Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ottosson, Peter
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Manufacturing Processes.
    Pilthammar, J
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden; Volvo Cars, Sweden.
    Wiklund, Daniel
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Manufacturing Processes.
    Skåre, Thomas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Manufacturing Processes.
    Sigvant, M
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden; Volvo Cars, Sweden.
    Substitutive models of press deflections for efficient numerical die cambering2023In: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, ISSN 1757-8981, E-ISSN 1757-899X, Vol. 1284, no 1, p. 012060-012060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cost and time for stamping die tryouts are significant within the car industry. A major contributing factor is that elastic deflections of stamping dies and presses are usually not considered during the virtual die design and forming simulation phase. Active surfaces of stamping dies are only cambered based on previous experiences of tool types and stamping presses. However, almost all stamping dies and presses are unique, and available experiences are not valid for new sheet materials. This leads to component deviations and often several loops of tool adjustments are needed. Previously partners within the SMART Advanced Manufacturing research project CAMBER have developed advanced deflection measuring devices to quantify the elastic deformations of stamping presses. Using these measurements, cambering methodologies can be utilized in sheet metal forming simulations. In this paper numerical substitutive stamping press models are described which are capable of compensating for measured stamping press dynamics. The result show that a numerical compensated tool can improve the contact by over 80% compared to the corresponding contact without compensation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Risseh, Arash E.
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technolgoy, Sweden.
    Nee, Hans-Peter
    KTH Royal Institute of Technolgoy, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Olof
    TitanX Engine Cooling Holding, Sweden.
    Brinkfeldt, Klas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF, Elektronikhårdvara.
    Contet, Arnaud
    TitanX Engine Cooling Holding, Sweden.
    Frobenius lng, Fabian
    EberSpracher Gmbh, Germany.
    Gaiser, Gerd
    EberSpracher Gmbh, Germany.
    Saramat, Ali
    Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Skare, Thomas
    TitanX Engine Cooling Holding, Sweden.
    Nee, Simon
    KTH Royal Institute of Technolgoy, Sweden.
    Dellrud, Jam
    Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Design of a Thermoelectric Generator for Waste Heat Recovery Application on a Drivable Heavy Duty Vehicle2017In: SAE International Journal of Commercial Vehicles, ISSN 1946391X, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 26-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Union’s 2020 target aims to be producing 20 % of its energy from renewable sources by 2020, to achieve a 20 % reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and a 20 % improvement in energy efficiency compared to 1990 levels. To reach these goals, the energy consumption has to decrease which results in reduction of the emissions. The transport sector is the second largest energy consumer in the EU, responsible for 25 % of the emissions of greenhouse gases caused by the low efficiency (<40 %) of combustion engines. Much work has been done to improve that efficiency but there is still a large amount of fuel energy that converts to heat and escapes to the ambient atmosphere through the exhaust system. Taking advantage of thermoelectricity, the heat can be recovered, improving the fuel economy. A thermoelectric generator (TEG) consists of a number of thermoelectric elements, which advantageously can be built into modules, arranged thermally and electrically, in a way such that the highest possible thermal power can be converted into electrical power. In a unique waste heat recovery (WHR) project, five international companies and research institutes cooperated and equipped a fully drivable Scania prototype truck with two TEGs. The entire system, from the heat transfer in the exchangers to the electrical power system, was simulated, built and evaluated. The primary experimental results showed that approximately 1 kW electrical power could be generated from the heat energy. In this paper the entire system from design to experimental results is presented.

  • 3.
    Skåre, Thomas
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Polymeric Materials and Composites.
    Asnafi, Nader
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Forming and trimming of 2-mm thick DP600 sheet steel in tools and dies 3D-printed in maraging steel by laser-based powder bed fusion2020In: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and EngineeringVolume 967, Issue 1, 17 November 2020, Article number 01204039th International Deep-Drawing Research Group Conference, IDDRG 2020; Seoul; South Korea; 26 October 2020 through 30 October 2020;, IOP Publishing Ltd , 2020, no 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a previous investigation, 3D-printed solid and topology optimized semi-industrial tools for forming and trimming of 2-mm thick hot-dip galvanized DP600 were certified. This certification required 50,000 strokes in U-bend forming and 100,000 strokes in trimming/cutting/blanking. The present paper focuses on the tool wear, the U-bend sheet surfaces, the shear and fracture zone lengths in trimming, and the punch forces in this certification. The 3D-printed tools behave as conventional tools do. Although small, there seems to be a difference in wear at the profile radius between the solid and topology optimized U-bending tool halves 3D-printed in maraging steel DIN1.2709.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf