Change search
Refine search result
1 - 27 of 27
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Gåsvaer, Daniel
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Hedegård, Joakim
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, KIMAB.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Lundin, Roger
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Persson, Kalle
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Widfeldt, Magnus
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Axelson, Jens
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Att utveckla den smarta svetscellen: Lean, svetsteknik och automation2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En svetscell producerar och är produktiv när svetsning pågår och ljubågen brinner. Då skapas värde i en svetscell. För att nå teknisk och ekonomisk framgång, behöver svetscellen fungera "smart" med effektiva flöden, hög tillgänglighet, optimerad svetsteknik och ur flera aspekter goda miljöegenskaper. Skriften fungerar som hjälp när företag vill utveckla sin svetsverkstad och förbättra svetsproduktionen, utifrån lean, svetsteknik och automation.

  • 2.
    Hedberg, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Fransson, Kristin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Prideaux, Sonja
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Roos, Sandra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Wallinder, Inger O.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Improving the life cycle impact assessment of metal ecotoxicity: Importance of chromium speciation, water chemistry, and metal release2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 1655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Investigations of metal ecotoxicity in life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) are becoming important tools for evaluating the environmental impact of a product or process. There is, however, improvement needed for LCIA of metal ecotoxicity in order to make this assessment more relevant and robust. In this work, three issues within the LCIA of metal ecotoxicity are investigated, mainly focusing on topics related to stainless steel manufacturing. The first issue is the importance of considering regional water chemistry when constructing the characterization factor (CF). A model freshwater of relevance for stainless steel manufacturing in a region of Sweden was created with chemistry different from available options. The second issue is related to the lack of consideration on changes in speciation of Cr(VI) in freshwater for a given emission, as Cr(VI) to some extent will be reduced to Cr(III). Two new options are suggested based on relationships between the Cr(VI)-total Cr ratio as a way to improve the relevancy of LCIA for Cr(VI) in freshwater. The last issue is how to treat metal release from slags in LCIA. Metal release from slags was shown to vary significantly between different ways of modelling slag emissions (differences in total metal content, slag leaching tests, estimated emissions to groundwater). © 2019 by the authors.

  • 3.
    Jönsson, Christina
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Arturin, Oscar L.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Hanning, Anne-Charlotte
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Landin, Rebecca
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Holmström, Emma
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Roos, Sandra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Microplastics shedding from textiles-developing analytical method for measurement of shed material representing release during domestic washing2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 7, article id 2457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The topic of shedding of micro-sized polymeric particles, so called microplastics, from textiles has been covered by an increasing number of studies over the past years. However, the methods with which the shedding of microplastics from textiles has been measured so far has shown a large variation. Consequently, the results regarding the amount of shed particles also vary, from 120 to 728,289 particles from similar garments in recent studies. This article presents research enabling for identification of whether the shedding of microplastics from different types of fabric was dependent on construction parameters. As none of the methods in the existing literature could be used for evaluating shedding of microplastics from textiles, a method was developed for this purpose. The resulting final method is described in this paper as well as the work with minimizing the error sources and consequently the standard deviation of the results through selection of material samples, equipment and procedure for sample preparation, washing, filtering the washing water and analyzing the shed microplastics. Comparing the environmental load of different garments, or identifying improvement possibilities in garment construction are two examples of how the method can be utilized.

  • 4.
    Jönsson, Christina
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Posner, Stefan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Roos, Sandra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Sustainable Chemicals: A Model for Practical Substitution2017In: Detox Fashion – Sustainable Chemistry and Wet processing / [ed] Muthu, Subramanian Senthilkannan, Singapore: Springer, 2017, p. 1-36Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The textile industry sees currently a fast development of legal and voluntary restrictions of chemicals content in textile products. However, the on-going phase-out work focuses on evaluating the environmental and health aspects of chemicals. The technical performance in the end application for the chemical does not receive the same attention. In addition, many research projects committed to evaluating hazardous substances and their possible alternatives also neglects the technical performance. The technical performance is left to the companies to evaluate. This may lead to inefficiency in the substitution process and also have the consequence that companies never dare to take the step to practical substitution, at least not in a proactive way. This chapter presents a model for practical substitution, developed and evaluated in several case studies, whereof two in the textile field: water and soil repellent textile coating materials and flame retarded textiles. From the general lessons learnt, an improved substitution methodology with widespread applicability has been defined.

  • 5.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Hildenbrand, Jutta
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Design for green lean building module production - Case study2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 25, p. 594-601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With an increasing societal need for temporary buildings, while construction industry faces resource and time efficiency challenges, factory assembly of modular buildings can be a solution. This case study at a start-up company uses experiences from assembly system design and eco-design literature to propose green lean design principles to be used in the design and development of building modules and their assembly stations. The eco-design strategy wheel is used as a basis and adapted for the assessment of green and lean building manufacturing.

  • 6.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Granzell, Ann-Sofie
    Development of the urban and industrial symbiosis in western Mälardalen2018In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 73, p. 96-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a product service systems business model development perspective, this paper presents a case study of Västra Mälardalens industrial symbiosis, its maturity level and potentials for further development. The status and potentials of the symbiosis network, based on a survey, interviews and workshops, together with background statistics, is used to evaluate the potential improvement areas and suggest future research. The study contributes with application of evaluation models and confirms earlier research and in addition suggests future research in the field. The Symbiosis network has potential to be acting as innovation catalyst supporting companies to go beyond core business development.

  • 7.
    Mellin, Pelle
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Åkermo, Malin
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Fernberg, Patrik
    RISE, Swerea. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Nordenberg, Eva
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Brodin, Håkan
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Strondl, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, KIMAB. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Nano-sized by-products from metal 3D printing, composite manufacturing and fabric production2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 139, p. 1224-1233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, the health and environmental perspective of nano-materials has gained attention. Most previous work focused on Engineered Nanoparticles (ENP). This paper examines some recently introduced production routes in terms of generated nano-sized by-products. A discussion on the hazards of emitting such particles and fibers is included. Fine by-products were found in recycled metal powder after 3D printing by Selective Laser Melting (SLM). The process somehow generated small round metal particles (∌1–2 ÎŒm) that are possibly carcinogenic and respirable, but not small enough to enter by skin-absorption. With preventive measures like closed handling and masks, any health related effects can be prevented. The composite manufacturing in particular generated ceramic and carbonaceous particles that are very small and respirable but do not appear to be intrinsically toxic. The smallest features in agglomerates were about 30 nm. Small particles and fibers that were not attached in agglomerates were found in a wide range of sizes, from 1 ÎŒm and upwards. Preventive measures like closed handling and masks are strongly recommended. In contrast, the more traditional production route of fabric production is investigated. Here, brushing residue and recycled wool from fabric production contained few nano-sized by-products.

  • 8.
    Posner, Stefan
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Chemicals in textiles - Risks to human health and the environment: Report from a government assignment2014Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Posner, Stefan
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Roos, Sandra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Brunn Poulsen, Pia
    FORCE Technology.
    Ólína Jörundsdottir, Hrönn
    Matis.
    Gunnlaugsdóttir, Helga
    Matis.
    Xenia Trier, D
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Astrup Jensen, Allan
    Nordic Institute of Product Sustainability Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology.
    A. Katsogiannis, Athanasios
    Norwegian Institute for Air Reasearch.
    Herzke, Dorte
    Norwegian Institute for Air Reasearch.
    Cecilie Bonefeld-Jörgensen, Eva
    University of Aarhus.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Alsing Pedersen, Gitte
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Ghisari, Mandana
    University of Aarhus.
    Jensen, Sophie
    Matis.
    Per- and polyfluorinated substances in the Nordic Countries: Use, occurence and toxicology2013Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This Tema Nord report presents a study based on open information and custom market research to review the most common perfluorinated substances (PFC) with less focus on PFOS and PFOA.The study includes three major parts: 1) Identification of relevant per-and polyfluorinated substances and their use in various industrial sectors in the Nordic market by interviews with major players and database information. 2) Emissions to and occurence in the Nordic environment of the substances described in 1). 3) A summary of knowledge of the toxic effects on humans and the environment of substances prioritized in 2). There is a lack of physical chemical data, analystical reference substances, human and environmental occurrence and toxicology data, as well as market information regarding PFCs other than PFOA and PFOS and the current legislation cannot enforce disclosure of specific PFC substance information.

  • 10.
    Roos, Sandra
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Rickard
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Calculating the toxicity footprint of Swedish clothing consumption2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the major environmental challenges of the textile industry is the emissions of toxic substances during the production of textiles. It is therefore vital that toxicity impact potential is included when calculating the environmental impact of textile products with life cycle assessment (LCA). Generally, toxicity is considered a weak point in LCA, and specifically for LCA of textile products there is a lack of guidance in the literature. This paper shares the experiences from using USEtox 2.0 for calculating the toxicity footprint of Swedish clothing consumption. The most commonly occurring garments, production processes and related toxic emissions were inventoried for the Swedish clothing consumption. The selected case offered the possibility to compare a variety of bio-based as well as synthetic materials and their production processes. The inventoried substances were matched against existing databases for USEtox characterization factors (CF): the USEtox databases and COSMEDE. For the substances that did not have any CF, USEtox 2.0 was used to calculate new CF. The potential contribution to freshwater ecotoxicity from the Swedish clothing consumption was calculated to 7.9 billion CTUe which can be interpreted as 7.9 cubic kilometres of freshwater where 50% of the species in the ecosystem are exposed daily to a concentration above their EC50. It was found that background processes in the life cycle (exhaust gases from fuel combustion, leakage of substances from mining waste etc.) accounted for 5.5 billion CTUe, or 70%. Direct emissions of toxic substances from the foreground processes (dyestuff, solvents, pesticides etc.) accounted for 2.4 billion CTUe, or 30%. It is important to note that there is a considerable amount of uncertainty in these values. An interesting discovery was that the wet treatment (dyeing and finishing) had the largest contribution to freshwater ecotoxicity impact, both regarding background and foreground processes. The cotton fibre production, infamous for its use of pesticides, had only the second largest contribution, followed by the yarn production. The paper concludes that emissions of toxic substances from textile production are an important environmental aspect to include in LCA studies of textile products. The results also contribute to the understanding of the order of magnitude that use and emissions from textile chemicals have in relation to a nations total clothing consumption. Sharing the experiences from the study can facilitate the inclusion of toxic substances in future LCA studies of textiles and other products.

  • 11.
    Roos, Sandra
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Holmquist, Hanna
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Arvidsson, Rickard
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    USEtox characterisation factors for textile chemicals based on a transparent data source selection strategy2018In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 890-903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Life cycle assessments (LCAs) of textile products which do not include the use and emission of textile chemicals, such as dyes, softeners and water-repellent agents, will give non-comprehensive results for the toxicity impact potential. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to provide a set of characterisation factors (CFs) for some of the most common textile chemicals and (2) to propose a data source selection strategy in order to increase transparency when calculating new CFs. Methods: A set of 72 common textile-related substances was matched with the USEtox 2.01, USEtox 1.01 and the COSMEDE databases in order to investigate coverage and coherence. For the 25 chemicals that did not already have established CFs in any of these databases, new CFs were calculated. A data source selection strategy was developed and followed in order to ensure consistency and transparency, and USEtox 2.01 was used for calculations. The parameters that caused the most uncertainty were identified during the modelling and strategies for handling them were developed. Results and discussion: Of the 72 textile-related substances, 48 already had calculated recommended or indicative CFs in existing databases, which showed good coherence. The main uncertainty identified during the calculation of 25 new CFs was the selection of input data regarding toxicity and degradation in water. However, for substances such as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), the acid dissociation constant (pKa) and partitioning coefficients (Kow and KOC) also require special considerations. Other input parameters had less than one order of magnitude impact on the CF result for essentially all substances. Conclusions: The paper presents a strategy for how to provide a complete set of toxicity CFs for a given list of substances. In addition, such a set of CFs for common textile-related substances is presented. The data source selection strategy provides a structured and transparent way of calculating additional CFs for textile chemicals with USEtox. Consequently, this study can help future LCA studies to provide relevant guidance towards environmentally benign chemical management in the textile industry.

  • 12.
    Roos, Sandra
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Hedberg, J
    Kaplin, C
    Odnevall Wallinder, Ingrid
    KTH Royal Institute of Thechnology.
    Integrating real metal runoff data to the life cycle assessment of alloys2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Roos, Sandra
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Posner, Stefan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Labelling of chemicals in textiles: Nordic Textile Initiative2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report contains an analysis of the needs and barriers for a legal requirement on declaration and/or labelling of chemicals in textiles. The project is a part of the Nordic action plan for textiles ”Well dressed in a clean environment. Nordic action plan for sustainable fashion and textiles”. Based on the findings from the analysis in this report, a way forward towards a legal requirement on a declaration and/or labelling of chemicals in textiles is proposed via two main options. One option is to work for an extension of the REACH legislation: to make it applicable for labelling and declaration. This option is supported by the industry. Another option is to create a new legislation framework; a product safety regulation for textiles. This option may have a more holistic approach and can include CE-marking.

  • 14.
    Roos, Sandra
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Posner, Stefan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Arvidsson, Rickard
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Svanström, Magdalena
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    An inventory framework for inclusion of textile chemicals in life cycle assessment2019In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 838-847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Toxicity impacts of chemicals have only been covered to a minor extent in LCA studies of textile products. The two main reasons for this exclusion are (1) the lack of life cycle inventory (LCI) data on use and emissions of textile-related chemicals, and (2) the lack of life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) data for calculating impacts based on the LCI data. This paper addresses the first of these two. Methods: In order to facilitate the LCI analysis for LCA practitioners, an inventory framework was developed. The framework builds on a nomenclature for textile-related chemicals which was used to build up a generic chemical product inventory for use in LCA of textiles. In the chemical product inventory, each chemical product and its content was modelled to fit the subsequent LCIA step. This means that the content and subsequent emission data are time-integrated, including both original content and, when relevant, transformation products as well as impurities. Another key feature of the framework is the modelling of modularised process performance in terms of emissions to air and water. Results and discussion: The inventory framework follows the traditional structure of LCI databases to allow for use together with existing LCI and LCIA data. It contains LCI data sets for common textile processes (unit processes), including use and emissions of textile-related chemicals. The data sets can be used for screening LCA studies and/or, due to their modular structure, also modified. Modified data sets can be modelled from recipes of input chemicals, where the chemical product inventory provides LCA-compatible content and emission data. The data sets and the chemical product inventory can also be used as data collection templates in more detailed LCA studies. Conclusions: A parallel development of a nomenclature for and acquisition of LCI data resulted in the creation of a modularised inventory framework. The framework advances the LCA method to provide results that can guide towards reduced environmental impact from textile production, including also the toxicity impacts from textile chemicals. Recommendations: The framework can be used for guiding stakeholders of the textile sector in macro-level decisions regarding the effectiveness of different impact reduction interventions, as well as for guiding on-site decisions in textile manufacturing.

  • 15.
    Roos, Sandra
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Posner, Stefan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Peters, G
    Simultaneous development of inventory and impact assessment enables chemicals inclusion in textile LCA2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Roos, Sandra
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Posner, Stefan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Peters, Greg M.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Is Unbleached Cotton Better Than Bleached? Exploring the Limits of Life-Cycle Assessment in the Textile Sector2015In: Clothing & Textiles Research Journal, ISSN 0887-302X, E-ISSN 1940-2473, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 231-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The applicability of life-cycle assessment (LCA) for the textile industry is discussed with a special focus on environmental impact from chemicals. Together with issues of water depletion and energy use, the use of chemicals and their emissions are important environmental considerations for textile products. However, accounting for chemicals is a weak point in LCA methodology and practice. Two research questions were investigated in a case study of hospital garments: 1) whether LCA adds value to assessments of the chemical performance of textile products, and 2) whether inclusion of toxicity issues in LCA affects environmental performance rankings for textile products. It is concluded that the quantitative and holistic tool LCA is useful for environmental decision makers in the textile industry, and becomes more effective when chemical impacts are included. A flexible way forward is demonstrated to meet the challenge of accounting for chemicals in LCAs of textile products.

  • 17.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Material efficiency measurements in manufacturing: Swedish case studies2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 181, p. 17-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major factor in the continued deterioration of the global environment is unsustainable management of resources that includes the type and quantity of resources consumed and manufactured as well as the subsequent generation and treatment of wasted materials. Improved material efficiency (ME) in manufacturing is key to reducing resource consumption levels and improving waste management initiatives. However, ME must be measured, and related goals must be broken down into performance indicators for manufacturing companies. This paper aims to improve ME in manufacturing using a structured model for ME performance measurements. We present a set of ME key performance indicators (ME-KPIs) at the individual company and lower operational levels based on empirical studies and a structured literature review. Our empirical findings are based on data collected on the performance indicators and material and waste flows of nine manufacturing companies located in Sweden. The proposed model categorizes ME-KPIs into the following categories: productive input materials, auxiliary input materials, output products, and residual output materials. These categories must be measured equally to facilitate the measurement, assessment, improvement and reporting of material consumption and waste generation in a manufacturing context. Required qualities for ME-KPI suggested in literature are also discussed, and missing indicators are identified. Most of the identified ME-KPIs measure quality- and cost-related factors, while end-of-life scenarios, waste segregation and the environmental effects of waste generation and material consumption are not equally measured. Additionally, ME-KPIs must also be connected to pre-determined goals and that defining or revising ME-KPIs requires communication with various external and internal actors to increase employees’ awareness and engagement.

  • 18.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola .
    Kurdve, Martin
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalens högskola .
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE, Swerea, IVF. Mälardalens högskola .
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalens högskola .
    Industrial waste management within manufacturing: A comparative study of Tools, policies, visions and concepts2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Kristinsdortter, Anna Runa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Comparison of Four Environmental Assessment Tools in Swedish Manufacturing: A Case Study2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 2173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To achieve sustainable development goals, it is essential to include the industrial system. There are sufficient numbers of tools and methods for measuring, assessing and improving the quality, productivity and efficiency of production, but the number of tools and methods for environmental initiatives on the shop floor is rather low. Incorporating environmental considerations into production and performance management systems still generally involves a top-down approach aggregated for an entire manufacturing plant. Green lean studies have been attempting to fill this gap to some extent, but the lack of detailed methodologies and practical tools for environmental manufacturing improvement on the shop floor is still evident. This paper reports on the application of four environmental assessment tools commonly used among Swedish manufacturing companies—Green Performance Map (GPM), Environmental Value Stream Mapping (EVSM), Waste Flow Mapping (WFM), and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)—to help practitioners and scholars to understand the different features of each tool, so in turn the right tool(s) can be selected according to particular questions and the industrial settings. Because there are some overlap and differences between the tools and a given tool may be more appropriate to a situation depending on the question posed, a combination of tools is suggested to embrace different types of data collection and analysis to include different environmental impacts for better prioritization and decision-making.

  • 20.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Kristinsdottir, Anna Runa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Comparison of four environmental assessment tools in Swedish manufacturing: A case study2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 2173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To achieve sustainable development goals, it is essential to include the industrial system. There are sufficient numbers of tools and methods for measuring, assessing and improving the quality, productivity and efficiency of production, but the number of tools and methods for environmental initiatives on the shop floor is rather low. Incorporating environmental considerations into production and performance management systems still generally involves a top-down approach aggregated for an entire manufacturing plant. Green lean studies have been attempting to fill this gap to some extent, but the lack of detailed methodologies and practical tools for environmental manufacturing improvement on the shop floor is still evident. This paper reports on the application of four environmental assessment tools commonly used among Swedish manufacturing companies-Green Performance Map (GPM), Environmental Value Stream Mapping (EVSM), Waste Flow Mapping (WFM), and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)-to help practitioners and scholars to understand the different features of each tool, so in turn the right tool(s) can be selected according to particular questions and the industrial settings. Because there are some overlap and differences between the tools and a given tool may be more appropriate to a situation depending on the question posed, a combination of tools is suggested to embrace different types of data collection and analysis to include different environmental impacts for better prioritization and decision-making.

  • 21.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Material efficiency in manufacturing: swedish evidence on potential, barriers and strategies2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, no 127, p. 438-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improved material efficiency is a key to improve the circular economy and capturing value in industry. Material efficiency reduces the generation of industrial waste, the extraction and consumption of resources, and energy demands and carbon emissions. However, material efficiency in the manufacturing sector, as a means of improving the recyclability, reusability, reduction and prevention of industrial waste, is little understood. This study aims to investigate, on a micro-level, further material efficiency improvement opportunities, barriers and strategies in selected manufacturing companies in Sweden, focusing on increasing waste segregation into high quality circulated raw material. Improvement opportunities at large global manufacturing companies are investigated; barriers hindering material efficiency improvement are identified and categorized at two levels; and strategies that have been deployed at manufacturing companies are reviewed. Empirical findings reveal (1) further potential for improving material efficiency through higher segregation of residual material from mixed and low quality fractions (on average, 26% of the content of combustible waste, in weight, was plastics; 8% and 6% were paper and cardboard, respectively); (2) the most influential barriers are within budgetary, information, management, employee, engineering, and communication clusters; (3) a lack of actual material efficiency strategy implementation in the manufacturing companies. According to our analysis, the majority of barriers are internal and originate within the manufacturing companies, therefore they can be managed (and eradicated if possible) with sufficient resources in terms of man hours, education and investment, better operational and environmental (waste) management, better internal communication and information sharing, and deployment of material efficiency strategies.

  • 22. Strömbom, S
    et al.
    Posner, Stefan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Roos, Sandra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Chemicals management in the textile sector: Dialogue between authorities, research institutes and retailers leading to concrete actions2015In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Life Cycle Management, 2015, p. 631-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Wedin, Helena
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Niit, Ellinor
    Swedish School of Textiles, Sweden.
    Ahmad Mansoor, Zaheer
    re:newcell, Sweden.
    Kristinsdottir, Anna Runa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    de la Motte, Hanna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Östlund, Åsa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Lindgren, Christofer
    re:newcell, Sweden.
    Investigation of recycled viscose fibres after removal of a reactive dye combination and an easy care finish agent2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Textile-to-textile recycling from cotton textiles can be done either mechanically or chemically. In chemical textile recycling of cotton there are challenges to overcome in order to regenerate new fibres. Two of the challenges among others are reactive dyes and wrinkle-free finishes that could disturb the regeneration process steps since these finishes are covalently linked to the cellulose.

    This poster discusses the impact of using a novel alkaline/acid bleaching sequence to strip reactive dyes and wrinkle-free finish (DMDHEU) from cotton textile for production of regenerated viscose fibre properties. The results might generate a promising step forward to overcome quality challenges for cellulosic chemical recycling.

  • 24.
    Wedin, Helena
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Niit, Ellinor
    Swedish School of Textiles, Sweden.
    Mansoor, Z. Ahmad
    re:newcell AB, Sweden.
    Kristinsdottir, Anna Runa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    de la Motte, Hanna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Östlund, Åsa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Lindgren, Christofer
    re:newcell AB, Sweden.
    Preparation of Viscose Fibres Stripped of Reactive Dyes and Wrinkle-Free Crosslinked Cotton Textile Finish2018In: Journal of polymers and the environment, ISSN 1566-2543, E-ISSN 1572-8919, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 3603-3612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chemical recycling of cellulosic fibres may represent a next-generation fibre–fibre recycling system for cotton textiles, though remaining challenges include how to accommodate fibre blends, dyes, wrinkle-free finishes, and other impurities from finishing. These challenges may disrupt the regeneration process steps and reduce the fibre quality. This study examines the impact on regenerated viscose fibre properties of a novel alkaline/acid bleaching sequence to strip reactive dyes and dimethyloldihydroxyethyleneureas (DMDHEU) wrinkle-free finish from cotton textiles. Potentially, such a bleaching sequence could advantageously be integrated into the viscose process, reducing the costs and environmental impact of the product. The study investigates the spinning performance and mechanical properties (e.g., tenacity and elongation) of the regenerated viscose fibres. The alkaline/acid bleaching sequence was found to strip the reactive dye and DMDHEU wrinkle-free finish from the cotton fabric, so the resulting pulp could successfully be spun into viscose fibres, though the mechanical properties of these fibres were worse than those of commercial viscose fibres. This study finds that reactive dyes and DMDHEU wrinkle-free finish affect the viscose dope quality and the regeneration performance. The results might lead to progress in overcoming quality challenges in cellulosic chemical recycling. 

  • 25.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Arbetsmiljö.
    Fransson, Kristin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Olsson, Elisabeth
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Roos, Sandra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Mall för miljöutredning - ett verktyg för att identifiera företagets miljöpåverkan2014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Mall för miljöutredning hjälper dig att samla in och redovisa kvantitativa data om material- och energiflödet genom det egna företaget. Med hjälp av dessa data skapas en bild som beskriver miljöpåverkan av företagets verksamhet och produkter i ett livscykelperspektiv.

    Till skriften hör bland annat:

    • en Wordmall för miljöutredningen, där man fyller i tabeller och justerar texten

    • ett inventerings- och beräkningsverktyg i Excel, som räknar ut miljöpåverkan av företagets transporter, material, utsläpp och energi

    • en översikt av miljölagarna för inventering av lagkrav

    • instruktioner och blanketter för Miljö-FMEA; ett sätt att identifiera och värdera miljöpåverkan.

  • 26.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Olsson, Elisabeth
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Life Cycle Assessment and Life Cycle Cost of Waste Management: Plastic Cable Waste2014In: Advances in Chemical Engineering and Science, ISSN 2160-0392, E-ISSN 2160-0406, Vol. 4, no 2, article id 45002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main driver for recycling cable wastes is the high value of the conducting metal, while the plastic with its lower value is often neglected. New improved cable plastic recycling routes can provide both economic and environmental incentive to cable producers for moving up the “cable plastic waste ladder”. Cradle-to-gate life cycle assessment, LCA, of the waste management of the cable scrap is suggested and explained as a method to analyze the pros and cons of different cable scrap recycling options at hand. Economic and environmental data about different recycling processes and other relevant processes and materials are given. Cable producers can use this data and method to assess the way they deal with the cable plastic waste today and compare it with available alternatives and thus illuminate the improvement potential of recycling cable plastic waste both in an environmental and in an economic sense. The methodology applied consists of: cradle-to-gate LCA for waste material to a recycled material (recyclate); quantifying the climate impact for each step on the waste ladder for the specific waste material; the use of economic and climate impact data in parallel; climate impact presented as a span to portray the insecurities related to which material the waste will replace; and possibilities for do-it-yourself calculations. Potentially, the methodology can be useful also for other waste materials in the future.

  • 27.
    Östlund, Åsa
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut / Material och produkter (TRm).
    Wedin, Helena
    Bolin, Lisa
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut / Energiteknik (ET).
    Berlin, Johanna
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut / Energiteknik (ET).
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Posner, Stefan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Smuk, Lena
    Eriksson, Magnus
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP - Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Trä.
    Sandin, Gustav
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Hållbar Samhällsbyggnad, Biobaserade material och produkter.
    Textilåtervinning: tekniska möjligheter och utmaningar2015Report (Refereed)
1 - 27 of 27
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.7