Change search
Refine search result
1 - 16 of 16
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aldaeus, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Dedic, Dina
    RISE, Innventia.
    Karpenja, Tatjana
    RISE, Innventia.
    Magnusson, Mikael
    RISE, Innventia.
    Modorato-Rosta, Caroline
    RISE, Innventia.
    Rosén, Fredrik
    RISE, Innventia.
    Sundin, Konstantin
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lindström, Mikael
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lucisano, Marco
    RISE, Innventia.
    Towards a cellulose-based society: current trends, future scenarios, and the role of the wood biorefinery2016In: Proceedings of the 14th European workshop on lignocellulosics and pulp, 2016, Vol. 2, p. 125-127Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a great need to maintain research for a future in which the traditional value chains of the forest industry are combined with the needs and demands of a bio-based economy. In such a future, the pulp mill biorefinery will be a crucial node. In order to map the transformation from a fossil-based society to a cellulose-based society, a global consumer survey has been made. In addition, interviews and workshops with various players throughout the bio-economy field have been accomplished. Several current trends that affect the road to a cellulose-based society have been identified. These trends are describing the effects of urbanization, consumer behaviour, new business models, material recycling, open innovation, and the need for early demonstration of new research. The trends have been combined with uncertainties into a number of plausible scenarios describing the society and the role of cellulose in the year 2030.

  • 2.
    Aldaeus, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Dedic, Dina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Karpenja, Tatjana
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Magnusson, Mikael
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Rosén, Fredrik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Sundin, Konstantin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Lindström, Mikael
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Lucisano, Marco
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Modorato-Rosta, Caroline
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Towards a cellulose-based society: current market and consumer trends2017In: The 7th Nordic Wood Biorefinery Conference held in Stockholm, Sweden, 28-30 Mar. 2017: NWBC 2017, Stockholm: RISE Bioekonomi , 2017, p. 1-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been proposed that the future of the forest industry will involve the traditional value chains combined with the needs and demands of a bio-based economy. A global consumer survey was undertaken, together with interviews and workshops with various representatives through the bio-economy. Sources also included in-depth literature studies and research reviews. Based on this input, several current trends have been identified that will affect the route towards a cellulose-based society. These trends describe the effects of urbanization, consumer behaviour, new business models, material recycling, open innovation and the necessity for early demonstration of new research. Four different but equally plausible scenarios have been identified describing the society and the role of cellulose in 2030, highlighting the role of the wood-based biorefinery.

  • 3.
    Almgren, K. M.
    et al.
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Kerholm, M.
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Gamstedt, E. K.
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Salmen, Lennart
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Lindström, Mikael
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Effects of moisture on dynamic mechanical properties of wood fiber composites studied by dynamic FT-IR spectroscopy2008In: Journal of reinforced plastics and composites (Print), ISSN 0731-6844, E-ISSN 1530-7964, Vol. 27, no 16-17, p. 1709-1721Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood fiber reinforced polylactide is a biodegradable composite where both fibers and matrix are from renewable resources. In the development of such new materials, information on mechanical behavior on the macroscopic and the molecular level is useful. In this study, dynamic Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is used to measure losses at the molecular level during cyclic tensile loading for bonds that are characteristic of the cellulosic fibers and the polylactid matrix. This molecular behavior is compared with measured macroscopic hysteresis losses for different moisture levels. The results show that moisture ingress will transfer the load from the fibers to the matrix, and that a more efficient fiber-matrix interface would diminish mechanical losses. Although the dynamic FT-IR spectroscopy method is still qualitative, this investigation shows that it can provide information on the stress transfer of the constituents in wood fiber reinforced plastics.

  • 4.
    Almgren, Karin M.
    et al.
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Gamstedt, E. Kristofer
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Berthold, Fredrik
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Lindström, Mikael
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Moisture uptake and hygroexpansion of wood fiber composite materials with polylactide and polypropylene matrix materials2009In: Polymer Composites, ISSN 0272-8397, E-ISSN 1548-0569, Vol. 30, no 12, p. 1809-1816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effects of butantetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) modification, choice of matrix, and fiber volume fraction on hygroexpansion of wood fiber composites have been investigated. Untreated reference wood fibers and BTCA-modified fibers were used as reinforcement in composites with matrices composed of polylactic acid (PLA), polypropylene (PP), or a mixture thereof. The crosslinking BTCA modification reduced the out-of- plane hygroexpansion of PLA and PLA/PP composites, under water-immersed and humid conditions, whereas the swelling increased when PP was used as matrix material. This is explained by difficulties for the BTCA- modified fibers to adhere to the PP matrix. Fiber volume fraction was the most important parameter as regards out-of-plane hygroexpansion, with a high-fiber fraction leading to large hygroexpansion. Fiber-matrix wettability during processing and consolidation also showed to have a large impact on the dimensional stability and moisture uptake.

  • 5.
    Almgren, Karin M.
    et al.
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Gamstedt, E. Kristofer
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Nygård, P.
    Malmberg, F.
    Lindblad, J.
    Lindström, Mikael
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Role of fibre-fibre and fibre-matrix adhesion in stress transfer in composites made from resin-impregnated paper sheets2009In: International Journal of Adhesion and Adhesives, ISSN 0143-7496, E-ISSN 1879-0127, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 551-557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paper-reinforced plastics are gaining increased interest as packaging materials, where mechanical properties are of great importance. Strength and stress transfer in paper sheets are controlled by fibre-fibre bonds. In paper-reinforced plastics, where the sheet is impregnated with a polymer resin, other stress-transfer mechanisms may be more important. The influence of fibre-fibre bonds on the strength of paper-reinforced plastics was therefore investigated. Paper sheets with different degrees of fibre-fibre bonding were manufactured and used as reinforcement in a polymeric matrix. Image analysis tools were used to verify that the difference in the degree of fibre-fibre bonding had been preserved in the composite materials. Strength and stiffness of the composites were experimentally determined and showed no correlation to the degree of fibre-fibre bonding, in contrast to the behaviour of unimpregnated paper sheets. The degree of fibre-fibre bonding is therefore believed to have little importance in this type of material, where stress is mainly transferred through the fibre-matrix interface.

  • 6.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Béland, Marie-Claude
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lindberg, Siv M.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Berthold, Fredrik
    RISE, Innventia.
    Vomhoff, Hannes
    RISE, Innventia.
    Wickholm, Kristina
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lindström, Mikael
    RISE, Innventia.
    It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s a super multimaterial!2015In: Paper Conference and Trade Show (PaperCon 2015), TAPPI Press, 2015, Vol. 1, p. 492-504Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Matching market demands and technological solutions is not always straightforward. In this article, we report on one material, a cellulose-PLA multimaterial, which was made on a full-scale pilot paper machine and adapted to five different market applications having specialized and often conflicting demands. The material can be injection molded, 3D-printed, hot pressed, treated as a textile, used in a laminate, or converted as a paper board, giving it a wide range of possible properties depending on how it is processed.The five application areas presented here were identified as gaps in the marketplace where seemingly conflicting needs were desired: opacity and transparency; compact for transport but having an expanded size during use; stiffness and flexibility; strength and light-weight; and durability and degradability. These properties are exemplified in a number of material and product demonstrators, illustrating how tailored solutions can give products with distinctly different personalities. The material can be made flexible and given movement as graceful as the wing of a bird or be processed to be strong and light-weight enough to be used in vehicles like airplanes. By having one material that is produced on a large scale, but then processed according to specific market demands and expectations, the gap between needing scale and needing scope is bridged.

  • 7. Johnson, O.
    et al.
    Lindberg, Siv M
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Roos, A.
    Hugosson, M.
    Lindström, Mikael
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Consumer perceptions and preferences on solid wood, wood-based panels, and composites: A repertory grid study2008In: Wood and Fiber Science, ISSN 0735-6161, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 663-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge about consumer perception and preferences on solid wood, wood-based panels, and wood-based composites is important for product development and marketing. The aim of this study was to identify attributes and associations that people use to describe different types of wood materials and to explore how they relate to preferences. The study involved nine samples that were evaluated with the Kelly’s repertory grid technique and content analysis. Based on respondents’ answers, 19 core categories reflecting sample attributes were extracted. General preferences for each sample were also recorded. Principal component analysis generated two factors describing 1) naturalness, wood-likeness, softness, unprocessed origin, living, pleasant, and high value; and 2) solid and homogeneous impression. A third, preliminary factor included categories describing irregular pattern, sleekness, and smoothness. The wood samples were most liked, whereas composites and panels were not appreciated. Preferred core categories were naturalness, wood-likeness, smoothness, living impression, and value. The least liked core categories were processed, hard, and high weight. The implications of the results for product development and marketing are discussed. © 2008 by the Society of Wood Science and Technology.

  • 8.
    Lindberg, Siv M
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Hartzen, Ann-Sofie
    Wodke, Thomas
    Lindström, Mikael
    RISE, Innventia.
    Hierarchic design and material identity2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Lindfors, Eva-Lisa
    et al.
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Lindström, Mikael
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Iversen, Tommy
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Polysaccharide degradation in waterlogged oak wood from the ancient warship Vasa2008In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 57-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A rather extensive degradation of cellulose and hemicelluloses was found in waterlogged oak wood samples from the ancient warship Vasa by size exclusion chromatography with the solvent system lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide (LiCl/DMAc). The degradation has mainly occurred after salvage of the wreck, probably as a consequence of keeping iron contaminated wood in contact with air. The most likely explanation is Fenton type of reactions degrading the wood polymers and oxidising reduced sulphur forms to sulphuric acid. An increased degradation rate of the Vasa wood can be anticipated in the future if the sulphuric acid cannot be neutralised and the oxidative reactions cannot be quenched.

  • 10.
    Lindström, Mikael
    et al.
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Berthold, Fredrik
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Gamstedt, Kristofer
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Nobell, Nandi
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Razavi, Farvash
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Wickholm, Kristina
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Sustainable materials design2008In: 2008 Nordic Wood Biorefinery Conference - Proceedings: NWBC 2008, 2008, p. 144-149Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally new materials have been developed in order to solve technological problems within the aerospace, military or medicine fields. Renewable materials are developed from another perspective; they are developed in order to meet the demands from a sustainable society. If they are developed to become replacement materials, they have to be better or cheaper in order to take market shares or there has to be a political willingness to promote them. Economical subsidies are never sound and a better strategy to introduce these new materials is to identify their unique properties and possibilities and to market them. One such strategy, materials design, will be discussed in this paper. Renewable materials open for new strategies in design. Traditionally, in the LCA perspective materials should be recycled as materials and preferably as the original material quality. This implies that there has to be a limited number of materials and they need to be identifiable in order to be sorted. Renewable, natural fibre reinforced materials will degrade during recycling materials and recycling. The consequence of this is that these materials should be recycled as energy. An integrated materials and product design will therefore be a new sustainable strategy. Researchers involved in R&D of new materials have been involved in discussions and collaborations with the R&D department of companies producing and marketing materials. In parallel, industrial designers and engineers involved in product development and design have had on-going discussion with the same companies, but through their marketing department. No communication between R&D and end-product designers. This paper suggest an R&D&D concept, Research and Development and Design, a hierarchical, integrated materials and product design strategy.

  • 11. Neagu, R. C.
    et al.
    Cuénoud, M.
    Berthold, Fredrik
    RISE, Innventia.
    Bourban, P. -E
    Gamstedt, E. K.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lindström, Mikael
    RISE, Innventia.
    Månson, J. -A.E.
    Processing and mechanical properties of novel wood fibre composites foams2009In: ICCM International Conferences on Composite Materials, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood fibre reinforced polylactic acid (PLA) composite foams have been successfully produced using supercritical carbon dioxide. A significant increase of specific properties, both stiffness and strength, was achieved by adding 5-10 wt% wood fibres. The experimental stiffness was comparable with a superposed micromechanical model for a three phase fibre reinforced foam. These first results on the integration of wood fibres into cellular PLA polymer are very encouraging.

  • 12.
    Nilsson, Helena
    et al.
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Olsson, Ann
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Lindström, Mikael
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Iversen, Tommy
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Bark suberin as a renewable source of long-chain ω-hydroxyalkanoic acids2008In: Macromolecular Symposia, ISSN 1022-1360, E-ISSN 1521-3900, Vol. 272, no 1, p. 104-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polycondensations of cis-9,10-epoxy-18-hydroxyoctadecanoic acid, isolated from birch outer bark, were performed at 75°C in toluene as solvent and at 85°C In bulk using immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B as catalyst. The polycondensation performed in toluene in presence of molecular sieves gave a polyester with DP 50 after 24 h. The same DP was obtained at much shorter reaction time (3 h) by bulk polymerization in an open vial without any drying agent present.

  • 13.
    Nilsson, Helena
    et al.
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Olsson, Ann
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Lindström, Mikael
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Iversen, Tommy
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Birch bark as a source for fine chemicals2008In: 2008 Nordic Wood Biorefinery Conference - Proceedings: NWBC 2008, 2008, Vol. 274, no 1, p. 125-128Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we report polycondensation and co-polymerization of cis-9,10-epoxy-18-hydroxyoctadecanoic acid (1) isolated from birch outer bark using immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (Novozyme 435) as catalyst to give epoxy activated straight chain polyesters and cyclic macromonomers.

  • 14. Nyström, Thomas
    et al.
    Fahnestock, Jesse Black
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut / Energiteknik (ET).
    Kilbo, Per
    Lindström, Mikael
    RISE, Innventia.
    Cirkulära affärsmodeller Hur forskning kring cirkulär affärsmodellsinnovation kan stärka svensk industri till att bli hållbart lönsam.2014Report (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Odeberg Glasenapp, Astrid
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Pötzsch, Sina
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Alfthan, Johan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Lindström, Mikael
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Berthold, Fredrik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    DuraWell : novel approach to enhance the moisture resistance of corrugated board paper2017In: 28th IAPRI Symposium on packaging, 2017, p. 178-197Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Salmen, Lennart
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lindström, Mikael
    RISE, Innventia. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Improved pulp yield and strength by retained glucomannans in kraft pulping of softwood2015In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 584-590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibilities of improving yield and strength properties of softwood bleached kraft pulps by retaining a higher content of glucomannan during kraft cooking using additives that decrease the rate of carbohydrate degradation were looked upon. In addition the effect of an increased alkaline concentration, favouring stopping reactions over peeling reactions was explored. Yield increases in the range of 2 to 4%-units were achieved using additives. In the case of the higher alkali charge instead a small yield decrease was noticed. Higher alkali charge in general resulted in a larger loss of xylan in the pulp. When examining the effects of the application of shearing forces at the end of the cook, mimicking industrial pulps, all cooks using high alkali conditions were affected by a large decrease in strength properties, both in tensile index and tear index as well as in fibre strength measured as re-wet Zero-span. For pulps cooked with polysulphide and H2S additions, stabilising the glucomannan degradation, the strength reductions were smaller than for the reference pulps. This resulted in pulps with both a higher yield and similar or better strength properties than those for the reference pulp. These pulps also had better beatability, i.e. the tensile strength increased faster during PFI-beating than for the reference pulp.

1 - 16 of 16
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.8