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  • 1.
    Attias, Noam
    et al.
    Israel Institute of Technology, Israel.
    Reid, Michael
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Mijowska, Sylwia
    Israel Institute of Technology, Israel.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Marcus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Pokroy, Boaz
    Israel Institute of Technology, Israel.
    Grobman, Yasha
    Israel Institute of Technology, Israel.
    Abitbol, Tiffany
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Biofabrication of Nanocellulose–Mycelium Hybrid Materials2021In: Advanced Sustainable Systems, ISSN 2366-7486, Vol. 5, no 2, article id 2000196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthy material alternatives based on renewable resources and sustainable technologies have the potential to disrupt the environmentally damaging production and consumption practices established throughout the modern industrial era. In this study, a mycelium–nanocellulose biocomposite with hybrid properties is produced by the agitated liquid culture of a white-rot fungus (Trametes ochracea) with nanocellulose (NC) comprised as part of the culture media. Mycelial development proceeds via the formation of pellets, where NC is enriched in the pellets and depleted from the surrounding liquid media. Micrometer-scale NC elements become engulfed in mycelium, whereas it is hypothesized that the nanometer-scale fraction becomes integrated within the hyphal cell wall, such that all NC in the system is essentially surface-modified by mycelium. The NC confers mechanical strength to films processed from the biocomposite, whereas the mycelium screens typical cellulose–water interactions, giving fibrous slurries that dewater faster and films that exhibit significantly improved wet resistance in comparison to pure NC films. The mycelium–nanocellulose biocomposites are processable in the ways familiar to papermaking and are suggested for diverse applications, including packaging, filtration, and hygiene products.

  • 2.
    Claesson, Per M.
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Li, Gen
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    He, Yunjian
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Huang, Hui
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Thorén, Per-Anders
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Haviland, David B.
    From force curves to surface nanomechanical properties2017In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 19, no 35, p. 23642-23657Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface science, which spans the fields of chemistry, physics, biology and materials science, requires information to be obtained on the local properties and property variations across a surface. This has resulted in the development of different scanning probe methods that allow the measurement of local chemical composition and local electrical and mechanical properties. These techniques have led to rapid advancement in fundamental science with applications in areas such as composite materials, corrosion protection and wear resistance. In this perspective article, we focussed on the branch of scanning probe methods that allows the determination of surface nanomechanical properties. We discussed some different AFM-based modes that were used for these measurements and provided illustrative examples of the type of information that could be obtained. We also discussed some of the difficulties encountered during such studies.

  • 3.
    Demidova, S. I.
    et al.
    Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Russia.
    Whitehouse, M. J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Merle, R.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nemchin, A. A.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden; Curtin University, Australia.
    Kenny, G. G.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Brandstätter, F.
    Natural History Museum, Austria.
    Ntaflos, T.
    Vienna University, Austria.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    A micrometeorite from a stony asteroid identified in Luna 16 soil2022In: Nature Astronomy, E-ISSN 2397-3366, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 560-567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the intense cratering history of the Moon, very few traces of meteoritic material have been identified in the more than 380 kg of samples returned to Earth by the Apollo and Luna missions. Here we show that an ~200-µm-sized fragment collected by the Luna 16 mission has extra-lunar origins and probably originates from an LL chondrite with similar properties to near-Earth stony asteroids. The fragment has not experienced temperatures higher than 400 °C since its protolith formed early in the history of the Solar System. It arrived on the Moon, either as a micrometeorite or as the result of the break-up of a bigger impact, no earlier than 3.4 Gyr ago and possibly around 1 Gyr ago, an age that would be consistent with impact ages inferred from basaltic fragments in the Luna 16 sample and of a known dynamic upheaval in the Flora asteroid family, which is thought to be the source of L and LL chondrite meteorites. These results highlight the importance of extra-lunar fragments in constraining the impact history of the Earth–Moon system and suggest that material from LL chondrite asteroids may be an important component. © 2022, The Author(s)

  • 4.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Cortes Ruiz, Maria
    City College of New York, US.
    Zhang, Xuwei
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Dedinaite, Andra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Wieland, Floria
    Institute for Materials Research, Germany.
    Winnik, Francoise
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Claesson, Per M
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Thermoresponsive Pentablock Copolymer on Silica: Temperature Effects on Adsorption, Surface Forces, and Friction2019In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 653-661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adsorption of hydrophilic or amphiphilic multiblock copolymers provides a powerful means to produce well-defined "smart" surfaces, especially if one or several blocks are sensitive to external stimuli. We focus here on an A-B-A-B-A copolymer, where A is a cationic poly((3-acrylamido-propyl)-trimethylammonium chloride) (PAMPTMA) block containing 15 (end blocks) or 30 (middle block) repeat units and B is a neutral thermosensitive water-soluble poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline) (PIPOZ) block with 50 repeat units. X-ray reflectivity and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring were employed to study the adsorption of PAMPTMA15-PIPOZ50-PAMPTMA30-PIPOZ50-PAMPTMA15 on silica surfaces. The latter technique was employed at different temperatures up to 50 °C. Surface forces and friction between the two silica surfaces across aqueous pentablock copolymer solutions at different temperatures were determined with the atomic force microscopy colloidal probe force and friction measurements. The cationic pentablock copolymer was found to have a high affinity to the negatively charged silica surface, leading to a thin (2 nm) and rigid adsorbed layer. A steric force was encountered at a separation of around 3 nm from hard wall contact. A capillary condensation of a polymer-rich phase was observed at the cloud point of the solution. The friction forces were evaluated using Amontons' rule modified with an adhesion term.

  • 5.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Montanari, Celine
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Bhattacharjya, DHRUBAJYOTI
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Aydin, Juhanes
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Ahniyaz, Anwar
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Bio-Based Binder Development for Lithium-Ion Batteries.2023In: Materials, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 16, no 16, article id 5553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of rechargeable lithium-ion battery (LIB) technology has facilitated the shift toward electric vehicles and grid storage solutions. This technology is currently undergoing significant development to meet industrial applications for portable electronics and provide our society with "greener" electricity. The large increase in LIB production following the growing demand from the automotive sector has led to the establishment of gigafactories worldwide, thus increasing the substantial consumption of fossil-based and non-sustainable materials, such as polyvinylidene fluoride and/or styrene-butadiene rubber as binders in cathode and anode formulations. Furthermore, the use of raw resources, such as Li, Ni, and Mn in cathode active materials and graphite and nanosilicon in anodes, necessitates further efforts to enhance battery efficiency. To foster a global sustainable transition in LIB manufacturing and reduce reliance on non-sustainable materials, the implementation of bio-based binder solutions for electrodes in LIBs is crucial. Bio-based binders such as cellulose, lignin, alginate, gums, starch, and others can address environmental concerns and can enhance LIBs' performance. This review aims to provide an overview of the current progress in the development and application of bio-based binders for LIB electrode manufacturing, highlighting their significance toward sustainable development.

  • 6.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Steponaviciu Te, Medeina
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Klimkevicius, Vaidas
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Makuska, Ričardas
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Dedinaite, Andra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Liu, Xiaoyan
    Shaanxi Normal University, China.
    Corkery, Robert W
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Bioinspired Adhesion Polymers: Wear Resistance of Adsorption Layers.2019In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 35, no 48, p. 15515-15525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mussel adhesive polymers owe their ability to strongly bind to a large variety of surfaces under water to their high content of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA) groups and high positive charge. In this work, we use a set of statistical copolymers that contain medium-length poly(ethylene oxide) side chains that are anchored to the surface in three different ways: by means of (i) electrostatic forces, (ii) catechol groups (as in DOPA), and (iii) the combination of electrostatic forces and catechol groups. A nanotribological scanning probe method was utilized to evaluate the wear resistance of the formed layers as a function of normal load. It was found that the combined measurement of surface topography and stiffness provided an accurate assessment of the wear resistance of such thin layers. In particular, surface stiffness maps allowed us to identify the initiation of wear before a clear topographical wear scar was developed. Our data demonstrate that the molecular and abrasive wear resistance on silica surfaces depends on the anchoring mode and follows the order catechol groups combined with electrostatic forces > catechol groups alone > electrostatic forces alone. The devised methodology should be generally applicable for evaluating wear resistance or "robustness" of thin adsorbed layers on a variety of surfaces.

  • 7.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Steponavičiu̅tė, Medeina
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Hedman, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden; Institute for Basic Science, South Korea.
    Klimkevičius, Vaidas
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Makuška, Ricardas
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Dėdinaitė, Andra
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Liu, Xioayan
    Shaanxi Normal University, China.
    Corkery, Robert
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per Martin
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Local Wear of Catechol-Containing Diblock Copolymer Layers: Wear Volume, Stick-Slip, and Nanomechanical Changes2021In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 125, no 38, p. 21277-21292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymers containing catechol groups have gained a large interest, as they mimic an essential feature of mussel adhesive proteins that allow strong binding to a large variety of surfaces under water. This feature has made this class of polymers interesting for surface modification purposes, as layer functionalities can be introduced by a simple adsorption process, where the catechol groups should provide a strong anchoring to the surface. In this work, we utilize an AFM-based method to evaluate the wear resistance of such polymer layers in water and compare it with that offered by electrostatically driven adsorption. We pay particular attention to two block copolymer systems where the anchoring group in one case is an uncharged catechol-containing block and in the other case a positively charged and catechol-containing block. The wear resistance is evaluated in terms of wear volume, and here, we compare with data for similar copolymers with statistical distribution of the catechol groups. Monitoring of nanomechanical properties provides an alternative way of illustrating the effect of wear, and we use modeling to show that the stiffness, as probed by an AFM tip, of the soft layer residing on a hard substrate increases as the thickness of the layer decreases. The stick-slip characteristics are also evaluated. © 2021 The Authors. 

  • 8.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Tokarski, T.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Cortes Ruiz, M.
    Grove School of Engineering, US.
    Li, G.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per M.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Nanoscale mapping of interphase with AFM: Polymer based nanocomposites2019In: Baltic Polymer Symposium 2019, BPS 2019 - Programme and Proceedings, Institute of Chemistry and Geosciences, Vilnius University , 2019, p. 37-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Yang, Zhijie
    Shandong University China.
    Claesson, Per M.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Pileni, Marie
    Sorbonne Université, France.
    Water Dispersive Suprastructures: An Organizational Impact on Nanomechanical Properties2021In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 8, no 3, article id 2001687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water dispersive 2D and 3D suprastructures offer a large number of potential applications in energy release, biomedicine and other fields. The nanomechanical properties of two suprastructures of self-assembled 9.6 nm Fe3O4 hydrophobic nanocrystals dispersed in water are elucidated by using atomic force microscopy. These suprastructures are either a shell consisting of a few layers of nanocrystals or spherical self-assemblies of nanocrystals in fcc superlattices called colloidosomes and supraballs, respectively. The major difference in the preparation of these suprastructure is based on the presence or not of octadecene molecules. It is recently demonstrated that these structures behave as nanoheaters and remain self-assembled after internalization in cancer cells. The observed differences between these suprastructures in terms of cell sensing are suggested to be related to their mechanical properties, which emphasize the importance of better understanding the nanomechanics of such suprastructures. In this study the nanomechanical properties of these suprastructures are shown to be load-depended in aqueous medium. Colloidosomes demonstrate higher flexibility and deformability than the supraballs. These findings provide essential knowledge for understanding differences in cell internalization and implementation in biomedicine. The differences in nanomechanical properties between these types of suprastructures are mainly due to their structures (hollow core–shell or fcc supracrystals). 

  • 10.
    He, Yunjuan
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ahniyaz, Anwar
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation.
    Deltin, Tomas
    PTE Coatings AB, Sweden.
    Corkery, Robert W.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per M.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Nano-scale mechanical and wear properties of a waterborne hydroxyacrylic-melamine anti-corrosion coating2018In: Applied Surface Science, ISSN 0169-4332, E-ISSN 1873-5584, Vol. 457, p. 548-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corrosion protection is commonly achieved by applying a thin polymer coating on the metal surface. Many studies have been devoted to local events occurring at the metal surface leading to local or general corrosion. In contrast, changes occurring in the organic coating after exposure to corrosive conditions are much less studied. In this article we outline how changes in the coating itself due to curing conditions, environmental and erosion effects can be investigated at the nanometer scale, and discuss how such changes would affect its corrosion protection performance. We focus on a waterborne hydroxyacrylic-melamine coating, showing high corrosion protection performance for carbon steel during long-term (≈35 days) exposure to 0.1 M NaCl solution. The effect of curing time on the conversion of the crosslinking reaction within the coating was evaluated by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR); the wetting properties of the cured films were investigated by contact angle measurement, and the corrosion resistance was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). In particular, coating nanomechanical and wear properties before and after exposure to 0.1 M NaCl, were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Fiber-like surface features were observed after exposure, which are suggested to arise due to diffusion of monomers or low molecular weight polymers to the surface. This may give rise to local weakening of the coating, leading to local corrosion after even longer exposure times. We also find a direct correlation between the stick-slip spacing during shearing and plastic deformation induced in the surface layer, giving rise to topographical ripple structures on the nanometer length scale.

  • 11.
    Huang, Hui
    et al.
    Shandong University, China; KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ihrner, Niklas
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ma, Houyi
    Shandong University, China.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per M.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Temperature-dependent surface nanomechanical properties of a thermoplastic nanocomposite2017In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 494, p. 204-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In polymer nanocomposites, particle-polymer interactions influence the properties of the matrix polymer next to the particle surface, providing different physicochemical properties than in the bulk matrix. This region is often referred to as the interphase, but detailed characterization of its properties remains a challenge. Here we employ two atomic force microscopy (AFM) force methods, differing by a factor of about 15 in probing rate, to directly measure the surface nanomechanical properties of the transition region between filler particle and matrix over a controlled temperature range. The nanocomposite consists of poly(ethyl methacrylate) (PEMA) and poly(isobutyl methacrylate) (PiBMA) with a high concentration of hydrophobized silica nanoparticles. Both AFM methods demonstrate that the interphase region around a 40-nm-sized particle located on the surface of the nanocomposite could extend to 55-70nm, and the interphase exhibits a gradient distribution in surface nanomechanical properties. However, the slower probing rate provides somewhat lower numerical values for the surface stiffness. The analysis of the local glass transition temperature (T g) of the interphase and the polymer matrix provides evidence for reduced stiffness of the polymer matrix at high particle concentration, a feature that we attribute to selective adsorption. These findings provide new insight into understanding the microstructure and mechanical properties of nanocomposites, which is of importance for designing nanomaterials.

  • 12.
    Huang, Hui
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Thorén, P -A
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ejenstam, Lina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Pan, J.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Fielden, M. L.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Haviland, D. B.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per M.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Local surface mechanical properties of PDMS-silica nanocomposite probed with Intermodulation AFM2017In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 150, p. 111-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanical properties of polymeric nanocomposites are strongly affected by the nature of the interphase between filler and matrix, which can be controlled by means of surface chemistry. In this report, we utilize intermodulation atomic force microscopy (ImAFM) to probe local mechanical response with nanometer-scale resolution of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) coatings with and without 20 wt% of hydrophobic silica nanoparticles. The data evaluation is carried out without inferring any contact mechanics model, and is thus model-independent. ImAFM imaging reveals a small but readily measurable inhomogeneous mechanical response of the pure PDMS surface layer. The analysis of energy dissipation measured with ImAFM showed a lowering of the viscous response due to the presence of the hydrophobic silica nanoparticles in the polymer matrix. An enhanced elastic response was also evident from the in-phase stiffness of the matrix, which was found to increase by a factor of 1.5 in presence of the nanoparticles. Analysis of dissipation energy and stiffness in the immediate vicinity of the nanoparticles provides an estimate of the interphase thickness. Because the local stiffness varies significantly near the nanoparticle, AFM height images contain artifacts that must be corrected in order to reveal the true surface topography. Without such a correction the AFM height images erroneously show that the stiff particles protrude from the surface, whereas corrected images show that they are actually embedded in the matrix and likely covered with a thin layer of polymer.

  • 13.
    Kaur, Jasreen
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kelpsiene, Egle
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Gupta, Govind
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Cedervall, Tommy
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Fadeel, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Label-free detection of polystyrene nanoparticles in Daphnia magna using Raman confocal mapping2023In: Nanoscale Advances, E-ISSN 2516-0230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Micro- and nanoplastic pollution has emerged as a global environmental problem. Moreover, plastic particles are of increasing concern for human health. However, the detection of so-called nanoplastics in relevant biological compartments remains a challenge. Here we show that Raman confocal spectroscopy-microscopy can be deployed for the non-invasive detection of amine-functionalized and carboxy-functionalized polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles (NPs) in Daphnia magna. The presence of PS NPs in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of D. magna was confirmed by using transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, we investigated the ability of NH2-PS NPs and COOH-PS NPs to disrupt the epithelial barrier of the GI tract using the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29. To this end, the cells were differentiated for 21 days and then exposed to PS NPs followed by cytotoxicity assessment and transepithelial electrical resistance measurements. A minor disruption of barrier integrity was noted for COOH-PS NPs, but not for the NH2-PS NPs, while no overt cytotoxicity was observed for both NPs. This study provides evidence of the feasibility of applying label-free approaches, i.e., confocal Raman mapping, to study PS NPs in a biological system. 

  • 14.
    Kharitonov, D. S.
    et al.
    Belarusian State Technological University, Belarus ; KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Sefer, B.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Zharskii, I. M.
    Belarusian State Technological University, Belarus.
    Claesson, Per M.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Kurilo, I. I.
    Belarusian State Technological University, Belarus.
    Corrosion of AD31 (AA6063) Alloy in Chloride-Containing Solutions2018In: Protection of Metals and Physical Chemistry of Surfaces, ISSN 2070-2051, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 291-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corrosion of AD31 (AA6063) alloy in neutral 0.05 M NaCl solutions is investigated via scanningprobe microscopy, linear-sweep voltammetry, and electrochemical-impedance spectroscopy. Al−Fe−Si−Mg intermetallic particles are determined to prevail in the structure of alloy and act as local cathodes. Intermodulation electrostatic-force-microscopy imaging shows that their Volta potential differs by 570 mV from that of the host aluminum matrix, making the alloy prone to localized corrosion. We show that the corrosion of alloy in the studied electrolyte mainly develops locally and results in pitting, with charge transfer being the limiting stage of the process. A mechanism of corrosion of the AD31 (AA6063) alloy in neutral chloride-containing solutions is proposed.

  • 15.
    Kharitonov, Dimitry
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland; Belarusian State Technological University, Belarus.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Sefer, Birhan
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden; Swerim AB, Sweden.
    Ryl, Jacek
    Gdansk University of Technology, Poland.
    Wrzesińska, Angelika
    Lodz University of Technology, Poland.
    Makarova, Irina
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Bobowska, Izabela
    Lodz University of Technology, Poland.
    Kurilo, Irina
    Belarusian State Technological University, Belarus.
    Claesson, Per M
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Surface and corrosion properties of AA6063-T5 aluminum alloy in molybdate-containing sodium chloride solutions2020In: Corrosion Science, ISSN 0010-938X, E-ISSN 1879-0496, Vol. 171, article id 108658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corrosion properties of aluminum alloy AA6063-T5 were investigated in molybdate-containing NaCl solutions. Electrochemical, microscopic, and spectroscopic experiments were utilized to examine the mechanism of corrosion inhibition by molybdates. SEM-EDX, magnetic force, and intermodulation electrostatic force microscopy data suggested that the inhibition initiation preferentially occurred over Fe-rich cathodic IMPs. Spectroscopic measurements demonstrated that the formed surface layer consists of mixed Mo(VI, V, IV) species. This layer provided inhibition with an efficiency of ∼90% after 4 h of exposure. High efficacy of ∼70% was achieved even after one week of exposure. A two-step oxidation-reduction mechanism of corrosion inhibition by aqueous molybdates was proposed. © 2020 The Authors

  • 16.
    Kretschmer, M.
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ceña-Diez, R.
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Butnarasu, C.
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Silveira, V.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Visentin, S.
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Berglund, P.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Sönnerborg, A.
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Lieleg, O.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Crouzier, Thomas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Yan, Hongji
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Synthetic Mucin Gels with Self-Healing Properties Augment Lubricity and Inhibit HIV-1 and HSV-2 Transmission2022In: Advanced Science, E-ISSN 2198-3844, Vol. 9, no 32, article id 2203898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mucus is a self-healing gel that lubricates the moist epithelium and provides protection against viruses by binding to viruses smaller than the gel's mesh size and removing them from the mucosal surface by active mucus turnover. As the primary nonaqueous components of mucus (≈0.2%–5%, wt/v), mucins are critical to this function because the dense arrangement of mucin glycans allows multivalence of binding. Following nature's example, bovine submaxillary mucins (BSMs) are assembled into “mucus-like” gels (5%, wt/v) by dynamic covalent crosslinking reactions. The gels exhibit transient liquefaction under high shear strain and immediate self-healing behavior. This study shows that these material properties are essential to provide lubricity. The gels efficiently reduce human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and genital herpes virus type 2 (HSV-2) infectivity for various types of cells. In contrast, simple mucin solutions, which lack the structural makeup, inhibit HIV-1 significantly less and do not inhibit HSV-2. Mechanistically, the prophylaxis of HIV-1 infection by BSM gels is found to be that the gels trap HIV-1 by binding to the envelope glycoprotein gp120 and suppress cytokine production during viral exposure. Therefore, the authors believe the gels are promising for further development as personal lubricants that can limit viral transmission. © 2022 The Authors. 

  • 17.
    Li, Gen
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Salazar-Sandoval, Eric Johansson
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation.
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per M
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Load-dependent surface nanomechanical properties of poly-HEMA hydrogels in aqueous medium.2019In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 15, no 38, p. 7704-7714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanical properties of hydrogels are of importance in many applications, including scaffolds and drug delivery vehicles where the release of drugs is controlled by water transport. While the macroscopic mechanical properties of hydrogels have been reported frequently, there are less studies devoted to the equally important nanomechanical response to local load and shear. Scanning probe methods offer the possibility to gain insight on surface nanomechanical properties with high spatial resolution, and thereby provide fundamental insights on local material property variations. In this work, we investigate the local response to load and shear of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) hydrogels with two different cross-linking densities submerged in aqueous solution. The response of the hydrogels to purely normal loads, as well as the combined action of load and shear, was found to be complex due to viscoelastic effects. Our results show that the surface stiffness of the hydrogel samples increased with increasing load, while the tip-hydrogel adhesion was strongly affected by the load only when the cross-linking density was low. The combined action of load and shear results in the formation of a temporary sub-micrometer hill in front of the laterally moving tip. As the tip pushes against such hills, a pronounced stick-slip effect is observed for the hydrogel with low cross-linking density. No plastic deformation or permanent wear scar was found under our experimental conditions.

  • 18.
    Li, Gen
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Varga, Imre
    Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary; University J. Selyeho, Slovakia.
    Kardos, Atilla
    Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary; University J. Selyeho, Slovakia.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Luleå University of Technology, Luleå.
    Claesson, Per M.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Temperature-Dependent Nanomechanical Properties of Adsorbed Poly-NIPAm Microgel Particles Immersed in Water2021In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 1902-1912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The temperature dependence of nanomechanical properties of adsorbed poly-NIPAm microgel particles prepared by a semibatch polymerization process was investigated in an aqueous environment via indentation-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods. Poly-NIPAm microgel particles prepared by the classical batch process were also characterized for comparison. The local mechanical properties were measured between 26 and 35 °C, i.e., in the temperature range of the volume transition. Two different AFM tips with different shapes and end radii were utilized. The nanomechanical properties measured by the two kinds of tips showed a similar temperature dependence of the nanomechanical properties, but the actual values were found to depend on the size of the tip. The results suggest that the semibatch synthesis process results in the formation of more homogeneous microgel particles than the classical batch method. The methodological approach reported in this work is generally applicable to soft surface characterization in situ.

  • 19.
    Li, Gen
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Varga, Imre
    Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary; University J. Selyeho, Slovakia.
    Kardos, Attila
    Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary; University J. Selyeho, Slovakia.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Nanoscale Mechanical Properties of Core-Shell-like Poly-NIPAm Microgel Particles: Effect of Temperature and Cross-Linking Density.2021In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, J Phys Chem B, Vol. 125, no 34, p. 9860-9869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly-NIPAm microgel particles with two different cross-linking densities were prepared with the classical batch polymerization process. These particles were adsorbed onto modified silica surfaces, and their nanomechanical properties were measured by means of atomic force microscopy. It was found that these particles have a hard core-soft shell structure both below and above the volume transition temperature. The core-shell-like structure appears due to a higher reaction rate of the cross-linker compared to that of the monomer, leading to depletion of cross-linker in the shell region. The microgel beads with lower average cross-linking density were found to be less stiff below the volume transition temperature than the microgel with higher cross-linking density. Increasing the temperature further to just above the volume transition temperature led to lower stiffness of the more highly cross-linked microgel compared to its less cross-linked counterpart. This effect is explained with the more gradual deswelling with temperature for the more cross-linked microgel particles. This phenomenon was confirmed by dynamic light scattering measurements in the bulk phase, which showed that the larger cross-linking density microgel showed a more gradual collapse in aqueous solution as the temperature was increased.

  • 20.
    Mulla, Yusuf
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Isacsson, Patrik
    Linköping University, Sweden; Ahlstrom Group Innovation, France.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. Linköping University, Sweden; Ahlstrom Group Innovation, Sweden.
    Beni, Valerio
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Östmark, Emma
    Stora Enso AB, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Karl
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Edberg, Jesper
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Bio-Graphene Sensors for Monitoring Moisture Levels in Wood and Ambient Environment2023In: Global Challenges, E-ISSN 2056-6646, Vol. 7, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood is an inherently hygroscopic material which tends to absorb moisture from its surrounding. Moisture in wood is a determining factor for the quality of wood being employed in construction, since it causes weakening, deformation, rotting, and ultimately leading to failure of the structures resulting in costs to the economy, the environment, and to the safety of residents. Therefore, monitoring moisture in wood during the construction phase and after construction is vital for the future of smart and sustainable buildings. Employing bio-based materials for the construction of electronics is one way to mitigate the environmental impact of such electronics. Herein, a bio-graphene sensor for monitoring the moisture inside and around wooden surfaces is fabricated using laser-induced graphitization of a lignin-based ink precursor. The bio-graphene sensors are used to measure humidity in the range of 10% up to 90% at 25 °C. Using laser induced graphitization, conductor resistivity of 18.6 Ω sq−1 is obtained for spruce wood and 57.1 Ω sq−1 for pine wood. The sensitivity of sensors fabricated on spruce and pine wood is 2.6 and 0.74 MΩ per % RH. Surface morphology and degree of graphitization are investigated using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis methods. © 2023 The Authors. 

  • 21.
    Nicolas-Boluda, A.
    et al.
    Université de Paris, France.
    Yang, Z.
    Shandong University, China.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Carn, F.
    Université de Paris, France.
    Winckelmans, N.
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Péchoux, C.
    Université Paris-Saclay, France.
    Bonville, P.
    Université Paris-Saclay, France.
    Bals, S.
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Claesson, Per M
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Gazeau, F.
    Université de Paris, France.
    Pileni, M. P.
    Sorbonne Université, France.
    Intracellular Fate of Hydrophobic Nanocrystal Self-Assemblies in Tumor Cells2020In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 30, no 40, article id 2004274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Control of interactions between nanomaterials and cells remains a biomedical challenge. A strategy is proposed to modulate the intralysosomal distribution of nanoparticles through the design of 3D suprastructures built by hydrophilic nanocrystals (NCs) coated with alkyl chains. The intracellular fate of two water-dispersible architectures of self-assembled hydrophobic magnetic NCs: hollow deformable shells (colloidosomes) or solid fcc particles (supraballs) is compared. These two self-assemblies display increased cellular uptake by tumor cells compared to dispersions of the water-soluble NC building blocks. Moreover, the self-assembly structures increase the NCs density in lysosomes and close to the lysosome membrane. Importantly, the structural organization of NCs in colloidosomes and supraballs are maintained in lysosomes up to 8 days after internalization, whereas initially dispersed hydrophilic NCs are randomly aggregated. Supraballs and colloidosomes are differently sensed by cells due to their different architectures and mechanical properties. Flexible and soft colloidosomes deform and spread along the biological membranes. In contrast, the more rigid supraballs remain spherical. By subjecting the internalized suprastructures to a magnetic field, they both align and form long chains. Overall, it is highlighted that the mechanical and topological properties of the self-assemblies direct their intracellular fate allowing the control intralysosomal density, ordering, and localization of NCs. 

  • 22.
    Simatos, Dimitrios
    et al.
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Sirringhaus, Henning
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Effects of Processing-Induced Contamination on Organic Electronic Devices2023In: Small Methods, E-ISSN 2366-9608, Vol. 7, no 11, article id 2300476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic semiconductors are a family of pi-conjugated compounds used in many applications, such as displays, bioelectronics, and thermoelectrics. However, their susceptibility to processing-induced contamination is not well understood. Here, it is shown that many organic electronic devices reported so far may have been unintentionally contaminated, thus affecting their performance, water uptake, and thin film properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to detect and quantify contaminants originating from the glovebox atmosphere and common laboratory consumables used during device fabrication. Importantly, this in-depth understanding of the sources of contamination allows the establishment of clean fabrication protocols, and the fabrication of organic field effect transistors (OFETs) with improved performance and stability. This study highlights the role of unintentional contaminants in organic electronic devices, and demonstrates that certain stringent processing conditions need to be met to avoid scientific misinterpretation, ensure device reproducibility, and facilitate performance stability. The experimental procedures and conditions used herein are typical of those used by many groups in the field of solution-processed organic semiconductors. Therefore, the insights gained into the effects of contamination are likely to be broadly applicable to studies, not just of OFETs, but also of other devices based on these materials. © 2023 The Authors. 

  • 23.
    Wojas, Natalia
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Wallqvist, Viveca
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Swerin, Agne
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Järn, Mikael
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Schoelkopf, Joachim
    Omya International AG, Switzerland.
    Gane, Patrick A C
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Claesson, Per M
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Nanoscale Wear and Mechanical Properties of Calcite: Effects of Stearic Acid Modification and Water Vapor2021In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 37, no 32, p. 9826-9837Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the wear of mineral fillers is crucial for controlling industrial processes, and in the present work, we examine the wear resistance and nanomech. properties of bare calcite and stearic acid-modified calcite surfaces under dry and humid conditions at the nanoscale. Measurements under different loads allow us to probe the situation in the absence and presence of abrasive wear. The sliding motion is in general characterized by irregular stick-slip events that at higher loads lead to abrasion of the brittle calcite surface. Bare calcite is hydrophilic, and under humid conditions, a thin water layer is present on the surface. This water layer does not affect the friction force. However, it slightly decreases the wear depth and strongly influences the distribution of wear particles. In contrast, stearic acid-modified surfaces are hydrophobic. Nevertheless, humidity affects the wear characteristics by decreasing the binding strength of stearic acid at higher humidity. A complete monolayer coverage of calcite by stearic acid results in a significant reduction in wear but only a moderate reduction in friction forces at low humidity and no reduction at 75% relative humidity (RH). Thus, our data suggest that the wear reduction does not result from a lowering of the friction force but rather from an increased ductility of the surface region as offered by the stearic acid layer. An incomplete monolayer of stearic acid on the calcite surface provides no reduction in wear regardless of the RH investigated. Clearly, the wear properties of modified calcite surfaces depend crucially on the packing d. of the surface modifier and also on the air humidity.

  • 24.
    Wärnheim, Alexander
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Corrosion. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Kotov, Nikolay
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Telaretti Leggieri, Rosella
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Edvinsson, Camilla
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Corrosion.
    Heydari, Golrokh
    SSAB, Sweden.
    Sundell, Per-Erik
    SSAB, Sweden.
    Deltin, Tomas
    Nordic United Coatings, Sweden.
    Johnson, C. Magnus
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Persson, Dan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Corrosion.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Nanomechanical and nano-FTIR analysis of polyester coil coatings before and after artificial weathering experiments2024In: Progress in organic coatings, ISSN 0300-9440, E-ISSN 1873-331X, Vol. 190, article id 108355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Local heterogeneities can have significant effects on the performance of anti-corrosion coatings. Even small features can act as initiation points for damage and result in corrosion of the substrate material. Analysis methods with high spatial resolution and the ability to collect information relevant to crosslinking and degradation behavior of these coatings are therefore highly relevant. In this work, we demonstrate the utility of nanomechanical AFM measurements and nano-FTIR in investigating the nanoscale mechanical and chemical properties of two polyester coil coating clearcoats before and after weathering. On the nanoscale, weathering led to a stiffer and less deformable coating with less variation in the nanomechanical properties. Chemical degradation was quantified using changes in band ratios in the IR-spectra. Macro and nano-scale measurements showed similar trends with the latter measurements showing larger heterogeneity. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of the described analysis techniques and will pave the way for future studies of local properties in other coating systems and formulations. © 2024 The Authors

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  • 25.
    Zhao, Wei
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sugunan, Abhilash
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Gillgren, Thomas
    BillerudKorsnäs AB, Sweden.
    Larsson, Johan A
    BillerudKorsnäs AB,Sweden.
    Zhang, Zhi-Bin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Zhang, Shi-Li
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sommertune, Jens
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Dobryden, Illia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Ahniyaz, Anwar
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Surfactant-free starch-graphene composite films as simultaneous oxygen and water vapour barriers2022In: npj 2D Materials and Applications, ISSN 2397-7132, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A single coating formulation for multifunctional composites, such as a gas barrier against both oxygen and water vapour, is the holy grail for the packaging industry. Since the last decade, graphene has been touted as the ideal barrier material in composites due to its morphology and impermeability to all gases. However, this prospect is limited by either poor dispersion of graphene or excess surfactants to aid the dispersion, both leading to shortcuts that allow gas permeation through the composite. Here, we demonstrate a combined gas barrier with starch-graphene composite films made from a single formulation of surfactant-free starch nanoparticle-stabilized graphene dispersion (2.97 mg mL−1). Hence, the incorporated graphene reduces the permeability of both the oxygen and the water vapour by over 70% under all the relative humidity conditions tested. Moreover, these films are foldable and electrically conductive (9.5 S m−1). Our surfactant-free approach of incorporating graphene into an industrially important biopolymer is highly relevant to the packaging industry, thus offering cost-effective and water-based solution depositions of multifunctional composite films for wide-ranging applications, such as gas barriers in food packaging. © 2022, The Author(s).

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