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  • 1.
    Faerneus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Designing for Joyful Movement2018Inngår i: Funology 2: From Usability to Enjoyment / [ed] Mark Blythe and Andrew Monk, Springer, 2018, s. 193-207Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction design research has broadened its focus from settings in which people would sit more or less still in front of static computers doing their work tasks, to instead thriving off new interactive materials, mobile use, and ubiquitously available data of all sorts, creating interactions everywhere. These changes have put into question such as play versus learning, work versus leisure, or casual versus serious technology use. As both hardware and software have become mobile—both literally and in terms of transgressing cultural categories—the different social spheres and the rules that they are associated with are changing

  • 2.
    Grahn, Sten
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Swerea, Swerea IVF AB.
    Langbeck, Björn
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Swerea, Swerea IVF AB.
    Benefits of Collaborative Robots in Assembly: An Evaluation Scheme2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Programming, safety measures and handling of inflexibility still hinder robot implementation for many applications. However, advancements in several fields such as programming, human–machine-interfaces and safety system technology are about to change this. These advancements could make it possible for operators to collaborate with robots that assist operators at close range, without compromising safety, often referred to as cobot installations. The aim of the project was to produce a picture of how potential economic advantages can be evaluated from installations of cobot cells, to be compared with manual assembly and standard robot installations.

  • 3.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Caramiaux, Baptiste
    CNRS, France; McGill University, Canada; University of Paris-Saclay, France.
    Erkut, Cumhur
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Forlizzi, Jodi
    Carnegie Mellon University, USA.
    Hajinejad, Nassrin
    Hochschule Bremen City University of Applied Sciences, Germany.
    Haller, Michael
    Upper Austria University of Applied Sciences, Austria.
    Hummels, Caroline C. M.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Isbister, Katherine
    University of California, USA.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Khut, George
    UNSW University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Loke, Lian
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Lottridge, Danielle
    Yahoo Inc, USA.
    Marti, Patrizia
    Universita di Siena, Italy.
    Melcer, Edward
    New York University Tandon School of Engineering, USA.
    Muller, Florian Floyd
    RMIT University, Australia.
    Graves Petersen, Marianne
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Schiphorst, Thecla
    Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Segura Marquez, Elena
    University of California, USA.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Svanaes, Dag
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; IT-University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Tobiasson, Helena
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Embracing First-Person Perspectives in Soma-Based Design2018Inngår i: Informatics, ISSN 2227-9709, Vol. 5, nr 1, artikkel-id 8Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A set of prominent designers embarked on a research journey to explore aesthetics in movement-based design. Here we unpack one of the design sensitivities unique to our practice: a strong first person perspective-where the movements, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, design researcher and user are at the forefront. We present an annotated portfolio of design exemplars and a brief introduction to some of the design methods and theory we use, together substantiating and explaining the first-person perspective. At the same time, we show how this felt dimension, despite its subjective nature, is what provides rigor and structure to our design research. Our aim is to assist researchers in soma-based design and designers wanting to consider the multiple facets when designing for the aesthetics of movement. The applications span a large field of designs, including slow introspective, contemplative interactions, arts, dance, health applications, games, work applications and many others.

  • 4.
    Jung, Heekyoung
    et al.
    University of Cincinnati, USA.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Soma-Wearable Design: Integrating Somaesthetic Practice and Fashion Design for Somatic Wellbeing2018Inngår i: Proceedings of DRS 2018, 2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    With advanced technologies and raised expectations for the quality of life, research and design attempts are increasing to promote wellbeing. While data-based reflective practice and behaviour change have been a main strategy in supporting technology-mediated wellbeing, we bring the perspectives of somaesthetic practice and fashion design to complement this research scene. Assuming that body consciousness could positively influence self-perception, presentation and performance through clothing, we propose soma-wearable design as an alternative approach to explore qualities that elaborate and promote somatic wellbeing. First, we conceptualize constructive links between design for reflection, somaesthetic practice, and style-fashion-dress; and re-interpret the core qualities of somaesthetic appreciation (Höök et al., 2016) for soma-wearable design: 1) transient space for reflection with the body, 2) sensory prompt synched to context, 3) body modification for subject formation, and 4) learning through bodily experience. We articulate these qualities based on the survey of selected fashion objects; apply the soma-wearable design approach to a workshop with fashion design students; and discuss implications about forms, materials and experiential qualities of soma-wearables. 

  • 5.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    A Study on a Tangible Interaction Approach to Managing Wireless Connections in a Smart Home Environment2012Inngår i: Proceedings of DeSForM 2012, Design and Semantics of Form and Movement, 2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological advances in computational, networking and sensing abilities are leading towards a future in which our daily lives are immersed with interactive devices that are networked and interoperable. Design has an important role in facilitating users to make sense of the many connections between devices in a networked environment. Two design solutions based on a tangible interaction approach have been developed, that allow users to manage wireless connections between devices in a smart living room context. One design (Interaction Tiles) is a centralized approach based on a high level of semantic abstraction. The second design (Nodes) employs a distributed and localized approach, building upon laws of grouping from Gestalt psychology. A user experiment (n=15) was conducted, comparing both design solutions in the form of video prototypes, to gain insights into the mental models users construct when using the methods. Findings suggest that users’ mental models of the Nodes design are more accurate representations of the actual structure of the network and that it allows for the projection of different mental models. Furthermore, findings also suggest that this does not necessarily lead to increased usability or increased perceived value.

  • 6.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Kuenen, Christoffel
    Umeå Institute of Design, Sweden.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Chapter 23: Unveiling the Expressivity of Complexity: Drifting in Design Research2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Design research is regarded to be a mode of inquiry particularly suited to engage with complex topics. In our work, we are interested in unpacking the complexity at the heart of an embodied aesthetic experience. In this article, through our digital and physical artefacts and a methodological reflection, we illustrate an ongoing design research project that a multi-disciplinary team of interaction designers, professional dancers, software developers, artists and 3D modelling experts are carrying out to develop insights on how to understand this complexity and how to use such insights as inspiration for interaction design-related projects. By embracing combinations of design, new technologies and simple visualisation tools, the project investigates the complex and hidden expressivity embedded in the skills of dancers in a programmatic design research approach. This investigation leads to insights on different levels. Firstly, cycles of formulation, realisation and reflection on design programs express parts of this complexity and this lets new research interests emerge. Secondly, as a body of work, reflecting on these cycles exposes how our “drifting” within this programmatic approach has started to unveil the complexities inherent in our research program. In this article we aim at contributing to the growing understanding of what designerly ways of knowing might be and how a practice aimed at expanding and contributing such knowledge unfolds.

  • 7.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Reflections on Designing for Aesthetic Engagement2015Inngår i: Proceedings of the 2nd Biennial Research Through Design Conference, 2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there has been a clear shift in the Interaction Design community towards the design for engagement as opposed to more traditional ideals of efficiency and functionality. Our work explores how to design for aesthetic engagement in interaction; building on an approach founded on phenomenology, embodiment, pragmatist aesthetics and embodied cognition. In this paper, we present four different research through design projects we have undertaken, in which we leveraged this approach. These designs cover a wide range of contexts, scales and use. Together, they describe and open up a design space: each of the projects provides rich, aesthetic experiences that respect complexity and ambiguity. They entice people to engage with body and mind, where meaning arises in dialogue with the artifact. We present and critically reflect on these projects in the form of an annotated portfolio. Comparing and contrasting the project results reveals insights into our overall approach and research interest regarding how to design for engagement. We conclude with opportunities that these reflections offer for the design of engaging interactions. Furthermore, we expand on the implications that these reflections suggest towards further trajectories of practice-based research into such experiences.

  • 8.
    Trotto, Ambra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Kuenen, Stoffel
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    MoCap Tango: Materialising Movement Qualities2016Inngår i: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2016, s. 10-10Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This video shows the ongoing design research project MoCap Tango. The project highlights the subtle qualities embedded in the physical dialogue between two tango dancers from a design perspective. Using custom-made wearables fitted with passive markers, in an optical Motion Capture System, the movements of two world-class tango dancers are captured. This data is used to experiment with real-time visualisations and 3D printed materialisations of the movements. The video presents the current state of the project, showing public performances in which the system was used as well as current work to use the data to create animations and 3D printed sculptures. Interviews with part of the design team highlight motivations for the project and discuss its relevance for embodied interaction design.

  • 9.
    Van der Veen, Rosa
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Charged Utopia VR: Exploring Embodied Sense-Making in the Virtual Space2018Inngår i: Proceedings of TEI '18: 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction (TEI '18). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2018, s. 292-298Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on preliminary results of a design research project that explores how spaces in virtual reality may be designed to build on qualities of embodied sensemaking. The project forms a basis for the exploration of an ethical dimension to interactions in virtual reality. This publication focuses on identifying qualities of embodied sense-making in an existing physical space, the interactive exhibition Charged Utopia. These qualities are transposed into a virtual interactive space. The translation of the qualities is done through the three main themes: Physical Movement, Resistance and Ambiguity. We present the design research process to describe how these themes were identified and transposed. We conclude with reflections that sketch ways in which we might capitalise on the opportunities offered by a virtual space, while respecting human skills in embodied sensemaking.

  • 10.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Lundin, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Swerea, Swerea IVF AB.
    Södergren, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Automation and flexibility: An apparent or real dilemma?2017Inngår i: International Series in Operations Research and Management Science, ISSN 0884-8289, E-ISSN 2214-7934, Vol. 255, s. 35-48Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    There are trade-offs between cost and capabilities throughout specification, implementation and operation of automated solutions in manufacturing companies. This chapter describes four identified dilemmas or contradictions while balancing flexibility to automation, based on an empirical study with interviews and workshop in five internationally competitive manufacturing companies. The study generated insights on experienced challenges while implementing automated solutions in manufacturing, and these apparent conflicts between automated solutions and maintaining a high operational flexibility need to be managed as manufacturing automation will continue to increase on all levels. © 2017, Springer International Publishing AG.

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