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  • 1.
    Ahlinder, Astrid
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Höglund, Evelina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Miljkovic, Ana
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Towards attractive texture modified foods with increased fiber content for dysphagia via 3D printing and 3D scanning2023In: Frontiers in Food Science and Technology, E-ISSN 2674-1121, Vol. 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As life expectancy increases so do age related problems such as swallowing disorders, dysphagia, which affects 10%–30% of people over 65 years old. For dysphagia patients the texture and rheological properties of the food, and the bolus, is critical to avoid choking and pneumonia. Texture modified foods, timbals, are often served to these patients due to their ease of swallowing. The main concern with these foods is that they do not look visually alike the food they replace, which can decrease the patient’s appetite and lead to reduced food intake and frailty. This study aims to improve both the visual appearance of texturized food as well as the energy density and fiber content of the timbal formulation. 3D scanning and additive manufacturing (3D Printing) were used to produce meals more reminiscent of original food items, increasing their visual appeal. Rheology was used to ensure the original flow profile was maintained as the timbal was reformulated by reducing starch contents and partially replacing with dietary fibers. The amount of starch was reduced from 8.7 wt% in the original formulation to 3.5 wt% and partially replaced with 3 wt% citrus fiber, while maintaining properties suitable for both swallowing and 3D printing. The resulting formulation has improved nutritional properties, while remaining suitable for constructing visually appealing meals, as demonstrated by 3Dprinting a chicken drumstick from a model generated with 3D scanning.

  • 2. Andersson, Helene
    et al.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Johansson, Daniel
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Kniola, Magda
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Extensional flow, viscoelasticity and baking performance of gluten-free zein-starch doughs supplemented with hydrocolloids2011In: Food Hydrocolloids, ISSN 0268-005X, E-ISSN 1873-7137, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 1587-1595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Viscoelastic doughs of zein and starch were prepared at 40 °C, above the glass transition temperature of zein. The effects of hydrocolloid supplementation with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) or oat bran with a high content of ?-glucan (28%) were investigated by dynamic measurements in shear, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and Hyperbolic Contraction Flow. Zein-starch dough without hydrocolloids exhibited rapid age-related stiffening, believed to be caused by cross-links between peptide chains. A prolonged softness was attributed to doughs containing hydrocolloids, with the oat bran exhibiting the most pronounced reduction in age-related stiffening. Moreover, CLSM-images of dough microstructure revealed that a finer fibre network may be formed by increased shearing through an addition of viscosity-increasing hydrocolloids, a reduction in water content in the dough or the use of appropriate mixing equipment. The Hyperbolic Contraction Flow measurements showed that doughs containing hydrocolloids had high extensional viscosities and strain hardening, suggesting appropriate rheological properties for bread making. Zein-starch dough without hydrocolloids showed poor bread making performance while hydrocolloid additions significantly improved bread volume and height. Although the hydrocolloid supplemented doughs had similar extensional rheological properties and microstructures, a fine crumb structure was attributed only to bread containing HPMC, marking the importance of surface active components in the liquid-gas interface of dough bubble walls. Zein could not mimic the properties of gluten on its own, but hydrocolloids did positively affect the structural and rheological properties of zein, which yielded dough similar to wheat dough and bread with increased volume. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Johanna
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Compression of plant seeds assuming soft spheres2021In: Annual Transactions of the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 29, p. 103-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Berta, Marco
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Koelewijn, Ingrid
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience. University of Applied Sciences HAS Den Bosch, The Netherlands.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Effect of zein protein and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose on the texture of model gluten-free bread2019In: Journal of texture studies, ISSN 0022-4901, E-ISSN 1745-4603, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 341-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of zein protein and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) on the texture and volume of gluten-free bread was investigated. The addition of HPMC to starch affected the dough viscoelasticity and it improved the bread volume during baking since it acts as an emulsifier. The addition of zein protein to gluten-free bread increased the crumb firmness and reduced the crust hardness within the range of concentrations investigated. No zein protein network could be observed in the bread crumb. The zein protein, cold mixed at low concentration, did not enhance the dough elasticity. Due to the lack of a protein network noncovalent interactions may stabilize the bubble structure stabilization within the crumb, rather than covalent links of the protein chain. With an optimized amount of zein protein and HPMC hydrocolloid, the gluten-free bread showed similar texture and staling behavior to that of model wheat bread. The optimized recipe, compiled into a spreadsheet, is available in the supporting information. The microstructural observations suggest that zein could be replaced with another protein for this recipe resulting in a similar bread texture.

  • 5.
    Chen, Guo
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Langton, Maud
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik. SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Lustrup, Kaare F.
    Lantmännen, Sweden; Flex Pack, Denmark.
    Nyden, Magnus
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Swenson, Jan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Impact of long-term frozen storage on the dynamics of water and ice in wheat bread2013In: Journal of Cereal Science, ISSN 0733-5210, E-ISSN 1095-9963, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 120-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Frozen storage of bread has a substantial impact on the dynamics of water and ice in the crumb and crust. In this study, the impact was characterized using wheat bread stored at -18 °C for a long term of ?4 months. The frozen bread incurred a considerable loss of the crumb water that migrated out and formed ice crystals on the bread surface. Such a moisture decrease underwent more rapidly for the bread stored without intact crust, suggesting the specific role of crust during frozen storage. Moisture also redistributed significantly within the frozen crumb, resulting in an elevated crumb heterogeneity of freezable water. This redistribution of freezable water was accompanied by a progressive recrystallization of the crumb-borne ice crystals, which were measured to grow into bulk sizes using a modified calorimetric procedure for analyzing the crumb samples at their as-frozen states.

  • 6.
    Eckardt, Johanna
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Alp, A.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Ekman, Susanne
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Åström, Annika
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Chen, Guo
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Swenson, Jan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Johansson, Daniel
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Langton, Maud I.B.C.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik. SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Long-term frozen storage of wheat bread and dough: Effect of time, temperature and fibre on sensory quality, microstructure and state of water2013In: Journal of Cereal Science, ISSN 0733-5210, E-ISSN 1095-9963, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 125-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to determine effect of storage time, storage temperature and addition of fibre on sensory quality, state of water, microstructure and texture of bread and dough. Samples with and without fibre, were stored frozen for 2, 3.5 and 6 months at temperatures of -19, -16 and -8 °C as dough and bread. Sensory quality was evaluated by a trained analytical panel. Microstructure was analysed by light microscopy. Texture measurements were performed on bread, and the state of water was measured by differential scanning calorimetry. Bread without fibre stored as dough at -19 °C was the sample most like freshly baked bread. Sensory evaluation also confirmed that quality of the final bread was improved if samples were stored as dough compared to stored as bread. The microstructure had larger gaps between the starch and gluten phases when stored at warmer temperatures, due to retrogradation of starch, dehydration of gluten and water migration. DSC measurements showed that bread stored at -19 °C gained extra amount of freezable water, but lost ice after storage at -8 °C. Texture measurements showed that firmness increased with extended storage time. Bread stored at -8 °C had lowest quality in all measurements.

  • 7. Filli, Kalep
    et al.
    Sjöqvist, M
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Rigdahl, M
    Development and Characterization of Extruded Biodegradable Foams based on Zein and Pearl Millet Flour2011In: Annual Transactionof the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 19, p. 139-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Hultgren, J.
    et al.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Segerkvist, K. A.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Berg, C.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Karlsson, A. H.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Algers, B.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Preslaughter stress and beef quality in relation to slaughter transport of cattle2022In: Livestock Science, ISSN 1871-1413, E-ISSN 1878-0490, Vol. 264, article id 105073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preslaughter handling inevitably exposes cattle to stress, which affects beef quality and yields. Short transports to the slaughterhouse or a short walk across the yard to a mobile abattoir parked on the farm may reduce stress, with potential beneficial effects on meat quality. To compare different road transport distances to a stationary (fixed) slaughterhouse, and the stationary plant with a mobile abattoir, we studied commercial slaughter of 298 cattle in each facility over a period of 13 months. For the stationary slaughterhouse, the estimated transport distance from farm to plant was 7–250 km (mean 99 km) and 96 animals spent one night in lairage there. All animals at both slaughterhouses were stunned with a captive bolt gun. Blood levels of cortisol, glucose and lactate at exsanguination and meat quality indicators were recorded. According to two-sample t-tests, thawing loss was 1 percent unit lower (p<0.0001), Warner-Bratzler shear force was 6.9 N lower (p<0.0001) and compressive load was 3.9 MPa lower (p<0.0001), but mean lactate level was 1.02 mmol/l higher (p<0.0001) and ultimate pH was 0.05 units higher (p=0.0001) in the mobile facility compared with the stationary. Effects of slaughter facility and estimated road transport distance to the stationary plant on blood lactate, ultimate meat pH, shear force and compressive load were analysed by generalized linear mixed models, with delivering farm as random effect. According to the models, predicted shear force was 23% higher at the 95th percentile of the transport distance compared with the 5th percentile (p=0.012), and there was some evidence of a similar difference in compressive load for heifers, albeit only marginally significant (39% higher at the 95th percentile; p=0.056). Predicted blood lactate was 19% higher in the mobile abattoir than the stationary slaughterhouse (p=0.046). Ultimate meat pH was higher in the mobile unit for cows and steers (p≤0.0020), and for carcasses weighing 311–380 kg (p≤0.0020). Compressive load was 27% lower in the mobile abattoir, compared to the stationary (p<0.0001), but shear force did not differ significantly between the two facilities. This study shows a negative effect of long transport distances on beef tenderness. It also provides evidence of differences in beef quality between a mobile abattoir and a stationary slaughterhouse, although these differences may be attributable to specific routines for carcass handling and ageing at the studied facilities, and not the transport and slaughter strategy itself. 

  • 9.
    Karlsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Berta, Marco
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Rigdahl, Mikael
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Flow Behaviour and Microstructure of a β-Glucan Concentrate2018In: Journal of Polymers and the Environment, ISSN 1566-2543, E-ISSN 1572-8919, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 3352-3361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extensional viscosity is an important rheological characteristic of polymer melts. It is however not as frequently reported on as the shear viscosity. The extensional viscosity is of special interest when considering polymeric materials for foaming and film blowing processes. Here, the extensional (and shear) viscosity along with the melt strength and the tensile properties of the corresponding solid film of a β-glucan concentrate are reported on. A capillary viscometer equipped with a hyperbolic die, yielding a contraction flow, was used to assess the extensional viscosity of the aqueous β-glucan compound at room temperature and at elevated temperatures (110 and 130 °C). In general, the extensional viscosity as well as the shear viscosity decreased with increasing deformation rate. The influence of two different amounts of added water (40 and 50%) was also examined. As expected, both types of viscosities decreased with increasing temperature. It is suggested that gelatinization of the starch fraction in the concentrate at 110 and 130 °C contributes to temperature dependence of the viscosity. To some extent, this is supported by light microscopy and confocal scanning laser microscopy studies of the microstructure of the materials. The results reported here indicate that the β-glucan concentrate might, after some modifications, be used as a complement to fossil-based polymers and processed by conventional manufacturing techniques. 

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  • 10.
    Niimi, Jun
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Ahlinder, Astrid
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Nilsson Pingel, Torben
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Niimi, Claudia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Höglund, Evelina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Loren, Niklas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Nielsen, Tim
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Saltiness enhancement: Impact of acid added to bread with heterogeneously distributed sodium chloride2023In: Lebensmittel-Wissenschaft + Technologie, ISSN 0023-6438, E-ISSN 1096-1127, Vol. 176, article id 114557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current global sodium consumption exceeds recommended daily intakes and there is a great need to reduce the sodium content in foods for a healthier society. The current study investigated the effect of combining sensory interaction principles and heterogeneous distribution of NaCl in bread on sensory properties, structure, and NaCl distribution. Breads were prepared in three different arrangements of NaCl distribution: homogenous, layered, and layered with lactic acid. Within each arrangement, four NaCl levels were tested. The breads were evaluated by a sensory panel for perceived saltiness, sourness, and qualitative texture, measured for stiffness, and the NaCl distribution was determined by X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). Perceived saltiness was significantly enhanced in breads beyond heterogeneous NaCl distribution when lactic acid was added. Stiffness measurements were affected by layering of bread, the layers without NaCl were stiffer with an increase in overall salt concentration. The heterogeneous distribution of NaCl in layered breads could be visualised by XFM and textural consequences of layering bread are discussed. The current study demonstrates the potential of combining principles of pulsation of taste and sensory interactions together to enhance salt perception, and hence suggesting the approach as a possible further strategy for NaCl reduction in bread.

  • 11.
    Schott, Florian
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Sven
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Larsson, Emanuel
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Lund University, Sweden.
    Marone, Frederica
    Swiss Light Source, Switzerland.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Röding, Magnus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hall, Stephen
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Loren, Niklas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Mokso, Rajmund
    Lund University, Sweden; DTU Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Raaholt, Birgitta
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Vehicles and Automation.
    Structural formation during bread baking in a combined microwave-convective oven determined by sub-second in-situ synchrotron X-ray microtomography2023In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 173, article id 113283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new concept has been developed for characterizing the real-time evolution of the three-dimensional pore and lamella microstructure of bread during baking using synchrotron X-ray microtomography (SRµCT). A commercial, combined microwave-convective oven was modified and installed at the TOMCAT synchrotron tomography beamline at the Swiss Light Source (SLS), to capture the 3D dough-to-bread structural development in-situ at the micrometer scale with an acquisition time of 400 ms. This allowed characterization and quantitative comparison of three baking technologies: (1) convective heating, (2) microwave heating, and (3) a combination of convective and microwave heating. A workflow for automatic batchwise image processing and analysis of 3D bread structures (1530 analyzed volumes in total) was established for porosity, individual pore volume, elongation, coordination number and local wall thickness, which allowed for evaluation of the impact of baking technology on the bread structure evolution. The results showed that the porosity, mean pore volume and mean coordination number increase with time and that the mean local cell wall thickness decreases with time. Small and more isolated pores are connecting with larger and already more connected pores as function of time. Clear dependencies are established during the whole baking process between the mean pore volume and porosity, and between the mean local wall thickness and the mean coordination number. This technique opens new opportunities for understanding the mechanisms governing the structural changes during baking and discern the parameters controlling the final bread quality. © 2023 The Author(s)

  • 12.
    Schuster, Erich
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Ann-Marie
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Rudemo, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Loren, Niklas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Interactions and diffusion in fine-stranded beta-lactoglobulin gels determined via FRAP and binding2014In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 106, no 1, p. 253-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of electrostatic interactions and obstruction by the microstructure on probe diffusion were determined in positively charged hydrogels. Probe diffusion in fine-stranded gels and solutions of ?-lactoglobulin at pH 3.5 was determined using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and binding, which is widely used in biophysics. The microstructures of the ?-lactoglobulin gels were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The effects of probe size and charge (negatively charged Na2-fluorescein (376Da) and weakly anionic 70kDa FITC-dextran), probe concentration (50 to 200 ppm), and ?-lactoglobulin concentration (9% to 12% w/w) on the diffusion properties and the electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged probes and the positively charged gels or solutions were evaluated. The results show that the diffusion of negatively charged Na2-fluorescein is strongly influenced by electrostatic interactions in the positively charged ?-lactoglobulin systems. A linear relationship between the pseudo-on binding rate constant and the ?-lactoglobulin concentration for three different probe concentrations was found. This validates an important assumption of existing biophysical FRAP and binding models, namely that the pseudo-on binding rate constant equals the product of the molecular binding rate constant and the concentration of the free binding sites. Indicators were established to clarify whether FRAP data should be analyzed using a binding-diffusion model or an obstruction-diffusion model.

  • 13.
    Stenberg, Elin
    et al.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Anders
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Arvidsson-Segerkvist, Katarina
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Carcass characteristics and meat quality attributes in lambs reared indoors, on cultivated pasture, or on semi-natural pasture2020In: Agricultural and Food Science, ISSN 1459-6067, E-ISSN 1795-1895, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 432-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated the effects of different lamb production systems on live weight gain (LWG), carcass quality and meat quality. Four production systems for weaned intact male lambs were examined: Indoor feeding with grass silage and concentrate (group 1), grazing on cultivated pasture with (group 2) or without (group 3) concentrate, and grazing on semi-natural pasture (group 4). Live weight, carcass weight, dressing percentage, carcass conformation, fatness and pH decline were recorded at slaughter, and M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum was analysed for colour, thawing and cooking loss, pH after 24 hours and 6 days, and Warner-Bratzler shear force. LWG was strongly affected by production system, being highest for group 1 and lowest for group 4 (p<0.001). Group 4 had the lowest conformation (p=0.002) and fat scores (p<0.001). Hence, production system affected age at slaughter, live weight gain, weight at slaughter, carcass conformation and fatness scores, but caused no differences in meat quality attributes in intact male lambs.

  • 14.
    Svanberg, Lina
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Malmberg, Kajsa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Gustinelli, Graziele
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Persson, Ingela
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Brive, Lena
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Wassén, Sophia
    Effect of anthocyanins on lipid oxidation and microbial spoilage in value-added emulsions with bilberry seed oil, anthocyanins and cold set whey protein hydrogels2019In: Food Chemistry, ISSN 0308-8146, E-ISSN 1873-7072, Vol. 272, p. 273-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this work was to explore the storage properties of a structured oil-in-water emulsion containing both water- and fat-soluble bioactive compounds from bilberries (Vaccinium myrtillus L.). Bilberry seed oil (BSO) was dispersed in a continuous aqueous phase of anthocyanins (AC) and whey protein isolate. The microstructure was evaluated using light microscopy and the effect of anthocyanins on lipid oxidation and microbial growth was investigated. The results showed that it was possible to generate a stable emulsion structure that resisted phase separation during 25 weeks of storage. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry measurements of the fatty acids in the BSO during storage showed that AC had a protective effect against lipid oxidation. The AC did not have an antimicrobial effect against the investigated strains Zygosaccharomyces bailii (ATCC 42476) and Aspergillus niger (ATCC 6275 (M68)).

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  • 15.
    Svanberg, Lina
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Wassén, Sophia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Gustinelli, Graziele
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Design of microcapsules with bilberry seed oil, cold-set whey protein hydrogels and anthocyanins: Effect of pH and formulation on structure formation kinetics and resulting microstructure during purification processing and storage2019In: Food Chemistry, ISSN 0308-8146, E-ISSN 1873-7072, Vol. 280, p. 146-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Encapsulation of polar and non-polar bioactive compounds from bilberries was achieved by designing microcapsules with bilberry seed oil (BSO) distributed in an aqueous phase of anthocyanins (AC) stabilized by whey protein isolate (WPI). Non-thermal emulsification method (o/w/o) was developed and the effect of pH (3 or 4.5), concentration of WPI (8.4–10.8% w/w), addition of AC (72–216 ppm) and emulsifier on the structure-forming kinetics, resulting microstructure during storage and after centrifugation and washing was investigated. Agglomeration of BSO was observed in all microcapsules at pH 4.5 due to slow gelling process and in samples at pH 3 at low concentrations of WPI (≤8.4%). Capsules with pH 3 (9.6–10.8% WPI) had weak structures but as the gelling process was faster, it generated an even distribution of BSO droplets. All samples at pH 4.5 and samples with WPI concentration ≥10.8% at pH 3 exhibited intact structures after centrifugation and washing.

  • 16.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Smakliga rätter för ökad konsumtion av nyttiga vegetabilier : slutrapport2010Report (Other academic)
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  • 17.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Structure Design.
    Fabregat, Nieves
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut. SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Langton, Maud
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Quality of bread baked from frozen dough - effects of rye, and sugar content, kneading time and proofing profile2016In: Lebensmittel-Wissenschaft + Technologie, ISSN 0023-6438, E-ISSN 1096-1127, Vol. 68, p. 626-633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate whether proofing profile influences volume and crumb firmness in bread baked from frozen dough, and whether rye or sugar content and different kneading times affect the microstructure of the frozen dough. Microscopy was used to explain the differences.Wheat doughs mixed with rye ("rye") and with sugar ("sweet") were frozen after 3 different proofing times (0, 18, and 38 min) and visualized with confocal laser scanning microscopy and 3-dimensional micro-computed tomography. The baked breads were evaluated for volume and texture. Breads from un-proofed frozen dough allowed to proof after thawing showed the highest volume (4.0 cm3/g) and the softest crumb texture. The pre-proofed sweet bread had firmer crumbs and lower volume (2.5-3.0 cm3/g) than the pre-proofed rye bread (2.7-3.7 cm3/g). Reasons for the differences in quality parameters between the rye and sweet breads were investigated by studying the different influences of kneading time and sugar content on fresh and frozen dough. The gluten network was found to be more homogeneously distributed in doughs with longer kneading times and lower sugar content, and less well distributed and more lumped in frozen than in fresh dough.

  • 18.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Langton, Maud
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Hermansson, Ann-Marie
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Structure-fracture measurements of particulate gels2004In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 39, no 21, p. 6473-6482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Images on a micron scale and the stress-strain behaviour of gel structures during tension were simultaneously recorded in real time using a mini fracture cell under the confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). ?-lactoglobulin gels tailor-made to vary in density, connectivity, thickness of strands and size of aggregates and clusters were used as a food model system. Amylopectin and gelatin were used to generate different types of ?-lactoglobulin network microstructures and also as a second continuous phase. Both rheological and structural differences in fragility between ?-lactoglobulin gels were verified according to the density of their aggregated network structure. A dense gel has a more brittle behaviour where the clusters are rigid and the crack propagates smoothly compared to a gel with an open network structure, which has a discontinuous crack growth, via a winding pathway around clusters, and also break-up of the pores far from the crack tip. Differences in the stretchability of the aggregated ?-lactoglobulin structure, induced by addition of amylopectin solution, were proved and related to differences in stress-strain behaviour and crack propagation. Gelatin gels in the pores between the ?-lactoglobulin clusters do not affect the structure of the ?-lactoglobulin network but make the fracture fragile giving a smooth fracture surface, cause continuous crack growth and fracture propagation through ?-lactoglobulin clusters. This is a consequence of that the mixed gel follows the behaviour of the gelatin gel when the gelatin phase is stronger than the ?-lactoglobulin network. © 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  • 19.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Loren, Niklas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Food Structure Analysis Using Light and Confocal Microscopy: Chapter 122020In: Handbook of Food Structure Development, Royal Society of Chemistry , 2020, no 18, p. 287-308Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microstructure codes for the properties of food. Processing enables the microstructure. Food microstructures are in most cases hierarchical, heterogeneous, multiphase, and complex. A full understanding of the food microstructure requires the characterization at many different length scales. Light microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy are powerful tools to image food microstructures at the micrometer level. In this chapter, the principles and use of these microscopy techniques are described. Examples of the use of light microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy to characterize and understand the microstructures in bread and dough, fibrous vegetable protein structures, plant cell walls, fat-rich food, and mayonnaise are discussed. In the end, an outlook on the use of light microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy in foods is given..

  • 20.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Loren, Niklas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Altskär, Annika
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Hermansson, A.-M.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Surface-directed structure formation of β-lactoglobulin inside droplets2011In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 2235-2242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The morphology of β-lactoglobulin structures inside droplets was studied during aggregation and gelation using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) equipped with a temperature stage and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that there is a strong driving force for the protein to move to the interface between oil and water in the droplet, and the β-lactoglobulin formed a dense shell around the droplet built up from the inside of the droplets. Less protein was found inside the droplets. The longer the β-lactoglobulin was allowed to aggregate prior to gel formation, the larger the part of the protein went to the interface, resulting in a thicker shell and very little material being left inside the droplets. The droplets were easily deformed because no network stabilizes them. When 0.5% emulsifier, polyglycerol polyresinoleat (PGPR), was added to the oil phase, the β-lactoglobulin was situated both inside the droplets and at the interface between the droplets and the oil phase; when 2% PGPR was added, the β-lactoglobulin structure was concentrated to the inside of the droplets. The possibility to use the different morphological structures of β-lactoglobulin in droplets to control the diffusion rate through a β-lactoglobulin network was evaluated by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The results show differences in the diffusion rate due to heterogeneities in the structure: the diffusion of a large water-soluble molecule, FITC-dextran, in a dense particulate gel was 1/4 of the diffusion rate in a more open particulate β-lactoglobulin gel in which the diffusion rate was similar to that in pure water.

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