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  • 1.
    Brunklaus, Birgit
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Sjons, Josefin
    Socio-economic analysis based on a life cycle perspective: Social and societal issues of new chemicals2020Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to demonstrate the sustainability of new chemicals, a number of analyses were performed within the EU Life projects TRIALKYL and IREPRO, such as the health assessment, socio-economic and life cycle assessment. 

    The objective of this Socio-Economic Analysis (SEA) is to determine whether the social and societal benefits the new chemicals outweigh the risk to human health and the environment. 

    Socio-economic analysis (SEA) is a methodology developed for chemical risk management and decision making derived from tools like the Cost benefit analysis, based on several social science perspectives, such as economic value of life, the risk of accidents or health care costs.

    The socio-economic analyses are based on the latest ECHA guideline, and also include a life cycle perspective. Besides environmental and health issues, the socio-economic analysis also include the risk of fire/explosion and life lost. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Hallström, Elinor
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Bajzelj, B
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Håkansson, N
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sjons, Josefin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Åkesson, A
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wolk, A
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sonesson, Ulf
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Dietary climate impact: Contribution of foods and dietary patterns by gender and age in a Swedish population2021In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 306, article id 127189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dietary climate impact in a Swedish population (56–95 years old) was estimated based on self-reported food intake from 50 000 men and women within two population-based cohorts and on climate data, covering emissions from farm to fork, for 600 foods representative for the Swedish market. Aims were to assess variation in dietary climate impact between population groups and between food categories. Mean dietary climate impact was 2.0 tons of CO2e/person/year, with about a threefold variation between high and low impact individuals. Food loss and waste accounted for 18%. Older individuals and women on average had lower total dietary climate impact per year, while differences between gender were smaller per 1000 kcal. Climate impact was greatly affected by dietary composition and especially by the content of animal-based and discretionary foods, responsible for 71% and 12% of total climate impact, respectively. Results indicate a large potential for reduced climate impact by adopting realistic dietary patterns. Suggested strategies to reach climate goals include reduction of red meat and prioritising lower impact foods within meat, dairy and seafood categories, limited consumption of discretionary foods and decreased over-consumption of total calories, combined with improvements in production including reduction of food loss and waste.

  • 3.
    Hallström, Elinor
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Bajzelj, B
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Håkansson, N
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sjons, Josefin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Åkesson, A
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wolk, A
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sonesson, Ulf
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Dietary climate impact: Contribution of foods and dietary patterns by gender and age in a Swedish population2021In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 306, article id 127189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dietary climate impact in a Swedish population (56–95 years old) was estimated based on self-reported food intake from 50 000 men and women within two population-based cohorts and on climate data, covering emissions from farm to fork, for 600 foods representative for the Swedish market. Aims were to assess variation in dietary climate impact between population groups and between food categories. Mean dietary climate impact was 2.0 tons of CO2e/person/year, with about a threefold variation between high and low impact individuals. Food loss and waste accounted for 18%. Older individuals and women on average had lower total dietary climate impact per year, while differences between gender were smaller per 1000 kcal. Climate impact was greatly affected by dietary composition and especially by the content of animal-based and discretionary foods, responsible for 71% and 12% of total climate impact, respectively. Results indicate a large potential for reduced climate impact by adopting realistic dietary patterns. Suggested strategies to reach climate goals include reduction of red meat and prioritising lower impact foods within meat, dairy and seafood categories, limited consumption of discretionary foods and decreased over-consumption of total calories, combined with improvements in production including reduction of food loss and waste.

  • 4.
    Mehlig, Kirsten
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Blomqvist, Irene
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Klingberg, Sofia
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bianchi, Marta Angela
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Sjons, Josefin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Hunsberger, Monica
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lissner, Lauren
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Secular trends in diet-related greenhouse gas emission estimates since 2000 - a shift towards sustainable diets in Sweden2021In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 3916-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study examines secular changes in diet-related greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE) in younger and older Swedish adults, since the turn of this century. Setting: The municipality of Gothenburg, in western Sweden. Design: Two cross-sectional health examination surveys were conducted in 2001-04 (T1) and 2014-18 (T2). At both times, an 86-item food frequency questionnaire was embedded in the survey. From the food frequencies and age-standardized portion sizes, GHGE estimates (kg CO2e/year) were calculated. GHGE was modeled as a function of time period and covariates, for five distinct age groups. Participants: Women and men aged 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64 and 65-75 were randomly selected from the population registry and recruited for examinations. After exclusion of participants with incomplete dietary data, the analytic sample consisted of 2569 individuals at T1 and 2119 at T2. Results: Lower dietary GHGE scores were observed at T2 compared to T1, in each age group, adjusting for sex, body mass index, and education. The largest differences in GHGE were observed in the youngest age group (circa 30% reduction). Decreasing trends in GHGE from animal-based foods were observed at all ages and were accompanied by smaller increases from plant-based sources in younger groups only. At all ages, GHGE from discretionary foods decreased, and prevalence of overweight remained stable. Conclusions: Optimal dietary trends should support both human health and planetary health. Our results suggest that Swedish adults have moved in this direction, e.g. through less intake of red meat products and stable weight status.

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  • 5.
    Nilsson, Katarina
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Baky, Andras
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Sjons, Josefin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Klimatindikatorer för svensk direktkonsumtion av livsmedel 2016 och 2018 – Resultat & metodik2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    RISE har på uppdrag av Naturvårdsverket tagit fram klimatindikatorer för svensk konsumtion av livsmedel baserat på statistik för 2016 och 2018. Jordbruksverket publicerar årligen statistik på direktkonsumtion av livsmedel i Sverige och informationen om konsumerad mängd livsmedel i olika produktgrupper har använts tillsammans med klimatavtryck för livsmedel, vilka tagits från RISE Klimatdatabas för livsmedel v. 1.7, för att ta fram klimatpåverkan för svensk direktkonsumtion av livsmedel. Utifrån Jordbruksverkets indelning av livsmedel i produktgrupper i konsumtionsstatistiken har klimatindikatorer tagits fram för de åtta olika produktgrupperna i statistikunderlaget, plus tre för undergrupper inom köttproduktgruppen, samt en klimatindikator för total direktkonsumtion av alla livsmedel 2016 och 2018. Följande produktgrupper har klimatberäknats: 1. Bröd och spannmålsprodukter 2. Kött och köttråvaror, som även delats upp i a. Kött, färskt och fryst b. Charkuterivaror och konserver (inklusive innanmat) c. Frysta köttprodukter och fryst färdiglagad mat innehållande kött 3. Fisk, kräftdjur och blötdjur 4. Mjölk, grädde, ost, ägg och matfett 5. Köksväxter 6. Frukt och bär 7. Potatis, potatisprodukter, socker, sirap, kaffe, te, kakao 8. Andra livsmedel, malt- och läskedrycker, mineralvatten samt alkoholhaltiga drycker De olika produktgrupperna består i sin tur av varugrupper, där varje varugrupp angivits en konsumtionsvolym. RISE har med information från Jordbruksverket och statistik från SCB och Jordbruksverket brutit ner de aggregerade konsumtionsvolymerna för varje varugrupp till specifik konsumtion av de olika livsmedel som ingår i respektive varugrupp. På detta sätt har matchningen till representativa klimatavtryck i RISE Klimatdatabas för livsmedel möjliggjorts och således också beräkningen av klimatindikatorer för de olika produktgrupperna då klimatindikatorerna representerar summan av klimatpåverkan från varorna som konsumeras i respektive varugrupp. Enbart klimatpåverkan från primärproduktion och förädling fram till industrigrind (det vill säga då livsmedlet är färdigt för distribution till handeln) ingår i klimatavtrycken i RISE Klimatdatabas för livsmedel. Klimatpåverkan från förpackning ingår dock inte, inte heller klimatpåverkan från distribution, handel och konsument.

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    Rapport
  • 6.
    Sjons, Josefin
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Environment.
    Livscykelanalys av hallonsylt, lingonsylt och äppelmos2016Report (Other academic)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 7.
    Sjons, Josefin
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Florén, Britta
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Biörklund Helgesson, Maria
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Hallström, Elinor
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Nilsson, Katarina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    RISE klimatskalor för livsmedel2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    RISE Jordbruk och livsmedel har tagit fram tio klimatskalor för livsmedel med syftet att stötta aktörer i livsmedelskedjan genom att ge vägledning kring vad som är låg respektive hög klimatpåverkan inom en grupp av livsmedel med liknande funktion. Skalorna kan användas för att jämföra olika livsmedels klimatavtryck inom samma grupp av livsmedel och på så sätt främja mer klimatsmarta val av livsmedel. Målgruppen för klimatskalorna är användare av RISE klimatdatabas för livsmedel, såsom aktörer som producerar och säljer livsmedel och i slutänden deras kunder, konsumenterna. Även för kockar och andra måltidsaktörer är klimatskalorna tänkta som ett hjälpmedel i den dagliga menyplaneringen. Indelning av livsmedel i tio klimatskalor har gjorts utifrån livsmedlens funktion och användningsområden, se punktlista nedan. Fokus har varit på sju av de tio klimatskalorna vilka omfattar de livsmedelsgrupper som utgör den största delen av vår konsumtion. De övriga tre klimatskalorna, kursiverade i punktlistan nedan, inkluderar antingen produkter som ofta konsumeras i mindre mängder och är mer olika varandra och därmed inte direkt utbytbara, eller sammansatta rätter för vilka RISE klimatskala för måltider rekommenderas att användas i första hand.

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    fulltext
  • 8.
    Strid, Anna
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hallström, Elinor
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Sonesson, Ulf
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Sjons, Josefin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Winkvist, Anna
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Bianchi, Marta Angela
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Sustainability indicators for foods benefiting climate and health2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 7, article id 3621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New methods for combined evaluation of nutritional and environmental aspects of food products are needed to enable a transformation of dietary guidelines integrating both health and environmental perspectives. We evaluated two sustainability aspects; nutrition and climate im-pact, of foods commonly consumed in Sweden and the implications of using parallel or integrated assessments of these two aspects, also discussing the usability and suitability of these food sustain-ability indicators in relation to Swedish dietary guidelines, industry food product development, and consumer communication. There were large differences in both nutrient density and climate impact among the different foods. The parallel assessment easily visualized synergies and trade-offs between these two sustainability aspects for the different foods. Coherence with dietary guidelines was good, and suitability and usability deemed satisfying. The integrated indicator showed better coherence with dietary guidelines than indicators based solely on nutrient density or climate impact; however, the difficulty to interpret the score limits its usability in product development and consumer communication. With both methods, advantageous as well as less advantageous plant-based and animal-based food alternatives were suggested. The two alternative methods evaluated could serve as useful tools to drive individual and societal development towards more sustainable food production and consumption. © 2021 by the authors.

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