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  • 1.
    Marti, Patrizia
    et al.
    University of Siena, Italy; Eindhoven Technical University, The Netherlands.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Tittarelli, Michele
    University of Siena, Italy; University of Florence, Italy.
    True, Nicholas
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Papworth, Nigel
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Hummels, Caroline
    Eindhoven Technical University, The Netherlands.
    Embodying Culture: Interactive Installation on Women's Rights2015In: First Monday, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 4, article id 5897Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper describes an interactive installation exploring perspectives on women’s rights, triggering visitors’ personal reflections through an immersive experience. Starting from the life histories of the women depicted in three paintings from fifteenth, sixteenth and seventeenth century, we explored three themes: emancipation, self-determination and violence. In the installation, representations of these three paintings were fragmented into panels, floating in the space suspended from a self-standing structure. On these elements, both the original painting and a writhing of visual material were dynamically displayed using a projector. The presence and movement of visitors in the room was tracked by means of a Kinect™ camera and influenced both the position and movements of the panels. A software crawler monitored discussions and debates on social networks. The intensity of these discussions was reflected in the movements of the panels and the content of the projections. The purpose of this interactive installation is to engage visitors in composing a harmonious picture of the complex domain of women’s rights. The experiential form confronts visitors with the opinions of other people debating the theme worldwide. The installation was the outcome of a craft-inspired learning module, grounded on constructivism and reflective practice.

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  • 2.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Kuenen, Stoffel
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Hummels, Caroline
    DiffractMe - Using A Skills-Based Approach in Design Practice2014In: The Proceedings of the Kansei Engineering and Emotion Research International Conference 2014 KEER2014, 2014, 9Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential of skills in design is intriguing; as skills open up new perceptions of the world they allow meaning to arise as we engage with the world. Several skills-based techniques that leverage this potential have been developed, and integrated into the Designing in Skills framework. The framework builds on personal engagement of designers in their practice, and promotes them to take a first-person perspective, enabling designs to be enriched with meaning. In this paper, we present the most recent workshop based on this approach, which specifically focuses on employing the Designing in Skills framework as a starting point and catalyst for design practice. We briefly introduce the Designing in Skills framework and present the DiffractMe! project in which we built on this approach to explore its potential for design practice. We conclude with reflections on the process and result by the involved designers. These reflections offer insights into the value of this approach for enriching interactive design with experiential qualities.

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    fulltext
  • 3.
    Trotto, Ambra
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hummels, Caroline
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Designing in Skills - Nurturing Personal Engagement in Design2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Potentialities of skills in design are intriguing. Skills open up new perceptions of the world, transform human understanding and engagement with the world itself. Our explorations suggest that leveraging existing designer's skills and training for new skills might remarkably contribute in designing for richness of meaning. We developed several skills-based techniques and validated them through a number of workshops. These techniques encourage participants to make before thinking, to reflect on the outcomes of making, and proceed by iterations of reflection-on-action. Also developed are techniques to increase the frequency of such iterations to minimize loss of meaning by abstraction, and techniques to foster depth of reflection. We organised these techniques into a framework, Designing in Skills (DiS). DiS nurtures personal engagement of designers, compelling a sense of responsibility; it supports designers toward what we call the "first-person perspective", enabling application of individual sensitivities. This paper presents firstly the motivation of our work and the surrounding theory. Subsequently, it introduces the framework and its development, using design cases that have led to its consolidation. It illustrates how DiS prepares for design practice and reflects on the theme of experiential richness.

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    FULLTEXT01
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