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  • 1. Almström, Peter
    et al.
    Andersson, Carin
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ericsson Öberg, Anna
    Hammersberg, Peter
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Landström, Anna
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Windmark, Christina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Winroth, Mats
    Zackrisson, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Sustainable and Resource Efficient Business Performance Measurement Systems: - The Handbook2017Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Volvo Construction Equipment, Sweden; Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Machining Equipment Life Cycle Costing Model with Dynamic Maintenance Cost2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 48, p. 102-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents how a Life cycle cost or Total cost of ownership analysis has been performed on machining equipment in a Swedish company. Life cycle cost models used in case studies are compared to an empirical model, used at the company, where dynamic energy, fluid, and maintenance cost are included. Linear and variable factors in the models are analyzed and discussed regarding data availability and estimation, especially with emphasis on maintenance. The life cycle cost aspect of the equipment give guidelines to consider operation, maintenance, tools, energy, and fluid cost in addition to acquisition cost, when designing/specifying the equipment.

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  • 3.
    Birkie, Seyoum Eshetu
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Chavez, Zuhara Zemke
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Emma
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Bellgran, Monica
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Bohlin, Lotta
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Bohman, Mikael
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Elvin, Malin
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Systematic Green Design in Production Equipment Investments: Conceptual Development and Outlook2023In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, ISSN 1868-4238, Vol. 692 AICT, p. 174-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the concept of green design in the context of production, focusing on investment projects for production equipment design and acquisition by a manufacturing firm. Research towards making manufacturing and production related activities more sustainable is increasing. In the manufacturing sector, environmental sustainability tends to be more commonly approached from the operations perspective. However, the decisions taken in the design phase of the production equipment significantly impact the operations phase. Therefore, proactive design approaches for sustainability applied in product design settings could be transferred to the design of the production equipment to build in green aspects from the outset. This study explores the research questions of what green production equipment design entails and how the concept of green design has evolved in the context of production. Overall, this conceptual paper highlights the importance of incorporating green design principles from the outset of the production design. Transferable methodological issues are also explored for further detailed investigation in the production equipment design context. Strong collaboration between equipment suppliers and the buying manufacturer that aims to integrate sustainability as part of requirements is proposed as an enabler for the way forward. The paper also provides insights into the evolution of the concept in this context for possible future research.

  • 4.
    Birkie, Seyoum Eshetu
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Korhonen, Jouni
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Implementation challenges affecting the environmental improvement performance in pharmaceutical production: Results of a green kaizen pilot2018In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, ISSN 1868-4238, Vol. 535, p. 58-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on working findings in an action research-based project, implementing a green kaizen pilot in a European pharmaceutical manufacturing company. The aim of the study is to investigate how continuous improvement initiatives with focus on environment originally developed for the automotive manufacturing industry could apply to the pharmaceutical industry. It also aspires to understand the enabling and hindering issues are for such implementation. There are considerable similarities of implementing lean in general in the two sectors, however, some key differences and challenges were apparent when implementing this specific green kaizen method called Green Performance Map. An implication for pharma practitioners implementing the green kaizen method concerns how to improve working procedures and production equipment to become more environmentally friendly amid high regulatory demands on process quality. Implementation challenges are discussed in terms of fidelity, locus and extensiveness of lean practices implementation. © 2018, IFIP International Federation for Information Processing.

  • 5.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Bengtsson, Marcus
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Utveckling av Robust Produktionsutrustning: En guide för god samverkan mellan beställare och leverantör2016Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Av dagens globala och allt hårdare konkurrens följer korta marknadsfönster och krav på snabb volym- uppgång i produktion. Det innebär i sin tur ökade krav på snabb och effektiv utveckling av produktions- utrustning som säkerställer hög prestanda direkt vid produktionsstart. Robust produktionsutrustning med hög produktionseffektivitet och minskade kostnader för drift och underhåll är därför en av de viktigaste faktorerna för stark konkurrenskraft och hög lönsamhet för svenska industriföretag. God samverkan mellan beställare och leverantör är nyckeln till framgång i denna typ av investerings- projekt. Denna handbok presenterar därför en modell som kan användas av tillverkande företag som vill utveckla robust produktionsutrustning. Modellen och övriga rekommendationer i handboken fokuserar på projekt som ska genomföras i stark samverkan och riktar sig till både beställaren och leverantören. Den har utvecklats i forskningsprojektet ”EQUIP – kund- och leverantörsintegration i utformning av produktionsutrustning” som finansierats av KK-stiftelsen under 2013-2016. Modellen består av sju utvecklingsfaser som är baser- ade på produktionsutrustnings livscykel: Fas 1 – Förstudie Fas 2 – Konceptstudie Fas 3 – Upphandling Fas 4 – Detaljerad utformning Fas 5 – Uppbyggnad Fas 6 – Installation och driftsättning Fas 7 – Produktion I varje fas presenteras kritiska aktivitetssteg och rekommendationer för hur ansvaret för dessa bör fördelas inom och emellan deltagande parter. Modellen använder ett livscykelperspektiv för utvecklingsprojekt för att underlätta samverkan samt tydligare visualisera sambandet mellan aktiviteter och deras påverkan på projektets framgång. Inom ramen för ett investeringsprojekt finns stor potential att utveckla hållbara produktionslösningar. Därför presenterar denna handbok även sju guider som kan stödja er i att ta fram produktionsutrustning som är säker, lean och hållbar under hela utrustningens livscykel. Huvudsyftet med handboken är att underlätta samverkan under hela investeringsprojektet på ett sätt som gagnar båda parter och bidrar till varaktiga relationer. Forskningsprojektets resultat visar att det finns ett stort intresse för främjad samverkan från både beställ- are och leverantör. Därför behövs stöd, verktyg och beredskap från båda parter för att våga investera tid och resurser på samverkan redan från början, i de tidiga faserna av ett nytt utvecklingsprojekt. Det är då potentialen att lägga grunden till långsiktig samverkan och utforma bästa möjliga produktionsutrustning på kortast möjliga tid är som störst.

  • 6.
    Chavez, Z. Z.
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, A.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Hauge, J. B.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Bellgran, M.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Birkie, S. E.
    KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Johnson, Patrik
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    From Surviving to Thriving: Industry 5.0 at SMEs Enhancing Production Flexibility2023In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology. Volume 689 AICT, Pages 789 - 802, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2023, Vol. 689 AICT, p. 789-802Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how human-centered digitalization can contribute to the flexibility and adaptability of small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) production processes, resulting in more resilient systems. This study explains the relationship between digital technologies and production system features through progressively more human-centric stages of a digitalized manufacturing system. The authors present a case study of an SME that implemented a human-centric strategy, placing people’s needs and interests at the center of its processes, leading to more flexible and inclusive production processes and consistent with the goals of Industry 5.0. The results suggest that a digitalized working method that considers human capabilities and needs can enable a more diverse workforce and the rapid setup of new and additional production processes, thus helping SMEs respond to supply chain disruptions. The findings have implications for managers and practitioners interested in driving or supporting the transition of SMEs to human-centric, resilient, and sustainable businesses. 

  • 7.
    Chen, Xiaoxia
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Johansson, Björn
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Despeisse, Melanie
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Enabling the twin transitions: Digital technologies support environmental sustainability through lean principles2023In: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, Vol. 38, p. 13-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing companies seek innovative approaches to achieve successful Green and Digital transitions, where adopting lean production is one alternative. However, further investigation is required to formulate the strategy with practical inputs and identify what digital technologies could be applied with which lean principles for environmental benefits. Therefore, this study first conducted a case study in three companies to collect practice-based data. A complementary literature review was then carried out, investigating the existing frameworks and complementing practices of digitalized lean implementations and the resulting environmental impact. Consequently, the Internet of Things and related connection-level technologies were identified as the key facilitators in lean implementations, specifically in visualization, communication, and poka-yoke, leading to environmental benefits. Furthermore, a framework of DIgitalization Supports Environmental sustainability through Lean principles (DISEL) was proposed to help manufacturing companies identify the opportunities of digitalizing lean principles for Environmental sustainability, thus enabling the twin transitions and being resilient. © 2023 The Authors

  • 8.
    Fogelberg, Emmie
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Kolbeinsson, Ari
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Mattsson, Sandra
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Salunkhe, Omkar
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Thorvald, Peter
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Thuresson, Urban
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Current and best practices in information presentation2024Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization and automation in industry can have both positive and negative effects on social sustainability. On one hand it can be a basis for monotonous, uncreative, and even dangerous workplaces and in some cases might even result in people losing their work. On the other hand, it can be a base for ergonomically sound and inclusive work, engaging everyone in improvements. This project aims for moving the focus on positive effects for social sustainability while still staying cost efficient and effective in economic and ecologic sustainability for digitalization and automation of work instructions and training in manual operations like assembly, machine operation & setup, maintenance, and material handling. The Industry 4.0 paradigm offers radically increased opportunities for doing just that. For example, increased digitization can create efficiency improvements through shorter lead times and reduced disruptions to production. New generations of technology and software as well as information dissemination can be accelerated and the traceability of products and materials in the industrial systems can be greatly increased. Digitization also provides opportunities to increase industrial resilience to challenges coming from elsewhere, such as demographic change and climate threats. Advanced application of digitization is seen by industries and decision-makers as the most important enabler for achieving the strategic sustainability goals and Agenda2030. A crucial factor for competitiveness is the human contribution. Here too, digitalisation is radically changing the conditions. In the last 20 years, work instructions have been transformed from printed text on paper into an increasingly digital representation. As knowledge increases about how work instructions for the manufacturing industry should be designed, they are rarely designed according to user conditions. At best, this results in a missed opportunity for performance improvements and at worst, it could potentially result in quality deficiencies, efficiency deficiencies and a lower degree of inclusion of staff groups. Digitization and automation permeate both society and industry more and more and there are many different technologies on the market. These can contribute to both increased efficiency and flexibility for the industry. However, there are a lot of challenges to both implement, design, and use instructions. Studies conducted in industry 2014–2018 show that operators and assembly workers only use instructions in 20–25% of cases in the operational phase when they are perceived as inefficient (Fast-Berglund & Stahre, 2013; Mattsson et al., 2018). Of course, this also increases the risks of, for example, assembly errors by not using instructions to the extent that they should be used. The corporate culture and standards are also an important part of how instructions are created and used. Depending on the structure and condition of the company and the production unit, for example, an assembly instruction at one company may include information about the product, process, and work environment, while an assembly instruction at another company includes completely different or only parts of this information. Of course, this is a natural consequence of sometimes far-inherited corporate cultures and traditions, but experience has also shown that it is to a very large extent the nature of work that defines the type of support system needed. In line with increased automation and increasing product variation as a result of increased customisation, operators’ tasks will require more creative work than before where the aim is to enable and handle the results of individual workers' creative thoughts about improvements in their own work situation, increasing cognitive load (Taylor et al., 2020). The development of digitalisation has created new opportunities for improved communication among employees in the manufacturing industry (Oesterreich & Teuteberg, 2016). Therefore, this technological development can and should support operators cognitively (Kaasinen et al., 2020; Mattsson et al., 2016). Although many new digital technologies are being developed and are available (Romero et al., 2016), it is still difficult to implement these so that people's cognitive work is supported. This is often due to the fact that the implementation does not take place in a way that people are comfortable with (Parasuraman & Riley, 1997). In many cases, humans are expected to adapt to technology and not the other way around (Thorvald et al., 2021). To implement better support for their operators, companies should focus on identifying the information needs that exist (Haghi et al., 2018) and then visualize it in a way that is useful to operators. The central aim for the project is to demonstrate how knowledge and systematic development of cognitive support and information design can increase quality and flexibility in future production and how this can be considered in the implementation of digital work instructions. In the industrial case studies, current state-of-practice in information presentation will be investigated and analysed together with state-of-the art knowledge and technology to map successful efforts in industry, identify what it is that makes them successful, or how a particularly challenging situation can be further improved through our knowledge of cognitive work in production.

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  • 9.
    Gåsvaer, Daniel
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Hedegård, Joakim
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, KIMAB.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Lundin, Roger
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Persson, Kalle
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Widfeldt, Magnus
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Axelson, Jens
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Att utveckla den smarta svetscellen: Lean, svetsteknik och automation2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En svetscell producerar och är produktiv när svetsning pågår och ljubågen brinner. Då skapas värde i en svetscell. För att nå teknisk och ekonomisk framgång, behöver svetscellen fungera "smart" med effektiva flöden, hög tillgänglighet, optimerad svetsteknik och ur flera aspekter goda miljöegenskaper. Skriften fungerar som hjälp när företag vill utveckla sin svetsverkstad och förbättra svetsproduktionen, utifrån lean, svetsteknik och automation.

  • 10.
    Hedman, M.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Larsson, L.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Operator Contributions to Innovation: Supporting Innovative Production Development in a Digital Learning Environment2022In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering, IOS Press BV , 2022, Vol. 21, p. 580-591Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As all technologies come to pass, change by innovation is needed both ways, exploiting current knowledge to do better and exploring new knowledge to do differently. Due to years of continuous improvement (CI), exploitation of current knowledge in production development is rather well investigated, exploration is less. It could be argued that not utilizing the potential explorative operator contributions to production innovation is a lost opportunity to increase a company's innovation capability. Simultaneously, operators are facing great changes when manufacturing is adopting to digitalization and sustainability challenges enhancing the need for production innovation. This study focused on a team of operators through a workshop series of five sessions about explorative activities in a format using structured and semi-structured interviews. The study provided a basis for constructing a model for positioning operators' both digital and explorative maturity level. Through the empirical data and the model, the conclusion is illustrated as alternative pathways to reach a desired level of operator maturity. It was concluded that approaching digital and explorative maturity for operators should be done as a two-step process. Increasing both maturities simultaneously, as with the studied team, showed difficult due to the digital and explorative maturity being co-dependent. The suggested two-step process contributes to a better understanding of prerequisites and opportunities for operators to participate and contribute to production innovation in digitalized work environments, ultimately increasing the company's innovation capability. © 2022 The authors

  • 11.
    Hildenbrand, Jutta
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Dahlström, Johan
    Kinnarps AB, Sweden.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Identifying and evaluating recirculation strategies for industry in the nordic countries2021In: Recycling, E-ISSN 2313-4321, Vol. 6, no 4, article id 74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing industry in the Nordic countries aims to include closing product and material loops to recover values in their circular economy strategies. Recirculating strategies for products and materials are required for existing products that are part of the stock and are also anticipated to be aligned with products designed for circularity and circular business models in the future. Options to capture value of discarded products are diverse and include reuse, remanufacturing and material recycling. The Circular Economy Integration in the Nordic Industry for enhanced sustain-ability and competitiveness (CIRCit) project developed a framework to guide decision makers in the industry on how to identify suitable treatments and subsequent use at the end of use or end of life of a product and how to select among different options. Factors considered in the assessment include technical feasibility, necessary efforts, networks of business partners, legal implications and overall sustainability aspects. Our empirical studies show great support for decision-makers in the value recovery of different products with different complexity levels. It is also concluded that the properties of products at their end of use are the main drivers behind selecting a proper recirculation strategy. This study contributes with an empirical evaluation and a consistent terminology framework for recirculation options. The general setup is relevant for the Nordic countries. © 2021 by the authors. 

  • 12.
    Hildenbrand, Jutta
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Lindahl, Emma
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Applying tools for end of use outlook in design for recirculation2021In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier B.V. , 2021, p. 85-90Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circular economy is widely embraced as one major path towards sustainability goals by contributing to resource efficiency and reaching climate targets. The research need at hand lies in how to implement changes. To achieve a circular system, design for recirculation is advised when introducing new products and production processes. However, in practical applications it is a challenge to foresee the complex nature of a real circular production system with many stakeholders in a system in transition. Product systems are embedded in a use context, where the user is a key stakeholder. Collection and systematization of experience and ideas from the field is here a key. This research draws on the experiences of assessing and improve circulation in industrial practice deploying the Recirculation Strategies Decision Tree and the Eco-design-strategy-wheel. Through two case studies, practitioners have been supported in action to evaluate their products and production processes in term of circularity. Cases showed a process from current status and recirculation challenges to a more circular future state in production and end of life was scrutinized. As a result, emphasis differed between the two tools. The Eco strategy wheel supported product design phase with an engineering perspective, The Recirculation Strategies Decision Tree on end-of-life phase with a market perspective. Common for both tools was the dependency on user or operator's handling. Outcome from this study is to emphasise the importance on social dimension in CE/user role in a circular product system. The interactive, user centered research with manufacturing companies is suggested for development to effectively close product loops. 

  • 13.
    Kjellsdotter, Linea
    et al.
    VTI, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Johansson, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Effects on logistics of increased on-site sorting2020Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The construction industry is one of the largest producers of waste and the EU waste framework directive (2008/98/EC) has established a target of 70% of construction and demolition waste (CDW) to be recycled by 2020. However, except for a few EU countries, only about 50% of CDW is recycled (European Commission, 2018). In order to increase recycling rates, sorting of waste material is of high importance (Kurdve et al., 2019). Still, there are different believes of where the sorting should take place; on-site or upstream the supply chain, e.g. at the waste collection company (CIRF, 2019). The purpose of this study is to increase the understanding of the effects that an increased on-site sorting may have on logistics, measured in terms of load factors and collection costs. Research Approach The study takes a quantitative approach, using empirical data from 22 Swedish construction projects of a construction company during the years 2016-2019. Data was gathered from the databases and bookkeeping of the construction company and the waste collection provider. This was complemented with interviews of personnel knowledgeable of the data from the two companies. Findings and Originality No statistic correlation could be found between on-site sorting level and load factor. Thus, an increased sorting level does not per definition add complexity in logistics. The sorting applied in the projects has in total saved about EUR 300 000 for the construction company, compared to not sort at all. This saving is in terms of lower treatment costs. However, storage and handling costs may increase for higher sorting levels, which is not calculated in this study. The saving in treatment cost also differs between material types, where greatest savings occur for combustible material compared with inert material. Research Impact Since 2000, CDW management has been attracting increasing attention from researchers around the world (Kambiz et al., 2016). Earlier studies in CDW management reports on pros and cons of on-site sorting (e.g. Tam et al., 2009; Wang et al., 2010). To our knowledge this is the first study that tries to empirically determine the effect of on-site sorting on load factors and collection costs. Practical Impact The study gives some guidelines in how construction companies could improve sorting rates and at the same time keep collection costs low. For example, our results indicate that it is positive to sort as much as possible of the chosen material from the mixed fractions and carefully choose the fractions to sort.

  • 14.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Digital assembly instruction system design with green lean perspective-Case study from building module industry2018In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 72, p. 762-767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manual "easy jobs" need to be efficient, standardised and quality assured to remain competitive against automated production. Digitalised work instructions offer an opportunity to support standardisation and quality assurance for manual work tasks in industry. Inspired by axiomatic design this study aims at selecting design of lean methods and equipment for digital assembly instructions and standardised work. Literature regarding standardised work and green lean production system is applied in a case study. Interviews, observations and green lean equipment design methods are used to conclude system requirements of a digital work instruction-system designed for assembly of modular buildings at Husmuttern AB. © 2018 The Authors.

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  • 15.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Bellgran, M.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Green lean operationalisation of the circular economy concept on production shop floor level2021In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 278, article id 123223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Addressing today's general requirements on sustainability, as captured by for example the UN sustainability goals, is a necessity within production operations. It means that production managers need to find and manage new working procedures and methods on the shop floor to increase resource efficiency and overall sustainability. Utilizing a green lean environmental improvement tool called Green Performance Map in manufacturing and pharma industry has proven successful results in engaging shop floor managers and operators in green kaizen and demonstrated the value of integrating the waste hierarchy model, hence operationalising the concept of circular economy. This paper presents results of eight industrial cases of pilot trials of the Green Performance Map, demonstrating how the waste hierarchy model was used as an operationalisation mechanism for increasing the circularity on the shop floor. This was made by prioritizing and executing environmental improvements identified by the shop floor team that implied moving up one or more steps in the waste hierarchy. By this action, resource efficiency was improved as well as the overall environmental behaviour. The research presented contributes to the green lean theory and its integration with circular economy in a production context. On managerial level, the research demonstrates a concrete way of how the circularity could be improved on the shop floor.

  • 16.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Bird, Anna
    Mälardalens University, Sweden.
    Lage-Hellman, Jens
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Establishing SME–university collaboration through innovation support programmes2020In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 1583-1604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The research purpose is to analyse when and how innovation support programmes (ISPs) can affect collaboration between universities and established small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). The paper specifically considers SME’s absorptive capacity. Design/methodology/approach: A Swedish research centre is studied in the context of innovation support and two of its SME-ISPs are examined with regards to industry–university collaboration and impact on firm innovation capabilities. Data collection and analysis are performed, using interviews, survey answers, document search and reflectional analysis to evaluate processes and effects of the centre and the programmes. Findings: A developed research centre, integrated into both academia and industry, can support translational collaboration and promote SME innovation absorptive capacity. The action learning elements and the organisational development approaches used when coaching in the ISPs contribute to the SMEs internal absorption capacity and collaborational skills. Organising collaboration into ISPs can provide a relational path to future collaboration with universities, which, for example start with student projects. Research limitations/implications: The study, though limited to one Swedish region, adds to empirical innovation research as it connects industry–university collaboration and absorptive capacity to organisational learning. Practical implications: The empirical results indicate possible long-term gains for industry and universities in building collaborative innovation into SME-ISPs. Originality/value: The contribution of this study pertains to the practice of innovation support for established SMEs with the inclusion of absorption capacity and collaborative innovation development. 

  • 17.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Swerea, Swerea IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Bird, Anna
    MÄLARDALEN UNIVERSITY, Sweden.
    Sundquist, Svante
    MÄLARDALEN UNIVERSITY, Sweden.
    Par experience from production innovation in Mälardalen2018In: PIN-C 2018 Conference Proceedings, 2018, p. 411-415, article id 5.15Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This case paper describes the role of Mälardalen Industrial Technology Center, an industry support organisation in Sweden and the way it scollaborative innovation support is operated. Three programmes where representatives from academia support industrial companies are studied. The coordinating organisation act as a developed collaboration research centre. This is important for action learning and group development. It is beneficial for the university and companies with a strong programme collaboration with researchers and students.

  • 18.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    De Goey, Heleen
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Can Social Sustainability Values be Incorporated in a Product Service System for Temporary Public Building Modules?2017In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 64, p. 193-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The temporary constructions industry has cost efficiency and sustainability challenges that may require new innovative business models as well as product and processes. This paperaims to discuss how social sustainability services can be included in product service system (PSS)by investigating a case where employment is offered in distributed temporary building module manufacturing in the PSS context. The case has been evaluated against PSS literature. Recent reviews and literature on inclusion of social sustainability and PSS for buildings were used. It is concluded that the current concept fits basic definitions of PSS although it is not typical. The social value of employment is difficult to evaluate and inclusion in PSS needs further research. Design practice could be used to further develop the services in the studied concept. © 2017 The Authors.

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  • 19.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Skagert, Katrin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Skyddsutrustning vid Covid 19 – Metodik för säker produktframtagning vid egen beredskapsproduktion2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During spring 2020 the covid 19 virus spread all over the world. A supply shortage of  personnel protective equipment (PPE) was apparent due to an increase of global need for PPE and worsened due to breakage of supply chains, closed factories, and boarders. It was difficult to rely on the ordinary global market for supply of PPE during the strained  situation caused by the pandemic. Employers, who are responsible for ensuring  security for their staff and not exposed to dangerous infections, tried to obtain personal protective equipment by various means. The result describes different methods to meet the need of PPE, such as emergency stockpile, acute purchase, gifts, voluntary- or own production in collaboration with local industry. There are apparent problems with having a sufficiently extensive contingency stock of PPE pending a possible pandemic or rely on being able to make acute purchases or receive gifts from the surrounding community. Voluntary production alone seldom reaches necessary volumes and it is difficult to ensure all aspects of sufficient quality. However, a temporary emergency production of PPE can quickly be started together with local domestic industry. The result describes the core components in such process. The requirements and standards regulating PPE mainly sets material requirements. We recommend getting an understanding of these requirement when sourcing raw materials or components. It is also important to have standardized operation procedures with easy to learn instructions in place and a quality assurance system preferably with fault proof process design (poka yoke). Through these steps and design, production can start quickly even with unexperienced staff and still be able to provide sufficient volumes of approved quality. Finally, the documentation, labelling and instructions for use of PPE are necessary to have in place and sent together with the product to the end user. The recommendation to authorities is to simplify the description of PPE requirements and procedures for permits.

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  • 20.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Hallin, Malin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Söderlund, C.
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Berglund, M.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Florin, U.
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Landström, A.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Designing visual management in manufacturing from a user perspective2019In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier B.V. , 2019, p. 886-891Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many organisations use daily meetings, whiteboards and an information system for employee intra-communication. While Operation Management research is often management centred, Human Centred Design, instead, takes a user’s perspective. This research aims to reflect upon and describe a method, applied in practice in a double case study within manufacturing, on how to (re-)design meetings and visual management boards, and what type of information and key performance indicators are most relevant for the personnel. The paper proposes a lean Kata-improvement inspired design method, which takes the personnel’s perspective on design of daily visual management. © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 21.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Henriksson, Fredrik
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Denzler, Patrick
    Zackrisson, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Production System And Material Efficiency Challenges For Large Scale Introduction Of Complex Materials2017In: Advanced Materials Proceedings, 2017, Vol. 2, no 8, p. 492-499Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper links production system research to advanced material research for the vehicle industry. Facilitated by need for reduction of fuel use, the automotive industry is pushing a radical change from using steel structures to new mixed materials structures. In production systems optimised for steel, the changes will affect productivity and material efficiency. Four industrial case studies focusing on production economy and productivity give implications of production technology demands on the material selection regarding new joining techniques and additive or forming methods which has to be investigated when considering new materials. Material efficiency analysis shows that minimising spill in production operations and regulatory demand of recycling need to be considered in material development, which implies both design for disassembly, advanced separation processes and use of recycled raw materials. To be successful in new material introduction, new information flows and knowledge sharing moving from operations and manufacturing development to materials development and design are needed. The material developers could use axiomatic design strategies to structure the production system demands on the materials. State of the art lightweight producers in vehicle and automotive industry are likely early adopters to advanced lightweight structures with need of information flows between material development and operations.

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  • 22.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Hildenbrand, Jutta
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Design for green lean building module production - Case study2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 25, p. 594-601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With an increasing societal need for temporary buildings, while construction industry faces resource and time efficiency challenges, factory assembly of modular buildings can be a solution. This case study at a start-up company uses experiences from assembly system design and eco-design literature to propose green lean design principles to be used in the design and development of building modules and their assembly stations. The eco-design strategy wheel is used as a basis and adapted for the assessment of green and lean building manufacturing.

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  • 23.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Granzell, Ann-Sofie
    Development of the urban and industrial symbiosis in western Mälardalen2018In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 73, p. 96-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a product service systems business model development perspective, this paper presents a case study of Västra Mälardalens industrial symbiosis, its maturity level and potentials for further development. The status and potentials of the symbiosis network, based on a survey, interviews and workshops, together with background statistics, is used to evaluate the potential improvement areas and suggest future research. The study contributes with application of evaluation models and confirms earlier research and in addition suggests future research in the field. The Symbiosis network has potential to be acting as innovation catalyst supporting companies to go beyond core business development.

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  • 24.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Langbeck, Björn
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Green Lean assembly system design – comparison between a large and a small company2016In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean production principles are used to direct operations. Together with the production system challenges these can be converted to design parameters to direct changes in axiomatic design of production systems. This paper presents two assembly cases with different operations, products and company sizes. The cases still show similarities in challenges and design parameters. The change implementation strategies differ, possibly depending on maturity of improvements and automation level. Both external and internal personnel may improve communication by an axiomatic design approach

  • 25.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Mattsson, Sandra
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Skagert, Katrin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Digitalt stöd och kultur för universell utformning av manuella arbeten2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents how universal design of manual assembly was supported through digital support in a project called Universal design of workplaces - manual assembly (UUAAMM). In the project we have followed a company Husmuttern AB and evaluated their approach to universal design. The aim of the project was to increase universal design in industry and show how other companies can use it and why. The approach focused on four areas: sustainable work, standard operational procedures, digital support and culture.

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  • 26.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Persson, Kalle
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Berglund, Rickard
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Ericson Öberg, Anna
    Volvo Group, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Trollsfjord, Pia
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Implementation of daily visual management at five small and medium sized enterprises in Produktionslyftet compared to six larger Swedish companies2016In: Swedish Production Symposium 2016, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper compares the implementation of daily visual management (DVM) in five SMEs (small and medium sized enterprises), with practice in six large Swedish companies, considering the challenge to include sustainability aspects. With method definition from Produktionslyftet (PL), a Swedish development programme, DVM includes daily meetings around key performance indices (KPIs) and visualised information on boards. The SMEs were studied within PL while the large companies were studied in the research project SuReBPMS (Sustainable and resource efficient Business Performance Measurement Systems). The empirical result from SMEs shows that KPIs often cover few areas (most common: delivery, safety and quality) while the larger companies have wider range of areas. In some SMEs the meeting agendas, KPIs and pulse-boards are standardised while in others there are differences between teams or operations. The larger companies were mainly standardised. Both SMEs and larger companies mostly include all employees in DVM, in line with PL-DVM methodology. The general tendency is to focus on short term rather than follow-up of strategic challenges in the DVM. Furthermore, environmental issues, such as climate impact, are rarely found on boards, while often reflected in company policy. However, many KPIs have a strong, indirect, connection to sustainability and environment.

  • 27.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden .
    Persson, Karl-Eric
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Widfeldt, Magnus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Berglund, Johan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Manufacturing Processes. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden .
    Drott, Alexander
    Volvo, Sweden.
    Lead-Time Effect Comparison of Additive Manufacturing with Conventional Alternatives2020In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering at SPS2020, IOS Press BV , 2020, p. 672-679Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This single case study used value stream mapping as input data to analyse alternatives for production of quenching tools in an on-site tool department of an automotive manufacturer. The existing manufacturing organised as a functional workshop was compared to the alternatives, adding an additive manufacturing cell or a conventional automated cell, with regards to lead-Time and needed process changes. The results indicate that lead-Time savings should not be the only reason for considering additive manufacturing. When it is beneficial for design and product functionality improvements, however, lead time improvements may give a contribution to the business case. © 2020 The authors

  • 28.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Salonen, Antti
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Value Stream Mapping used in interaction between industry and university2016In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For technical studies in production and logistics management, a common approach chosen by students and companies is to perform a Value Stream Map (VSM) as a process mapping method in order to evaluate the current state. This paper investigates how value stream mapping as a method has been used in master theses and is compared to cases where a consultant from academia is supporting a company with VSM. The study concludes a proposal to supervisors to direct students towards a somewhat less tool driven approach with more change management actions included.

  • 29.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Wendin, Marcus
    Miljögiraff, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Cecilia
    Volvo Group, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Waste flow mapping to improve sustainability of waste management: A case study approach2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 98, p. 304-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovative, resource-efficient solutions and effective waste management systems capture value in business and contribute to sustainability. However, due to scattered waste management responsibilities in the vehicle industry and the orientation of operations management and lean tools, which mostly focus on lead-time and labour-time improvements, the requirement of a collaborative method to include material waste efficiency in operational development is identified. The main purpose of this research is to study how operations management and environmental management can be integrated on an operational level and include the waste management supply chain. Based on a literature review of environmental and operational improvement tools and principles, the gaps and needs in current practice were identified. A large case study implementing a waste flow mapping (WFM) method on a set of manufacturing sites revealed potentials in terms of reducing material losses and inefficiencies in the handling of materials and waste. Finally, the integrated WFM method was analysed with respect to the gaps and needs identified in the existing body of tools for operational and environmental improvement. The method combines lean manufacturing tools, such as value stream mapping with cleaner production and material flow cost accounting strategies. The empirical data showed that the WFM method is adequate for current state analysis of waste material efficiency potentials, especially when multiple organisations are involved. However, further development and specific methods are needed such as, for example, logistics inefficiencies, root cause analysis, implementation guidelines for best practice and systems for performance monitoring of actors.

  • 30.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Wendin, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Cecilia
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Amprazis, Pernilla
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Waste Flow Mapping: Handbook (eng.)2017Book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Sjögren, Peter
    ABB, Sweden.
    Gåsvaer, Daniel
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Widfeldt, Magnus
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Production System Change Strategy in Lightweight Manufacturing2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 50, p. 160-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two change management strategies: a minimum change, exploitation strategy (kaizen) and a maximum output, exploration strategy (kaikaku) have been applied in a manufacturing case study. Value stream mapping and discrete event simulation were used to analyse the production system changes, with regards to robustness and total lead-time, to increase knowledge of how to choose change management strategy. The results point out that available time is crucial. It is important to consider not only product specification and return of investment, but also the change and risk management. Future research should develop engineering change management further.

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  • 32.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    van Loon, Patricia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Johansson, Mats
    Cost and value drivers in circular material flow logistics2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study paper presents system costs and effect on costs due to variation inmanufacturing performance in recycling of manufacturing generated waste. One caseconcern metal, manufacturing waste and the other plastic assembly process waste. Thereexist potentials for improvements in logistics and operation planning which could beaided by sharing production performance information. There are also potentials toincrease value of the recycling material.

  • 33.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Wendin, Marcus
    Miljögiraff AB.
    Bengtsson, Cecilia
    AB Volvo.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Waste Flow Mapping: Improve sustainability and realize waste management values2012In: Waste Flow MappingArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient Waste Management System creates increased business value contributing to manufacturing industry sustainability and realizes economic opportunities. Previous studies have shown the economic potential of improving material efficiency by climbing the waste hierarchy and turning waste liabilities into assets. World economic forum also identifies innovation for resource efficient solutions and business models as the most strategic option to capture value in industry. The main responsibility for waste lies with the operations owner but since waste management usually is operated by other functions or companies, supportive methods to include material waste in operational development are needed. The main purpose of the research has therefore been to develop a method framework for identifying and analysing potentials for waste management in manufacturing industry, including residual material values of metals, combustible and inert waste, process fluids and other hazardous waste. Case studies were conducted to find economically competitive environmental improvements on team, site and multisite level and to define suitable performance indicators for continuous improvements. A novel approach: waste flow mapping (WFM), combining Value Stream Mapping (VSM), Eco mapping and a waste composition analysis with basic lean principles is used. The material’s value flow and the information flow is analysed in a VSM. Eco-mapping is used to give a graphical structure for the analysis of labour and equipment, with subsequent costs. Finally the waste hierarchy and composition analysis is used to imply the potential for business improvements and best practice examples are used. The developed method reveals the potential in an easy way and support integration of waste management in operations and continuous improvement work.

    Empirical data from a full scale multi-site study of waste management of material residuals at a global manufacturing company’s operations in Sweden are used to exemplify that with the WFM approach the mapping can be done in an efficient and consistent manner, revealing value losses and improvement potentials. Fraction definitions and operational practice standards were essential to realise cost efficiency and reach a more sustainable footprint. Comparisons between sites show that with simple actions, substantial improvements in recycling efficiency can be made, leading to proposed performance indicators and highlighting the need for established standardized implementation solutions. The results further point out the importance of avoiding mixing material with lower quality grade of that material. The experiences prove that Waste Flow Mapping is a suitable method to efficiently identify sustainability improvement potentials.

  • 34. Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University.
    Green performancemap: visualising environmental KPIs2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production.
    Johansson, Mats I.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Ebin, Burcak
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Considerations when modelling ev battery circularity systems2019In: Batteries, ISSN 2313-0105, Vol. 5, no 2, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The electric vehicle market is expected to grow substantially in the coming years, which puts new requirements on the end-of-life phase and on the recycling systems. To a larger extent, the environmental footprint from these vehicles is related to raw material extraction and production, and, consequently, a material-and energy-efficient 3R system (reuse, remanufacturing, recycling) is urgently needed. The ability to understand and model the design and development of such a system therefore becomes important. This study contributes to this by identifying factors that affect 3R system design and performance, relating these factors to the various actors and processes of the system and categorising them according to time from implementation to impact. The above is achieved by applying a PEST analysis (political, economic, social and technological factors), differentiating between political, economic, social and technological factors. Data were gathered from literature, by interviews and by a number of workshops in the automotive industry and the 3R system and observations at meetings, etc. The study confirms some previous results on how vehicle battery 3R systems work and adds knowledge about the influencing factors, especially the timeframes and dynamics of the system, necessary for modelling the system and the influencing factors. For practitioners, the results indicate how to use appropriate models and which factors are most relevant to them.

  • 36.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Tettey, Uniben
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Gustavsson, Conny
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Manufacturing Processes.
    FKG method for collecting data and calculation of climate footprint forcomponents supplied to the automotive industry2024Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Th is method is developed for the purpose of helping suppliers to the automotive industry present a potential climate footprint of their proposed products to their customers in a quotation stage. The supplier/producer company is responsible for making a complete inventory of all inputs and outputs of the proposed product in accordance with the D ata C o llection T emplate. The method is based on the modelling of a climate footprint for a fictive average product, that can be used to present an estimated potential climate footprint for future product offers. Th e method was developed as integral parts of a climate footprint project coordinated by FKG, representing Swedish automotive component suppliers. The project resulted in this method, including an inventory tool to be used by supplier s to collect data and an average product model and calculator to estimate a potential clim ate footprint of the suppliers products. The inventory data includes information on supplied materials (types and qualities), transportation ( volume , mode, and distance), and energy sources (types and suppliers) used in production during 2021 or 2022 . This data can be used in simulations for future products. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) consultants utilize the inventory to construct a simplified cradle to gate model in software tools like SimaPro, LCA for Experts (formerly GaBi )), or other LCA modelling software tool . This model, which employs a “simple cut off for recycled input materials and recyclable materials from production (“simple cut off” according to Ekvall et al. 2020 as recommended by EPD International see further chapter 2 and 3 for scope and modelling )), either utilizes certified climate data (e. EPDs) from sub suppliers or, more commonly, relies on general Ecoinvent data for materials and energy. A simplified LCA model for the average product from the previous year is documented and serves as the baseline for the calculation . Subsequently, a calculator is developed that can simulate a climate footprint for production of a new product in the factory based on the production volume and material mix from the previous year. In the calculator, the climate footprint of the 'core' for each main process and subprocess is treated as fixed factors proportional to the weight of the product. The upstream part treats the raw material mix (bill of materials) as a variable that can be adjusted for each product, where each raw material has specific materials) as a variable that can be adjusted for each product, where each raw material has specific climate footprint factorsclimate footprint factors.. Validation of the Validation of the method method toto developdevelop an an averageaverage--productproduct--model and the calculator is carried out by model and the calculator is carried out by a a validation bodyvalidation body.. In this first version of the methodIn this first version of the method, , the validation body is the validation body is RISE. The validation proRISE. The validation programgram builds on builds on review of review of assumed dataassumed data andand confirms the use of reasonabconfirms the use of reasonable and le and sufficient sufficient data for thedata for the simplifiedsimplified LCALCA modelmodel. The validation program. The validation program does not verify does not verify thatthat the bill of materials the bill of materials andand bill of bill of processes processes are sufficient are sufficient to produce to produce the the product/product/component butcomponent but validates the reasonableness of thvalidates the reasonableness of this is datadata..

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  • 37.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Lean and green integration into production system models - Experiences from Swedish industry2014In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 85, p. 180-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on integration of operations management, specifically production system models with environmental management and related issues such as quality and safety. Based on knowledge concerning lean-based improvement programmes for company-specific production systems (XPS) and integration between formal management systems, such as ISO 9001 and 14001, industrial practices from integrating management systems with the XPS were studied. A literature-based comparison between formal management systems and XPS is made, indicating integration potentials. The empirical research is an analysis of five vehicle and automotive companies in which various efforts have been made to integrate their management systems with their XPS. The results show that although conscious steps have been taken since the introduction of ISO 14001 in integrating environmental management into everyday operations, there are still obstacles to overcome. To fully include sustainability aspects, the characteristics of the improvement systems have to be adapted and extended. One barrier to extended integration is the lack of integration strategy. There is further a lack of sustainability metrics and adaptation of improvement methods to push companies' operational performance. In addition, organisational issues still arise concerning the responsibility and ownership of environmental management in relation to operations. Based on these results it is concluded that processes for integration are recommended; however, each organisation needs to consider its operations, corporate culture and business opportunities of its environmental management. Still, incorporating environmental management systems into XPS is seen as an effective way of establishing company commonality in continuous improvement, resulting in holistic understanding and improved organisation performance.

  • 38.
    Landström, Anna
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Almström, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Winroth, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Andersson, Carin
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ericson Öberg, Anna
    Volvo Construction Equipment AB, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Windmark, Christina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    A life cycle approach to business performance measurement systems2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 25, p. 126-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Virtually every company has implemented a Business Performance Measurement System (BPMS) with the purpose of monitoring production and business performance and to execute the corporate strategy at all levels in a company. The purpose of this article is to shed light on common pitfalls related to the practical use of BPMS and further to present a life cycle model with the purpose of introducing structured approach to avoiding the pitfalls. The article contributes to further development of the BPMS life cycle concept and practical examples of how it can be used.

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  • 39.
    Landström, Anna
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Andersson, Carin
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Windmark, Christina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Almström, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Winroth, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF, Energi och miljö.
    Ericsson Öberg, Anna
    Volvo Construction Equipment, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Andreas
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Sweden.
    Present state analysis of business performance measurement systems in large manufacturing companies2016In: PMA Conference 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to empirically investigate the present state of the performance measurement systems (PMS) at 7 sites of 6 different large Swedish manufacturing companies. The methodology has both a bottom-up and a top-down perspective. Important findings are that the PMSs are very similar in how they function but differ a lot in what is measured.

  • 40.
    Lindahl, Emma
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Bellgran, Monica
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    How could a SME supplier's value chain be evaluated by circular production principles?2022In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier B.V. , 2022, Vol. 105, p. 648-653Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased demands for circularity in manufacturing industry put pressure on transformation in order to meet the Sustainable Development Goals. Small-and-medium-sized-enterprises (SME)'s have an important role, supplying value chains with material and components for larger companies and original-equipment-manufacturers (OEMs). SME suppliers' net environmental footprint contributes to the OEM's overall footprint, however, SME suppliers are characterized by limited resources and competence to perform circularity activities. SME net environmental footprint consists of both production related targets combined with product related targets. Circular product performance evaluation have raised a demand for easy-to-use, self-assisting tools as a complement or substitute for standardised life-cycle-assessment (LCA) methods, often considered as costly with advanced calculations, and highlights the need for the development of accessible tools and guides that support the SMEs' circularity work. An established industrial tool based on previous research called the Green Performance Map (GPM), has successfully been used to assist circularity performance in production operations. This paper sets out to test the GPM tool in a new setting, addressing circularity in an extended value chain context, including three main areas; production and sourcing, product use and product end-of-life. The research presented is based on an in-depth case study with an interactive research approach and aims to explore how to reach a full value chain perspective on circularity in production. The result indicates that a joint and inclusive collaboration centred on the adapted GPM-tool, identifies and structures circular production principles as well as product use and end-of-life performance as a basis for evaluation. Findings from research study show that a comprehensive input-output tool could be used with limited competence and time, achieve increased employee awareness of circularity in the product value chain. This single case study brings a small empirical contribution to existing literature on SME circular production transformation, however it clearly shows on the urgency to evaluate circularity along the value chain in order to support a full industrial circular production transformation.

  • 41.
    MacHado, Carla
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Almstrom, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Öberg, Anna
    Volvo, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Almashalah, Sultan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Maturity Framework Enabling Organizational Digital Readiness2020In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering at SPS2020, IOS Press BV , 2020, p. 649-660Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization and the use of advanced technologies for more flexible and resource efficient production processes are changing the industrial competitive environment. However, new technologies are not seldom implemented without the whole organization being ready to fully utilize its benefits. This readiness can be expressed as organizational digital maturity. Previous studies identified that the level of digitalization is increasing, but, in many cases, due to lack of foundation, it is not aligned with the business strategy and/or supported by the organizational and technological infrastructures. There is a gap in existing models to provide practical starting-up steps to support the organizational digital readiness. A conceptual readiness framework for organizational digital readiness was tested through the analysis and reflection of four cases implemented by a Swedish manufacturing company. Findings point out that it is important to create a proper organizational foundation, a readiness, to ensure a company to evolve in digital maturity. That can be developed based on three main stages of change management practices. The tool can be used to identify the organizational readiness and thereby the gaps and thresholds necessary to overcome. This will enable companies to utilize the technology level necessary to increase cost and resource efficiency, and hence competitiveness. In addition, dimensions and a roadmap for organizational, digital, and smart readiness is presented. © 2020 The authors 

  • 42. Machado, Carla
    et al.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Swerea, Swerea IVF.
    Winroth, Mats
    Bennett, David
    Production management and smart manufacturing from a systems perspective2018In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering, 2018, p. 329-334Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The traditional view of production systems relies on the organization of physical and information flows enabling customer satisfaction with products or services, following inputs from strategy, policies, rules and principles, supported by tools, systems and methods, and improved through performance management systems. Moving forward to new levels of industrialization, smart manufacturing represents systems integration and automation supported by Cyber-Physical-Systems (CPS) to enable more autonomous, agile and sustainable production processes, which can at the same time be influenced by, as well as influencing the organizational system in real time. As a new managerial topic, this research paper intends to study and systematically organize the literature related to smart manufacturing and production systems design in order to identify whether smart manufacturing can be implemented through the production systems approach and, if so, what are the requirements for implementation and integration of different management systems (e.g. quality, and environment systems).

  • 43.
    Machado, Carla
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Winroth, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Almström, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Ericson Öberg, Anna
    Volvo Construction Equipment, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    AlMashalah, Sultan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Digital organisational readiness: experiences from manufacturing companies2021In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 167-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This research aims to identify and organise the conditions of organisational readiness for digital transformation. Design/methodology/approach: This qualitative study comprises three case studies within manufacturing companies from different sizes and industries located in Sweden. Plant visits and in-depth interviews bring to light companies' experiences with initial steps towards digital transformation. A set of conditions for digital organisational readiness was translated into a questionnaire and tested with one of the studied companies. Findings: This paper organises and tests digital organisational readiness conditions to support companies' initial steps on digital transformation. The results are put in perspective of established change management theory and previous studies about digital transformation. The findings will conclude in a questionnaire to support dialogue and digital organisational readiness assessments. Research limitations/implications: Additional conditions for the initial phase of digital transformation could possibly be found if more cases had been included in the study. Practical implications: The article identifies a set of conditions translated into a questionnaire that should be used as a dialogue tool to create strategic alignment and support companies in their initial discussions. If this process can be faster and more efficient, the company can achieve a competitive advantage against competitors. Originality/value: This research's relevance relies on the fact that companies are advancing in adopting digital technologies without being ready from an organisational perspective. This gap creates barriers for companies' digital maturing processes, stopping them from having full access to digital technologies' benefits. © 2021, Carla Gonçalves Machado, Mats Winroth, Peter Almström, Anna Ericson Öberg, Martin Kurdve and Sultan AlMashalah.

  • 44.
    Mattsson, Sandra
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Almström, P.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Skagert, Katrin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Synthesis of Universal Workplace Design in Assembly-A Case Study2022In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering, IOS Press BV , 2022, Vol. 21, p. 184-196Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To form an inclusive and sustainable society, workplace design that can be used by different individuals, regardless of sex, language, background, and body function variations is needed. Such workplaces can also give economic benefits to companies if they provide a more accessible, safer, more productive and error proofed working environment. This aim of this paper is to evaluate a universal design concept developed at a company aiming at providing an 'easy job'-workplace design for manual industrial operations. The study investigated key factors from 8 interviews and compared it to theoretical constructs such as WHO's ICIDH-2. A synthesis was formed that included the following factors: personal factors, environmental factors and outcomes of universal work. The study has resulted in new insights regarding universal workplace design and the vision is that the synthesis can be used by other production companies that want to increase the universal design in assembly work. © 2022 The authors

  • 45.
    Mattsson, Sandra
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Almström, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Skagert, Katrin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Framework for universal design of digital support and workplace design in industry2023In: international journal of manufacturing researchArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to propose a framework for universal design of manual assembly workplaces. Workplaces that are adapted to different individuals, regardless of gender, language, background and functional variations, also support the fundamental goals of the Industry 5.0 concept and an accessible, safer, productive and error-proof work environment. The study included: 1) a qualitative study on key factors for universal design and comparison with universal design theory; 2) improvement suggestions to the company based on observations, interviews and theory; 3) a framework for universal design. The framework included the following areas: personalisation and context, activities/tasks and output, and methods/standards and factors were suggested so that companies could start their analysis work for the design. The study resulted in new insights and empirics regarding universal workplace design.

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  • 46.
    Mohammadi, Zahra
    et al.
    Mälardalen University .
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University .
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Critical Factors in Designing of Lean and Green Equipment2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing production equipment considering lean and related sustainability requirements may be a major factor in achieving productiveness through lean implementation. The objective of the study is to investigate the impact of lean production requirements on equipment design and how the lean requirements affects early design phases and global footprint. Data collection method includes literature review and in depth interviews with equipment users. The results provide support to importance of considering green and lean requirements in designing of production equipment by introducing important lean design factors for production equipment. These factors are designing simple equipment, error-proofing, being portable and flexible, supporting one piece flow, supporting short setup time, easy and reliable maintenance, supporting the operator interface with machine, safety of the operator, supporting production processes and layouts, energy efficiency, easy to operate, minimum cost, visualization, straight flows, teamwork, standardization, quality assurance, using pervious experiences, easy to clean, and easy to control. 

  • 47.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Material efficiency measurements in manufacturing: Swedish case studies2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 181, p. 17-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major factor in the continued deterioration of the global environment is unsustainable management of resources that includes the type and quantity of resources consumed and manufactured as well as the subsequent generation and treatment of wasted materials. Improved material efficiency (ME) in manufacturing is key to reducing resource consumption levels and improving waste management initiatives. However, ME must be measured, and related goals must be broken down into performance indicators for manufacturing companies. This paper aims to improve ME in manufacturing using a structured model for ME performance measurements. We present a set of ME key performance indicators (ME-KPIs) at the individual company and lower operational levels based on empirical studies and a structured literature review. Our empirical findings are based on data collected on the performance indicators and material and waste flows of nine manufacturing companies located in Sweden. The proposed model categorizes ME-KPIs into the following categories: productive input materials, auxiliary input materials, output products, and residual output materials. These categories must be measured equally to facilitate the measurement, assessment, improvement and reporting of material consumption and waste generation in a manufacturing context. Required qualities for ME-KPI suggested in literature are also discussed, and missing indicators are identified. Most of the identified ME-KPIs measure quality- and cost-related factors, while end-of-life scenarios, waste segregation and the environmental effects of waste generation and material consumption are not equally measured. Additionally, ME-KPIs must also be connected to pre-determined goals and that defining or revising ME-KPIs requires communication with various external and internal actors to increase employees’ awareness and engagement.

  • 48.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Material efficiency in manufacturing2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developments, industrialization and mass production have triggered rapid increase of raw material consumption and great volumes of industrial waste, while industrial waste management infrastructure has not been developed with the same pace. One mean in striving for industrial waste management is the management of process materials. This paper introduces the performance measure sorting rate for each segment of waste material, along with a method for sorting analysis to help improving overall material efficiency and industrial waste management. The results revealed that more than 50% of combustible bins’ content could be separately segregated as plastic, wood, paper, cardboard and bio-degradable.

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  • 49.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola .
    Kurdve, Martin
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    Mälardalens högskola .
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE, Swerea, IVF. Mälardalens högskola .
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalens högskola .
    Industrial waste management within manufacturing: A comparative study of Tools, policies, visions and concepts2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Zackrisson, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Kristinsdortter, Anna Runa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Comparison of Four Environmental Assessment Tools in Swedish Manufacturing: A Case Study2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 2173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To achieve sustainable development goals, it is essential to include the industrial system. There are sufficient numbers of tools and methods for measuring, assessing and improving the quality, productivity and efficiency of production, but the number of tools and methods for environmental initiatives on the shop floor is rather low. Incorporating environmental considerations into production and performance management systems still generally involves a top-down approach aggregated for an entire manufacturing plant. Green lean studies have been attempting to fill this gap to some extent, but the lack of detailed methodologies and practical tools for environmental manufacturing improvement on the shop floor is still evident. This paper reports on the application of four environmental assessment tools commonly used among Swedish manufacturing companies—Green Performance Map (GPM), Environmental Value Stream Mapping (EVSM), Waste Flow Mapping (WFM), and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)—to help practitioners and scholars to understand the different features of each tool, so in turn the right tool(s) can be selected according to particular questions and the industrial settings. Because there are some overlap and differences between the tools and a given tool may be more appropriate to a situation depending on the question posed, a combination of tools is suggested to embrace different types of data collection and analysis to include different environmental impacts for better prioritization and decision-making.

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