dimensions of design are apparent in its expanding roles in sustainable development―for example, in expressing lifecycle information about products, changing energy consumption behavior, rethinking transportation or food services, and steering decision-making processes in communities or companies. Amended as 'sustainable', design is repositioned from being part of the problem of unsustainable development. However, preoccupied with forms or solutions, design is not always attentive to its political dimensions. How, by, and for whom sustainability is formulated are political questions to be discussed within discourses and practices of sustainable development―and sustainable design. Such questions are at stake in critical studies and critical practices of design. Reflecting here on design examples from my own work and that of others, I articulate a series of such questions inspired by critical theory and political philosophy. These open a discussion of the roles of design in sustainable consumption and sustainable communities, in which it is profoundly implicated in the reorganization of everyday life. Combining reflections and examples, the graphic form of this article reflects an interweaving of theory and practice, the materiality of academia and the criticality of design.

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  • 150.
    Mazé, Ramia
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute, Interactive Institute Stockholm. Design Göteborg.
    Bueno, M.
    Mixers: A participatory approach to design prototyping2002In: Proceedings of DIS, 2002, 10, , p. 4p. 341-344Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this design exhibit, we describe methods we have used to design a noticeboard interface for an older community in London. Three low-fidelity methods of prototyping interaction provided shared and accessible means for us and our end users to communicate design ideas, explore qualities of the user experience, and evaluate them within situations of use. This approach facilitated the development of an appropriate, innovative and feasible solution for a unique context.

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