Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Béland, Marie-Claude
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Bennett, J. M.
    Effect of local microroughness on the gloss uniformity of printed paper surfaces2000In: Appl. Opt., Vol. 39, p. 2719-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Béland, Marie-Claude
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Exploring How Material Demonstrators Accelerate the Transition to a Circular Bioeconomy2023In: diid disegno industriale industrial design, E-ISSN 2785-2245, no 79, p. 44-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking ideas to market can be a long, iterative, and complex process. When dealing with new bio-based materials, under-standing factors that help bridge the lab-to-market gap and how materials are selected for new product development have the potential to speed up the transition to a circular bioeconomy. This article defines abstract and conceptual material demonstrators and explores how they support the innovation process in different ways. Nine roles are iden-tified, including how material demonstrators contribute to generating and expressing new ideas, enable a shared understanding of technology, support the discovery of market value and the visualization of potential applications as well as helping to articulate internal and external strategies and communications. Abstract and conceptual material dem-onstrators are exemplified with both technology-driven and market-driven bio-based materials used in packaging.

  • 3.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Béland, Marie-Claude
    RISE, Innventia.
    Modelling the angle-dependent light scattering from sheets of pulp fibre fragments2004In: Nordic Pulp Paper Res.J., Vol. 19, no 3, p. 354-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Béland, Marie-Claude
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lindberg, Siv M.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Berthold, Fredrik
    RISE, Innventia.
    Vomhoff, Hannes
    RISE, Innventia.
    Wickholm, Kristina
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lindström, Mikael
    RISE, Innventia.
    It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s a super multimaterial!2015In: Paper Conference and Trade Show (PaperCon 2015), TAPPI Press, 2015, Vol. 1, p. 492-504Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Matching market demands and technological solutions is not always straightforward. In this article, we report on one material, a cellulose-PLA multimaterial, which was made on a full-scale pilot paper machine and adapted to five different market applications having specialized and often conflicting demands. The material can be injection molded, 3D-printed, hot pressed, treated as a textile, used in a laminate, or converted as a paper board, giving it a wide range of possible properties depending on how it is processed.The five application areas presented here were identified as gaps in the marketplace where seemingly conflicting needs were desired: opacity and transparency; compact for transport but having an expanded size during use; stiffness and flexibility; strength and light-weight; and durability and degradability. These properties are exemplified in a number of material and product demonstrators, illustrating how tailored solutions can give products with distinctly different personalities. The material can be made flexible and given movement as graceful as the wing of a bird or be processed to be strong and light-weight enough to be used in vehicles like airplanes. By having one material that is produced on a large scale, but then processed according to specific market demands and expectations, the gap between needing scale and needing scope is bridged.

  • 5.
    Lindberg, Siv M.
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Béland, Marie-Claude
    RISE, Innventia.
    Edström, Karin
    RISE, Innventia.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE, Innventia.
    Berthold, Fredrik
    RISE, Innventia.
    Towards a cellulose-based society: Demonstrating the feasibility of new bio-based material concepts and products2016In: Proceedings - D and E 2016: 10th International Conference on Design and Emotion - Celebration and Contemplation, 2016, p. 411-419Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In moving towards a cellulose-based society, interdisciplinary effort is required as it is at this interface that new ideas are found and can grow. New bio-based materials will play a key role but getting them into the marketplace is not always straightforward. Many options are available both for sourcing and for producing composite materials from wood-based cellulose and poly-lactic acid (PLA). Depending on how the material is processed, a multitude of properties can be generated. The main goal with this work was to attempt to reduce the research-To-market gap. This was done by testing a new way of working together where we bundled innovation-oriented projects and research-oriented projects around the theme of material experience. We then systematically worked with material demonstrators. In this article, we exemplify the results by focusing on one research-oriented project that did not at the outset have a market context and on one innovation-oriented project with clear market requirements. In addition to introducing a new concept in bundling research-oriented and innovation-oriented projects, this paper contributes several practical examples of what material demonstrators can do. We also present an application and analysis of Moultrie’s extended Science-Technology-Application-Market (STAM) model to analyze the material demonstrators and design phases of the bundled projects. We modified the proposed classification with different types of material demonstrators according to how close they are to an actual product segment. Designers and scientists worked together but with different emphasis in each phase.

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf