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  • 1.
    Björn-Hansen, Aksel
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Maria
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Building Momentum: Scaling up Change in Community Organizations2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Addressing calls in Sustainable HCI to scale up our work in HCI targeting sustainability, and the current knowledge gap of how to do this practically, we here present a qualitative study of 10 sustainability-oriented community organizations that are working to scale up their change making. They are all loosely connected to a local Transition network, meaning that they are aiming at transforming current practices in society, through local and practical action, to meet challenges related to climate change. We wanted to know how they try to scale up their change making, and what role ICT plays in enabling scaling up. The study contributes new insights about three stages of scaling up, in which ICT plays different roles. We conclude with implications for HCI for how to support community organizations in scaling up, while keeping values important for working toward a more resilient society.

  • 2.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Håkansson, Maria
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Ljungblad, Sara
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    How do you Play with a Robotic Toy Animal? A long-term study of Pleo2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pleo is one of the more advanced interactive toys currently available for the home market, taking the form of a robotic dinosaur. We present an exploratory study of how it was interacted with and reflected upon in the homes of six families during 2 to 10 months. Our analysis emphasizes a discrepancy between the participants’ initial desires to borrow a Pleo and what they reported later on about their actual experiences. Further, the data suggests an apparent tension between participants expecting the robot to work as a ‘toy’ while making consistent comparisons with real pet animals. We end by discussing a series of implications for design of this category of toys, in order to better maintain interest and engagement over time.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 3. Gaye, Lalya
    et al.
    Håkansson, Maria
    Ljungblad, Sara
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Context Photography2007In: vague terrainArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Graves Petersen, Marianne
    et al.
    Ljungblad, Sara
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS. IDI.
    Håkansson, Maria
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS. IDI.
    Designing for Playful Photography2009In: New Review of Hypermedia and Multimedia, ISSN 1361-4568, E-ISSN 1740-7842, Vol. 15, p. 193-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper highlights the concept of playful photography as an emerging and important area for Human Computer Interaction (HCI) research, through bringing together three research projects investigating new ways of engaging with digital photography with theories related to playfulness and experience-centred design. Drawing upon this, we start to unpack playful photography and its characteristics. Instead of aiming for a unifying theory of photography related to experience-centred research, we take a reflective stance on our own research work. This is intended to encourage a critical discussion about playful photography, as well as support the on-going research in this area with a possible theoretical perspective.

  • 5.
    Håkansson, Maria
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS. IDI.
    On the move - sharing music, inspiration and fun2009In: Vodafone receiver magazineArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Håkansson, Maria
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS. IDI.
    Studying Mobile Music Sharing2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Håkansson, Maria
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Kovacs, Peter
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Thuvander, Liane
    Chalmers Univeristy of Technology, Sweden.
    SOL:AR: Beställarstöd för Solenergiinvesteringar genom avancerad visualisering2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The solar energy business has developed rapidly in Sweden in recent years, but so farmost companies and individuals have chosen to install solar cells on roofs. Anotherrelatively unexplored resource that we argue offer potential and where we see anemerging trend for various solar solutions, is building facades. In contexts where lackof space prevents building new or standalone solar energy installments, facades canstill be used for a range of purposes, e.g., generating renewable solar power and/orprovide space for shading devices and thereby reduced demand for cooling. In theSOL:AR project we have investigated how a future digital visualization tool could makeit easier for clients who are considering solar solutions, including categories ofproducts like solar cells, building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) and solar shading.How could a digital tool give a quick insight into e.g., the profitability of solar cells or asolar shading solution on a certain façade, and how would these look aesthetically? Along term aim in the project is to stimulate the development of facades as a resourcethat opens for new opportunities for solar solutions.Through interviewing potential target groups like property owners and other keyactors about their needs and requests regarding a digital tool, mapping out technicalpossibilities as well as legal and organizational aspects, we have investigated theprerequisites for such a tool. We have identified property owners as our primary targetgroup, and in particular medium-sized property owners with commercial buildings,although there seems to be an increasing interest in solar solutions also in tenantowners’ associations and apartment buildings. In total, at least 30 people fromproperty companies, trade organizations, solar energy companies, governmentalagencies, and urban planning offices have participated in our interviews andworkshops respectively and contributed their thoughts and needs about how a digitalvisualization tool could create value in the procurement of solar solutions for facades.The results from the study suggest that a digital visualization tool could create valuefor property owners if it triggers the interest for solar solutions early in a renovation-/rebuilding process; is easy to use for people regardless of role at the propertycompany or tenant owners’ association; can provide an idea of how a certain solarsolution would look along with an estimation of economic and environmental benefits(rather than exact calculations); can support the communication about solar solutionsbetween property owners and tenants; can be used “in the field” at a certain buildingas well as in the office; is owned by a neutral actor and is free of charge for propertyowners to use.Together with insights from the technical state-of-the art mapping and legal issues, wehave gathered these user-oriented insights in a list of requirements for a future tool. Toconclude the project, we conducted a workshop with invited actors from thevisualization and solar shading industry to secure the relevance of the technicalrequirement list and identify further important questions for a future developmentphase. Future challenges include identifying a neutral owner for the tool, identify areasonable payment model, as well as implementing the tool step-wise while waitingfor necessary technical advances in the area of augmented reality and 3D datarespectively.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Håkansson, Maria
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Rost, Mattias
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Gifts from friends and strangers: a study of mobile music sharing2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile technology has turned the traditionally collective activity of enjoying music into an often private one. New technologies such as wireless ad hoc networks have the potential to re-connect listeners who are now separated by headphones. We report on a field study of Push!Music, a novel mobile music sharing system . Push!Music allows both manual and automatic sharing of music between users through ad hoc wireless networking, and also provides a social awareness of other users nearby. The system was used by 13 subjects for three weeks. In post-study interviews, we identified four categories of results: social awareness, sharing music with friends, sharing music with strangers, and sharing automatically. Based on this, we present implications for design that can be applied not only to mobile music sharing systems, but to mobile media sharing in general: Allow division into active and passive use; enhance the awareness of who, where and when; support reciprocity; and finally, support identity and impression management.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Håkansson, Maria
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Rost, Mattias
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Facilitating Mobile Music Sharing and Social Interaction with Push!Music2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Push!Music is a novel mobile music listening and sharing system, where users automatically receive songs that have autonomously recommended themselves from nearby players depending on similar listening behaviour and music history. Push!Music also enables users to wirelessly send songs between each other as personal recommendations. We conducted a two-week preliminary user study of Push!Music, where a group of five friends used the application in their everyday life. We learned for example that the shared music in Push!Music became a start for social interaction and that received songs in general were highly appreciated and could be looked upon as ‘treats’.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Knowles, Brandin
    et al.
    Lancaster University, UK.
    Bates, Oliver
    Lancaster University, UK.
    Håkansson, Maria
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    This changes sustainable HCI2018In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More than a decade into Sustainable HCI (SHCI) research, the community is still struggling to converge on a shared understanding of sustainability and HCI's role in addressing it. We think this is largely a positive sign, reflective of maturity; yet, lacking a clear set of aims and metrics for sustainability continues to be the community's impediment to progressing, hence we seek to articulate a vision around which the community can productively coalesce. Drawing from recent SHCI publications, we identify commonalities that might form the basis of a shared understanding, and we show that this understanding closely aligns with the authoritative conception of a path to a sustainable future proffered by Naomi Klein in her book This Changes Everything. We elaborate a set of contributions that SHCI is already making that can be unified under Klein's narrative, and compare these categories of work to those found in past surveys of the field as evidence of substantive progress in SHCI.

  • 11.
    Ljungblad, Sara
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Håkansson, Maria
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Ubicomp challenges in collaborative scheduling: Pin&Play at the Göteborg film festival.2007In: Journal of Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, Special Issue on Ubiquitous Computing in the Real World, Vol. 11, p. 563-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ubicomp technology faces many technical challenges, which makes it difficult to test in real world situations. However, understanding and building for everyday practices is crucial for ubicomp designers, in order to push the technological development in the directions needed. We have developed and tested a ubiquitous computing prototype supporting collaborative scheduling. It is based on Pin&Play, a surface-based networking technology with interactive pushpins. The team of a local film festival was engaged in the development process, which resulted in a partial implementation illustrating how their current work practice could be supported. Drawing on this particular design case, we report findings and discuss challenges for ubicomp technology in general.

  • 12.
    Warneryd, Martin
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System setup and Service Innovation. Mälardalen University, Sweden; Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Maria
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Resources.
    Karltorp, Kersti
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System setup and Service Innovation. Jönköping International Business School, Sweden.
    Unpacking the complexity of community microgrids: A review of institutions’ roles for development of microgrids2020In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 121, article id 109690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community microgrids implemented in existing electricity grids can meet both development targets set out in the Paris agreement: 1. mitigate greenhouse gas emissions through increased implementation of renewable energy sources, and 2. to adapt to climate related disturbances and risk of catastrophes. Community microgrids are, however, complex to implement and institutional change is needed to reach their full potential. The purpose of this article is to review existing literature and analyze institutional developments influencing the growth of community microgrids. The literature describes a concentration of microgrid activities in specific regions: USA, EU, Asia and Australia. Varying reasons for implementing community microgrids were found in the different regions but similar institutional developments occurred, albeit with differing emphasis due to contextual specificities. Formal directions do however influence informal institutions even though their aims differ. Power utilities stand out as a critical actor and both formal and informal institutions put pressure on utilities to update their traditional business models. This article illustrates how informal and formal institutions play a significant role in the growth of community microgrids in existing electricity grids and provide interesting examples which can be utilized by policymakers. Microgrid development is still in a formative phase and further institutional change in the form of updated regulations is needed. © 2020 The Authors

1 - 12 of 12
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