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  • 1.
    Berglin, Mattias
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cavanagh, Jorunn Pauline
    Amicoat A/S, Norway; UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Caous, Josefin Seth
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Thakkar, Balmukund Sureshkumar
    Amicoat A/S, Norway.
    Vasquez, Jeddah Marie
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Stensen, Wenche
    UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Lyvén, Benny
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Svendsen, John-Sigurd
    Amicoat A/S, Norway; UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Svenson, Johan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production.
    Flexible and Biocompatible Antifouling Polyurethane Surfaces Incorporating Tethered Antimicrobial Peptides through Click Reactions2023In: Macromolecular Bioscience, ISSN 1616-5187, E-ISSN 1616-5195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficient, simple antibacterial materials to combat implant-associated infections are much in demand. Herein, the development of polyurethanes, both cross-linked thermoset and flexible and versatile thermoplastic, suitable for “click on demand” attachment of antibacterial compounds enabled via incorporation of an alkyne-containing diol monomer in the polymer backbone, is described. By employing different polyolic polytetrahydrofurans, isocyanates, and chain extenders, a robust and flexible material comparable to commercial thermoplastic polyurethane is prepared. A series of short synthetic antimicrobial peptides are designed, synthesized, and covalently attached in a single coupling step to generate a homogenous coating. The lead material is shown to be biocompatible and does not display any toxicity against either mouse fibroblasts or reconstructed human epidermis according to ISO and OECD guidelines. The repelling performance of the peptide-coated materials is illustrated against colonization and biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis on coated plastic films and finally, on coated commercial central venous catheters employing LIVE/DEAD staining, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and bacterial counts. This study presents the successful development of a versatile and scalable polyurethane with the potential for use in the medical field to reduce the impact of bacterial biofilms. 

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  • 2.
    Cahill, Patrick
    et al.
    Cawthron Institute, New Zealand.
    Grant, Thomas
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Rennison, David
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Champeau, Olivier
    Cawthron Institute, New Zealand.
    Boundy, Michael
    Cawthron Institute, New Zealand.
    Passfield, Emillie
    Cawthron Institute, New Zealand.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Brimble, Margaret
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Svenson, Johan
    Cawthron Institute, New Zealand.
    Nature-Inspired Peptide Antifouling Biocide: Coating Compatibility, Field Validation, and Environmental Stability2023In: ACS Applied Bio Materials, E-ISSN 2576-6422, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 2415-2425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reports the development of a class of eco-friendly antifouling biocides based on a cyclic dipeptide scaffold, 2,5-diketopiperazine (2,5-DKP). The lead compound cyclo(N-Bip-l-Arg-N-Bip-l-Arg) (1) was synthesized in gram amounts and used to assess the compatibility with an ablation/hydration coating, efficacy against biofouling, and biodegradation. Leaching of 1 from the coating into seawater was assessed via a rotating drum method, revealing relatively stable and predictable leaching rates under dynamic shear stress conditions (36.1 ± 19.7 to 25.2 ± 9.1 ng-1 cm-2 day-1) but low or no leaching under static conditions. The coatings were further analyzed using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), with 1 seen to localize at the surface of the coating in a surfactant-like fashion. When coatings were deployed in the ocean, detectable reductions in biofouling development were measured for up to 11 weeks. After this time, biofouling overwhelmed the performance of the coating, consistent with leaching kinetics. Biodegradation of 1 in seawater was assessed using theoretical oxygen demand and analytical quantification. Masking effects were observed at higher concentrations of 1 due to antimicrobial properties, but half-lives were calculated ranging from 13.4 to 16.2 days. The results can rationally inform future development toward commercial antifouling products. 

  • 3.
    Dahlström, Mia
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Material och ytteknik.
    Sjögren, Martin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Per R.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lindh, Liselott
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Arnebrant, Thomas
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Pinori, Emiliano
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Medicinteknik.
    Elwing, Hans
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Material och ytteknik.
    Affinity states of biocides determine bioavailability and release rates in marine paints2015In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 201-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A challenge for the next generation marine antifouling (AF) paints is to deliver minimum amounts of biocides to the environment. The candidate AF compound medetomidine is here shown to be released at very low concentrations, ie ng ml(-1) day(-1). Moreover, the release rate of medetomidine differs substantially depending on the formulation of the paint, while inhibition of barnacle settlement is independent of release to the ambient water, ie the paint with the lowest release rate was the most effective in impeding barnacle colonisation. This highlights the critical role of chemical interactions between biocide, paint carrier and the solid/aqueous interface for release rate and AF performance. The results are discussed in the light of differential affinity states of the biocide, predicting AF activity in terms of a high surface affinity and preserved bioavailability. This may offer a general framework for the design of low-release paint systems using biocides for protection against biofouling on marine surfaces.

  • 4.
    Fromell, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Yang, Yi
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Elwing, Hans
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Absence of conformational change in complement factor 3 and factor XII adsorbed to acrylate polymers is related to a high degree of polymer backbone flexibility2017In: Biointerphases, ISSN 1934-8630, E-ISSN 1559-4106, Vol. 12, no 2, article id 02D417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In previous investigations, the authors have examined the adsorption of albumin, immunoglobulin, and fibrinogen to a series of acrylate polymers with different backbone and side-group flexibility. The authors showed that protein adsorption to acrylates with high flexibility, such as poly(lauryl methacrylate) (PLMA), tends to preserve native conformation. In the present study, the authors have continued this work by examining the conformational changes that occur during the binding of complement factor 3 (C3) and coagulation factor XII (FXII). Native C3 adsorbed readily to all solid surfaces tested, including a series of acrylate surfaces of varying backbone flexibility. However, a monoclonal antibody recognizing a "hidden" epitope of C3 (only exposed during C3 activation or denaturation) bound to the C3 on the rigid acrylate surfaces or on polystyrene (also rigid), but not to C3 on the flexible PLMA, indicating that varying degrees of conformational change had occurred with binding to different surfaces. Similarly, FXII was activated only on the rigid poly(butyl methacrylate) surface, as assessed by the formation of FXIIa-antithrombin (AT) complexes; in contrast, it remained in its native form on the flexible PLMA surface. The authors also found that water wettability hysteresis, defined as the difference between the advancing and receding contact angles, was highest for the PLMA surface, indicating that a dynamic change in the interface polymer structure may help protect the adsorbed protein from conformational changes and denaturation.

  • 5. Gruner, MS
    et al.
    Szilvay, GR
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Lienemann, M
    Laaksonen, P
    Linder, MB
    Self-assembly of class II hydrophobins on polar surfaces2012In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 4293-4300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrophobins are structural proteins produced by filamentous fungi that are amphiphilic and function through self-assembling into structures such as membranes. They have diverse roles in the growth and development of fungi, for example in adhesion to substrates, for reducing surface tension to allow aerial growth, in forming protective coatings on spores and other structures. Hydrophobin membranes at the air-water interface and on hydrophobic solids are well studied, but understanding how hydrophobins can bind to a polar surface to make it more hydrophobic has remained unresolved. Here we have studied different class II hydrophobins for their ability to bind to polar surfaces that were immersed in buffer solution. We show here that the binding under some conditions results in a significant increase of water contact angle (WCA) on some surfaces. The highest contact angles were obtained on cationic surfaces where the hydrophobin HFBI has an average WCA of 62.6° at pH 9.0, HFBII an average of 69.0° at pH 8.0, and HFBIII had an average WCA of 61.9° at pH 8.0. The binding of the hydrophobins to the positively charged surface was shown to depend on both pH and ionic strength. The results are significant for understanding the mechanism for formation of structures such as the surface of mycelia or fungal spore coatings as well as for possible technical applications. .

  • 6.
    Herzberg, Moshe
    et al.
    Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles. Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Eliahu, Sarai
    Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.
    Bodin, Lovisa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Agrenius, Karin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Zlotkin, Amir
    DisperseBio Ltd, Israel.
    Svenson, Johan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Efficient prevention of marine biofilm formation employing a surface-grafted repellent marine peptide2021In: ACS Applied Bio Materials, E-ISSN 2576-6422, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 3360-3373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Creation of surfaces resistant to the formation of microbial biofilms via biomimicry has been heralded as a promising strategy to protect a range of different materials ranging from boat hulls to medical devices and surgical instruments. In our current study, we describe the successful transfer of a highly effective natural marine biofilm inhibitor to the 2D surface format. A series of cyclic peptides inspired by the natural equinatoxin II protein produced by Beadlet anemone (Actinia equine) have been evaluated for their ability to inhibit the formation of a mixed marine microbial consortium on polyamide reverse osmosis membranes. In solution, the peptides are shown to effectively inhibit settlement and biofilm formation in a nontoxic manner down to 1 nM concentrations. In addition, our study also illustrates how the peptides can be applied to disperse already established biofilms. Attachment of a hydrophobic palmitic acid tail generates a peptide suited for strong noncovalent surface interactions and allows the generation of stable noncovalent coatings. These adsorbed peptides remain attached to the surface at significant shear stress and also remain active, effectively preventing the biofilm formation over 24 h. Finally, the covalent attachment of the peptides to an acrylate surface was also evaluated and the prepared coatings display a remarkable ability to prevent surface colonization at surface loadings of 55 ng/cm2 over 48 h. The ability to retain the nontoxic antibiofilm activity, documented in solution, in the covalent 2D-format is unprecedented, and this natural peptide motif displays high potential in several material application areas.

  • 7. Hulander, M
    et al.
    Lundgren, A
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Ohrlander, M
    Lausmaa, Jukka
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Elwing, H
    Immune complement activation is attenuated by surface nanotopography2011In: International Journal of Nanomedicine, ISSN 1176-9114, E-ISSN 1178-2013, Vol. 6, p. 2653-2666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The immune complement (IC) is a cell-free protein cascade system, and the first part of the innate immune system to recognize foreign objects that enter the body. Elevated activation of the system from, for example, biomaterials or medical devices can result in both local and systemic adverse effects and eventually loss of function or rejection of the biomaterial. Here, the researchers have studied the effect of surface nanotopography on the activation of the IC system. By a simple nonlithographic process, gold nanoparticles with an average size of 58 nm were immobilized on a smooth gold substrate, creating surfaces where a nanostructure is introduced without changing the surface chemistry. The activation of the IC on smooth and nanostructured surfaces was viewed with fluorescence microscopy and quantified with quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring in human serum. Additionally, the ability of pre-adsorbed human immunoglobulin G (IgG) (a potent activator of the IC) to activate the IC after a change in surface hydrophobicity was studied. It was found that the activation of the IC was significantly attenuated on nanostructured surfaces with nearly a 50% reduction, even after pre-adsorption with IgG. An increase in surface hydrophobicity blunted this effect. The possible role of the curvature of the nanoparticles for the orientation of adsorbed IgG molecules, and how this can affect the subsequent activation of the IC, are discussed. The present findings are important for further understanding of how surface nanotopography affects complex protein adsorption, and for the future development of biomaterials and blood-contacting devices.

  • 8.
    Hulander, Mats
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Anders O.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Faxälv, Lars
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Palmquist, Anders
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Material och ytteknik. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Elwing, Hans B.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gradients in surface nanotopography used to study platelet adhesion and activation2013In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 110, no 1, p. 261-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gradients in surface nanotopography were prepared by adsorbing gold nanoparticles on smooth gold substrates using diffusion technique. Following a sintering procedure the particle binding chemistry was removed, and integration of the particles into the underlying gold substrate was achieved, leaving a nanostructured surface with uniform surface chemistry. After pre-adsorption of human fibrinogen, the effect of surface nanotopography on platelets was studied. The use of a gradient in nanotopography allowed for platelet adhesion and activation to be studied as a function of nanoparticle coverage on one single substrate. A peak in platelet adhesion was found at 23% nanoparticle surface coverage. The highest number of activated platelets was found on the smooth control part of the surface, and did not coincide with the number of adhered platelets. Activation correlated inversely with particle coverage, hence the lowest fraction of activated platelets was found at high particle coverage. Hydrophobization of the gradient surface lowered the total number of adhering cells, but not the ratio of activated cells. Little or no effect was seen on gradients with 36. nm particles, suggesting the existence of a lower limit for sensing of surface nano-roughness in platelets. These results demonstrate that parameters such as ratio between size and inter-particle distance can be more relevant for cell response than wettability on nanostructured surfaces. The minor effect of hydrophobicity, the generally reduced activation on nanostructured surfaces and the presence of a cut-off in activation of human platelets as a function of nanoparticle size could have implications for the design of future blood-contacting biomaterials.

  • 9.
    Karlsen, Eskil
    et al.
    Amicoat AS, Norway; Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Stensen, Wenche
    Amicoat AS, Norway: Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Juskewitz, Eric
    Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Svenson, Johan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Svendsen, John Sigurd
    Amicoat AS, Norway; Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Anti-colonization effect of au surfaces with self-assembled molecular monolayers functionalized with antimicrobial peptides on s. Epidermidis2021In: Antibiotics, ISSN 0066-4774, E-ISSN 2079-6382, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 1516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medical devices with an effective anti-colonization surface are important tools for com-batting healthcare-associated infections. Here, we investigated the anti-colonization efficacy of antimicrobial peptides covalently attached to a gold model surface. The gold surface was modified by a self-assembled polyethylene glycol monolayer with an acetylene terminus. The peptides were covalently connected to the surface through a copper-catalyzed [3 + 2] azide-acetylene coupling (CuAAC). The anti-colonization efficacy of the surfaces varied as a function of the antimicrobial activity of the peptides, and very effective surfaces could be prepared with a 6 log unit reduction in bacterial colonization. © 2021 by the authors. 

  • 10.
    Lindgren, J. Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Ytreberg, Erik
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Albin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Dahlström, Magnus
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Dahl, Peter
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Wrange, Anna-Lisa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Dahlström, Mia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Copper release rate needed to inhibit fouling on the west coast of Sweden and control of copper release using zinc oxide2018In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 453-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How zinc oxide influences copper release has been tested and the lowest release rate of copper from various combinations of copper and zinc in a paint matrix evaluated, whilst still deterring macrofouling, including barnacles and bryozoans. Copper (I) oxide was added to a generic AF paint in 0, 8.5, 11.7 or 16.3 wt% copper oxide in combination with 0, 10 or 20 wt% zinc oxide and applied on PMMA panels. The results show that zinc influences the release rate of copper. When 10 and 20 wt% zinc was added, the total amount of copper released significantly increased by on average 32 and 47% respectively. All treatments that included copper were successful in deterring macrofouling, including the treatment with the lowest average Cu release rate, ie 4.68 μg cm−2 day−1. 

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  • 11.
    Lundgren, Anders
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Munktell, Sara
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lacey, Matthew
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Material och ytteknik. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Björefors, Fredrik
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Formation of gold nanoparticle size and density gradients via bipolar electrochemistry2016In: ChemElectroChem, E-ISSN 2196-0216, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 378-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bipolar electrochemistry is employed to demonstrate the formation of gold nanoparticle size gradients on planar surfaces. By controlling the electric field in a HAuCl4-containing electrolyte, gold was reduced onto 10nm diameter particles immobilized on pre-modified thiolated bipolar electrode (BPE) templates, resulting in larger particles towards the more cathodic direction. As the gold deposition was the dominating cathodic reaction, the increased size of the nanoparticles also reflected the current distribution on the bipolar electrode. The size gradients were also combined with a second gradient-forming technique to establish nanoparticle surfaces with orthogonal size and density gradients, resulting in a wide range of combinations of small/large and few/many particles on a single bipolar electrode. Such surfaces are valuable in, for example, cell-material interaction and combinatorial studies, where a large number of conditions are probed simultaneously.

  • 12.
    Lundgren, Anders O.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hulander, Mats
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Brorsson, Joakim
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Malte
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Elwing, Hans B.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Olof
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Material och ytteknik. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gold-nanoparticle-assisted self-assembly of chemical gradients with tunable sub-50 nm molecular domains2014In: Particle & particle systems characterization, ISSN 0934-0866, E-ISSN 1521-4117, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 209-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simple and efficient principle for nanopatterning with wide applicability in the sub-50 nanometer regime is chemisorption of nanoparticles; at homogeneous substrates, particles carrying surface charge may spontaneously self-organize due to the electrostatic repulsion between adjacent particles. Guided by this principle, a method is presented to design, self-assemble, and chemically functionalize gradient nanopatterns where the size of molecular domains can be tuned to match the level corresponding to single protein binding events. To modulate the binding of negatively charged gold nanoparticles both locally (<100 nm) and globally (>100 μm) onto a single modified gold substrate, ion diffusion is used to achieve spatial control of the particles' mutual electrostatic interactions. By subsequent tailoring of different molecules to surface-immobilized particles and the void areas surrounding them, nanopatterns are obtained with variable chemical domains along the gradient surface. Fimbriated Escherichia coli bacteria are bound to gradient nanopatterns with similar molecular composition and macroscopic contact angle, but different sizes of nanoscopic presentation of adhesive (hydrophobic) and repellent poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) domains. It is shown that small hydrophobic domains, similar in size to the diameter of the bacterial fimbriae, supported firmly attached bacteria resembling catch-bond binding, whereas a high number of loosely adhered bacteria are observed on larger hydrophobic domains. Chemical gradients with the resolution needed to address complex biological binding events at the single protein level are prepared using surface-deposited gold nanoparticles as a versatile template for orthogonal chemicalmodifications. The effect of hydrophobic domain arrangement on the sub-50 nm scale is shown to influence binding of fimbriae carrying E. coli bacteria. 

  • 13.
    Nyman, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Lacintra, Michael G.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Westman, Johan O.
    University of Borås, Sweden; Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Material och ytteknik.
    Lundin, Magnus
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Pellet formation of zygomycetes and immobilization of yeast2013In: New Biotechnology, ISSN 1871-6784, E-ISSN 1876-4347, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 516-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pelleted growth provides many advantages for filamentous fungi, including decreased broth viscosity, improved aeration, stirring, and heat transfer. Thus, the factors influencing the probability of pellet formation of Rhizopus sp. in a defined medium was investigated using a multifactorial experimental design. Temperature, agitation intensity, Ca2+-concentration, pH, and solid cellulose particles, each had a significant effect on pelletization. Tween 80, spore concentration, and liquid volume were not found to have a significant effect. All of the effects were additive; no interactions were significant. The results were used to create a simple defined medium inducing pelletization, which was used for immobilization of a flocculating strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the zygomycetes pellets. A flor-forming S. cerevisiae strain was also immobilized, while a non-flocculating strain colonized the pellets but was not immobilized. No adverse effects were detected as a result of the close proximity between the filamentous fungus and the yeast, which potentially allows for co-fermentation with S. cerevisiae immobilized in pellets of zygomycetes.

  • 14.
    Pansch, Christian
    et al.
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Germany; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Per R.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Pinori, Emiliano
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Wrange, Anna-Lisa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    A new flow-through bioassay for testing low-emission antifouling coatings2017In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 33, no 8, p. 613-623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current antifouling (AF) technologies are based on the continuous release of biocides into the water, and consequently discharge into the environment. Major efforts to develop more environmentally friendly coatings require efficient testing in laboratory assays, followed by field studies. Barnacles are important fouling organisms worldwide, increasing hydrodynamic drag on ships and damaging coatings on underwater surfaces, and thus are extensively used as models in AF research, mostly in static, laboratory-based systems. Reliable flow-through test assays for the screening of biocide-containing AF paints, however, are rare. Herein, a flow-through bioassay was developed to screen for diverse low-release biocide paints, and to evaluate their effects on pre- and post-settlement traits in barnacles. The assay distinguishes between the effects from direct surface contact and bulk-water effects, which are crucial when developing low-emission AF coatings. This flow-through bioassay adds a new tool for rapid laboratory-based first-stage screening of candidate compounds and novel AF formulations.

  • 15.
    Pinori, Emiliano
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Medicinteknik. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Elwing, Hans B.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Material och ytteknik. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The impact of coating hardness on the anti-barnacle efficacy of an embedded antifouling biocide2013In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 763-773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The efficacy of antifouling coatings designed to minimise the release of biocide, either by embedded (non-covalent) or tethered (covalently bonded) biocides, relies on sufficient bioavailability of the active compound upon contact between the organism and the coating. This investigation is focused on whether coating hardness affects the efficacy of embedded coating systems. Two experimental, non-eroding and waterborne latex paint formulations composed mainly of polystyrene (PS) or polyvinyl versatate (PV) were chosen for their difference in mechanical properties measured in terms of Buchholz indentation resistance. Ivermectin was added to both formulations to a final concentration of 0.1% (w/v) and the steady state release rate was measured according to ISO 15181 at between 34 and 70 ng cm-2 day-1 for both formulations. Field trials conducted over 3 months showed significant differences in anti-barnacle efficacy between the formulations despite their similar release profiles. The softer PV coating showed complete anti-barnacle efficacy, ie no barnacles were detected, while the harder PS coating showed no efficacy against barnacle colonisation during the same time period. The results indicate a new antifouling strategy whereby a route of intoxication is triggered by the organism itself upon interaction with the coating and its embedded biocide. This finding opens new possibilities in controlling macrofouling by low emission antifouling coatings.

  • 16.
    Rosendahl, Jennifer
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Svanström, Andreas
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Petronis, Sarunas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Bogestål, Yalda
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Stenlund, Patrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Standoft, Simon
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Ståhlberg, Anders
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Landberg, Göran
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Joakim
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    3D Printed Nanocellulose Scaffolds as a Cancer Cell Culture Model System2021In: Bioengineering, E-ISSN 2306-5354, Vol. 8, no 7, article id 97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current conventional cancer drug screening models based on two-dimensional (2D) cell culture have several flaws and there is a large need of more in vivo mimicking preclinical drug screening platforms. The microenvironment is crucial for the cells to adapt relevant in vivo characteristics and here we introduce a new cell culture system based on three-dimensional (3D) printed scaffolds using cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) pre-treated with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpyperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) as the structural material component. Breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231, were cultured in 3D TEMPO-CNF scaffolds and were shown by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and histochemistry to grow in multiple layers as a heterogenous cell population with different morphologies, contrasting 2D cultured mono-layered cells with a morphologically homogenous cell population. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that 3D TEMPO-CNF scaffolds induced elevation of the stemness marker CD44 and the migration markers VIM and SNAI1 in MCF7 cells relative to 2D control. T47D cells confirmed the increased level of the stemness marker CD44 and migration marker VIM which was further supported by increased capacity of holoclone formation for 3D cultured cells. Therefore, TEMPO-CNF was shown to represent a promising material for 3D cell culture model systems for cancer cell applications such as drug screening.

  • 17.
    Stenlund, Patrik
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Enstedt, Linnea
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Chemical Process and Pharmaceutical Development.
    Gilljam, Karin
    Regenics AS, Norway.
    Standoft, Simon
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Ahlinder, Astrid
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lundin Johnson, Maria
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Lund, Henrik
    Regenics AS, Norway.
    Millqvist-Fureby, Anna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Chemical Process and Pharmaceutical Development.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Development of an All-Marine 3D Printed Bioactive Hydrogel Dressing for Treatment of Hard-to-Heal Wounds2023In: Polymers, E-ISSN 2073-4360, Vol. 15, no 12, article id 2627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current standard wound care involves dressings that provide moisture and protection; however, dressings providing active healing are still scarce and expensive. We aimed to develop an ecologically sustainable 3D printed bioactive hydrogel-based topical wound dressing targeting healing of hard-to-heal wounds, such as chronic or burn wounds, which are low on exudate. To this end, we developed a formulation composed of renewable marine components; purified extract from unfertilized salmon roe (heat-treated X, HTX), alginate from brown seaweed, and nanocellulose from tunicates. HTX is believed to facilitate the wound healing process. The components were successfully formulated into a 3D printable ink that was used to create a hydrogel lattice structure. The 3D printed hydrogel showed a HTX release profile enhancing pro-collagen I alpha 1 production in cell culture with potential of promoting wound closure rates. The dressing has recently been tested on burn wounds in Göttingen minipigs and shows accelerated wound closure and reduced inflammation. This paper describes the dressings development, mechanical properties, bioactivity, and safety. 

  • 18.
    Svanström, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rosendahl, Jennifer
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Salerno, Simona
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Leiva, Maria
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gregersson, Pernilla
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Bogestål, Yalda
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Lausmaa, Jukka
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Oko, Asaf
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Petronis, Sarunas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Standoft, Simon
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Ståhlberg, Anders
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Joakim
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Landberg, Göran
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Optimized alginate-based 3D printed scaffolds as a model of patient derived breast cancer microenvironments in drug discovery2021In: Biomedical Materials, ISSN 1748-6041, E-ISSN 1748-605X, Vol. 16, no 4, article id 045046Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cancer microenvironment influences tumor progression and metastasis and is pivotal to consider when designing in vivo-like cancer models. Current preclinical testing platforms for cancer drug development are mainly limited to 2D cell culture systems that poorly mimic physiological environments and traditional, low throughput animal models. The aim of this work was to produce a tunable testing platform based on 3D printed scaffolds (3DPS) with a simple geometry that, by extracellular components and response of breast cancer reporter cells, mimics patient-derived scaffolds (PDS) of breast cancer. Here, the biocompatible polysaccharide alginate was used as base material to generate scaffolds consisting of a 3D grid containing periostin and hydroxyapatite. Breast cancer cell lines (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231) produced similar phenotypes and gene expression levels of cancer stem cell, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, differentiation and proliferation markers when cultured on 3DPS and PDS, contrasting conventional 2D cultures. Importantly, cells cultured on 3DPS and PDS showed scaffold-specific responses to cytotoxic drugs (doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil) that were different from 2D cultured cells. In conclusion, the data presented support the use of a tunable alginate-based 3DPS as a tumor model in breast cancer drug discovery. © 2021 The Author(s).

  • 19. Trepos, R
    et al.
    Pinori, Emiliano
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor.
    Jonsson, P R
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor.
    Svenson, Johan
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor.
    Coutinho, R
    Innovative approaches for the development of new copper-free marine antifouling paints2014In: Journal of Ship and Ocean Technology, ISSN 1226-5594, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 7-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Védie, Elora
    et al.
    University de Toulon, France.
    Barry-Martinet, Raphaelle
    University de Toulon, France.
    Senez, Vincent
    University Lille, France.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Stenlund, Patrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Brisset, Hughes
    Université de Toulon, France.
    Bressy, Christine
    Université de Toulon, France.
    Briand, J-F
    Université de Toulon, France.
    Influence of Sharklet-Inspired Micropatterned Polymers on Spatio-Temporal Variations of Marine Biofouling2022In: Macromolecular Bioscience, ISSN 1616-5187, E-ISSN 1616-5195, Vol. 22, no 11, article id 2200304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to show the influence of surface characteristics (microtopography, chemistry, mechanical properties) and seawater parameters on the settlement of marine micro- and macroorganisms. Polymers with nine microtopographies, three distinct mechanical properties, and wetting characteristics are immersed for one month into two contrasting coastal sites (Toulon and Kristineberg Center) and seasons (Winter and Summer). Influence of microtopography and chemistry on wetting is assessed through static contact angle and captive air bubble measurements over 3-weeks immersion in artificial seawater. Microscopic analysis, quantitative flow cytometry, metabarcoding based on the ribulose biphosphate carboxylase (rbcL) gene amplification, and sequencing are performed to characterize the settled microorganisms. Quantification of macrofoulers is done by evaluating the surface coverage and the type of organism. It is found that for long static in situ immersion, mechanical properties and non-evolutive wettability have no major influence on both abundance and diversity of biofouling assemblages, regardless of the type of organisms. The apparent contradiction with previous results, based on model organisms, may be due to the huge diversity of marine environments, both in terms of taxa and their size. Evolutive wetting properties with wetting switching back and forth over time have shown to strongly reduce the colonization by macrofoulers. © 2022 The Authors. 

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