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  • 1. Andersson, Gerd
    et al.
    Bullock, Adrian
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Nylander, Stina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Software and Systems Engineering Laboratory.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Sjölinder, Marie
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Waern, Annika
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Boman, Magnus
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Decisions, Networks and Analytics lab.
    Classifying Mobile Services2004Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A categorization of telecommunications services is presented, as a deliverable in a project commissioned by TeliaSonera.

  • 2. Belenguer, J. S.
    et al.
    Lundén, M
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Sundström, Petra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Immaterial materials: designing with radio2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Boman, Magnus
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Decisions, Networks and Analytics lab.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Espinoza, Fredrik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Cöster, Rickard
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Trust in Micro Service Environments2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Report produced in the project Enabling and Promoting Trust in Micro Service Environments (EPTMSE) with a web site at www.trust-eze.org. The report gives an overview of the concept of trust in domains such as psychology, sociology, philosophy, and computer science, and then describes the current domain of Micro Service Environments - open and unregulated electronic service environments - where users can create, use, and share electronic services, and where the need for decentralized trust mechanisms is high. Some design and implementation choices and solutions for trust mechanisms are suggested.

  • 4.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Isbister, Katherine
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Sundström, Petra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Understanding users and their situation2011In: Emotion-Oriented Systems: The Humaine Handbook, Springer , 2011, 10, p. 653-666Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first step in any design process is to set the stage for what to design and how that should be realised. In terms of user-centred design, this includes to develop a sense of who will be using the system, where it is intended to be used, and what it should be used for. In this chapter we provide an overview of this part of the development process, and its place in the design cycle, and some orienting design challenges that are specific to affective interaction. Thereafter we present a variety of methods that designers may want to consider in actual design work. We end by providing a set of examples from previous and ongoing research in the field, which could also work as inspirations or guiding sources in the early stages in a user-centred design process.

  • 5.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Isbister, Katherine
    Westerman, Steve
    Gardner, Peter
    Sutherland, Ed
    Vasalou, Asimina
    Sundström, Petra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Kaye, Joseph 'Jofish'
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Evaluation of Affective Interactive Applications2011In: Emotion-Oriented Systems: The Humaine Handbook, Springer , 2011, 10, p. 687-703Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods are developed for different audiences and purposes. HCI researchers develop methods to shape the future through pure, applied and blue sky research – as is still the case with most affective interactive applications. Unsurprisingly, practitioners will be more concerned that the methods they use not only are tractable but produce better and more innovative results in terms of the systems they ultimately release into the world. Researchers, on the other hand, may have other concerns, such as the novelty of their techniques. Up until recently, most HCI methods (both for researchers and practitioners) were developed for work applications and desktop situations. They focused on efficiency, learnability, transparency, control and other work-related values. They were developed in response to a theoretical orientation which viewed the user as an information processing system not so dissimilar to the computer itself. But now that HCI is concerned with technologies that enter all aspects of life, our methods have begun to change and will need to continue to change. In keeping with our changing conception of what a “user” is and a wider concern with their experience of use of new technologies, a key challenge will be to develop and expand methods for analyzing not just what people do with the technology but how it makes them feel, and not just how people understand technology but how they make sense of it as part of their lives. Methods must be concerned, not only with issues of usefulness and usability, but also with issues of aesthetics, expression, and emotion. In addition we need to focus on evaluating technology not just in the short term under controlled conditions but also in the longer term and in broader social and cultural contexts. In this section, we will therefore provide two strands of evaluation methods. The first concerns what we might see as more traditional usability evaluation: is my system usable for the purpose it was designed for? The second strand tries to get at what we have named “third wave of HCI” in the previous chapters: does my system provide for the kind of (emotional) experience that it aimed to do?

  • 6.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Svensson, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Waern, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Designing for Social Navigation of Food Recipes2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Svensson, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Waern, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Individual Differences in Social Navigation2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Sundström, Petra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Interactional Empowerment2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9. Isbister, Katherine
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Sharp, Michael
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    The Sensual Evaluation Instrument: Developing an Affective Evaluation Tool2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe the development and initial testing of a tool for self-assessment of affect while interacting with computer systems: the Sensual Evaluation Instrument. We discuss our research approach within the context of existing affective and HCI theory, and describe stages of evolution of the tool, and initial testing of its effectiveness.

  • 10. Isbister, Katherine
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Sundström, Petra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Generating Ideas and Building Prototypes2011In: Emotion-Oriented Systems: The Humaine Handbook, Springer , 2011, 6, p. 671-685Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design always involves the difficult step from seeing users and their activities to inventing something new that will make sense to them. In this chapter we turn to framing of the problem in such a way that the design process can start and the first prototypes can be constructed. Following a prototype-driven approach, we first provide a discussion of how to frame a problem, drawing on information gathered by methods presented in the previous chapter. We then show not only how to generate ideas for prototypes that would aid to validate a potential solution to that problem, but also methods to actually build and validate such prototypes. Finally, we discuss specific challenges related to affective interaction. The intention pursued with a prototype-driven approach is not to design a product, but a research vehicle for exploring a specific research idea. However, for one to say something of how successful a solution has been, a scenario for such prototype needs to be as realistic as possible, almost as if one was to design a product.

  • 11. Kaye, Joseph 'Jofish'
    et al.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Isbister, Katherine
    The Design and Evaluation Process2010In: Emotion-Oriented Systems: The Humaine Handbook, Springer , 2010, 8, p. 641-656Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this chapter is to describe the design and evaluation process in the light of affective interaction. With a starting point in user-centred design we will explore what additional problems or opportunities become important when designing for affective interaction with computer systems. This chapter also provides a historical background to HCI ending with what is sometimes named the third wave of HCI – that is, designing for aesthetic, emotional experiences with and through technology.

  • 12.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Explaining recommendations through user groups2000In: Proceedings of NordiCHI'2000: the First Nordic Conference on Computer Human Interaction, 23-25 Oct 2000, Stockholm, Sweden, 2000, 1Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Methods for evaluating a dramatic game2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes ongoing work on creating a dramatic gaming prototype. A specific problem is how to evaluate the game and the gaming experience as there are no existing methods specifically suited for this purpose. Two methods are presented that aim to capture different aspects of the players’ subjective experiences. One of the methods, the sensual evaluation instrument, is an experimental non-verbal method that attempts to capture players’ immediate emotional experiences. The other, Repertory Grid Technique, is a method for eliciting and evaluating people’s subjective experience of interacting with technology, used after the gaming session.

  • 14.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Methods for Evaluating a Dramatic Game: Capturing subjective enjoyment of dramatic experiences2006In: Technology-Mediated Narrative Environments for Learning, Rotterdam/Taipei: Sense Publishers , 2006, 1, p. 123-132Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Plot, Spectacle, and Experience: Contributions to the Design and Evaluation of Interactive Storytelling2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactive storytelling is a new form of storytelling emerging in the crossroads of many scholarly, artistic, and industrial traditions. In interactive stories the reader/spectator moves from being a receiver of a story to an active participant. By allowing participants to influence the progression and outcome of the story new experiences will arise. This thesis has worked on three aspects of interactive storytelling: plot, spectacle, and experience. The first aspect is concerned with finding methods for combining the linear structure of a story, with the freedom of action required for an interactive experience. Our contribution has focused on a method for avoiding unwanted plot twists by predicting the progression of a story and altering its course if such twists are detected. The second aspect is concerned with supporting the storytelling process at the level of spectacle. In Aristotelian terms, spectacle refers to the sensory display that meets the audience of a drama and is ultimately what causes the experience. Our contribution focuses on graphically making changing emotions and social relations, important elements of dramatic stories in our vision, salient to players at the level of spectacle. As a result we have broadened the view of what is important for interactive storytelling, as well as what makes characters believable. So far not very much research has been done on evaluating interactive stories. Experience, the third aspect, is concerned with finding qualitative methods for evaluating the experience of playing an interactive story. In particular we were interested in finding methods that could tell us something about how a players experience evolved over time, in addition to qualities such as agency that have been claimed to be characteristic for interactive stories. Our contribution consists of two methods that we have developed and adapted for the purposes of evaluating interactive stories that can provide such information. The methods have been evaluated on three different interactive storytelling type games.

  • 16.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Towards Socio-Emotionally Rich Interactive Narrative2003Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Bergmark, Niklas
    Hedlund, Erik
    Enhancing Believability using Affective Cinematography2003In: Intelligent Virtual Agents, 4th International Workshop, IVA 2003, Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Verlag , 2003, 1Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Boman, Magnus
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Decisions, Networks and Analytics lab.
    Anticipatory Guidance of Plot2003In: Anticipatory Behavior in Adaptive Learning Systems, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York: Springer Verlag , 2003, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Isbister, Katherine
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Using the sensual evaluation instrument2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our research we made use of an instrument previously developed to facilitate nonverbal self-report of emotion, which consists of 8 sculpted objects. We describe the use of this instrument in the assessment of three interactive storytelling experiences in a small user study, and draw some conclusions about the instrument’s effectiveness in supporting design.

  • 20.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Isbister, Katherine
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Using the Sensual Evaluation Instrument2009In: Journal of Digital Creativity, Vol. 3, p. 165-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our research we made use of an instrument previously developed to facilitate nonverbal self-report of emotion, which consists of eight sculpted objects. We describe the use of this instrument in the assessment of three interactive storytelling experiences in a small user study and draw some conclusions about the instrument's effectiveness in supporting design.

  • 21.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Persson, Per
    Palo, Carolina
    Evaluating Believability in an Interactive Narrative2001In: Intelligent Agent Technology - Research and Development, New Jersey, London, Singapore, Hong Kong: World Scientific , 2001, 1Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Lundén, Marcus
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Solsona Belenguer, Jordi
    Karlsson, Anna
    Jaensson, Tove
    The LEGA: a device for leaving and finding tactile traces2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes experiences from development and deployment of the Lega, a hand held device for physical sharing of experiences during an art exhibition. Touching and moving the device in different ways creates a tactile trace that can be experienced by others through their own device. The system was successfully deployed at an art exhibition for two months where user studies were performed. Here we present some general observations regarding the systems performance and discuss issues that we encountered.

  • 23.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Waern, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Talking to the Swedish chef: social interactions in recommender systems1999In: Proceedings of the 13th workshop on Behavior Planning for Life-Like Characters and Avatars, March 1999, Sitges, Spain, 1999, 1Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24. Lindström, Madlene
    et al.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Sundström, Petra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Combetto, Marco
    Taylor, Alex
    Breslin, Roberto
    Affective Diary - Designing for Bodily Expressiveness and Self-Reflection2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diary provides a useful means to express inner thoughts and record experiences of past events. In re-readings, it also provides a resource for reflection, allowing us to re-experience, brood over or even shed the thoughts and feelings we've associated with events or people. To expand on the ways in which we creatively engage in diary-keeping, we have designed an affective diary that captures some of the physical, bodily aspects of experiences and emotions--what we refer to as "affective body memorabilia". The affective diary assembles sensor data, captured from the user and uploaded via their mobile phone, to form an ambiguous, abstract colourful body shape. With a range of other materials from the mobile phone, such as text and MMS messages, photographs, etc., these shapes are made available to the user. Combining these materials, the diary is designed to invite reflection and to allow the user to piece together their own stories.

  • 25.
    Persson, Per
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Korhonen, Panu
    Galore, Janet
    Tierney, Mark
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Redmon, Chad
    Hemanus, Juha
    Lönnqvist, Peter
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Expressive messaging on mobile platforms2001Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents design requirements for expressive, avatar-based multi-modal messaging on mobile platforms. It is argued that expressive messaging needs to exploit context of peers, embodied appearance and behaviour, in combination with text. Our approach allows strong expressiveness and yet simple, on the fly message compositions required in a mobile, noisy setting. Technical challenges for a user ready prototype are sketched. It is argued that the context of usage between work-related stationary terminals and mobile ones is radically different.

  • 26.
    Persson, Per
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Korhonen, Panu
    Galore, Janet
    Tierney, Mark
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Redmon, Chad
    Hemánus, Juha
    Lönnqvist, Peter
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Expressive Messaging on Mobile Platforms2001Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a design for expressive multimodal messaging on mobile platforms. Strong context, simple text messages, and crude animations combine well to produce surprisingly expressive results.

  • 27.
    Persson, Per
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Lönnqvist, Peter
    Anthropomorphism: a multi-layered phenomenon2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Persson, Per
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Lönnqvist, Peter
    Understanding social intelligence2002In: Socially Intelligent Agents, Springer Publishers , 2002, 1, Vol. 3, p. 21-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Persson, Per
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Lönnqvist, Peter
    Understanding socially intelligent agents: a multilayered phenomenon2001In: IEEE transactions on systems, man and cybernetics. Part A. Systems and humans, ISSN 1083-4427, E-ISSN 1558-2426, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 349-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ultimate purpose with Socially Intelligent Agent (SIA) technology is not to simulate social intelligence per se, but to let an agent give an impression of social intelligence. Such user-centred SIA technology, must consider the everyday knowledge and expectations by which users make sense of real, fictive or artificial social beings. This folk-theoretical understanding of other social beings involves several, rather independent levels such as expectations on behaviour, expectations on primitive psychology, models of folk-psychology, understanding of traits, social roles and empathy. The framework presented here allows us to analyse and reconstruct users´ understanding of existing and future SIAs, as well as specifying the levels SIA technology models in order to achieve an impression of social intelligence.

  • 30.
    Rostami, Asreen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    The IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hook, Jonathan
    University of York, UK.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Taylor, Robyn
    Newcastle University, UK.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Spence, Jocelyn
    The University of Nottingham, UK.
    Williamson, Julie
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Design fiction for mixed-reality performances2017In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing for mixed-reality performances is challengingboth in terms of technology design, and in terms ofunderstanding the interplay between technology,narration, and (the outcomes of) audience interactions.This complexity also stems from the variety of roles inthe creative team often entailing technology designers,artists, directors, producers, set-designers andperformers. In this multidisciplinary, one-dayworkshop, we seek to bring together HCI scholars,designers, artists, and curators to explore the potentialprovided by Design Fiction as a method to generateideas for Mixed-Reality Performance (MRP) throughvarious archetypes including scripts, programs, andposters. By drawing attention to novel interactivetechnologies, such as bio-sensors and environmentalIoT, we seek to generate design fiction scenarioscapturing the aesthetic and interactive potential formixed-reality performances, as well as the challengesto gain access to audience members’ data – i.e.physiological states, daily routines, conversations, etc

  • 31.
    Simbelis, Vygandas
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Kosmack Vaara, Elsa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Repurposing Bits and Pieces of the Digital2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2016, p. 840-851Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Repurposing refers to a broad set of practices, such as recycling or upcycling, all aiming to make better use of or give new life to physical materials and artifacts. While these practices have an obvious interest regarding sustainability issues, they also bring about unique aesthetics and values that may inspire design beyond sustainability concerns. What if we can harness these qualities in digital materials? We introduce Delete by Haiku, an application that transforms old mobile text messages into haiku poems. We elaborate on how the principles of repurposing -- working on a low budget, introducing chance and combining the original values with the new ones -- can inform interaction design in evoking some of these aesthetic values. This approach changes our views on what constitutes "digital materials" and the opportunities they offer. We also connect recent debates concerning ownership of data with discussions in the arts on the "Death of the Author."

  • 32.
    Simbelis, Vygandas
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Kosmack Vaara, Elsa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Delete by Haiku: Poetry from Old SMS Messages2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2017, p. 460-460Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work draws on repurposing practices to inform design for deletion and handling of digital waste -- a way of letting go -- in graceful and aesthetically appealing ways.

    Delete by Haiku is a mobile phone application that explores how deleting old text messages can become an enjoyable and creative practice by turning messages into haiku poetry. Through the application users interactively repurpose selected old text messages on their mobile phone into a haiku poem aided by a haiku-generating algorithm. By repeatedly pinching the selected messages they break apart into words that tumble down in a Tetris like manner. Gradually words are deleted until the remaining words find their position and form a haiku.

    The video presents a walkthrough of how to interact with the application to select messages in various ways, how to apply "themes" to gain some control over the generation process, and eventually share created poems with others through social media.

  • 33.
    Sjölinder, Marie
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Jansson, Lisa
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Bergh, Cecilia
    Södersten, Per
    Zandian, Modjtaba
    User involvement of patients with eating disorder – the design process from user needs to prototype2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Ståhl, Anna
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Kosmack Vaara, Elsa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Being, bringing and bridging - Three aspects of sketching with nature2017In: DIS 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, 2017, p. 1309-1320Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We articulate and reflect on the use of nature as a physical sketching material. We have closely documented explorations of various organic and non-organic materials found during excursions in a local forest and how we used them as resources in sketching. This serves as an exemplar case of how sketching in interaction design can be grounded in empirical explorations of nature. We discuss three examples of sketching based on explorations and experiences with elements and objects from a forest. Processes and characteristics of phenomena in nature such falling leaves, melting and freezing of snow, and perennial growth allowed us to expand our design repertoire and sketching skills, especially as new forms of representations and interactions. Based on this we outline three aspects of how nature can be included in sketching processes: being in nature, bringing nature to the lab, and bridging nature and interaction design.

  • 35.
    Sundström, Petra
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Kosmack Vaara, Elsa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Solsona Belenguer, Jordi
    Wirström, Niklas
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Lundén, Marcus
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Waern, Annika
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Experiential Artifacts as a Design Method for Somaesthetic Service Development2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Svensson, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Waern, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Social Navigation of Food Recipes2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Svensson, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Waern, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    A Recipe Based On-line Food Store1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Svensson, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Waern, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    A Recipe Based On-line Food Store2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Tholander, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Nylander, Stina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Software and Systems Engineering Laboratory.
    Experiencing art through kinesthetic dialogue2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From the analysis of how the Lega, a touch, motion, and location sensitive device that allows museum visitors to share their experiences, we identified kinaesthetic dialogue as an orienting concept for the understanding and the design of movement-based social interaction and experiences. It provides an analytical lens which captures critical aspects of kinaesthetic action in aesthetic experiences, as well as for better understanding of how users appropriate such artefacts in interaction. We believe that kinaesthetic dialog is a promising candidate for a meta-concept to capture interaction design knowledge in movement based technologies.

  • 40.
    Waern, Annika
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Tierney, Mark
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Rudström, Åsa
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Decisions, Networks and Analytics lab.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    ConCall: An information service for researchers based on EdInfo1998Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present new types of web information services, where users and information brokers collaborate in creating a user-adaptive information service. Such services impose a novel task on information brokers: they become responsible for maintaining the inference strategies used in user modeling. In return, information brokers obtain more accurate information about user needs, since the adaptivity ensures that user profiles are kept up to date and consistent with what users actually prefer, not only what they say that they prefer. We illustrate the approach by an example application, in which conference calls are collected and distributed to interested readers.

  • 41.
    Waern, Annika
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Tierney, Mark
    Rudström, Åsa
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Decisions, Networks and Analytics lab.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Mård, Torben
    ConCall: Edited and Adaptive Information Filtering1999Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The information overflow problem is not simply one of information retrieval and information filtering: the user (reader) might also require aid in summarizing the retrieved information and judging its accuracy and quality. This shows that there is a clear role for the information broker, the human expert that gathers, structures, and evaluates information. Typically information-brokering services of today utilize a predefined classification schema for information. Readers can individualize the service by selecting from the predefined categories. This approach has many disadvantages. First, the individual readers must select between classes of information that may be orthogonal to their real interests. Second, they are forced to use the broker's classification not only for retrieval, but also for structuring the retrieved information. Third, it becomes impossible for readers to indicate that they are looking for types of information that are not covered by the service. Finally, as the information changes over time, the classification schema may have to change. In the EdInfo project [1] we have chosen a different approach. Editors, information brokers, readers, and information services may all use different classification schemas, and change them over time. Techniques from collaborative and intelligent filtering as well as information retrieval are used to create tools that allow services, brokers, and readers to communicate and synchronize their classification schemas.

  • 42.
    Waern, Annika
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Tierney, Mark
    Rudström, Åsa
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Decisions, Networks and Analytics lab.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Mård, Torben
    Digital Libraries: Information Broker Roles in Collaborative Filtering1998Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main goal of the EdInfo project [1] is to utilize human information brokers, or editors, as a resource in adaptive information systems. An information broker can be any of the following: The dedicated expert that collects and potentially reviews literature within a restricted area of interest; The journalist that produces articles with specific reader groups in mind; The librarian that organizes incoming information and directs readers to various sources; The professional information broker, that processes specific information requests, seeks for appropriate information sources, and produces summaries of the obtained information. The common characteristic of these roles is that the information broker has some kind of understanding of what his or her customers want, and is willing to adapt to these needs. Information brokers collect information from various sources, evaluate its relative importance and then choose whether to include the information as it is, disregard it, summarize it, or perhaps rewrite or illustrate it differently than in the original source.

1 - 42 of 42
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