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  • 1.
    Ail, Ujwala
    et al.
    Linköpings Universitet, Sweden.
    Khan, Zia Ullah
    Linköpings Universitet, Sweden.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE, Innventia. RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Berthold, Fredrik
    RISE, Innventia. RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Parasuraman, Rajasekar
    Indian Institute of Science, India.
    Umarji, Arun M.
    Indian Institute of Science, India.
    Slettengren, Kerstin
    RISE, Innventia. RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Pettersson, Henrik
    RISE, Innventia. RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköpings Universitet, Sweden.
    Room temperature synthesis of transition metal silicide-conducting polymer micro-composites for thermoelectric applications2017In: Synthetic metals, ISSN 0379-6779, E-ISSN 1879-3290, Vol. 225, 55-63 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic polymer thermoelectrics (TE) as well as transition metal (TM) silicides are two thermoelectric class of materials of interest because they are composed of atomic elements of high abundance; which is a prerequisite for mass implementation of thermoelectric (TE) solutions for solar and waste heat recovery. But both materials have drawbacks when it comes to finding low-cost manufacturing. The metal silicide needs high temperature (>1000 °C) for creating TE legs in a device from solid powder, but it is easy to achieve long TE legs in this case. On the contrary, organic TEs are synthesized at low temperature from solution. However, it is difficult to form long legs or thick films because of their low solubility. In this work, we propose a novel method for the room temperature synthesis of TE composite containing the microparticles of chromium disilicide; CrSi2 (inorganic filler) in an organic matrix of nanofibrillated cellulose- poly(3,4-ethyelenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (NFC-PEDOT:PSS). With this method, it is easy to create long TE legs in a room temperature process. The originality of the approach is the use of conducting polymer aerogel microparticles mixed with CrSi2 microparticles to obtain a composite solid at room temperature under pressure. We foresee that the method can be scaled up to fabricate and pattern TE modules. The composite has an electrical conductivity (σ) of 5.4 ± 0.5 S/cm and the Seebeck coefficient (α) of 88 ± 9 ΌV/K, power factor (α2σ) of 4 ± 1 ΌWm−1K−2 at room temperature. At a temperature difference of 32 °C, the output power/unit area drawn across the load, with the resistance same as the internal resistance of the device is 0.6 ± 0.1 ΌW/cm2.

  • 2. Eita, M.
    et al.
    Arwin, H.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE, Innventia.
    Wågberg, L.
    Addition of silica nanoparticles to tailor the mechanical properties of nanofibrillated cellulose thin films2011In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, no 2, 566-572 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Erlandsson, J.
    et al.
    Lopez Duran, V.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE, Innventia.
    Sandberg, M.
    Larsson, P.A.
    Wågberg, L.
    Macro- and mesoporous nanocellulose beads for use in energy storage devices2016In: Applied Materials Today, ISSN 23529407, Vol. 5, 246-254 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemically cross-linked, wet-stable cellulose nanofibril (CNF) aerogel beads were fabricated using a novel procedure. The procedure facilitated controlled production of millimetre-sized CNF aerogel beads without freeze-drying or critical point drying, while still retaining a highly porous structure with low density. The aerogel beads were mechanically robust in the dry state, supporting loads of 1.3 N at 70% compression, even after being soaked in water and re-dried. Furthermore, they displayed both a good stability in water and a remarkably good shape recovery after wet compression. Owing to the stability in water, the entire surface of the highly porous aerogel beads could be successfully functionalized with polyelectrolytes and carboxyl-functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (CF-SWCNTs) using the Layer-by-Layer technique, introducing a significant electrical conductivity (1.6 mS/cm) to the aerogel beads. The functionalized, electrically conducting aerogel beads could carry as much as 2 kA/cm2 and act as electrodes in a supercapacitor displaying a stabilized charge storage capacity of 9.8 F/g after 50 charging–discharging cycles.

  • 4.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Béland, Marie-Claude
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lindberg, Siv M.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Berthold, Fredrik
    RISE, Innventia.
    Vomhoff, Hannes
    RISE, Innventia.
    Wickholm, Kristina
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lindström, Mikael
    RISE, Innventia.
    It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s a super multimaterial!2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Matching market demands and technological solutions is not always straightforward. In this article, we report on one material, a cellulose-PLA multimaterial, which was made on a full-scale pilot paper machine and adapted to five different market applications having specialized and often conflicting demands. The material can be injection molded, 3D-printed, hot pressed, treated as a textile, used in a laminate, or converted as a paper board, giving it a wide range of possible properties depending on how it is processed.The five application areas presented here were identified as gaps in the marketplace where seemingly conflicting needs were desired: opacity and transparency; compact for transport but having an expanded size during use; stiffness and flexibility; strength and light-weight; and durability and degradability. These properties are exemplified in a number of material and product demonstrators, illustrating how tailored solutions can give products with distinctly different personalities. The material can be made flexible and given movement as graceful as the wing of a bird or be processed to be strong and light-weight enough to be used in vehicles like airplanes. By having one material that is produced on a large scale, but then processed according to specific market demands and expectations, the gap between needing scale and needing scope is bridged.

  • 5.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Coppel, L.G.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Eita, M.
    De, Mayolo E.A.
    Arwin, H.
    Wågberg, L.
    Dynamics of moisture interaction with polyelectrolyte multilayers containing nanofibrillated cellulose2012In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, no 2, 496-499 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Gwinnutt, J.
    et al.
    Cumming, S.
    Prigneaux, J.
    Stevenson, A.
    Dils, C.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE, Innventia.
    Slater, A.
    Knorr, K.
    Jolly, M.
    Möbitz, C.
    Lutke, C.
    Hofmann, M.
    Käppel, D.
    How will high-performance nonwovens transform your business?2016In: Technical Textiles International, ISSN 09645993, Vol. 25, no 5, 33-37 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Jiao, Fei
    et al.
    Linköpings university, Sweden.
    Naderi, Ali
    BillerudKorsnäs, Sweden.
    Zhao, Dan
    Linköpings university, Sweden.
    Schlueter, Joshua
    University of Kentucky, USA.
    Shahi, Maryam
    University of Kentucky, USA.
    Sundström, Jonas
    RISE, Innventia. RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE, Innventia. RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Edberg, Jesper
    Linköpings University, Sweden.
    Ail, Ujwala
    Linköpings University, Sweden.
    Brill, Joseph
    BillerudKorsnäs, Sweden.
    Lindström, Tom
    RISE, Innventia. RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköpings University, Sweden .
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköpings University, Sweden .
    Ionic thermoelectric paper2017In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 5, 16883-16888 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ionic thermoelectric materials, for example, polyelectrolytes such as polystyrene sulfonate sodium (PSSNa),constitute a new class of materials which are attracting interest because of their large Seebeck coefficientand the possibility that they could be used in ionic thermoelectric SCs (ITESCs) and field effect transistors.However, pure polyelectrolyte membranes are not robust or flexible. In this paper, the preparation of ionicthermoelectric paper using a simple, scalable and cost-effective method is described. After a compositewas fabricated with nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC), the resulting NFC–PSSNa paper is flexible andmechanically robust, which is desirable if it is to be used in roll-to-roll processes. The robust NFC–PSSNa thermoelectric paper combines high ionic conductivity (9 mS cm1), high ionic Seebeckcoefficient (8.4 mV K1) and low thermal conductivity (0.75 W m1 K1) at 100% relative humidity,resulting in overall figure-of-merit of 0.025 at room temperature which is slightly better than that for thePSSNa alone. Fabricating a composite with cellulose enables flexibility and robustness and this is anadvance which will enable future scaling up the manufacturing of ITESCs, but also enables its use fornew applications for conformable thermoelectric devices and flexible electronics.

  • 8. Kawahara, J.
    et al.
    Andersson Ersman, P.
    Wang, X.
    Gustafsson, G.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE, Innventia.
    Berggren, M.
    Reconfigurable sticker label electronics manufactured from nanofibrillated cellulose-based self-adhesive organic electronic materials2013In: Organic electronics, ISSN 1566-1199, E-ISSN 1878-5530, no 11, 3061-3069 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Khan, Z.U
    et al.
    Edberg, J
    Hamedi, M.M
    Gabrielsson, R
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE, Innventia.
    Wågberg, L
    Engquist, I
    Berggren, M
    Crispin, X
    Thermoelectric Polymers and their Elastic Aerogels2016In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electronically conducting polymers constitute an emerging class of materials for novel electronics, such as printed electronics and flexible electronics. Their properties have been further diversified to introduce elasticity, which has opened new possibility for "stretchable" electronics. Recent discoveries demonstrate that conducting polymers have thermoelectric properties with a low thermal conductivity, as well as tunable Seebeck coefficients - which is achieved by modulating their electrical conductivity via simple redox reactions. Using these thermoelectric properties, all-organic flexible thermoelectric devices, such as temperature sensors, heat flux sensors, and thermoelectric generators, are being developed. In this article we discuss the combination of the two emerging fields: stretchable electronics and polymer thermoelectrics. The combination of elastic and thermoelectric properties seems to be unique for conducting polymers, and difficult to achieve with inorganic thermoelectric materials. We introduce the basic concepts, and state of the art knowledge, about the thermoelectric properties of conducting polymers, and illustrate the use of elastic thermoelectric conducting polymer aerogels that could be employed as temperature and pressure sensors in an electronic-skin.

  • 10.
    Lindberg, Siv M.
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Béland, Marie-Claude
    RISE, Innventia.
    Edström, Karin
    RISE, Innventia.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE, Innventia.
    Berthold, Fredrik
    RISE, Innventia.
    Towards a cellulose-based society: Demonstrating the feasibility of new bio-based material concepts and products2016In: Proceedings - D and E 2016: 10th International Conference on Design and Emotion - Celebration and Contemplation, 2016, 411-419 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In moving towards a cellulose-based society, interdisciplinary effort is required as it is at this interface that new ideas are found and can grow. New bio-based materials will play a key role but getting them into the marketplace is not always straightforward. Many options are available both for sourcing and for producing composite materials from wood-based cellulose and poly-lactic acid (PLA). Depending on how the material is processed, a multitude of properties can be generated. The main goal with this work was to attempt to reduce the research-To-market gap. This was done by testing a new way of working together where we bundled innovation-oriented projects and research-oriented projects around the theme of material experience. We then systematically worked with material demonstrators. In this article, we exemplify the results by focusing on one research-oriented project that did not at the outset have a market context and on one innovation-oriented project with clear market requirements. In addition to introducing a new concept in bundling research-oriented and innovation-oriented projects, this paper contributes several practical examples of what material demonstrators can do. We also present an application and analysis of Moultrie’s extended Science-Technology-Application-Market (STAM) model to analyze the material demonstrators and design phases of the bundled projects. We modified the proposed classification with different types of material demonstrators according to how close they are to an actual product segment. Designers and scientists worked together but with different emphasis in each phase.

  • 11. Malti, Abdellah
    et al.
    Edberg, Jesper
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE, Innventia.
    Khan, Zia Ullah
    Andreasen, Jens W
    Liu, Xianjie
    Zhao, Dan
    Zhang, Hao
    Yao, Yulong
    Brill, Joseph W
    Engquist, Isak
    Fahlman, Mats
    Wågberg, Lars
    Crispin, Xavier
    Berggren, Magnus
    An organic mixed ion-electron conductor for power electronics2016In: Advanced science, Vol. 3, 1-9 p., 1500305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mixed ionic–electronic conductor based on nanofibrillated cellulose composited with poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythio­phene):­poly(styrene-sulfonate) along with high boiling point solvents is demonstrated in bulky electrochemical devices. The high electronic and ionic conductivities of the resulting nanopaper are exploited in devices which exhibit record values for the charge storage capacitance (1F) in supercapacitors and transconductance (1S) in electrochemical transistors.

  • 12. Malti, Abdellah
    et al.
    Edberg, Jesper
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE, Innventia.
    Ullah Khan, Zia
    Andreasen, Jens W
    Liu, Xianjie
    Zhao, Dan
    Zhang, Hao
    Yao, Yulong
    Brill, Joseph W
    Engquist, Isak
    Fahlman, Mats
    Wågberg, Lars
    Crispin, Xavier
    Berggren, Magnus
    An organic mixed ion-electron conductor for power electronics2015In: Advanced science, E-ISSN 2198-3844, 1500305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mixed ionic–electronic conductor based on nanofibrillated cellulose composited with poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythio­phene):­poly(styrene-sulfonate) along with high boiling point solvents is demonstrated in bulky electrochemical devices. The high electronic and ionic conductivities of the resulting nanopaper are exploited in devices which exhibit record values for the charge storage capacitance (1F) in supercapacitors and transconductance (1S) in electrochemical transistors.

  • 13.
    Sandberg, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping university.
    Tordera, Daniel
    Linköping university.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE, Innventia.
    Sawatdee, Anurak
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Dedic, Dina
    RISE, Innventia.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping university.
    Jonsson, Magnus P
    Linköping university.
    Photoconductive zinc oxide-composite paper by pilot paper machine manufacturing2016In: Flexible and printed electronics, ISSN 2058-8585, Vol. 1, 044003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smartmaterials can be used for awide variety of applications, including sensing and energy harvesting.Implementation of smartmaterials in large area devices requires scalablemanufacturing. The use ofpaper-making techniques would offer an enormous production capacity, allowing for low-cost andlarge-scalemanufacturing. In thisworkwe present a successful pilot scale papermachinemanufacturingof functional composite papers(100mmin−1 with aweb width of 30 cm) based on cellulose fibres andcommercial tetrapodal zinc oxidemicrowhiskers(ZnO-Ts).Carbon electrodes could successfully beprinted on the paper to form complete electronic devices where the paper itself is the active material.Thisenabled development of aZnO-composite paper photosensor,where we characterized its stability,sensitivity and speed. The devices show excellent photosensing properties over awide range of lightirradiances(0.01–1Sun), including short response times (∼10 s) and long-term stability. Under simulatedsunlight and a bias voltage of 1 V, small(0.5 cm2) two-probe interdigitated photosensor devices provided12μAphotocurrent.Under the same conditions, four-probe measurements of the composite papershowed a sheet resistance of 6.9·107Ω/sq. Four-probe measurements also demonstrated that the paperconductivity varies linearlywith light irradiance. To the best of ourknowledge, this is thefirst example ofpilot paper machine production of an optoelectronic paper, demonstrating the potential for large-scalepapermanufacturing of active smart paper from low-cost industrial bulk materials.

  • 14. Sani, N
    et al.
    Wang, X
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE, Innventia.
    Andersson Ersman, P
    Crispin, X
    Dyreklev, P
    Engquist, I
    Gustafsson, G
    Berggren, M
    Flexible lamination-fabricated ultra-high frequency diodes based on self-supporting semiconducting composite film of silicon micro-particles and nano-fibrillated cellulose2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, 28921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low cost and flexible devices such as wearable electronics, e-labels and distributed sensors will make the future "internet of things" viable. To power and communicate with such systems, high frequency rectifiers are crucial components. We present a simple method to manufacture flexible diodes, operating at GHz frequencies, based on self-adhesive composite films of silicon micro-particles (Si-ÎŒPs) and glycerol dispersed in nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC). NFC, Si-ÎŒPs and glycerol are mixed in a water suspension, forming a self-supporting nanocellulose-silicon composite film after drying. This film is cut and laminated between a flexible pre-patterned Al bottom electrode and a conductive Ni-coated carbon tape top contact. A Schottky junction is established between the Al electrode and the Si-ÎŒPs. The resulting flexible diodes show current levels on the order of mA for an area of 2 mm2, a current rectification ratio up to 4 × 103 between 1 and 2 V bias and a cut-off frequency of 1.8 GHz. Energy harvesting experiments have been demonstrated using resistors as the load at 900 MHz and 1.8 GHz. The diode stack can be delaminated away from the Al electrode and then later on be transferred and reconfigured to another substrate. This provides us with reconfigurable GHz-operating diode circuits.

1 - 14 of 14
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