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  • 1.
    Arvidsson Segerkvist, Katarina
    et al.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Brunsø, Karen
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Brønd Laursen, Klaus
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Cherono Schmidt Henriksen, Julie
    Økologisk Landsforening, Denmark.
    Elsmark, Jenny
    Svenskt Kött, Sweden.
    Esbjerg, Lars
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Hessle, Anna
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Holtz, Emma
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Karlsson, Anders H
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Lind, Ann-Kristina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Stenberg, Elin
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Strand, Theres
    Svenska Köttföretagen, Sweden.
    Tønning Tønnesen, Mathilde
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Bark, Linnea
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Åkesson, Ulrika
    Agroväst Livsmedel, Sweden.
    Consumer driven innovation towards improved beef and lamb meat quality: Partnership project summary2021Report (Other academic)
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  • 2.
    Bark, Linnea
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Stress kopplat till larm och statistik från automatiska mjölkningssystem (AMS)2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Automatic milking systems (AMS), also called milking robots, have become more common and in 2018 one third of all dairy cows in Sweden was milked in AMS. Advantages with AMS is that it improves the physical working environment, it allows for more flexible working hours and it collects individual data of milk production, milk quality and animal health. The milking robot works day and night, and it is common with one robot serving the total herd. Since downtime in the robot can result in reduced production and animal welfare, the system is more vulnerable compared to a manual milking system. Therefore, there is an alarm system connected to the milking robot that informs the farmer whenever there is a stoppage in the robot. Previous studies on work environment in AMS have shown that the farmers experienced that psychological work environment had deteriorated due to the need for constant readiness to solve any stoppage. Furthermore, they also experienced an overflow of information from the robot that made it hard to overview. The aim of this study was to investigate how Swedish farmers and service technicians experience stress related to alarms and data from the milking robot and how the stress is prevented. In this study, interviews were performed with farmers that had AMS (n=6), farmers that have had AMS but changed over to manual milking (n=3) and service technicians. Beside the interviews the farmers also filled a questionnaire where they graded the experience of stress. The results show that the farmers that had AMS experienced little stress related to alarm and data, while farmers that had given up AMS experienced more stress. The farmers experienced that stress related to alarms could partly be prevented by having a lower number of cows per AMS and by having access to more than one milking unit. Stress related to being on call could be prevented by having access to a network of persons that could relief the farmer from the alarm, especially if the farmer easily gets stressed, experience a high alarm frequency, or have great need of time off work in periods. Farmers that have had AMS experienced more stress related to data compared to farmers that had AMS. However, the interviews did not result in concrete solution in how to prevent stress. The service technicians were in general content with their work, but the on-call service was a negative part of the work. It takes long time to get into the job and it is therefore necessary to have a functioning system where more experienced colleagues can support the less experienced.

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  • 3.
    Berg, Charlotte
    et al.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Hansson, Helena
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Herlin, Anders
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Hultgren, Jan
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Jacobson, Magdalena
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Jansson, Anna
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Jamar, Anna
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Jeppson, Knut-Håkan
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Keeling, Linda
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Kolstrup, Christina
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lundmark Hedman, Frida
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Rydhmer, Lotta
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Staaf Larsson, Birgitta
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Salomon, Eva
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Sandberg, Eva
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Steen, Margareta
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Wall, Helena
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Utegående nötkreatur och får2020Report (Other academic)
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  • 4.
    Bergman Bruhn, Å
    et al.
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Andersson, I
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    With the stable as a workplace – about attractive, healthy and sustainable employments in the Swedish equine sector.2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Bergman Bruhn, Åsa
    et al.
    University Dalarna, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Andersson, Ing-Marie
    University Dalarna, Sweden.
    Safety climate assessment in the equine sector – a study of Swedish riding schools and trotting stables2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose The equine sector has grown strongly in recent years in Sweden as well as in many European countries. The Swedish equine sector includes a wide variety of activities, e.g. businesses related to breeding, competition, tourism and training, and more non-profit activities such as association-run riding schools and leisure. Work environment issues are a major concern for the sector since it is labor-intensive, and a majority of the work tasks are still performed manually leading to high workloads and physical strain. Furthermore, working with and handling horses is hazardous, and the sector has a relatively high occupational injury rate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety climate at riding schools and trotting stables through the validated Nordic questionnaire on safety climate (NOSACQ-50). Methods The questionnaire, consisting of 50 statements across 7 safety climate dimensions, was handed out to employees at 11 workplaces, six riding schools and five trotting stables. Results and discussion The results are based on data from 62 employees. The analysis of all the participants’ responses showed that one of the seven dimensions, “workers’ safety priority and risk non-acceptance”, needs to be developed in comparison to the other six. Furthermore, the preliminary results indicate that there are differences in the perceived safety climate dependent on working experience of the employee. Some significant differences were also found between riding schools and trotting stables in the dimension “workers trust in the efficacy of safety systems”. Conclusions Understanding the safety climate in the equine sector is a first step to find approaches to enhance safety and in the longer-term increase sustainability in horse-related occupations. The study is part of two joint projects with the aim to improve the work environment in the Swedish equine sector, funded by AFA Insurance and The Swedish-Norwegian Foundation for Equine Research.

  • 6.
    Bergman Bruhn, Åsa
    et al.
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Andersson, Ing-Marie
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    The double-sided nature of lifestyle-oriented work in the Swedish equine industry2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The equine industry faces problems in terms of recruitment and retention of employees when it comes to fostering decent working conditions and sustainable employments, despite the obvious advantage of offering a lifestyle-oriented work with the privilege of personal leisure interests. The overall aim is to gain knowledge of how employees in the equine industry – here including riding schools and trotting stables – experience their work and work environment. The study is part of two larger research projects, financed by the Swedish-Norwegian Foundation for Equine Research and AFA Insurance, where the purpose is to, in close collaboration with the equine industry, identify and implement methods and tools for a systematic work environment management. The study includes data from a questionnaire, individual interviews and observations. The results showed that the employees considered their work as one of the most important things in life, that they primarily worked for self-realization and good quality of life and that they perceived their current work both attractive and meaningful. Love of horses, passion for the sport, practical work in an outdoor setting, significant, stimulating and varied tasks as well as workplace relations, are the most important factors for the attractiveness and meaningfulness of the work. Nevertheless, imbalance between work and leisure time as well as high physical workload and lack of adequate equipment challenges the experience of an attractive, meaningful and sustainable work. The experiences differed somewhat between the two groups examined, i.e. employees in riding schools and trotting stables.

  • 7.
    Bergman Bruhn, Åsa
    et al.
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Andersson, Ing-Marie
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Rosén, Gunnar
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Motivational factors for occupational safety and health improvements: A mixed-method study within the Swedish equine sector2023In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 159, article id 106035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A well-functioning systematic occupational safety and health management is beneficial for both individuals and organizations, and employee motivation seems to be crucial for positive outcomes. Occupational safety and health issues are a major concern for the Swedish equine sector since the work environment in horse stables is known to be characterized by low mechanization, high physical workloads, and high injury risks. The purpose of this study was to gain an increased understanding of how systematic occupational safety and health management is performed and which factors that influence motivation for occupational safety and health improvements in the Swedish equine sector. An explanatory sequential mixed-methods study, based on quantitative data from questionnaires and qualitative data from semi-structured interviews, was conducted. Various statistical analyses were performed to obtain quantitative data and an abductive applied thematic analysis was applied for the qualitative data. The results indicate that both intrinsic motivators, i.e. attitudes, values, and influence, as well as contextual factors such as motivational management, occupational culture, and workplace resources, influence compliance in systematic occupational safety and health management and participation in occupational safety and health improvements, which in turn affect workplace outcomes regarding safety and health. The positive relationship found between an implemented and functioning systematic occupational safety and health management and employee motivation for occupational safety and health improvements indicate the importance of employee involvement and participation. Understanding the motivational factors for occupational safety and health improvements from an employee perspective is an important step to creating healthy and sustainable workplaces.

  • 8.
    Bergman Bruhn, Åsa
    et al.
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Rydell, Alexis
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Ing-Marie
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Med stallet som arbetsplats: om attraktivt arbete i hästnäringen2020In: Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv, ISSN 1400-9692, E-ISSN 2002-343X, Vol. 26Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Tidigare studier har visat att det finns både utmaningar och brister gällande arbetsmiljö och arbetsförhållanden inom hästnäringen. Syftet med den här artikeln är att identifiera hur anställda i hästnäringen upplever sitt nuvarande arbete och vilka faktorer de anser vara viktiga för att ett arbete ska upplevas som attraktivt, samt att undersöka skillnader mellan det nuvarande arbetet och anställdas idealbild av ett attraktivt arbete. Studien baseras på en enkätundersökning med sammantaget 150 svar från anställda i travstall och ridskolor. I artikeln diskuteras utmaningar och möjligheter för att skapa attraktiva arbeten i hästnäringen.

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  • 9.
    Geng, Qiuqing
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Arbetsolyckor bland kvinnor i jordbruket - en inledande studie om orsaker och åtgärder2015Report (Other academic)
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  • 10.
    Gustafsson, Linnea
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Tekniker för att mäta köttkvalitet och slaktkroppsegenskaper på nötkreatur och lamm före slakt2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Meat quality is a broad concept that can include e.g. retail product, ethical traits and eating quality. This report mainly focuses on the eating quality, i.e. the sensory properties, of the meat. Studies have shown that tenderness and taste is the most important eating quality traits in meat. The tenderness and taste are partly influenced by the amount of intramuscular fat (marbling) in the meat. Swedish carcasses of cattle and lamb is mainly classified according to the EUROP-system, which classifies the carcasses’ shape and external fat deposition. There is also a Swedish standard for classification of marbling in beef, which is optional for the abattoirs to use. These parameters are only possible to influence when the animal is alive. The marbling of the meat is affected by e.g. breed, sex, age and feeding regime. In general, animals with lower growth rates have a greater potential to produce marbled meat. Also, an intense feeding regime has been shown to have a positive impact on the marbling grade. Marbling is a moderately heritable trait in cattle, which means that genetic progress can be achieved by selecting for marbling within a breed. To measure meat quality on live animals can provide valuable information in the aim to improve meat quality in Swedish beef.

    This review presents techniques that have been evaluated in the application to measure carcass meat quality traits on live cattle and lambs. The techniques covered in the report are ultrasound, bioelectrical impedance (BIA), computed tomography, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), 3D-imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Studies have shown that marbling in cattle can be measured with similar accuracy by ultrasound and BIA, and there is also potential to develop NMR for measurement of marbling in shallow muscles. Both fat and muscles in cattle can be measured with ultrasound, BIA, computed tomography and there is also potential to develop 3D-imaging for these traits. Fewer studies have focused on lamb meat quality and for marbling, only studies on computed tomography was found. Muscles and fat content in live lambs have been successfully measured by ultrasound, BIA, computed tomography and DXA. At present, ultrasound and 3D-imaging are the techniques considered to have the potential to be practically applicable for measuring carcass meat quality traits in live animals in Sweden.

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  • 11.
    Gustafsson, Linnea
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Ultraljud - mätning av köttkvalitet på levande nötkreatur2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Meatquality, i.e. sensory quality, includes traits such as tenderness and texture,flavour and juiciness. Tenderness and flavour are considered to be the mostimportant meat quality traits and are related to the amount of marbling of themeat, i.e. the amount of intramuscular fat. The marbling of the meat isaffected by e.g. sex, age, breed, genetic disposition and feeding regime.Marbling is moderately heritable in cattle, which mean that genetic progresscan be achieved by selecting for marbling within a breed. In Sweden, a standardfor beef marbling scoring has been developed, which is optional for theslaughterhouses to use. However, few slaughterhouses have implemented themarbling scoring system in their payment model to farmers, which means thatthere are no apparent financial incentives for meat producers to produceanimals of high eating quality. The possibility to predict the marbling score in live animals mayincrease the interest for eating quality traits of beef in Sweden and improve productionplanning, the prediction of time for slaughter and breeding. Ultrasound isalready an established method for estimating beef carcass characteristics andis used e.g. in the USA and Canada.

    The study aimed to evaluate ultrasound as amethod to measure carcass meat quality traits on live cattle in Sweden. Data of94 cattle was included in the study. The animals were scanned with ultrasoundbefore slaughter and ultrasound and carcass measurements of marbling, backfatthickness and muscle depth were then compared. The results showed a relativelylow correlation between marbling score by ultrasound and marbling assessedvisually on the carcass, but it was within the range of results from previousstudies. However, the distribution of data was limited with few animals withhigh marbling scores, which means that a correlation analysis may not bereliable. Therefore, the marbling score was also analysed as a categoricalvariable with Fisher’s exact test, and the results showed a significantrelationship between marbling grade before and after slaughter. The ultrasound measurements made a correct classifying in around half of the cases. The results also showed a lower correlation for measurement of backfat compared toprevious studies (r= 0,51 at the 12/13th rib and r=0,43 at the 10/11thrib), while the results for measurement of muscle depth was moderatelycorrelated to the carcass measurement.  Theresults can most likely be improved by better knowledge and understanding ofthe ultrasound technique and handling skills of both ultrasound hardware andsoftware. Furthermore, the results for marbling can probably be improved by arecalibration of the software to meet Swedish conditions, as the ultrasound measurementsgenerally seems to underestimate the marbling score. There is potential to useultrasound to measure marbling and meat quality traits on Swedish cattle, butthere is a need of more data material and better knowledge and experience toshow more reliable results.

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    Gustafsson Lindahl RISE rapport 2019 78
  • 12. Gustafsson, Mats
    et al.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Berglund, Britt
    Gustafsson, Hans
    Stå- och liggtider för brunstdetektion i uppbundna system: en pilotstudie2007Report (Refereed)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 13.
    Hagberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Andersson, Thomas
    Parsteel AB, Sweden.
    Atkinson, Sophie
    Smart djurhantering EF, Sweden.
    Hessle, Anna
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Lind, Ann-Kristina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lindqvist, Fredrik
    SSAB EMEA AB, Sweden.
    Lundquist, Christer
    Parsteel AB, Sweden.
    Olsson, Henrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Sundberg, Martin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    Lindahl, Sophie
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Wahlund, Lotten
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lättviktsgrindar av höghållfast stål för säkrare djurhantering och arbetsmiljö2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lightweight gates of high-strength steel for improved worker safety and cattle handling This report presents the work with developing a lightweight gate of high-strength steel for the handling of cattle. The project was conducted as a European Innovation Partnership (EIP) project. The project group consisted of co-workers from the unit of Agriculture and Horticulture and the unit of Process and Environmental Engineering at Research Institutes of Sweden (RISE Jordbruk och trädgård och RISE Kretsloppsteknik), Parsteel AB (former Nilssons Plåtindustri AB), SSAB EMEA AB, Sophie Atkinson at Smart Animal Handling, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) in Skara and the cattle farmer Lars Olsson. The main objectives of the project were to develop a lightweight gate weighing at least 50% less and being three times as strong as a traditional gate for cattle handling. The main motive was to improve the ergonomic conditions and working environment for the animal handlers. Additionally, for the safety of both animals and handlers, the gate must withstand the loads from cattle. Other objectives were to design and construct a gate that does not exceed the price of a high-quality gate and not contribute to increased negative environmental impact. A lightweight gate can be made of various materials such as plastic, fiberglass or steel. Regarding the project group's participants and their competencies, in addition to the numerous requirements placed on a lightweight gate, the choice fell on high-strength steel. High-strength steel is characterized by having high yield strengths, up to 1300 MPa, in comparison with traditional construction steel with yield strength of 355 MPa. For the specific lightweight gate, steel pipes with a yield strength of approximately 750 MPa were chosen. These pipes are mainly used in the automotive and engine industry, where high demands are placed on strength while at the same time a light construction is desired. The gate itself was designed during the project and several details were examined and developed in regard to functionality and safety for both cattle and handlers. The work environment legislation states that gates must be dimensioned and anchored so that the animals cannot break out (AFS 2008:17). The gates must also not pose a risk of injury to the cattle. In order to work safely with cattle, knowledge of cattle behavior is essential and consequently the report contains a chapter describing cattle senses and behavior. Both the lightweight gates and the handling system, built up by the gates, must be adapted to the cattle. In the project, the bud box handling system was tested. The handling system was originally developed to make use of the behavioral characteristics of cattle to encourage forward movement in the desired direction. In the project the handling system's functionality and safety, by using lightweight gates and additional equipment and components, were further designed. The handling system was tested in two groups of heifers at the SLU Götala Beef and Lamb Research Centre. The lightweight gates were also tested in a dairy herd and a beef herd, while hoof trimming, and at a small-scale abattoir. Generally, the light weight of the gates was considered an advantage as the handling of the gates is simplified also resulting in more frequent use of the gates, increasing safety for both animals and humans. During the project, several strength tests were performed by building unique test rigs. In one test rig, the weld of the pipes of the lightweight gate was tested. In another test rig, the strength of lightweight gates, compared with traditional gates on the market, were tested. The outcome of the tests confirmed the original aim of the project, a lightweight gate made of high-strength steel, about 50% lighter and at least three times as strong as traditional gates, had been developed and designed during the project period.

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  • 14.
    Hagberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Pourazari, Fereshteh
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Ny teknik inom grisproduktionen2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Investments in pig operations often involve investments in various technical equipment and systems. Automatic feeding and automatic regulation of the ventilation in pig units are commonly installed today. The future technologies, being under development, are more advanced technical solutions as the pigs' growth, behavior, well-being, and health are monitored with the aim to give the pig producer real time data of the production and eventually, what measures required to be taken. Precision Livestock Farming (PLF) aims to combine hardware, e.g., cameras, microphones and sensors, with computer software to collect and analyze data. By real time automatic monitoring, the production results and pigs’ welfare and health are easier to follow-up instantly. The PLF technology function as a warning system for disturbances in the pig units before the stockperson has had time to notice the changes making it possible for quick and targeted interventions. Different types of cameras are being developed to record different behaviors in pigs, such as aggressive behaviors. Face recognition, by a mobile phone application, is being developed for individual recognition of pigs and as a replacement of ear tags. In addition, attempts are made to monitor the pigs' activity and body measurements with camera technology to obtain information about pig health and growth. Finding a reliable system for automatic weight estimation of the pigs would gain profitability. Thermal cameras, IR technology, will be of great importance in pig production in the future. Other equipment already on the market are sensors for sound analysis with the aim to early detect any respiratory disturbances among the pigs. Prior to any technology investment, it is essential that the pig producer has been ensured that the system and equipment have been carefully tested, and especially applied in commercial herds. Some of the technologies presented in this report have only been tested in small herds and in controlled research environments, and therefore need further development before commercialization. Additionally, the technologies must have been tested under different production conditions, e.g., among different pig categories, housing conditions and pen designs. Future commercial technologies preferably include continuous monitoring of the individual pig's behavior, well-being, and health, along with production results and indoor environmental parameters. It is important that the techniques are developed based on the needs of the pig and the stockperson to avoid any inconveniences. The technologies must also be profitable and user-friendly.

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  • 15.
    Isaksson, Sven
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Wahlund, Lotten
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Tekniker för att mäta kvalitet på nöt- och lammkött efter slakt2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report reviews various measurement techniques and methods for assessing meat quality in lamb and beef after slaughter. It has mainly been based upon searches in databases of scientific literature, but also on discussions with industry people and colleagues.

    The concept of meat quality is multifaceted and not easily defined. At the same time, most people who appreciate a good piece of meat would agree on that tough meat should be avoided. Hence, one property that has attained considerable attention in the literature is tenderness. Another characteristic that is usually emphasized as something positive is marbling, partly due to several studies that have indicated a relation between marbling and taste, juiciness and tenderness, all being properties that are important for a positive eating experience. Other features that attract attention are e.g. fatty acid composition, water retention ability, pH and colour.

    The first attempts to find an objective method for tenderness measurement were based on mechanical methods. Essentially a spear-like object that was shot into the meat, while the resulting force was measured. For measurement of other parameters, such as pH, relatively traditional techniques were similarly used, based on more or less analogue technology. However, in recent decades there has been an increasing amount of studies using techniques that have benefited from the exponential development of digital and solid-state technologies. This development has e.g. led to easier ways to generate, measure and analyse electromagnetic, optical and acoustic signals.

    A common approach in simpler measurement methods is trying to find an algorithm that is based on analysis of the frequency response of a signal that typically may be of electrical nature, ultrasound or light. Methods utilizing NIR have been particularly promising. One example of NIR equipment is NitFomTM, which is used for quality assessment of fat in pork meat. Methods based on measurement of electrical impedance have also, at least periodically, found establishment on the market.

    There are also more advanced approaches, with the ambition to obtain spatial resolution of properties within the object under assessment. For measurements with three-dimensional resolution, primarily computer tomography imaging (CTI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are candidates, but also ultrasound. Hitachi-Aloka, makes ultrasonic equipment that can be used for scanning live animals, and another example of ultrasonic equipment is ECM EXAGO. MRI and CTI, however, are still too expensive, advanced and slow to be realistic alternatives for online measurement in the industry in the near future.

    MRI and CTI are developments of NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) and X-ray. While also NMR seems to be a little too expensive for industrial applications, and primarily a lab tool, X-rays have been used in the meat industry since the 1970s, e.g. for measurement of fat content. One commercial product that early found establishment on the market is Anyl-Ray Oystar.

    The development of the digital camera opened up for advanced image processing. There are several studies based on analysis of the kind of information that can be extracted from RGB images, so-called vision technology, but also on analysis of images that contain much more detailed spectral information, so-called hyper- or multispectral image analysis. However, analysis of the amount of information that is collected with the latter kind of technology requires large computation and data management capabilities. In this context, the continuing development towards more accessible computational power is highly valued.

    While image processing based on RGB information has been successful in measuring more or less what is also perceived by human eye (in this context such parameters as marbling and colour), hyperspectral image analysis has shown potential to go one step further. In addition to visual properties, the technology has shown promising results in measuring such things as chemical composition (e.g. proportions of fat, protein and water), pH and tenderness. Much resources have been invested in development of functional systems for online classification of meat in the industry. The results have been promising, and companies have been started up for the purpose, but the definitive breakthrough has not yet taken place.

    In conclusion, several attempts have been made to find objective measurement methods for assessing and potentially classifying meat quality. Many promising results have been reported in the literature. Yet it is difficult to make any recommendations on one single salvaging technique based upon these results. Possibly, the technology that is currently attracting the most attention and hopes is hyperspectral image analysis, especially if the intention is to find a technology, suitable for forming the basis for a classification system. In such a context, hyperspectral imaging is a technology that meets many positive criteria: it is contact-free, it has spatial resolution, it combines advantages of both vision and NIR. There are also several studies that show promising results, and there is still good hope that the technology will develop further in near-time (both in terms of price and performance), hand in hand with the trend in society towards increased digitalisation (i.e. development of artificial intelligence, better and cheaper sensors, increased access to computational power, connected devices, etc.).

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  • 16.
    Laurell, Johan
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Adolfsson, Niklas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Eveborn, David
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Förstudie för innovationsupphandling: teknik för förbättrad arbetsmiljö vid slamtömning.2014Report (Refereed)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 17.
    Lind, Ann-Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Karlsson, Madelein
    SLU.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Båge, Renee
    SLU.
    Kalvningsdetektor - Kan bättre koll på kalvningarna förbättra arbetsmiljö och säkerhet2016Report (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 18.
    Lind, Ann-Kristina
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Calving alert system - a helping technique or a welfare problem?2019In: Precision Livestock Farming 2019 - Papers Presented at the 9th European Conference on Precision Livestock Farming, ECPLF 2019, Organising Committee of the 9th European Conference on Precision Livestock Farming (ECPLF), Teagasc, Animal and Grassland Research and Innovation Centre , 2019, p. 385-388Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It can be a challenge for beef and dairy farmers to predict when a cow is close to calving, to move her to a calving pen in time and to properly monitor and assist the calving. The objective was to evaluate how a calving alert system, attached to the tail, affects the cow. The system monitors the tail's movements, and the farmer is notified via a text message to the mobile phone approximately one hour before calving. A case-control and an interview study were carried out. In the case-control study, cow behaviour was observed during and after the procedure of attaching the sensor on the tail. Controls were equally prepared, but the sensor was attached and then immediately removed again. The ethogram protocol contained behaviours like, for example, back arching, tail lifting, fidgeting and kicking. The case-control study had to be discontinued due to the sensors causing damage to the cow's tail and therefore, there were too few cows included in the study to be able to determine if there were statistical differences between the test and control cows. In the interview study which included 15 interviewed farmers, 80% stated that the cows' behavioural reaction was negative when the sensor was attached. Almost all farmers had observed damage to the tails after using the sensor and 20% had observed such severe damage that amputation was necessary.

  • 19.
    Lind, Ann-Kristina
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Moocall – en sensor med koll på kalvningar2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It may be a challenge for beef and dairy farmers to predict when a cow is close to calving, to move her to a calving pen in time and to properly monitor and assist the calving. The objective was to evaluate how a calving alert system, attached to the tail, affects the cow. The system monitors the tail’s movements, and the farmer is notified via a text message approximately one hour before calving. 

    A case-control and an interview study with farmers were carried out. In the case-control study, cow behaviour was observed during and after the procedure attaching the calving alert system on the tail. Controls were equally prepared, but the sensor was first attached and immediately removed again. The ethogram protocol contained for example back arching, tail lifting, fidgeting and kicking. 

    The case-control study had to be discontinued due to sensors causing damage on the tail. Results from the interview study shows that 80% of the interviewed farmers stated that the cows behaviour reaction was negative when the sensor was attached to the tail and that it lasted up to one hour. Almost all farmers had observed damages on the tails after using the sensor and 20% had observed such severe damage that amputation was necessary. 

    The studied sensor functioned well technically according to the interviews, but the observed tail damage indicates that the cows experienced discomfort by the sensor and that using the sensor is associated with welfare problems for the cows.

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  • 20.
    Lind, Ann-Kristina
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Möjligheter och utmaningar med en digitalisering av köttkedjan2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Automation of work tasks has become commonplace for many primary producers with livestock, e.g. the use of milking robots and selection gates as well as automated feeding, weighing of animals and manure and litter handling. Advances in automation and digitalisation may be crucial for a sustainable increase in agricultural productivity and the future competitiveness of agricultural businesses. So far, the technical development has mainly been within crop management and milk production, while meat production still has a limited technical development. In fact, the entire meat supply chain is characterized by a low degree of digitization and automation. A digitalisation of the meat chain requires electronic identification of animals (e.g. RFID tags) to enable automated data collection, data management and decision support systems.

    The aim of this project activity was to investigate how a digitalisation of the meat chain could be designed and practically implemented in Sweden. Furthermore, the aim was to identify the drivers and barriers for increased digitalisation and automation of the meat supply chain as well as relevant actors’ needs and demands for information flow and data sharing. Finally, we aimed to identify what added values a digitalisation of the meat supply chain could provide in the form of increased efficiency, secure safer traceability and a more transparent production from farm to the consumer.

    The study was conducted during the period 2017 to 2019. Study visits in Denmark were made, as Denmark has implemented electronic ear tagging as a legal requirement and thus have experience from the development of digital systems in the meat chain. Study visits were also made in Sweden, to discuss the possibilities of digitalisation with various actors in the meat chain. In addition, an interview study was conducted with farmers, who today use electronic ear tags, to elucidate the areas of use and value added to Swedish farmers today. The study was concluded with a workshop, where the industry together with technology companies gathered to discuss opportunities, barriers and the need for a digital meat chain in Sweden.

    The results of this study showed that the Swedish meat industry generally is positive to an implementation of a digital meat supply chain. The advantages identified were that the digitalisation can be used to optimise production processes, increase food safety, increase data security and increase advisory and veterinary services. However, the industry is also aware of the initial cost a digitalisation will require due to investments in digital systems and various technical solutions, and this was considered a major barrier.

    In Sweden, the industry is well aware of the benefits that a digitalisation of the meat supply chain would entail, it is agreed that it is the future and that there is a need to digitize the meat supply chain from an efficiency and competition perspective. One barrier, however, is that it is generally preferred that the implementation will be voluntary, while some actors emphasise a need for quick transformation as a prolonged process increases costs and makes the transition to digital systems more difficult. Authorities and industry organisations need to take the initiative to demonstrate the need for a digitized meat supply chain and clearly take a position on the issue.

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    Lind et al 2020
  • 21.
    Lind, Ann-Kristina
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    Åkerfeldt, Magdalena
    SLU, Sweden.
    Enkel rengöring av foderrörför bättre arbetsmiljö och djurhälsa2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Important for the farm's profitability is to have good animal health and high production with cost-effective efforts. The project has practical value for both animal, owners and industry, as poor hygienic quality in the feed has repercussions on animal health and production. The use of liquid feeding system for pigs is common in Sweden, but there is very little experience of the consequences when feed residues remain in the pipes in liquid feeding systems that are not cleaned between production cycles. The aim of the present study was to get a first indication of the feed hygiene quality, pig health and growth, effectiveness of the cleaning and farmers work environment, by investigating the effect of cleaning of the discharge pipes in liquid feeding systems, with a special cleaning tool designed for the purpose.

    The experiment was performed at a commercial piglet herd in Sweden and a total of 473 growing pigs were included in the study. At weaning (five weeks of age), the litters were moved from the farrowing unit to a growing unit. Feed samples were collected at three times throughout the experimental period. Six un-cleaned and six cleaned discharge pipes were selected for visual assessment of the pipes and collecting of feed samples. All pigs were individually monitored for diseases and injuries by the staff every day and if measures were made in the pens, this was noted in a protocol. The pigs were weighed two times during the study period to register growth rate.

    Content of yeasts, enterobacteriaceae and moulds in the liquid feed from the mixer tank did not exceed the recommended threshold values but pH was higher than recommended threshold pH for liquid feed in the mixer tank as well as in all the feed samples collected from the pipes at the different sampling occasions. There was no significant difference in pH between un-cleaned and cleaned pipes (p=0.951) or between sampling occasions (p=0.246). Occurrence of yeasts, enterobacteriaceae and moulds (log cfu/g) did not differ between treatments or sampling occasions (p>0.245 for all). Enterobacteriaceae occurred in all samples ranging from 3.6-6.0 log cfu/g. The pigs in the pens with cleaned pipes had a slower daily growth compared with the pigs in the pens with un-cleaned pipes (p=0.011).

    The farmer could stand in an upright position during the entire time of cleaning procedure. According to the farmer, it was easy to use the cleaning tool and that it could not be possible to clean the feeding pipes with only an ordinary high-pressure washer.

    Poor feed hygienic quality can cause diarrhoea in pigs, which can result in slower growth rate. Disease spread in animals due to lack of hygiene reduces animal welfare and production capacity, resulting in additional work, longer rearing times and increased veterinary costs. Therefore, careful and regular cleaning of the stable is necessary for successful production. Cleaning the feed pipes in pig stables has the potential to improve animal health by improving the hygienic quality of the feed, but more research is required in the field, in order to be able to investigate the long-term effect in the entire herd of cleaning the pipes.

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  • 22.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Arbetsmiljö och säkerhet vid arbete runt verkstolen2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hoof trimming – work environment and safety around the trimming chuteA regular work task on dairy farms is hoof trimming, which is usually performed 2-3 times a year. Hoof trimming is time consuming, interrupts the daily work routine, and is often perceived as stressful by farmers. In Sweden, hoof trimming is commonly performed by a professional hoof trimmer who brings the trimming chute and other gear to the farm. Usually the farmer or an employee assists the hoof trimmer by moving cows to the trimming chute and also by fixating the cow’s legs in the chute.

    The aim of the study was to investigate Swedish hoof trimmers’ work environment and safety. Furthermore, the aim was to study work routines and the collaboration between the hoof trimmer and the person assisting on the farm. The results of the study will be used as a basis for improving the work environment and routines.

    The study included a literature review, a survey and a field study. The survey was sent to hoof trimmers and included questions on perceived work environment, injury risk, experienced work-related injuries, and working routines. The field study included four farm visits, where both the hoof trimmer and the person assisting on the farm were studied during hoof trimming. A questionnaire was used to estimate perceived strain, stress and energy levels throughout the day. Video recordings of the work around the trimming chute were used to assess working postures, routines and injury risks.

    The results showed that work injuries were common among the hoof trimmers. The most frequent sources of injury were the cows and the grinding machine. Injuries by the grinder were mainly cuts to fingers, hands and arms. Common injuries by cows were fractures from being kicked or crushed. For the assistant, the tasks related to a high injury risk was leading cows to the chute and attaching the rope around the cow’s legs when in the chute. Several hoof trimmers had also experienced musculoskeletal problems and the conclusion from the field study was that some working postures must be corrected to decrease work load and muscle strain. Sufficient knowledge in ergonomics is essential for the hoof trimmers to be able to improve their working postures during hoof trimming to prevent strain injuries.

    The study identified a need for improvements regarding the trimming chute, the grinder and the personal safety equipment. Furthermore, for hoof trimmers to find ways to lower the stress levels during their work may also be an important measure to decrease injury risks and improve the psychosocial work environment. Various advices regarding the safety and work environment during hoof trimming, aimed at both the hoof trimmer and the person assisting at the farm, is presented in the report.

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  • 23.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Klövverkning av nötkreatur - djurvänlig och säker hantering2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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    Klövverkning av nötkreatur 2017
  • 24.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Risk factors for occupational injuries during cattle handling on Swedish dairy farms2014Report (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Slaktsvins beteende i ekologisk produktion: en jämförelse mellan två system2003Report (Refereed)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 26.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Adolfsson, Niklas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    En olycka händer så lätt: exempel från jordbruk och ridskolor2008Report (Refereed)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 27.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Antonsson, Ann-Beth
    Östlund, Gabriella
    Vad krävs för att arbetsskadorna i lantbruket ska minska?2008Report (Refereed)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 28.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Benfalk, Christel
    Kisekka-Ndawula, Paulo
    Uppgård, Eva
    Branschriktlinjer för småskalig slakt och styckning av storboskap, gris och lamm2009Report (Refereed)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 29.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Bergman Bruhn, Åsa
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Ing-Marie
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Occupational Safety Climate in the Swedish Equine Sector2022In: Animals, E-ISSN 2076-2615, Vol. 12, no 4, article id 438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish equine sector is considered a high-risk work environment, with relatively high injury rates and high severity of injuries. General safety research has identified a correlation between the safety performance and safety culture, but little is known about the intricacies of the safety culture in the Swedish equine sector, especially concerning managers’ and employees’ perceptions of their work environment. The safety climate assessment is recognised as an effective tool for identifying potential problems in the workplace, thus enhancing safety behaviour and decreasing the frequency and severity of injuries. The aim was to evaluate the safety climate at riding schools and trotting stables through the Nordic Safety Climate Questionnaire (NOSACQ-50) diagnostic tool, and to get a better understanding of the workers’ perceptions regarding safety and safety management at their workplace through complementary interviews. The results showed that the safety climate was generally positive and that employees were aware of the risks relating to their work. Riding schools commonly had routines in place for risk assessment and work environment management, but such routines were often lacking at trotting stables, indicating inadequate prioritisation of safety by the management. The main area that should be targeted to improve safety in the sector is employees’ prioritisation and non-acceptance of risks. Proactive instead of reactive safety management should be promoted, where safety is an integral part of daily work and all employees are encouraged to identify factors contributing to occupational injuries and develop strategies for injury prevention. © 2022 by the authors.

  • 30.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Bergman Bruhn, Åsa
    University Dalarna, Sweden.
    Bendroth, Margareta
    Hushållningssällskapet Sjuhärad, Sweden.
    Andersson, Ing-Marie
    University Dalarna, Sweden.
    Improving work environment and safety within the Swedish equine sector through novel methods and tools2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work environment in horse stables is known to be characterized by low mechanization, high physical workloads and high injury risks. The Swedish Work Environment Authority has also reported a lack of knowledge in the systematic work environment management and risk assessments as well as shortcomings regarding work environment and work conditions in the Swedish equine sector. The aim of this study was to identify, adapt and implement methods and tools for systematic work environment management, with emphasis on characteristics to stimulate motivation and commitment at work, in order to improve the work environment in the sector. The study had a participatory action research approach, and were conducted at four workplaces, two riding schools and two trotting stables, in Sweden. The employees were guided to identify the challenges in their work environment, both physical and organizational, through a combination of methods including surveys, interviews and observations. A workshop with the employees was then organized to discuss and prioritize actions needed to improve the work environment based on the identified needs, resulting in an action plan. The project group were coaching the workplaces through the action phase, including e.g. support to managers in the systematic work environment management, changing working routines and equipment, improving work ergonomics, and improving communication and information with digital aids. Preliminary results indicate that this approach can help to create involvement and motivation and to provide valuable insights on how to improve health and safety. The project was funded by the Swedish-Norwegian Foundation for Equine Research.

  • 31. Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    Borchardt, Per
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut / Organisk kemi (Kmo).
    Lausmaa, Jukka
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut / Funktionella material (KMf).
    Xia, Wei
    Enqvist, H
    Studies of early growth mechanisms of hydroxyapatite on single crystalline rutile – a model system for bioactive surfaces2010In: Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, Vol. 21, p. 2743-2749Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Gustafsson, Mats
    Gilbertsson, Mikael
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Automatisk ströhantering för slaktsvin2008Report (Refereed)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 33.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Lind, Ann Kristina
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Wahlund, Lotten
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Hur optimeras provisoriska drivningssystem till fixeringsbox avseende säkerhet, effektivitet och djurvälfärd?2016Report (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 34.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Lind, Ann-Kristina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Arbetsolyckor vid mjölkning2017Report (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 35.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Lind, Ann-Kristina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Wahlund, Lotten
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Drivning av köttdjur till klövverkning2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to contribute to more extensive knowledge and understanding of the specific risks related to beef cattle handling when moving cattle to hoof trimming. Results obtained can be used to identify measures to increase safety and decrease injuries when handling beef cattle in potentially stressful situations.

    The moving of cattle to hoof trimming were studied on eight Swedish farms with beef production. Behavioural observations of handlers and animals were conducted, and the data was used to identify the type of interactions used to move the animals, the behaviour of the animals, interruptions in animal flow and any potential injury risks to handlers or animals. The animal handling to hoof trimming were studied from three perspectives: the handler, the animals and the handling facilities. The design of the handling facilities was reviewed on e.g. adequacy and safety using a checklist. Interviews were conducted with the farmers and included questions about perceived risks when moving the animals to hoof trimming, factors that impact risks and safety, how the handling facility functioned and possible improvements to ease handling or decrease risks.

    The farms had similar handling system designs during hoof trimming, with the trimming chute placed in a feed alley in the free-stall and waiting pen and transfer alley built of gates. No system was optimally designed based on basic principles of cattle behaviour, e.g. that cattle want to follow each other and go with the herd, that they want to return the way they came and want to see the person who handles them. Shortcomings in the handling systems, observed on several farms, where that transfer alleys and gates were not properly secured, inadequate width of single-filed transfer alleys and that the width of the alleys was not fixed (thus eventually became too wide), and lack of well-functioning solutions to prevent animals from backing out of the single-filed alley. A common problem was also slippery floors, causing animals to frequently slip and even fall during handling.

    The results show that the moving of beef cattle to hoof trimming can involve significant risks of the handler being run over, crushed or kicked. The magnitude of the injury risk associated with the handling depends on the behaviour of the handler and animals as well as the design of the handling system. Calm handling, avoiding putting stress on the animals, is fundamental. By designing the handling facility based on basic principles of cattle behaviour, interruptions in animal flow can be reduced and ease of handling can thereby be promoted. Several of the hazards observed on the farms were possible to prevent with limited efforts, for example by properly securing gates and transfer alleys and reducing the risk of slipping by keeping the floors clean from manure and cover the concrete floors with bedding material (e.g. wood shavings or straw). Many hazardous situations occurred when the animals were moved from the waiting pen to the transfer alley, and solutions to improve the facility design are needed to increase safety. Furthermore, there is a need to increase the farmers’ knowledge on how to attain a safe handling during hoof trimming.

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  • 36.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Lind, Ann-Kristina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Wistrand, Stefan
    Säker Arbetsmiljö Sverige, Sweden.
    Tjurar – en olycksfallsrisk i lösdriften2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There seem to be an increasing trend among Swedish dairy farmers to have bulls in the herd to facilitate estrous detection. However, a bull is involved with increased injury risk to the farmer and the employees, especially if the bull is housed with the dairy cows in the free stall. Of the fatalities in farms, where cattle were involved, an attack from a bull of dairy breed was the most common incident during a 7-year period.The aim of the study was to investigate how bulls are handled and housed on dairy farms, and also to get a deeper understanding of the frequency, character and underlying causes of bull-related incidents. Furthermore, the aim was to investigate the motives behind farmers’ decision to have bulls in the herd and their perception of the risks related to handling the bull.The results showed that farmers had strong arguments, both economical and job-saving, to why they chose to have a bull in the herd. Many used bulls only with the heifers, but it was also common to use the bull on cows where the artificial insemination (AI) was unsuccessful. The bull was seen as an opportunity to save costs for AI. Among the farmers in the study who chose not to have a bull, the injury risk was a major argument.Farmers considered the main injury risks related to handling of bulls to be ignorance by the handler and stressful situations. Other factors mentioned were deficiencies in management systems and routines and the fact that bulls are dangerous animals. It was 29% of farmers who had a bull in the herd, who stated that there had been a work related injury involving a bull on the farm. However, a majority of farmers assessed the injury risk related to bull handling as low.The results indicate that there were shortcomings in the routines for estrous detection in many of the farms. In the farms where the bull was housed in the free stall with the dairy cows, the majority lacked aids and written routine procedures for estrus detection. Some possible alternatives to improve fertility in the herd without the need of a bull are to implement routines for systematic estrus detection, to invest in estrous detection aids (e.g. activity monitors), training staff in estrous signals and to look over the barn environment, feed, etc. to make sure that these factors do not prevent the cows from showing heat. It would be interesting to evaluate these various options economically, to see which measures are the most cost effective.When deciding to have a bull in the dairy herd, it is important that interior fittings and handling systems are adapted to the size and strength of a bull, and that as much work as possible can be done with the handler having minimal contact with the bull. Furthermore, it is important that the working routines are clear and well thought-out for how to handle the bull safely during different working tasks. The results from the survey show that the majority of farmers had pronounced routines for handling of the bull, even though few had written routines. However, the results of the interviews indicate that the routines were insufficient, as they mainly involved not working alone with the bull and always to plan an escape route. For the routines to be applicable and efficient they need to be more specific and preferably describe step-by-step howdifferent work tasks should be carried out when the bull must be handled. This will ensure that all employees follow the same procedures so that the bull can learn and get used to the routines, which will increase safety.

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  • 37.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik. SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Peter
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Hagevoort, Gerald Robert
    New Mexico State University, USA.
    Lunner-Kolstrup, Christina
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Douphrate, David I.
    University of Texas, USA.
    Pinzke, Stefan
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Grandin, Temple
    Colorado State University, USA.
    Occupational Health and Safety Aspects of Animal Handling in Dairy Production2013In: Journal of Agromedicine, ISSN 1059-924X, E-ISSN 1545-0813, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 274-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Livestock handling in dairy production is associated with a number of health and safety issues. A large number of fatal and nonfatal injuries still occur when handling livestock. The many animal handling tasks on a dairy farm include moving cattle between different locations, vaccination, administration of medication, hoof care, artificial insemination, ear tagging, milking, and loading onto trucks. There are particular problems with bulls, which continue to cause considerable numbers of injuries and fatalities in dairy production. In order to reduce the number of injuries during animal handling on dairy farms, it is important to understand the key factors in human-animal interactions. These include handler attitudes and behavior, animal behavior, and fear in cows. Care when in close proximity to the animal is the key for safe handling, including knowledge of the flight zone, and use of the right types of tools and suitable restraint equipment. Thus, in order to create safe working conditions during livestock handling, it is important to provide handlers with adequate training and to establish sound safety management procedures on the farm.

  • 38.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik. SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Pinzke, Stefan
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Herlin, Anders
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Keeling, Linda J.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Human-animal interactions and safety during dairy cattle handling-Comparing moving cows to milking and hoof trimming2016In: Journal of Dairy Science, ISSN 0022-0302, E-ISSN 1525-3198, Vol. 99, no 3, p. 2131-2141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cattle handling is a dangerous activity on dairy farms, and cows are a major cause of injuries to livestock handlers. Even if dairy cows are generally tranquil and docile, when situations occur that they perceive or remember as aversive, they may become agitated and hazardous to handle. This study aimed to compare human-animal interactions, cow behavior, and handler safety when moving cows to daily milking and moving cows to more rarely occurring and possibly aversive hoof trimming. These processes were observed on 12 Swedish commercial dairy farms. The study included behavioral observations of handler and cows and cow heart rate recordings, as well as recording frequencies of situations and incidents related to an increased injury risk to the handler. At milking, cows were quite easily moved using few interactions. As expected, the cows showed no behavioral signs of stress, fear, or resistance and their heart rate only rose slightly from the baseline (i.e., the average heart rate during an undisturbed period before handling). Moving cows to hoof trimming involved more forceful and gentle interactions compared with moving cows to milking. Furthermore, the cows showed much higher frequencies of behaviors indicative of aversion and fear (e.g., freezing, balking, and resistance), as well as a higher increase in heart rate. The risk of injury to which handlers were exposed also increased when moving cows to hoof trimming rather than to routine milking. Some interactions (such as forceful tactile interactions with an object and pulling a neck strap or halter) appeared to be related to potentially dangerous incidents where the handler was being kicked, head-butted, or run over by a cow. In conclusion, moving cows to hoof trimming resulted in higher frequencies of behaviors indicating fear, more forceful interactions, and increased injury risks to the handler than moving cows to milking. Improving potentially stressful handling procedures (e.g., by better animal handling practices and preparation of cows to cope with such procedures) can increase handler safety, animal welfare, ease of handling, and efficiency.

  • 39.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik. SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Pinzke, Stefan
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Keeling, Linda Jane
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Peter
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    The effect of stress, attitudes and behavior on safety during animal handling in Swedish dairy farming2015In: Journal of Agricultural Safety and Health, ISSN 1074-7583, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 13-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Working with livestock is a hazardous activity, and animals have been found to be the most frequent injury source on dairy farms. Understanding the risk factors for injury and the causal relationships related to injuries and animal handling is important for developing prevention strategies and effective safety interventions. This study examined stress and handler attitude as possible risk factors for animal handling injuries in dairy farming, in particular when moving cows. Twelve dairy farms were visited on two occasions representing different stress levels: when cows were being moved to milking (low stress) and to hoof trimming (high stress). Behavioral observations of handlers and cows were performed, and questionnaires were completed on attitudes (risk acceptance, safety locus of control, and attitudes toward cows) and stress (perceived stress/energy level and job strain). The injury risks were found to be higher when moving cows to hoof trimming compared with moving cows to milking and gentle, moderately forceful, and forceful interactions were more frequently used. When moving cows to milking, observed risk situations were related only to the perceived energy level of the handler. When moving cows to hoof trimming, injury risks were correlated to job strain and time spent in the risk zone (defined as the area where the handler could be hit by the cow's head or hind legs). The time spent in the risk zone was positively correlated with job strain, age, and experience. Attitudes were not found to have significant impact on safety but were to some extent indirectly involved. These results suggest that the main focus in injury reduction work should be on reducing the time the handler spends in close proximity to animals during aversive procedures and on minimizing cow fear and stress by proper handling techniques and appropriate design of handling facilities.

  • 40.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Ringmar, Anders
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Adolfsson, Niklas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Barnolycksfall i jordbruket2009Report (Refereed)
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  • 41.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Sindhöj, Erik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Blad, M
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Berg, C
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Wallenbeck, A
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Controlled atmosphere stunning of pigs using nitrogen, argon and carbon dioxide in high-expansion foam.2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Sindhøj, Erik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Brattlund Hellgren, Rebecka
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Berg, Charlotte
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Wallenbeck, Anna
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Responses of Pigs to Stunning with Nitrogen Filled High-Expansion Foam2020In: Animals, E-ISSN 2076-2615, Vol. 10, no 12, p. 1-13, article id 2210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nitrogen gas (N2) delivered in high expansion foam in a closed container could be a feasible method for humanely stunning pigs. This study aimed to evaluate potential aversion in pigs to the N2 foam method and its effect on stun quality. Furthermore, the study aimed to assess potential aversion to the foam itself. Sixty pigs (27.8 ± 4.4 kg) were divided into three treatments and were exposed to either N2-filled foam, air-filled foam, or no foam air. The N2 foam was effective at purging the air from the container and quickly created stable anoxic conditions. The pigs did not show any strong aversive behaviours when exposed to foam. However, they seemed to avoid putting their heads and snouts into the foam when foam levels became high. Escape attempts through the lid also increased when the foam started covering their heads. The mean time to loss of posture was 57.9 s. Based on the results, stunning with the N2 foam technique could be a viable alternative to high concentration CO2 stunning and potentially lead to improved animal welfare at slaughter.

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  • 43.
    Lindgren, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Gunnarsson, Stefan
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Wiberg, Sofia
    Inälvsparasiter i betesmark och hos grisar i ekologiska besättningar2009Report (Refereed)
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  • 44.
    Lindgren, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Stabilisering av mark för bättre djurvälfärd och miljö2007Report (Refereed)
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  • 45.
    Lindgren, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Roepstorff, Allan
    Inälvsparasiter hos ekologiska smågrisar.2009Report (Refereed)
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  • 46.
    Lindgren, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Roepstorff, Allan
    Parasiter hos ekologiska slaktsvin och i jord på grisbeten och stallgödslad åkermark2005Report (Refereed)
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  • 47.
    Lindgren, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Ljungvall, O.
    Nilsson, O.
    Ljungstrom, B.-L.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Hoglund, J.
    Parascaris equorum in foals and in their environment on a Swedish stud farm, with notes on treatment failure of ivermectin2008In: Veterinary parasitology, ISSN 0304-4017, E-ISSN 1873-2550, Vol. 151, no 2-4, p. 337-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental contamination and the egg excretion pattern of the ascarid Parascaris equorum (Nematoda) was investigated in relation to anthelmintic treatment on a Swedish stud farm. Faecal samples from 15 foals, dewormed every 8th-week with a paste formulation of ivermectin at the standard dose rate of 0.2 mg/kg bodyweight, were collected at five sampling occasions between August and November 2006. In addition, soil samples were obtained from four paddocks used by these foals in November 2006. The number of eggs per gram (epg) was counted in both faeces and soil. Egg excretion started when the foals were 3-4 months, and reached the highest levels when they were approximately 5-month-old, and was then followed by a decline. Egg excretion seemed to be unaffected by ivermectin despite these foals were dewormed at regular intervals. In four out of five foals examined 10 days after treatment, epg actually increased. In contrast, when either fenbendazol or pyrantel embonate were used instead of ivermectin, treatments were effective. The number of eggs in soil was significantly higher in the permanent paddock compared to in the temporarily used soil paddock and in the summer paddocks. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 48.
    Rørvang, Maria
    et al.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Blad, Miranda
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Wallenbeck, Anna
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    An added aroma changes the behaviour of domestic pigs in a novel situation aimed for stunning2024In: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, ISSN 0168-1591, E-ISSN 1872-9045, Vol. 270, article id 106145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The currently most widespread stunning method for pigs is high concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2), but this method is under scrutiny due to animal welfare deficits. One alternative method currently under development with potential to replace CO2 is nitrogen (N2) filled high expansion foam. While N2 does not elicit the same aversive behaviour as CO2, it is currently not known if the high expansion foam itself may be frightening to the pigs. Means to alleviate fear reactions to foam could consist of diverting pigs’ attention using aromas (an odour in combination with taste) of interest to them. The current study aimed to investigate if an added aroma (vanilla aroma) affected pigs’ avoidance and exploratory behaviour when exposed to air-filled high expansion foam in a foam box. The study included 50 pigs (30 females, 20 males) of 14–16 weeks of age, of different crosses between Yorkshire, Hampshire and Duroc. The pigs were randomly assigned to either the treatment with air-filled foam with added aroma or the control treatment with no added aroma, which they were exposed to in a foam box. The results showed that pigs with the aromatised foam expressed significantly more exploration behaviour directed towards the foam and box walls, but not towards the floor or the lid. The aromatised foam also resulted in a higher activity level of the pigs. In contrast to the hypotheses, pigs with aromatised foam expressed more avoidance behaviour, and escape attempts were exclusively observed when pigs were exposed to aromatised foam. Slipping events and frequency of vocalisations did not differ between pigs with and without aroma added to the foam. This study shows that an added aroma (taste and odour in combination) increased pigs’ exploration behaviour towards the foam, and thus could serve as a distraction for the pigs when inside a confined foam box. The results emphasise the importance of taking foam aroma into consideration in the further development of the N2-filled high expansion as a stunning method. The potential anxiety- or stress-reducing effect of any added aroma needs further investigation, and future studies should focus on assessing various types of aromas, and/or odours, as well as different concentrations of the compounds to determine which solution is most efficient in alleviating pig stress and anxiety. 

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  • 49.
    Salomon, Eva
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Akerhielm, H.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Lindgren, Kristina
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Outdoor pig fattening at two Swedish organic farms-Spatial and temporal load of nutrients and potential environmental impact2007In: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, ISSN 0167-8809, E-ISSN 1873-2305, Vol. 121, no 4, p. 407-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, outdoor organic pig production is gaining interest. However, the excretory behaviour of pigs may create plant nutrient hotspots in outdoor areas, increasing the environmental impact. This study examined fluxes and balances of N, P, K, Cu and Zn at pen level, and determined the effects of the excretory behaviour of fattening pigs on nutrient load, manure distribution and N, P, K, Cu and Zn concentration in soil within pens at two farms with different outdoor systems (mobile and stationary). A pen in the mobile system had about 72 pigs ha-1 and in the stationary system about 91 pigs ha-1. The average pen balance in the mobile system was 270 kg N, 60 kg P, 110 kg K, 0.4 kg Cu and 1.3 kg Zn ha-1 and in the stationary system 205 kg N, 57 kg P, 99 kg K, 0.4 kg Cu and 1.5 kg Zn ha-1. The smaller net accumulation of nutrients in the stationary system was due to about 30% of excrement nutrients being excreted indoors. A substantial proportion of nutrients (43-95%) from one pig group was found to be concentrated in an area of arable land representing 4-24% of the total pen area. In the mobile system the major part of the defecating was deposited on the hut, feeding and drinking sub-areas. The manure mapping also revealed pig behaviour of avoiding defecation in certain zones. In the stationary system, the concentration of exchangeable P and K in soil (0-30 cm depth) in areas preferred for excretion was more than four-fold higher and the concentration of mineral-N (0-90 cm depth) was about eight-fold higher than in other areas of the pen by the end of the fattening period. Preferred areas for excretion within the pen were affected both by the present pig groups and by previous pig groups 4 years back in time. In the mobile system, the concentration of mineral-N in soil was about three-fold higher in preferred excretion areas compared with other areas. Neither of the two outdoor systems succeeded in avoiding excessive point loads of N within the pen. The flexibility of the mobile outdoor system has to be further improved so that no harmful point loads of nutrients can occur. In the stationary system, a nutrient management technique for collecting the manure on the preferred excretion areas on arable land needs to be developed. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 50.
    Salomon, Eva
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Benfalk, Christel
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Geng, Qiuqing
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Ekogrisar i hydda eller stall: så påverkas djur, bonde och miljö2005Report (Refereed)
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