Change search
Refine search result
1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Jim
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Umeki, Kentaro
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Furusjö, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Kirtania, Kawnish
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Multiscale Reactor Network Simulation of an Entrained Flow Biomass Gasifier: Model Description and Validation2017In: Energy Technology, ISSN 2194-4288, Vol. 5, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the development of a multiscale equivalent reactor network model for pressurized entrained flow biomass gasification to quantify the effect of operational parameters on the gasification process, including carbon conversion, cold gas efficiency, and syngas methane content. The model, implemented in the commercial software Aspen Plus, includes chemical kinetics as well as heat and mass transfer. Characteristic aspects of the model are the multiscale effect caused by the combination of transport phenomena at particle scale during heating, pyrolysis, and char burnout, as well as the effect of macroscopic gas flow, including gas recirculation. A validation using experimental data from a pilot-scale process shows that the model can provide accurate estimations of carbon conversion, concentrations of main syngas components, and cold gas efficiency over a wide range of oxygen-to-biomass ratios and reactor loads. The syngas methane content was most difficult to estimate accurately owing to the unavailability of accurate kinetic parameters for steam methane reforming.

  • 2.
    Bergvall, Niklas
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Sandström, Linda
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Öhrman, Olov G. W.
    Preem AB, Sweden.
    Corefining of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-Oil with Vacuum Residue and Vacuum Gas Oil in a Continuous Slurry Hydrocracking Process2020In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 8452-8465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integration of renewable raw materials in existing refineries is most likely the shortest way for the successful, large-scale introduction of biofuels in the transport sector in the short term and medium term. One possible renewable raw material for this application is fast pyrolysis bio-oil (FPBO), which in this study has been coprocessed (at 0 and 20 wt %) with vacuum residue (VR, 50 wt %) and vacuum gas oil (VGO, balance) in a continuous, as well as a semibatch, slurry hydrocracking process. Experiments both with and without FPBO were performed at 450°C and 150 bar with a continuous hydrogen flow through the reactor. Oil-soluble molybdenum hexacarbonyl and molybdenum 2-ethylhexanoate were used as catalyst precursors, to be sulfided in situ. The continuous trials resulted in reactor walls completely free of coking, and they resulted in a low overall coke yield (about 1 wt %). The hydrodeoxygenation reached almost 92%, and the total acid number was reduced by nearly 99% in the FPBO experiment A mass balance of the renewable carbon from FPBO, based on the performed experiments, showed that the fossil CO2 emissions can be lowered by 1.35 kg per kg of processed FPBO if all renewable carbon in gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons is used to replace its fossil counterparts, and all methane formed from FPBO is used to produce hydrogen. Semibatch experiments gave less successful results when upgrading FPBO-containing feedstock, with a high coke yield (8 wt %) as well as a high gas yield (24 wt %). The results of this study demonstrate that FPBO can be successfully coprocessed with heavy fossil oils in a continuous slurry hydrocracking process without neg. affecting the processing of the fossil components of the feed and that a continuous process is preferred over batch or semibatch processes when studying coprocessing of bio-oils.

  • 3.
    Bräck, Thomas
    et al.
    Meva Energy, Sweden.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Hedman, Henry
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Sepman, Alexeu
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Replace fossil gas in industrial burners with renewable biogas2018In: The 8th Nordic Wood Biorefinery Conference: NWBC 2018: proceedings / [ed] Hytönen Eemeli, Vepsäläinen Jessica, Espoo: VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland , 2018, p. 73-73Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Carlborg, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Ma, Charlie
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Backman, Rainer
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Landälv, Ingvar
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Winikka, Henrik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Exposure of refractory materials during high-temperature gasification of a woody biomass and peat mixture2018In: Journal of the European Ceramic Society, ISSN 0955-2219, E-ISSN 1873-619X, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 777-787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Finding resilient refractory materials for slagging gasification systems have the potential to reduce costs and improve the overall plant availability by extending the service life. In this study, different refractory materials were evaluated under slagging gasification conditions. Refractory probes were continuously exposed for up to 27 h in an atmospheric, oxygen blown, entrained flow gasifier fired with a mixture of bark and peat powder. Slag infiltration depth and microstructure were studied using SEM EDS. Crystalline phases were identified with powder XRD. Increased levels of Al, originating from refractory materials, were seen in all slags. The fused cast materials were least affected, even though dissolution and slag penetration could still be observed. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were done for mixtures of refractory and slag, from which phase assemblages were predicted and viscosities for the liquid parts were estimated. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  • 5.
    Carlsson, Per
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. SINTEF Energy Research AS, Norway.
    Ma, Charlie
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Molinder, Roger
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Öhrman, Olov .G.W
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Slag formation during oxygen-blown entrained-flow gasification of stem wood2014In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 6941-6952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stem wood powders were fired in a mullite-lined pilot-scale oxygen-blown pressurized entrained-flow gasifier. During repeated campaigns involving increases in fuel load and process temperature, slag formations that eventuated in the blockage of the gasifier outlet were observed. These slags were retrieved for visual and chemical characterization. It was found that the slags had very high contents of Al and, in particular, high Al/Si ratios that suggest likely dissolution of the mullite-based refractory of the gasifier lining due to interactions with the fuel ash. Possible causes for the slag formation and behavior are proposed, and practical implications for the design of future stem wood entrained-flow gasifiers are also discussed.

  • 6. Eriksson, D.
    et al.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Hedman, Henry
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Stenberg, M.
    Öhrman, Olov .G.W
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Lestander, T.A.
    Bergsten, U.
    Ohman, M.
    Characterization of Scots pine stump-root biomass as feed-stock for gasification2012In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 104, p. 729-736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective was to explore the potential for gasifying Scots pine stump-root biomass (SRB). Washed thin roots, coarse roots, stump heartwood and stump sapwood were characterized (solid wood, milling and powder characteristics) before and during industrial processing. Non-slagging gasification of the SRB fuels and a reference stem wood was successful, and the gasification parameters (synthesis gas and bottom ash characteristics) were similar. However, the heartwood fuel had high levels of extractives (≈19%) compared to the other fuels (2-8%) and thereby ≈16% higher energy contents but caused disturbances during milling, storage, feeding and gasification. SRB fuels could be sorted automatically according to their extractives and moisture contents using near-infrared spectroscopy, and their amounts and quality in forests can be predicted using routinely collected stand data, biomass functions and drill core analyses. Thus, SRB gasification has great potential and the proposed characterizations exploit it. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 7.
    Gebart, Bo Rikard
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Marklund, Magnus
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Carlsson, Per
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Grönberg, C.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Johansson, Ann-Christine
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Öhrman, Olov
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Recent advances in the understanding of pressurized black liquor gasification.2011In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, Vol. 45, p. 521-526Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Leijenhorst, Evert J.
    et al.
    BTG Biomass Technology Group BV, The Netherlands.
    Assink, Daan
    BTG Biomass Technology Group BV, The Netherlands.
    van de Beld, Bert
    BTG Biomass Technology Group BV, The Netherlands.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Carlsson, Per
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Öhrman, Olov G. W.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Entrained flow gasification of straw- and wood-derived pyrolysis oil in a pressurized oxygen blown gasifier2015In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 79, p. 166-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fast pyrolysis oil can be used as a feedstock for syngas production. This approach can have certain advantages over direct biomass gasification. Pilot scale tests were performed to investigate the route from biomass via fast pyrolysis and entrained flow gasification to syngas. Wheat straw and clean pine wood were used as feedstocks; both were converted into homogeneous pyrolysis oils with very similar properties using in-situ water removal. These pyrolysis oils were subsequently gasified in a pressurized, oxygen blown entrained flow gasifier using a thermal load of 0.4 MW. At a pressure of 0.4 MPa and a lambda value of 0.4, temperatures around 1250 °C were obtained. Syngas volume fractions of 46% CO, 30% H2 and 23% CO2 were obtained for both pyrolysis oils. 2% of CH4 remained in the product gas, along with 0.1% of both C2H2 and C2H4. Minor quantities of H2S (3 vs. 23) cm3 m−3, COS (22 vs. 94) cm3 m−3 and benzene (310 vs. 532) cm3 m−3 were measured for wood- and straw derived pyrolysis oils respectively. A continuous 2-day gasification run with wood derived pyrolysis oil demonstrated full steady state operation. The experimental results show that pyrolysis oils from different biomass feedstocks can be processed in the same gasifier, and issues with ash composition and melting behaviour of the feedstocks are avoided by applying fast pyrolysis pre-treatment.

  • 9.
    Lestander, T. A.
    et al.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Grimm, A.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Rudolfsson, M.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Gasification of pure and mixed feedstock components: Effect on syngas composition and gasification efficiency2022In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 369, article id 133330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this work was to investigate whether the use of individual tree components (i.e., stem wood, bark, branches, and needles of spruces) as feedstocks during oxygen blow gasification is more efficient than using mixtures of these components. Experiments were performed at three oxygen levels in an 18-kW oxygen blown fixed bed gasifier with both single and mixed component feedstocks. The composition of the resulting syngas and the cold gas efficiency based on CO and H2 (CGEfuel) were used as response variables to evaluate the influence of different feedstocks on gasification performance. Based on the experimental results and data on the composition of ∼26000 trees drawn from a national Swedish spruce database, multivariate models were developed to simulate gasifier performance under different operating conditions and with different feedstock compositions. The experimental results revealed that the optimal CGEfuel with respect to the oxygen supply differed markedly between the different spruce tree components. Additionally, the models showed that co-gasification of mixed components yielded a lower CGEfuel than separate gasification of pure components. Optimizing the oxygen supply for the average tree composition reduced the GCEfuel by 1.3–6.2% when compared to optimal gasification of single component feedstocks. Therefore, if single-component feedstocks are available, it may be preferable to gasify them separately because doing so provides a higher gasification efficiency than co-gasification of mixed components. © 2022 The Authors

  • 10.
    Ma, Charlie
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Hedman, Henry
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Backman, Rainier V.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marcus
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Characterization of reactor ash deposits from pilot-scale pressurized entrained-flow gasification of woody biomass2013In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 27, no 11, p. 6801-6814Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pressurized entrained-flow gasification of renewable forest residues has the potential to produce high-quality syngas suitable for the synthesis of transport fuels and chemicals. The ash transformation behavior during gasification is critical to the overall production process and necessitates a level of understanding to implement appropriate control measures. Toward this end, ash deposits were collected from inside the reactor of a pilot-scale O 2-blown pressurized entrained-flow gasifier firing stem wood, bark, and pulp mill debarking residue (PMDR) in separate campaigns. These deposits were characterized with environmental scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-ray diffractometry. The stem wood deposit contained high levels of calcium and was comparatively insubstantial. The bark and PMDR fuels contained contaminant sand and feldspar particles that were subsequently evident in each respective deposit. The bark deposit consisted of lightly sintered ash aggregates comprising presumably a silicate melt that enveloped particles of quartz and, to a lesser degree, feldspars. Discontinuous layers likely to be composed of alkaline-earth metal silicates were found upon the aggregate peripheries. The PMDR deposit consisted of a continuous slag that contained quartz and feldspar particles dispersed within a silicate melt. Significant levels of alkaline-earth and alkali metals constituted the silicate melts of both the bark and PMDR deposits. Overall, the results suggest that fuel contaminants (i.e., quartz and feldspars) play a significant role in the slag formation process during pressurized entrained-flow gasification of these woody biomasses.

  • 11.
    Ma, Chunyan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Wang, Nan
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Chen, Yifeng
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Khokarale, Santosh
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Bui, Thai
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Lestander, Torbjörn
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Rudolfsson, Magnus
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Sweden; Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Ji, Xiaoyan
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Towards negative carbon emissions: Carbon capture in bio-syngas from gasification by aqueous pentaethylenehexamine2020In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 279, article id 115877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, an aqueous pentaethylenehexamine (PEHA) solution was studied for CO2 removal from bio-syngas for the first time. Firstly, pure CO2 absorption in aqueous PEHA solution under different conditions was conducted, and 20 wt% PEHA solution was identified as the best option. Secondly, the capture of CO2 was tested with synthetic syngas from a gas cylinder, and the species other than CO2 showed a negligible impact on CO2 removal. Finally, to evaluate the practical feasibility of using aqueous PEHA solution on the downstream CO2 capture, the pilot experiments of gasification with boreal forest-based biomasses were designed to provide real syngas with a realistic distribution in composition for further testing. The results showed that the operating conditions and the type of feedstocks affected the distribution in the bio-syngas composition. Among these feedstocks, at the optimal oxygen supply, using spruce needles generated the highest yields of CO and H2 and, meanwhile, gave rise to similar yields of other gases such as CO2, CH4, etc. The influence of the species other than CO2 for CO2 removal was negligible. Additionally, aqueous PEHA solution was tested as a biomass pretreatment agent, showing that no significant changes could be identified by the ultimate analysis (except for increased nitrogen content), but the yields of CO were affected negatively. On the other hand, when using the pretreated biomass by the aqueous PEHA solution, the NH3 concentration in bio-syngas reached to the highest (4000 parts per million), which slightly affected the CO2 absorption capacity and initial absorption rate of 20 wt% PEHA solution in a positive way.

  • 12.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Hedman, Henry
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Marklund, Magnus
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Öhrman, Olov G. W.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Gebart, Rikard
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Pressurized oxygen blown entrained-flow gasification of wood powder2013In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 932-941Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, an oxygen blown pilot scale pressurized entrained-flow biomass gasification plant (PEBG, 1 MWth) was designed, constructed, and operated. This Article provides a detailed description of the pilot plant and results from gasification experiments with stem wood biomass made from pine and spruce. The focus was to evaluate the performance of the gasifier with respect to syngas quality and mass and energy balance. The gasifier was operated at an elevated pressure of 2 bar(a) and at an oxygen equivalence ratio (λ) between 0.43 and 0.50. The resulting process temperatures in the hot part of the gasifier were in the range of 1100-1300 °C during the experiments. As expected, a higher λ results in a higher process temperature. The syngas concentrations (dry and N 2 free) during the experiments were 25-28 mol % for H2, 47-49 mol % for CO, 20-24 mol % for CO2, and 1-2 mol % for CH 4. The dry syngas N2 content was varied between 18 and 25 mol % depending on the operating conditions of the gasifier. The syngas H 2/CO ratio was 0.54-0.57. The gasifier cold gas efficiency (CGE) was approximately 70% for the experimental campaigns performed in this study. The synthesis gas produced by the PEBG has potential for further upgrading to renewable products, for example, chemicals or biofuels, because the performance of the gasifier is close to that of other relevant gasifiers.

  • 13.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Hedman, Henry
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Marklund, Magnus
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Pressurized entrained flow gasification of pulverized biomass - Experiences from pilot scale operation2016In: Chemical Engineering Transactions, ISSN 1974-9791, E-ISSN 2283-9216, Vol. 50, p. 325-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the goals in the national energy strategy of Sweden is that the vehicle fleet should be independent of fossil fuels by 2030. To reach that goal and to domestically secure for supply of alternative fuels, one of the suggested routes is methanol production from forest residues via pressurized and oxygen blown entrained flow gasification. In this context, ongoing industrial research in a 1 MWth gasification pilot plant is carried out at SP Energy Technology Center (SP ETC) in Pitea, Sweden. The plant is operated with pulverized or liquid fuels at process pressures up to 10 bar and this work summarizes the experiences from over 600 hours of operation with forest based biomass fuels. This paper covers results from thorough process characterization as well as results from extractive samplings of both permanent gases and particulate matter (soot) from inside the hot gasifier. Furthermore, the challenges with pressurized entrained flow gasification of pulverized biomass are discussed. During the characterization work, four of the most important process parameters (i.e. oxygen stoichiometric ratio (λ), fuel load, process pressure and fuel particle size distribution) were varied with the purpose of studying the effect on the process performance and the resulting syngas quality. The experimental results showed that the maximum cold gas efficiency (CGE) based on all combustible species in the syngas was 75% (at λ=0.30), whereas the corresponding value based only on CO and H2 (with respect to further MeOH synthesis from the syngas) was 70% (at λ=0.35). As expected, the pilot experiments showed that both the soot yield and soot particle size was reduced by increasing λ. One of the additional conclusions from this work was that; minimizing heat losses from the gasifier is of utmost importance to optimize the process performance regarding energy efficiency (i.e. CGE). Therefore, a well-insulated refractory lined gasifier is the primary alternative in regards to reactor design to maximize the CGE. Future development of the PEBG process should focus on identifying suitable hot-phase refractory, that exhibit long life-time and can sustain the alkali-rich biomass ash under gasification conditions. In addition to this, the remaining issue around how to improve the slag flow from the reactor, by additives or fuel mixing, should be investigated.

  • 14.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Jacobsson, Daniel
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wahlqvist, David
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ek, Martin
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Inorganic Chemistry during Pyrolysis, Gasification, and Oxyfuel Combustion of Kraft Pulping Black Liquor2024In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 5279-5287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changed utilization of black liquor in the pulp and paper industry has the potential to offer simplified carbon capture and, thus, negative net emissions from these large point sources. This can be achieved either by adapting existing recovery boilers to oxyfuel combustion or by replacing them with black liquor gasification technology. In this work, the chemistry during black liquor conversion was therefore studied in detail under different atmospheres relevant for pyrolysis, gasification, and oxyfuel combustion. Experiments were performed using environmental scanning transmission electron microscopy (ESTEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), supported with thermodynamic equilibrium calculations (TECs) to understand and interpret the results. Black liquor conversion was found to be generally similar in air and oxyfuel atmospheres containing approximately 20-25 mol % oxygen. The results however indicated that there was a higher probability of forming carbonates in the melt at higher carbon dioxide (CO2) partial pressures, which in addition was found to be associated with potentially higher sulfur loss during black liquor conversion. Both of these characteristics can negatively affect the chemical recycling at the pulp mill by increasing the need for lime and makeup chemicals.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Lundin, Lisa
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Celebi, Mustafa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    van der Vlist, Klaas
    Smurfit Kappa Group, Netherlands.
    Moradian, Farzad
    Stena Recycling International AB, Sweden.
    Aspects of chemical recycling of complex plastic waste via the gasification route2021In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 126, p. 65-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxygen blown high-temperature gasification constitutes an opportunity for chemical recycling of plastic wastes. This article summarizes the results from comparative tests of combustion and gasification of two complex plastic wastes: a plastic reject (PR) from processing recycled paper and an automotive shredder residue (ASR). Calculated gasification efficiencies corresponded to about 80% and 60%, respectively. Gasification resulted in lower yields of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) compared to direct combustion. A two-stage process, including gasification followed by syngas combustion, reduced the emissions of HCl and PCDD/F in the flue gas to <1.4% and <0.2%, respectively, compared to the levels from direct combustion of the PR feedstock. Most of the PCDD/F (>99%) was captured along with particulate matter (soot) during gasification. The contribution to the toxic concentration of PCDD/F was mainly from the PCDF congeners. Fly ash particulate matter from ASR combustion contained a significant proportion of zinc, which thus constitutes a great potential for use in zinc recycling. © 2021 Elsevier Ltd

  • 16.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Lundström, Sandra
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Ögren, Yngve
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Oxygen-blown gasification of pulp mill bark residues for synthetic fuel production2021In: Processes, ISSN 2227-9717, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synthetic fuel production via gasification of residual biomass streams from the pulp and paper industry can be an opportunity for the mills to enable improved resource utilization and at the same time reduce the production of excess heat. This paper summarizes initial oxygen-blown gasification experiments with two bark residues from a European pulp and paper mill, i.e., a softwood bark and a hardwood bark. The gasification process was characterized by measuring syngas yields and process efficiency to find optimum operating conditions. In addition, impurities in the syngas and ash behavior were characterized. Maximum yields of CO and H2 were obtained from softwood bark and amounted to approximately 29 and 15 mol/kg fuel, respectively. Optimum cold gas efficiency was achieved at an oxygen stoichiometric ratio of λ = 0.40 and was approximately 76% and 70% for softwood bark and hardwood bark, respectively. Increased λ had a reducing effect on pollutants in the syngas, e.g., higher hydrocarbons, NH3, HCl, and soot. The situation for sulfur species was more complex. Evaluation of the bark ashes indicated that slag formation could start already from 800◦C. Furthermore, a non-intrusive laser diagnostics technique gave rapid feedback on the millisecond scale. Measured syngas temperature and water content were in good agreement with the applied reference methods. © 2021 by the authors. 

  • 17.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Patrik T.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Gebart, Rikard
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Gudmundsson, Anders
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Sanati, Mehri
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Online characterization of syngas particulates using aerosol mass spectrometry in entrained-flow biomass gasification2014In: Aerosol Science and Technology, ISSN 0278-6826, E-ISSN 1521-7388, Vol. 48, no 11, p. 1145-1155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrained flow gasification is a promising technique where biomass is converted to a synthesis gas (syngas) under fuel-rich conditions. In contrast to combustion, where the fuel is converted to heat, CO2, and H2O, the syngas from gasification is rich in energetic gases such as CO and H2. These compounds (CO and H2) represent the building blocks for further catalytic synthesis to chemicals or biofuels. Impurities in the syngas, such as particulates, need to be reduced to different levels depending on the syngas application. The objective of this work was to evaluate the amount of particulates; the particle size distribution and the particle composition from entrained flow gasification of pine stem wood at different operating conditions of the gasifier. For this purpose, online time resolved measurements were performed with a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The main advantage of SP-AMS compared to other techniques is that the particle composition (soot, PAH, organics, and ash forming elements) can be obtained with high time resolution and thus studied as a direct effect of the gasifier-operating conditions. The results suggest that syngas particulates were essentially composed of soot at these tested process temperatures in the reactor (1200-1400°C). Furthermore, the AMS analysis showed a clear correlation between the amounts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot in the raw syngas. Minimization of soot and PAH yields from entrained flow gasification of wood proved to be possible by further increasing the O2 addition.

  • 18.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Nordwaeger, Martin
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Ingemar
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Nordin, Anders
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Entrained flow gasification of torrefied wood residues2014In: Fuel processing technology, ISSN 0378-3820, E-ISSN 1873-7188, Vol. 125, p. 51-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, four different fuels were gasified in a pressurized entrained flow pilot plant gasifier at approximately 270 kWth. The different fuels were; two torrefied wood residues, one raw wood residue and one torrefied stem wood. The system pressure and oxygen equivalence ratio (λ) were held constant for all four gasification experiments. It was found that the torrefaction pretreatment significantly reduced the milling energy consumption for fuel size reduction, which in turn contributed to increased gasification plant efficiency. Furthermore, the results indicate that the carbon conversion efficiency may be enhanced by an intermediate torrefaction pretreatment, whereas both less severe torrefaction and more severe torrefaction resulted in reduced carbon conversions. The results also indicate that the CH4 yield was significantly reduced for the most severely torrefied fuel. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 19.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Qureshi, Muhammad
    VTT, Finland.
    Wennebro, Jonas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Lindfors, Christian
    VTT, Finland.
    Ohra-Aho, Taina
    VTT, Finland.
    Shafaghat, Hoda
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Johansson, Ann-Christine
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Entrained flow gasification of polypropylene pyrolysis oil2021In: Molecules, ISSN 1431-5157, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 26, no 23, article id 7317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Petrochemical products could be produced from circular feedstock, such as waste plastics. Most plants that utilize syngas in their production are today equipped with entrained flow gasifiers, as this type of gasifier generates the highest syngas quality. However, feeding of circular feedstocks to an entrained flow gasifier can be problematic. Therefore, in this work, a two-step process was studied, in which polypropylene was pre-treated by pyrolysis to produce a liquid intermediate that was easily fed to the gasifier. The products from both pyrolysis and gasification were thoroughly characterized. Moreover, the product yields from the individual steps, as well as from the entire process chain, are reported. It was estimated that the yields of CO and H2 from the two-step process were at least 0.95 and 0.06 kg per kg of polypropylene, respectively, assuming that the pyrolysis liquid and wax can be combined as feedstock to an entrained flow gasifier. On an energy basis, the energy content of CO and H2 in the produced syngas corresponded to approximately 40% of the energy content of the polypropylene raw material. This is, however, expected to be significantly improved on a larger scale where losses are proportionally smaller. © 2021 by the authors. 

  • 20.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Sweeney, Daniel J.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Extractive Sampling of Gas and Particulates from the Reactor Core of an Entrained Flow Biomass Gasifier2016In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 6405-6412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the purpose of demonstrating a process for pressurized entrained flow gasification for pulverized biomass, the aim with this work was to characterize the conditions inside the gasifier. To gain a broader understanding, it was important to extract both gases and particulate matter from the hot reaction zone. The objectives were, therefore, to (1) develop a sampling system capable of extracting both gas and particulates from the gasifier, (2) study the production of particulate matter as well as its composition and size distribution as a function of different operating conditions, and (3) extract time-resolved data for the syngas species (CO, CO2, and CH4) in order to study the compositional variance. The results indicated that the syngas heating value was lower at the sampling position in the gasifier compared to the heating value measured downstream of the quench cooler. The difference was most probably an effect of ongoing gasification of carboneous solids downstream of the sampling position in the gasifier. Furthermore, it was concluded that the fuel feedrate was fluctuating, most likely because of heterogeneity in the fuel powder and/or the challenges in the fuel feeding system itself. With regards to particulate matter in the syngas, it was shown to mostly consist of soot. The soot yield was significantly reduced by increasing γ. The reactor core sampling system proved superior to the traditional sampling system downstream of the quench with regard to measuring soot yield at different operating conditions of the gasifier. Finally, it was concluded that the submicron fly ash particles from oxygen blown biomass gasification contain high propotions of refractory elements (e.g., Ca, Mg, and Si) in addition to the more volatile elements (e.g., K, Na, S, and Cl). This is probably due to extremely high temperature in the flame and substoichiometric condition in the gasifier, which may promote vaporization of refractory elements during char gasification.

  • 21.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Hedman, H.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Marklund, Magnus
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Gebart, Rikard
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Pressurized entrained flow gasification of biomass powder: Initial results from pilot plant experiments2012In: The 4th Nordic Wood Biorefinery Conference, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Hedman, Henry
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Wennebro, Jonas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Gebart, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Influence of process parameters on the performance of an oxygen blown entrained flow biomass gasifier2015In: Fuel, ISSN 0016-2361, E-ISSN 1873-7153, Vol. 153, p. 510-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pressurized, O2 blown, entrained flow gasification of pulverized forest residues followed by methanol production is an interesting option for synthetic fuels that has been particularly investigated in the Nordic countries. In order to optimize gasification plant efficiency, it is important to understand the influence of different operating conditions. In this work, a pressurized O2 blown and entrained flow biomass gasification pilot plant was used to study the effect of four important process variables; (i) the O2 stoichiometric ratio (λ), (ii) the load of the gasifier, (iii) the gasifier pressure, and (iv) the fuel particle size. Commercially available stem wood fuels were used and the process was characterized with respect to the resulting process temperature, the syngas yield, the fuel conversion and the gasification process efficiency. It was found that CH4 constituted a significant fraction of the syngas heating value at process temperatures below 1400 °C. If the syngas is intended for catalytic upgrading to a synthetic motor fuel where CO and H2 are the only important syngas species, the process should be optimized aiming for a process temperature slightly above 1400 °C in order to reduce the energetic losses to CH4 and C6H6. This resulted in a cold gas efficiency (based only on CO and H2) of 70%. The H2/CO ratio was experimentally determined within the range 0.45-0.61. Thus, the syngas requires shifting in order to increase the syngas composition of H2 prior to fuel synthesis.

  • 23.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Öhrman, Olov .G.W
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Carlsson, Per
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Stjernberg, Jesper
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden; LKAB, Sweden.
    Characterisation of submicron particles produced during oxygen blown entrained flow gasification of biomass2014In: Combustion and Flame, ISSN 0010-2180, E-ISSN 1556-2921, Vol. 161, no 7, p. 1923-1934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper submicron particles sampled after the quench during 200kW, 2bar(a) pressurised, oxygen blown gasification of three biomass fuels, pure stem wood of pine and spruce, bark from spruce and a bark mixture, have been characterised with respect to particle size distribution with a low pressure cascade impactor. The particles were also characterised for morphology and elemental composition by a combination of scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy/selected area electron diffraction pattern (HRTEM/EDS/SAED) techniques. The resulting particle concentration in the syngas after the quench varied between 46 and 289mg/Nm3 consisting of both carbon and easily volatile ash forming element significantly depending on the fuel ash content. Several different types of particles could be identified from classic soot particles to pure metallic zinc particles depending on the individual particle relation of carbon and ash forming elements. The results also indicate that ash forming elements and especially zinc interacts in the soot formation process creating a particle with shape and microstructure significantly different from a classical soot particle.

  • 24.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Wennebro, Jonas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Gullberg, Marcus
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Pure oxygen fixed-bed gasification of wood under high temperature (>1000 °C) freeboard conditions2017In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 191, p. 153-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the performance (syngas composition, syngas production and gasification efficiency) of an 18 kW atmospheric fixed bed oxygen blown gasifier (FOXBG) with a high temperature (&gt;1000 °C) freeboard section was compared to that of a pressurized (2–7 bar) oxygen blown entrained flow biomass gasifier (PEBG). Stem wood in the form of pellets (FOXBG) or powder (PEBG) was used as fuel. The experimentally obtained syngas compositions, syngas production rates and gasification efficiencies for both gasification technologies were similar. Efficient generation of high quality syngas (in terms of high concentration and yield of CO and H2 and low concentration and yield of CH4, heavier hydrocarbons and soot) is therefore not specific to the PEBG. Instead, efficient gasification seems to be linked to high reactor process temperatures that can also be obtained in a FOXBG. The high quality of the syngas produced in the FOXBG from fuel pellets is promising, as it suggests that in the future, much of the cost associated with milling the fuel to a fine powder will be avoidable. Furthermore, it is also implied that feedstocks that are nearly impossible to pulverize can be used as un-pretreated fuels in the FOXBG.

  • 25.
    Winikka, Henrik
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Toth, Pal
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center. University of Miskolc, Hungary.
    Jansson, Kjell
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Molinder, Roger
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Broström, Markus
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Sandström, Linda
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Lighty, JoAnn S.
    University of Utah, USA.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Particle formation during pressurized entrained flow gasification of wood powder: Effects of process conditions on chemical composition, nanostructure, and reactivity2018In: Combustion and Flame, ISSN 0010-2180, E-ISSN 1556-2921, Vol. 189, p. 1339-1351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of operating condition on particle formation during pressurized, oxygen blown gasification of wood powder with an ash content of 0.4 wt% was investigated. The investigation was performed with a pilot scale gasifier operated at 7 bar(a). Two loads, 400 and 600 kW were tested, with the oxygen equivalence ratio (λ) varied between 0.25 and 0.50. Particle concentration and mass size distribution was analyzed with a low pressure cascade impactor and the collected particles were characterized for morphology, elemental composition, nanostructure, and reactivity using scanning electron microscopy/high resolution transmission electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. In order to quantify the nanostructure of the particles and identify prevalent sub-structures, a novel image analysis framework was used. It was found that the process temperature, affected both by λ and the load of the gasifier, had a significant influence on the particle formation processes. At low temperature (1060 °C), the formed soot particles seemed to be resistant to the oxidation process; however, when the oxidation process started at 1119 °C, the internal burning of the more reactive particle core began. A further increase in temperature (> 1313 °C) lead to the oxidation of the less reactive particle shell. When the shell finally collapsed due to severe oxidation, the original soot particle shape and nanostructure also disappeared and the resulting particle could not be considered as a soot anymore. Instead, the particle shape and nanostructure at the highest temperatures (> 1430 °C) were a function of the inorganic content and of the inorganic elements the individual particle consisted of. All of these effects together lead to the soot particles in the real gasifier environment having less and less ordered nanostructure and higher and higher reactivity as the temperature increased; i.e., they followed the opposite trend of what is observed during laboratory-scale studies with fuels not containing any ash-forming elements and where the temperature was not controlled by λ.

  • 26.
    Ögren, Yngve
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Sepman, Alexey
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Fooladgar, Ehsan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Development and evaluation of a vision driven sensor for estimating fuel feeding rates in combustion and gasification processes2024In: Energy and AI, ISSN 2666-5468, Vol. 15, article id 100316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A machine vision driven sensor for estimating the instantaneous feeding rate of pelletized fuels was developed and tested experimentally in combustion and gasification processes. The feeding rate was determined from images of the pellets sliding on a transfer chute into the reactor. From the images the apparent area and velocity of the pellets were extracted. Area was determined by a segmentation model created using a machine learning framework and velocities by image registration of two subsequent images. The measured weight of the pelletized fuel passed through the feeding system was in good agreement with the weight estimated by the sensor. The observed variations in the fuel feeding correlated with the variations in the gaseous species concentrations measured in the reactor core and in the exhaust. Since the developed sensor measures the ingoing fuel feeding rate prior to the reactor, its signal could therefore help improve process control. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 27.
    Öhrman, Olov G. W.
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Molinder, Roger
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Johansson, Ann-Christine
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Analysis of trace compounds generated by pressurized oxygen blown entrained flow biomass gasification2014In: Environmental Progress and Sustainable Energy, 2014, Vol. 33, p. 699-705, article id 3Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trace compounds were measured in synthesis gas and waste water from a pilot scale pressurized entrained flow oxygen blown biomass gasifier. The feedstock used was milled soft stem wood powder. Gaseous trace compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography. Up to 20 ppm of hydrogen sulfide was observed in the cold synthesis gas and the concentration seemed to be independent of the oxygen equivalence ratio (ER). Benzene varied from 30 to 1100 ppm, strongly depended on the ER and correlated well with the methane concentration. The concentrations of acetylene and ethylene increased as the ER was reduced and could have acted as precursors for the observed soot particles which were characterized using thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. Common polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from high temperature biomass gasification such as pyrene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and naphthalene were observed in low concentrations in the soot, in the cold synthesis gas and also in the waste water from the quench. Inorganic elements from the feedstock were observed in the waste water. Comparisons were also made with previous results from a black liquor gasifier.

  • 28.
    Öhrman, Olov G.W.
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    Johansson, A.J.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Hedman, Henry
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Leijenhorst, E. J.
    Assink, A.
    van de Beld, L.
    Pressurized oxygen blown entrained flow gasification of pyrolysis oil.2013In: Proceedings 21st European Biomass Conference and Exhibition, 2013, p. 441-445Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Öhrman, Olov G.W
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Johansson, Ann-Christine
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Hedman, Henry
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Pedersen, Mads
    Biogasol, Denmark.
    Pressurized oxygen blown entrained flow gasification of a biorefinery lignin residue2013In: Fuel processing technology, ISSN 0378-3820, E-ISSN 1873-7188, Vol. 115, p. 130-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Renewable fuels could in the future be produced in a biorefinery which involves highly integrated technologies. It has been reported that thermochemical conversion (gasification) of lignocellulosic biomass has a high potential for end production of renewable biofuels. In this work, lignin residue from biochemical conversion of wheat straw was gasified in an oxygen blown pressurized entrained flow gasifier (PEBG) at 0.25-0.30 MWth, 0.45 < λ < 0.5 and 1 bar (g). A video camera mounted inside the PEBG was used to observe the flame during start up and during operation. Hydrogen (H 2), carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were the main gas components with H2/CO ratios varying during the gasification test (0.54-0.63). The methane (CH4) concentration also varied slightly and was generally below 1.7% (dry and N2 free). C2-hydrocarbons (< 1810 ppm) and benzene (< 680 ppm) were also observed together with low concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S, < 352 ppm) and carbonyl sulfide (COS, < 131 ppm). The process temperature in the reactor was around 1200 C. The slag seemed to consist of Cristobalite (SiO2) and Berlinite (AlPO4) and Na, Ca, Mg, K and Fe in lower concentrations. Cooling of the burner will be necessary for longer tests to avoid safety shut downs due to high burner temperature. The cold gas efficiency and carbon conversion was estimated but more accurate measurements, especially the syngas flow, needs to be determined during a longer test in order to obtain data on the efficiency at optimized operating conditions. The syngas has potential for further upgrading into biofuels, but will need traditional gas cleaning such as acid gas removal and water gas shifting. Also, higher pressures and reducing the amount of N2 is important in further work.

1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf