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  • 1.
    Krause, G.
    et al.
    Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Germany.
    Le Vay, L.
    Bangor University, UK.
    Buck, B. H.
    Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Germany; University of Applied Sciences Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Costa-Pierce, B. A.
    Ecological Aquaculture Foundation, USA; Ecological Aquaculture Foundation, Portugal.
    Dewhurst, T.
    Kelson Marine Co, USA.
    Heasman, K. G.
    Cawthron Institute, New Zealand.
    Nevejan, N.
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    Nielsen, P.
    DTU Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Nielsen, K. N.
    Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Park, K.
    Kunsan National University, South Korea.
    Schupp, M. F.
    Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Germany: University of Dundee, UK.
    Thomas, J. -B
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Troell, M.
    Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Webb, J.
    Bangor University, UK.
    Wrange, Anna-Lisa
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Ziegler, Friederike
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Strand, Åsa
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Prospects of Low Trophic Marine Aquaculture Contributing to Food Security in a Net Zero-Carbon World2022In: Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, E-ISSN 2571-581X, Vol. 6, article id 875509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To limit compromising the integrity of the planet, a shift is needed towards food production with low environmental impacts and low carbon footprint. How to put such transformative change towards sustainable food production whilst ensuring food security into practice remains a challenge and will require transdisciplinary approaches. Combining expertise from natural- and social sciences as well as industry perspectives, an alternative vision for the future in the marine realm is proposed. This vision includes moving towards aquaculture mainly of low trophic marine (LTM) species. Such shift may enable a blue transformation that can support a sustainable blue economy. It includes a whole new perspective and proactive development of policy-making which considers, among others, the context-specific nature of allocation of marine space and societal acceptance of new developments, over and above the decarbonization of food production, vis á vis reducing regulatory barriers for the industry for LTM whilst acknowledging the complexities of upscaling and outscaling. This needs to be supported by transdisciplinary research co-produced with consumers and wider public, as a blue transformation towards accelerating LTM aquaculture opportunities in a net zero-carbon world can only occur by considering the demands of society. Copyright © 2022 Krause, Le Vay, Buck, Costa-Pierce, Dewhurst, Heasman, Nevejan, Nielsen, Nielsen, Park, Schupp, Thomas, Troell, Webb, Wrange, Ziegler and Strand.

  • 2.
    Lindgren, J. Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Ytreberg, Erik
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Albin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Dahlström, Magnus
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Dahl, Peter
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Wrange, Anna-Lisa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Dahlström, Mia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Copper release rate needed to inhibit fouling on the west coast of Sweden and control of copper release using zinc oxide2018In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 453-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How zinc oxide influences copper release has been tested and the lowest release rate of copper from various combinations of copper and zinc in a paint matrix evaluated, whilst still deterring macrofouling, including barnacles and bryozoans. Copper (I) oxide was added to a generic AF paint in 0, 8.5, 11.7 or 16.3 wt% copper oxide in combination with 0, 10 or 20 wt% zinc oxide and applied on PMMA panels. The results show that zinc influences the release rate of copper. When 10 and 20 wt% zinc was added, the total amount of copper released significantly increased by on average 32 and 47% respectively. All treatments that included copper were successful in deterring macrofouling, including the treatment with the lowest average Cu release rate, ie 4.68 μg cm−2 day−1. 

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  • 3.
    Wrange, Anna-Lisa
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Barboza, F. R.
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Germany.
    Ferreira, J.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Eriksson-Wiklund, A. -K
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ytreberg, E.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Jonsson, P. R.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Watermann, B.
    LimnoMar, Germany.
    Dahlström, Mia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Monitoring biofouling as a management tool for reducing toxic antifouling practices in the Baltic Sea2020In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 264, article id 110447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over two million leisure boats use the coastal areas of the Baltic Sea for recreational purposes. The majority of these boats are painted with toxic antifouling paints that release biocides into the coastal ecosystems and negatively impact non-targeted species. Regulations concerning the use of antifouling paints differ dramatically between countries bordering the Baltic Sea and most of them lack the support of biological data. In the present study, we collected data on biofouling in 17 marinas along the Baltic Sea coast during three consecutive boating seasons (May–October 2014, 2015 and 2016). In this context, we compared different monitoring strategies and developed a fouling index (FI) to characterise marinas according to the recorded biofouling abundance and type (defined according to the hardness and strength of attachment to the substrate). Lower FI values, i.e. softer and/or less abundant biofouling, were consistently observed in marinas in the northern Baltic Sea. The decrease in FI from the south-western to the northern Baltic Sea was partially explained by the concomitant decrease in salinity. Nevertheless, most of the observed changes in biofouling seemed to be determined by local factors and inter-annual variability, which emphasizes the necessity for systematic monitoring of biofouling by end-users and/or authorities for the effective implementation of non-toxic antifouling alternatives in marinas. Based on the obtained results, we discuss how monitoring programs and other related measures can be used to support adaptive management strategies towards more sustainable antifouling practices in the Baltic Sea. © 2020 The Authors

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