Change search
Refine search result
1 - 26 of 26
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Faerneus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Designing for Joyful Movement2018In: Funology 2: From Usability to Enjoyment / [ed] Mark Blythe and Andrew Monk, Springer, 2018, p. 193-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction design research has broadened its focus from settings in which people would sit more or less still in front of static computers doing their work tasks, to instead thriving off new interactive materials, mobile use, and ubiquitously available data of all sorts, creating interactions everywhere. These changes have put into question such as play versus learning, work versus leisure, or casual versus serious technology use. As both hardware and software have become mobile—both literally and in terms of transgressing cultural categories—the different social spheres and the rules that they are associated with are changing

  • 2.
    Fagerberg, Petra
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Designing gestures for affective input: an analysis of shape, effort and valence2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss a user-centered approach to incorporating affective expressions in interactive applications, and argue for a design that addresses both body and mind. In particular, we have studied the problem of finding a set of affective gestures. Based on previous work in movement analysis and emotion theory [Davies, Laban and Lawrence, Russell], and a study of an actor expressing emotional states in body movements, we have identified three underlying dimensions of movements and emotions: shape, effort and valence. From these dimensions we have created a new affective interaction model, which we name the affective gestural plane model. We applied this model to the design of gestural affective input to a mobile service for affective messages.

  • 3. Fagerberg, Petra
    et al.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    eMoto - Emotionally Engaging Interaction2004In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Caramiaux, Baptiste
    CNRS, France; McGill University, Canada; University of Paris-Saclay, France.
    Erkut, Cumhur
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Forlizzi, Jodi
    Carnegie Mellon University, USA.
    Hajinejad, Nassrin
    Hochschule Bremen City University of Applied Sciences, Germany.
    Haller, Michael
    Upper Austria University of Applied Sciences, Austria.
    Hummels, Caroline C. M.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Isbister, Katherine
    University of California, USA.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Khut, George
    UNSW University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Loke, Lian
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Lottridge, Danielle
    Yahoo Inc, USA.
    Marti, Patrizia
    Universita di Siena, Italy.
    Melcer, Edward
    New York University Tandon School of Engineering, USA.
    Muller, Florian Floyd
    RMIT University, Australia.
    Graves Petersen, Marianne
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Schiphorst, Thecla
    Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Segura Marquez, Elena
    University of California, USA.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Svanaes, Dag
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; IT-University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Tobiasson, Helena
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Embracing First-Person Perspectives in Soma-Based Design2018In: Informatics, ISSN 2227-9709, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A set of prominent designers embarked on a research journey to explore aesthetics in movement-based design. Here we unpack one of the design sensitivities unique to our practice: a strong first person perspective-where the movements, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, design researcher and user are at the forefront. We present an annotated portfolio of design exemplars and a brief introduction to some of the design methods and theory we use, together substantiating and explaining the first-person perspective. At the same time, we show how this felt dimension, despite its subjective nature, is what provides rigor and structure to our design research. Our aim is to assist researchers in soma-based design and designers wanting to consider the multiple facets when designing for the aesthetics of movement. The applications span a large field of designs, including slow introspective, contemplative interactions, arts, dance, health applications, games, work applications and many others.

  • 5.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Hummels, Caroline
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Isbister, Katherine
    University of California, USA.
    Marti, Patrizia
    University of Siena, Italy.
    Segura, Elena M.
    University of California, USA.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Mueller, Florian
    RMIT University, Australia.
    Sanches, Pedro A. N.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Schiphorst, Thecia
    Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Svanaes, Dag
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Petersen, Marianne Graves
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Lim, Youn-Kyung
    Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea.
    Soma-based design theory2017In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, 2017, p. 550-557Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Movement-based interaction design is increasingly popular, with application domains ranging from dance, sport, gaming to physical rehabilitation. In a workshop at CHI 2016, a set of prominent artists, game design-ers, and interaction designers embarked on a research journey to explore what we came to refer to as "aesthetics in soma-based design". In this follow-up work-shop, we would like to take the next step, shifting from discussing the philosophical underpinnings we draw upon to explain and substantiate our practice, to form our own interaction design theory and conceptualisations. We propose that soma-based design theory needs practical, pragmatic as well as analytical study -- otherwise the felt dimension will be missing. We will consider how such tacit knowledge can be articulated, documented and shared. To ground the discussion firmly in the felt experience of our own practice, the work-shop is organised as a joint practical design work session, supported by analytical study.

  • 6.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Jonsson, Martin
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Mercurio, Johanna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Somaesthetic Appreciation Design2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2016, 10, p. 3131-3142Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a strong concept we name Somaesthetic Appreciation based on three different enquiries. First, our own autobiographical design enquiry, using Feldenkrais as a resource in our design process, bringing out the Soma Carpet and Breathing Light applications. Second, through bringing in others to experience our systems, engaging with and qualitatively analysing their experiences of our applications. In our third enquiry, we try to pin down what characterizes and sets Somaesthetic Appreciation designs apart through comparing with and analysing others’ design inquiries as well as grounding them in the somaesthetic theories. We propose that the Somaesthetic Appreciation designs share a subtleness in how they encourage and spur bodily inquiry in their choice of interaction modalities, they require an intimate correspondence – feedback and interactions that follow the rhythm of the body, they entail a distinct manner of making space shutting out the outside world – metaphorically and literally – to allow users to turn their attention inwards, and they rely on articulation of bodily experiences to encourage learning and increased somatic awareness.

  • 7.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Martin
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Robertson, Toni
    University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
    Marti, Patrizia
    University of Siena, Italy; Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Dag, Svanaes
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Graves Petersen, Marianne
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Forlizzi, Jodi
    Carnegie Mellon University, US.
    Schiphorst, Thecla
    Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Isbister, Katherine
    University of California, US.
    Hummels, Caroline
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Klooster, Sietske
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Loke, Lian
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Poonkhin Khut, George
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Move to be moved2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2016, p. 3301-3308Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Movement-based design is reaching critical mass in HCI, and we can start to identify strategies, similarities and differences in how it is approached. Similarities may include, for example, a strong first person perspective on design, emphasising movement, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, as well as starting from the premise that our bodily ways of being in the world are shaped by the ecologies of people, cultural practices and the artefacts we create and use. Different classes of systems are starting to emerge, such as spurring somaesthetic appreciation processes using biofeedback loops or carefully nudging us to interact with our own movements; engaging us in affective loops where the technology takes on a stronger agency, attempting to pull participants into particular experiences; extending on our senses and perception – even creating new senses through technology; social interactions, engaging us to jointly explore movement or touch; even endowing machines with their own ‘somatics’, exploring our relationship to technology; as well as engaging in larger political issues around the body, such as gender perspectives, or challenging the mind-body divide.

  • 8.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Jonsson, Martin
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Mercurio, Johanna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Boris Design, Hong Kong.
    Banka Johnson, Eva-Carin
    IKEA, UK.
    Somaesthetic Design2015In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 26-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Somaesthetics is an interdisciplinary field, originally proposed by the philosopher Richard Shusterman and grounded in pragmatist philosophy and phenomenology. An interesting result of engaging in Feldenkrais exercises was the effect on the whole beings. After a lesson, all students felt they had become more honest, more grounded in themselves, more reflective, and a bit slower in their movements and reactions. When bringing out three designs, researchers repeatedly had to try different digital and physical materials, faking interactions and testing them in situ to find the ones that would make sense. The interactions had to be simulated and acted out in order for them to really feel their impact on their bodily experiences. Simply imagining what they would be like was not enough to qualify the experience.

  • 9.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Sundström, Petra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Interactional Empowerment2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Jonsson, Martin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Sweden; KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Mercurio, Johanna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Boris Design Studio, Hong Kong.
    Naveen, Ramani
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    The Aesthetics of Heat: Guiding Awareness with Thermal Stimuli2016In: Proceedings of the TEI '16: Tenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, 2016, 10, p. 109-117Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss the design process and results from a design exploration on the use of thermal stimuli in body awareness exercises. A user-study was performed on an interactive prototype in the form of an interactive heat mat. The paper brings forth an alternative understanding of heat as a design material that extends the common understanding of thermal stimuli in HCI as a communication modality to instead bring the aesthetic and experiential properties to the fore. Findings account for felt body experiences of thermal stimuli and a number of design qualities related to heat as a design material are formulated, pointing to experiential qualities concerning the felt body, subjectivity and subtleness as well as material qualities concerning materiality, inertia and heat transfer

  • 11.
    Jung, Heekyoung
    et al.
    University of Cincinnati, USA.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Soma-Wearable Design: Integrating Somaesthetic Practice and Fashion Design for Somatic Wellbeing2018In: Proceedings of DRS 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With advanced technologies and raised expectations for the quality of life, research and design attempts are increasing to promote wellbeing. While data-based reflective practice and behaviour change have been a main strategy in supporting technology-mediated wellbeing, we bring the perspectives of somaesthetic practice and fashion design to complement this research scene. Assuming that body consciousness could positively influence self-perception, presentation and performance through clothing, we propose soma-wearable design as an alternative approach to explore qualities that elaborate and promote somatic wellbeing. First, we conceptualize constructive links between design for reflection, somaesthetic practice, and style-fashion-dress; and re-interpret the core qualities of somaesthetic appreciation (Höök et al., 2016) for soma-wearable design: 1) transient space for reflection with the body, 2) sensory prompt synched to context, 3) body modification for subject formation, and 4) learning through bodily experience. We articulate these qualities based on the survey of selected fashion objects; apply the soma-wearable design approach to a workshop with fashion design students; and discuss implications about forms, materials and experiential qualities of soma-wearables. 

  • 12.
    Kosmack Vaara, Elsa
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Silvasan, Iuliana
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Temporal Relations in Affective Health2010In: NordiCHI '10 Proceedings of the 6th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, 2010, 13Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Affective Health project we explore possibilities of how to, through biofeedback support users in making sense of the relationship between their stress and their behavior in everyday life. Affective Health is a tool for visualizing patterns and trends of bodily and contextual information. It is particularly important that the design reflects changes over time as this is how people start recognizing patterns in their own behavior and connect it to their bodily reactions. We spent substantial effort sketching and testing ways of portraying time that would move us away from more mathematically inspired representations such as for example graphs and calendars. Instead, we want users to see the signals our bodies emit as part of themselves, of their own ways of being in the world, alive, acting and reacting to their environment. We have explored many possible, alternative ways of visualizing temporal representations through biofeedback. For example as the relation between different places and with time as different layers of history in a concept inspired from ecology. The latest and most developed concept is a cyclic repetition of biodata mapped on a spiral shape.

  • 13. Lindström, Madlene
    et al.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Sundström, Petra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Combetto, Marco
    Taylor, Alex
    Breslin, Roberto
    Affective Diary - Designing for Bodily Expressiveness and Self-Reflection2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diary provides a useful means to express inner thoughts and record experiences of past events. In re-readings, it also provides a resource for reflection, allowing us to re-experience, brood over or even shed the thoughts and feelings we've associated with events or people. To expand on the ways in which we creatively engage in diary-keeping, we have designed an affective diary that captures some of the physical, bodily aspects of experiences and emotions--what we refer to as "affective body memorabilia". The affective diary assembles sensor data, captured from the user and uploaded via their mobile phone, to form an ambiguous, abstract colourful body shape. With a range of other materials from the mobile phone, such as text and MMS messages, photographs, etc., these shapes are made available to the user. Combining these materials, the diary is designed to invite reflection and to allow the user to piece together their own stories.

  • 14.
    Sanches, Pedro
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden .
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden .
    Sas, Corina
    Lancaster University, UK .
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Ambiguity as a resource to inform proto-practices: The case of skin conductance2019In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 26, no 4, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skin conductance is an interesting measure of arousal level, largely unfamiliar to most end-users. We designed a mobile application mirroring end-users’ skin conductance in evocative visualizations, purposefully made ambiguous to invite rich interpretations. Twenty-three participants used the system for a month. Through the lens of a practice-based analysis of weekly interviews and the logged data, several quite different—sometimes even mutually exclusive—interpretations or proto-practices arose: as stress management; sports performance; emotion tracking; general life logging; personality representation; or behavior change practices. This suggests the value of a purposefully open initial design to allow for the emergence of broader proto-practices to be followed by a second step of tailored design for each identified goal to facilitate the transition from proto-practice to practice. We contribute to the HCI discourse on ambiguity in design, arguing for balancing openness and ambiguity with scaffolding to better support the emergence of practices around biodata.

  • 15.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Designing for Emotional Expressivity2005Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In our daily lives we communicate emotions not only in face-to-face situations, but also in the digital world. When communicating emotions to other people we are not always aware of exactly what we are expressing. Emotions are communicated not only by the actual words we say, but through physical expressions like gestures, body posture and tone of voice. Designing for emotional expressivity requires a design that can capture the characteristics of emotions as well as the subjective experiences. This design should also mirror the communicative reality that we live in and open up for personality, context and situation to be expressed. In order to explore emotional communication in the digital world we have designed, implemented and evaluated eMoto, a mobile service for sending text messages that can be enhanced with emotional content. In this thesis we will present a detailed description of the design process, including user studies, leading to the design of the emotional expressivity in the eMoto prototype. Through the use of a body movement analysis and a dimensional model of emotion experiences, we arrived at the final design. The service makes use of the sub-symbolic expressions; colours, shapes and animations, for expressing emotions in an open-ended way. The results from the user studies show that the use of these sub-symbolic expressions can work as a foundation to use as a creative tool, but still allowing for the communication to be situated. The inspiration taken from body movements proved to be very useful as a design input. From the design process and the user studied we have extracted four desirable qualities when designing for emotional expressivity: to consider the media specific qualities, to provide cues of emotional expressivity building on familiarity, to be aware of contradictions between the modalities, and to open for personal expressivity. Incorporating these qualities open up for more expressivity when designing within this area. The actual design process is itself another example that can be used as inspiration in future designs aiming at emotional expressivity.

  • 16.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Designing for Interactional Empowerment2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis further defines how to reach Interactional Empowerment through design for users. Interactional Empowerment is an interaction design program within the general area of affective interaction, focusing on the users’ abil­ity to reflect, express themselves and engage in profound meaning-making. This has been explored through design of three systems eMoto, Affective Di­ary and Affective Health, which all mirror users’ emotions or bodily reactions in interaction in some way. From these design processes and users’ encoun­ters with the system I have extracted one experiential quality, Evocative Bal­ance, and several embryos to experiential qualities. Evocative Balance refers to interaction experiences in which familiarity and resonance with lived expe­rience are balanced with suggestiveness and openness to interpretation. The development of the concept of evocative balance is reported over the course of the three significant design projects, each exploring aspects of Interaction­al Empowerment in terms of representing bodily experiences in reflective and communicative settings. By providing accounts of evocative balance in play in the three projects, analyzing a number of other relevant interaction design experiments, and discussing evocative balance in relation to existing con­cepts within affective interaction, we offer a multi-grounded construct that can be appropriated by other interaction design researchers and designers. This thesis aims to mirror a designerly way of working, which is recognized by its multigroundedness, focus on the knowledge that resides in the design pro­cess, a slightly different approach to the view of knowledge, its extension and its rigour. It provides a background to the state-of-the-art in the design communi­ty and exemplifies these theoretical standpoints in the design processes of the three design cases. This practical example of how to extend a designer’s knowledge can work as an example for design researchers working in a similar way.

  • 17.
    Ståhl, Anna
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Kosmack Vaara, Elsa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Reflecting on the design process of affective health2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Ståhl, Anna
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Svensson, Martin
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Taylor, Alex
    Combetto, Marco
    Experiencing the Affective Diary2009In: Journal of Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, Vol. 5, p. 365-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diary is generally considered to be a book in which one keeps a regular record of events and experiences that have some personal significance. As such, it provides a useful means to privately express inner thoughts or to reflect on daily experiences, helping in either case to put them in perspective. Taking conventional diary keeping as our starting point, we have designed and built a digital diary, named Affective Diary, with which users can scribble their notes, but that also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors and mobile media to be collected from users’ mobile phones. A premise that underlies the presented work is one that views our bodily experiences as integral to how we come to interpret and thus make sense of the world. We present our investigations into this design space in three related lines of inquiry: (1) a theoretical grounding for affect and bodily experiences; (2) a user-centred design process, arriving at the Affective Diary system; and (3) an exploratory end-user study of the Affective Diary with 4 users during several weeks of use. Through these three inquiries, our overall aim has been to explore the potential of a system that interleaves the physical and cultural features of our embodied experiences and to further examine what media-specific qualities such a design might incorporate. Concerning the media-specific qualities, the key appears to be to find a suitable balance where a system does not dictate what should be interpreted and, at the same time, lends itself to enabling the user to participate in the interpretive act. In the exploratory end-user study users, for the most part, were able to identify with the body memorabilia and together with the mobile data, it enabled them to remember and reflect on their past. Two of our subjects went even further and found patterns in their own bodily reactions that caused them to learn something about themselves and even attempt to alter their own behaviours.

  • 19.
    Ståhl, Anna
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Jonsson, Martin
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Mercurio, Johanna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Boris Design Studio, Sweden.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Banka Johnson, Eva-Carin
    IKEA, Sweden.
    The Soma Mat and Breathing Light2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2016, 11, p. 305-308Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the experience of using the prototypes Soma Mat and Breathing Light. These are designed with a somaesthetic approach to support a meditative bodily introspection. We use light and heat as modalities to subtly guide participants to turn their gaze inwards, to their own bodies. People trying our prototypes reports on a feeling of relaxation, softer movements, and an increased awareness of their own breathing.

  • 20.
    Ståhl, Anna
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Evocative Balance: Designing for Interactional Empowerment2014In: International Journal of Design, Vol. 8, p. 43-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose an experiential quality called evocative balance as key in designing for affective interaction that aims to empower users in and through the interaction. Evocative balance draws on the dual meaning of the word “evoke” in characterizing the user’s sense that data and actions evoke familiar recollections of lived experience, yet are still open enough to evoke multiple interpretations in an ongoing process of co-constructive making of meaning. Our aim is to capture those experiences that resonate with our lived, everyday, social and bodily experiences; those experiences that we can recognise in ourselves and, through empathy, in others. We elaborate on and substantiate the meaning of this quality by means of retrospective reflection on three of our own design projects. This account provides detailed insights on how to find the balance between openness and familiarity through design.

  • 21.
    Ståhl, Anna
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Sundström, Petra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    A Foundation for Emotional Expressivity2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To express emotions to others in mobile text messaging in our view require designs that can both capture some of the ambiguity and subtleness that characterizes emotional interaction and keep the media specific qualities. Through the use of a body movement analysis and a dimensional model of emotion experiences, we arrived at a design for a mobile messaging service, eMoto. The service makes use of the sub-symbolic expressions; colors, shapes and animations, for expressing emotions in an open-ended way. Here we present the design process and a user study of those expressions, where the results show that the use of these sub-symbolic expressions can work as a foundation to use as a creative tool, but still allowing for the communication to be situated. The inspiration taken from body movements proved to be very useful as a design input. It was also reflected in the way our subjects described the expressions.

  • 22.
    Ståhl, Anna
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Kosmack Vaara, Elsa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Being, bringing and bridging - Three aspects of sketching with nature2017In: DIS 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, 2017, p. 1309-1320Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We articulate and reflect on the use of nature as a physical sketching material. We have closely documented explorations of various organic and non-organic materials found during excursions in a local forest and how we used them as resources in sketching. This serves as an exemplar case of how sketching in interaction design can be grounded in empirical explorations of nature. We discuss three examples of sketching based on explorations and experiences with elements and objects from a forest. Processes and characteristics of phenomena in nature such falling leaves, melting and freezing of snow, and perennial growth allowed us to expand our design repertoire and sketching skills, especially as new forms of representations and interactions. Based on this we outline three aspects of how nature can be included in sketching processes: being in nature, bringing nature to the lab, and bridging nature and interaction design.

  • 23.
    Sundström, Petra
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    A user-centred approach to affective interaction2005In: Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, Springer , 2005, 4Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have built eMoto, a mobile service for sending and receiving affective messages, with the explicit aim of addressing the inner experience of emotions. eMoto is a designed artifact that carries emotional experiences only achieved through interaction. Following on the theories of embodiment, we argue emotional experiences can not be design in only design for. eMoto is the result of a user-centered design approach, realized through a set of initial brain-storming methods, a persona, a Laban-analysis of body language and a two-tiered evaluation method. eMoto is not a system that could have been designed from theory only, but require an iterative engagement with end-users, however, in combination with theoretical work. More specifically, we will show how we have managed to design an ambiguous and open system that allows for users’ emotional engagement.

  • 24.
    Sundström, Petra
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    A Wild Evaluation of Users' Emotional Engagement2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Sundström, Petra
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    eMoto - Affectively Involving both Body and Mind2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is known that emotions are experienced by both body and mind. Oftentimes, emotions are evoked by sub-symbolic stimuli, such as colors, shapes, gestures, or music. We have built eMoto, a mobile service for sending affective mes-sages to others, with the explicit aim of addressing such sensing. Through combining affective gestures for input with affective expressions that make use of colors, shapes and animations for the background of messages, the interac-tion pulls the user into an embodied ‘affective loop’. We present a user study of eMoto where 12 out of 18 subjects got both physically and emotionally involved in the interac-tion. The study also shows that the designed ‘openness’ and ambiguity of the expressions, was appreciated and under-stood by our subjects.

  • 26.
    Sundström, Petra
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    "In situ" informants exploring an emotional mobile messaging system in their everyday practice2007In: International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, Vol. 65, p. 388-403Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 26 of 26
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.7