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  • 1. Benyon, David
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Nigay, Laurance
    Spaces of Interaction2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the world becomes increasingly computationally enabled, so our view of human-computer interaction (HCI) needs to evolve. The proliferation of wireless connectivity and mobile devices in all their various forms moves people from being outside a computer and interacting with it to being inside an information space and moving through it. Sensors on the body, wearable computers, wireless sensor networks, increasingly believable virtual characters and speech-based systems are all contributing to new interactive environments. New forms of interaction such as gesture and touch are rapidly emerging and interactions involving emotion and a real sense of presence are beginning. These are the new spaces of interaction we need to understand, design and engineer. Most importantly these new forms of interaction are fundamentally embodied. Older views of a disembodied cognition need to be replaced with an understanding of how people with bodies live in and move through spaces of interaction.

  • 2.
    Brown, Carl
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Gustavsson, Rune
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Lindewall, Per
    Waern, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Final report on interactive route guidance 1988-19911991Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this report we present the more important research contributions made in the Interactive Route Guidance (IRG) project* carried out at SICS Knowledge Based Systems Laboratory. The emphasis has been to look at those issues which affect acceptability of the IRG system both from the driver's and society's point of view. These contributions include : - a hierarchical representation of maps. - a heuristic search algorithm for route-finding in a hierarchical space. - a description of navigator stereotypes which may be implemented as user models in a navigational system. - principles for description of routes to the resident-navigator. - a methodology for the description of dynamic information that may affect traffic and route planning. - an algorithm which tailors planned routes to constraints and considers dynamic information in the planning. - a methodology for the presentation of route changes. - a system architecture for the integration of the route planning mechanism with the mechanisms for planning and presenting routes suitable for human stereotypes. - a system architecture for the integration of in-car information systems.

  • 3.
    Bullock, Adrian
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Andersson, Gerd
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Demo: playing fantasyA with SenToy2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe a way of controlling the emotional states of a synthetic character in a game (FantasyA) through a tangible interface named SenToy. SenToy is a doll with sensors in the arms, legs and body, allowing the user to influence the emotions of her character in the game. The user performs gestures and movements with SenToy, which are picked up by the sensors and interpreted according to a scheme found through an initial Wizard of Oz study. Different gestures are used to express each of the following emotions: anger, fear, happiness, surprise, sadness and gloating. Depending upon the expressed emotion, the synthetic character in FantasyA will, in turn, perform different actions. The evaluation of SenToy acting as the interface to the computer game FantasyA has shown that users were able to express most of the desired emotions to influence the synthetic characters, and that overall, players, especially children, really liked the doll as an interface.

  • 4.
    Bullock, Adrian
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Andersson, Gerd
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    SenToy: a tangible interface to control the emotions of a synthetic character2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assuming that learning is done best as a collaboration activity, better technical support for communication should be in place. Today's communication support for netlearning is in most cases asynchronous. Support for audio and video for synchronous communication will make it possible to collaborate more natural as in face-to-face meetings. Adding possibilities for an electronic shared workspace will amplify this collaboration to get it, in some cases, even better than face-to-face meetings. One problem with this is that people are not aware of the technological tools that exist today. Another problem is that people also might have tried synchronous communication in earlier days, where neither network, nor computers were powerful enough, which gave poor performance and a bad experience with echoing audio and blocky video with very few frames/s.This is not the case today. By making people aware of that and by making them try and use the different technologies they will get trust in use of the technology and be able to develop methodologies that utilise the technology in a pedagogic way (http://www.meetings.sunet.se/). By making people use net-based meetings as a natural way for communication new possibilities opens for netlearning.

  • 5.
    Bullock, Adrian
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Andersson, Gerd
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Towards tangibility in gameplay: building a tangible affective interface for a computer game2003In: ICMI '03 Proceedings of the 5th international conference on Multimodal interfaces, 2003, 2, , 8 p.60-67 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Game development is an emerging area of development for new types of interaction between computers and humans. New forms of communication are now being explored there, influenced not only by face to face communication but also by recent developments in multi-modal communication and tangible interfaces. This demo will feature a computer game, FantasyA, where users can play the game by interacting with a tangible interface, SenToy (see Figure 1). The main idea is to involve objects and artifacts from real life into ways to interact with systems, and in particular with games. So, SenToy is an interface for users to project some of their emotional gestures through moving the doll in certain ways. This device would establish a link between the users (holding the physical device) and a controlled avatar (embodied by that physical device) of the computer game, FantasyA.

  • 6.
    Bylund, Markus
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Pommeranz, Alina
    Pieces of identity2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the motivation, design, and deployment of the Pieces of Identity system. Two goals motivated the system: to provoke a discussion concerning the relationship between privacy and mobile information technology during an inauguration event of a mobile technology research center, and to stir reactions contributing to the widening of the design space of privacy and information and communication technology (ICT). The results contrasts the two well-established preconceptions about privacy that nothing is private anymore and that personal information is best locked away.

  • 7. Chalmers, Matthew
    et al.
    Dieberger, Andreas
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Rudström, Åsa
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Decisions, Networks and Analytics lab.
    Social Navigation and Seamful Design2004In: Cognitive Studies: Bulletin of the Japanese Cognitive Science Society, Vol. 11, 171-181 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Dahlbäck, Nils
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Sjölinder, Marie
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Decisions, Networks and Analytics lab.
    Spatial cognition in the mind and in the world - the case of hypermedia navigation1996In: Proceedings of The Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Sciences Society, 1996, 7Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9. Dieberger, Andreas
    et al.
    Dourish, Paul
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Resnick, Paul
    Wexelblat, Alan
    Social navigation: techniques for building more usable systems2000In: ACM interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, Vol. 7, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Dieberger, Andreas
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Increasing awareness of browsing and editing activities in a virtual web community1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Fagerberg, Petra
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Designing gestures for affective input: an analysis of shape, effort and valence2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss a user-centered approach to incorporating affective expressions in interactive applications, and argue for a design that addresses both body and mind. In particular, we have studied the problem of finding a set of affective gestures. Based on previous work in movement analysis and emotion theory [Davies, Laban and Lawrence, Russell], and a study of an actor expressing emotional states in body movements, we have identified three underlying dimensions of movements and emotions: shape, effort and valence. From these dimensions we have created a new affective interaction model, which we name the affective gestural plane model. We applied this model to the design of gestural affective input to a mobile service for affective messages.

  • 12. Fagerberg, Petra
    et al.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    eMoto - Emotionally Engaging Interaction2004In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Isbister, Katherine
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Sundström, Petra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Understanding users and their situation2011In: Emotion-Oriented Systems: The Humaine Handbook, Springer , 2011, 10, 653-666 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first step in any design process is to set the stage for what to design and how that should be realised. In terms of user-centred design, this includes to develop a sense of who will be using the system, where it is intended to be used, and what it should be used for. In this chapter we provide an overview of this part of the development process, and its place in the design cycle, and some orienting design challenges that are specific to affective interaction. Thereafter we present a variety of methods that designers may want to consider in actual design work. We end by providing a set of examples from previous and ongoing research in the field, which could also work as inspirations or guiding sources in the early stages in a user-centred design process.

  • 14.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Bodily Orientations around Mobiles: Lessons learnt in Vanuatu2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since we started carrying mobile phones, they have altered the ways in which we orient our bodies in the world. Many of those changes are invisible to us - they have become habits, deeply ingrained in our society. To make us more aware of our bodily ways of living with mobiles and open the design space for novel ways of designing mobiles and their interactions, we decided to study one of the last groups of users on earth who had not been exposed to mobiles: the people of Vanuatu. As they had so recently started using mobiles, their use was still in flux: the fragility of the mobile was unusual to them as was the need to move in order to find coverage. They were still getting used to carrying their mobiles and keeping them safe. Their encounters with mobile use exposed the need to consider somaesthetic practices when designing mobiles as they profoundly affect our bodily ways of being in the world.

  • 15.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Sanches, Pedro
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Jaensson, Tove
    License to chill!: how to empower users to cope with stress2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There exists today a paucity of tools and devices that empower people to take control over their everyday behaviors and balance their stress levels. To overcome this deficit, we are creating a mobile service, Affective Health, where we aim to provide a holistic approach towards health by enabling users to make a connection between their daily activities and their own memories and subjective experiences. This construction is based upon values detected from certain bodily reactions that are then visualized on a mobile phone. Accomplishing this entailed figuring out how to provide real-time feedback without making the individual even more stressed, while also making certain that the representation empowered rather than controlled them. Useful design feedback was derived from testing two different visualizations on the mobile in a Wizard of Oz study. In short, we found that a successful design needs to: feel alive, allow for interpretative openness, include short-term history, and be updated in real-time. We also found that the interaction did not increase our participants stress reactions.

  • 16. Forsberg, Mattias
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Svensson, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Design Principals of Social Navigation1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Hammarström, Kent Saxin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Ereback, Anna-Lena
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Sjölinder, Marie
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Decisions, Networks and Analytics lab.
    Convene - MUD interfaces for disabled users1999In: Users in Action: Stories of Users and Telematics in Everyday Life, Stockholm, Sweden: Kommunikationsforskningsberedningen (KFB) , 1999, 1, , 195 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18. Helmes, John
    et al.
    Taylor, Alex
    Cao, Xiang
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Schmitt, Peter
    Villar, Nicolas
    Rudiments 1, 2 & 3: design speculations on autonomy2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes the design process and installation of three speculative, rudimentary machines, or rudiments. Through careful iterations in their design, the rudiments are intended to provoke curiosity and discussion around the possibility of autonomy in interactive systems. The design of the rudiments is described in detail, alongside the design decisions that were made to suggest a machine autonomy and to provoke discussion. Some preliminary reflections from installing the rudiments in two separate households are also reported. Widely divergent opinions of the rudiments from the two households are used to discuss a number of themes for thinking about autonomy and interactive systems design. Overall, the presented work adopts a perspective strongly oriented towards guiding future research, but, importantly, aims to do so by opening up and exposing the design possibilities rather than constraining them.

  • 19.
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Waern, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Mobile Life: A Research Foundation for Mobile Services2007In: Proceedings of the 6th Global Mobility Roundtable, 2007, 1, , 11 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The telecom and IT industry is now facing the challenge of a second IT-revolution, where the spread of mobile and ubiquitous services will have an even more profound effect on commercial and social life than the recent Internet revolution. Users will expect services that are unique and fully adapted for the mobile setting, which means that the roles of the operators will change, new business models will be required, and new methods for developing and marketing services have to be found. Most of all, we need technology and services that put people at core. The industry must prepare to design services for a sustainable web of work, leisure and ubiquitous technology we can call the mobile life. In this paper, we describe the main components of a research agenda for mobile services, which is carried out at the Mobile Life Center at Stockholm University. This research program takes a sustainable approach to research and development of mobile and ubiquitous services, by combining a strong theoretical foundation (embodied interaction), a welldefined methodology (user-centered design) and an important domain with large societal importance and commercial potential (mobile life). Eventually the center will create an experimental mobile services ecosystem, which will serve as an open arena where partners from academia and industry can develop our vision an abundant future marketplace for future mobile servíces.

  • 20.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Adaption to the User's Task1995Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adapting explanations to users with varying background knowledge and abilities is a difficult task: the explanation content, style, amount of details, terms used, etc. may be affected in various ways. We have used our analysis of the information seeking tasks of the users in one particular domain as a basis for adaptation. We structured the domain information into a set of information entities where each entity describes one aspect of a node in the information space. Each information entity is fitted to one or several information seeking tasks, and by combining entities we create an explanation adapted to the user's current task. We do not avoid concepts which are unknown to the user in our information entities. Instead we allow the users to ask follow-up questions on those concepts in order to cater the users' differences in background knowledge. Which follow-up questions are available also depends on the users' current task. Finally, we emphasise the need to make the difference between the adapted explanations obvious to the user. Only then can the users predict which explanations best fit their need and thereby control the self-adaptive mechanisms of the system. So, our system is adaptive to the information seeking task of the user, while the user's knowledge, abilities and roles, are catered for by other means.

  • 21.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Affective Loop Experiences: Designing for Interactional Embodiment2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Involving our corporeal bodies in interaction can create strong affective experiences. Systems that both can be influenced by and influence users corporeally exhibit a use quality we name an affective loop experience. In an affective loop experience, (i) emotions are seen as processes, constructed in the interaction, starting from everyday bodily, cognitive or social experiences; (ii) the system responds in ways that pull the user into the interaction, touching upon end users' physical experiences; and (iii) throughout the interaction the user is an active, meaning-making individual choosing how to express themselves—the interpretation responsibility does not lie with the system. We have built several systems that attempt to create affective loop experiences with more or less successful results. For example, eMoto lets users send text messages between mobile phones, but in addition to text, the messages also have colourful and animated shapes in the background chosen through emotion-gestures with a sensor-enabled stylus pen. Affective Diary is a digital diary with which users can scribble their notes, but it also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors mapping to users' movement and arousal and placed along a timeline. Users can see patterns in their bodily reactions and relate them to various events going on in their lives.

  • 22.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Affective loop experiences: designing for interactional embodiment2009In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 364, 3585-3595 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Involving our corporeal bodies in interaction can create strong affective experiences. Systems that both can be influenced by and influence users corporeally exhibit a use quality we name an affective loop experience. In an affective loop experience, (i) emotions are seen as processes, constructed in the interaction, starting from everyday bodily, cognitive or social experiences; (ii) the system responds in ways that pull the user into the interaction, touching upon end users' physical experiences; and (iii) throughout the interaction the user is an active, meaning-making individual choosing how to express themselves—the interpretation responsibility does not lie with the system. We have built several systems that attempt to create affective loop experiences with more or less successful results. For example, eMoto lets users send text messages between mobile phones, but in addition to text, the messages also have colourful and animated shapes in the background chosen through emotion-gestures with a sensor-enabled stylus pen. Affective Diary is a digital diary with which users can scribble their notes, but it also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors mapping to users' movement and arousal and placed along a timeline. Users can see patterns in their bodily reactions and relate them to various events going on in their lives. The experiences of building and deploying these systems gave us insights into design requirements for addressing affective loop experiences, such as how to design for turn-taking between user and system, how to create for ‘open’ surfaces in the design that can carry users' own meaning-making processes, how to combine modalities to create for a ‘unity’ of expression, and the importance of mirroring user experience in familiar ways that touch upon their everyday social and corporeal experiences. But a more important lesson gained from deploying the systems is how emotion processes are co-constructed and experienced inseparable from all other aspects of everyday life. Emotion processes are part of our social ways of being in the world; they dye our dreams, hopes and bodily experiences of the world. If we aim to design for affective interaction experiences, we need to place them into this larger picture.

  • 23.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Designing and evaluating intelligent user interfaces1999In: IUI '99: Proceedings of the 1999 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces, 5-8 Jan 1999, Redondo Beach, Los Angeles, California, USA, 1999, 1Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Designing Familiar Open Surfaces2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While participatory design makes end-users part of the design process, we might also want the resulting system to be open for interpretation, appropriation and change over time to reflect its usage. But how can we design for appropriation? We need to strike a good balance between making the user an active co-constructor of system functionality versus making a too strong, interpretative design that does it all for the user thereby inhibiting their own creative use of the system. Through revisiting five systems in which appropriation has happened both within and outside the intended use, we are going to show how it can be possible to design with open surfaces. These open surfaces have to be such that users can fill them with their own interpretation and content, they should be familiar to the user, resonating with their real world practice and understanding, thereby shaping its use.

  • 25.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Evaluating affective interaction2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Evaluating interactive characters going beyond body language2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Knowing, Communicating and Experiencing through Body and Emotion2008In: IEEE Transactions on Learning technologies, Vol. 1, 248-259 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With new technologies such as body sensors, tangible interaction, haptics, interactive cloth, or small computing devices such as mobiles, we can move interaction from the desktop out into the world and onto our bodies. Likewise, with the boom of computer games, domestic digital technology use, and social communication tools, we have to consider designing for non-instrumental goals, beyond task completion. This has been picked up by human-computer interaction researchers in the so-called third wave of HCI. We suggest that learning technologies could use some of the results from the third wave of HCI, placing body and emotion more centrally into the communication and construction of knowledge. Designing for bodily interaction, emotional communication or aesthetics is not trivial. In design work, a designer can only set the stage for certain experience to happen, but in the end, it is the user who co-constructs the experience with or through the interaction. Based on our experiences of designing for bodily and emotional communication, we will posit three postulates that might be helpful in designing for involving interaction: leaving ‘surfaces’ open for users to appropriate, building for users to recognise themselves socially, emotional or bodily through the interface, and avoiding reductionism.

  • 28.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Mobile Life – innovation in the wild2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After a decade of work in our research labs on mobile and ubiquitous technology, often formed by the early visions of ubiquitous computing, with the urge to move interaction from the desktop out into the wild, these technologies have now moved out into the world – into the wild. We are in the middle of a second IT-revolution, caused by the spread of mobile and ubiquitous services, in combination with a broad consumer-oriented market pull. The first IT-revolution, the introduction and deployment of Internet and the World Wide Web during the 1990’s, had a major impact on all parts of our society. As mobile, ubiquitous technology now becomes wide-spread, the design and evaluation of mobile services – i.e. information technology that can be accessed and used in virtually any setting – represents an important business arena for the IT- and telecom industry. Together we have to look for a sustainable web of work, leisure and ubiquitous technology we can call the mobile life. But what impact does this have on HCI research? In particular, what is our role in innovating new services, new technologies, new interaction models and new ways of living with this technology? Obviously, new methods for design and evaluation of interfaces are needed, especially when those interfaces are not always clearly ‘interfaces’ anymore, but blend in with various new materials in our environments or even worn on our bodies. Usage situations are shifting, unstable, mobile settings – interaction in the wild. There is a need for design methods that help structure a multitude of different sources of inspiration and fieldwork, and synthesize it into concrete requirements and service or technology concepts. In our work we have used a variety of such methods, such as ethnography as a basis for design, Laban-notation to analyse body behaviours, novel forms of quick sketching of mobile service interaction, cultural probes to understand emotional processes in people’s everyday lives, bodystorming for situating ideas in the real world, and the experience clip method for user self-evaluation to evaluate mobile services in their realistic setting. We have also developed our own methods, such as e.g. user-driven innovation - studying extreme or specialised user groups and then innovating services for other user groups based on those experiences But we also see trends that will turn these ways of approaching innovation upside down. Producers and consumers blend together in what we name Mobile 2.0-services, creating content dependent on the mobile setting. Sketching in hardware and software combinations becomes accessible not only to technology experts, but to all. How can HCI-practice change to make the ‘digital materials’ accessible to all rather than supporting only HCI-experts to develop innovative design? As pointed out in the vision “Being Human: Human-Computer Interaction in the year 2020”, HCI needs to orient towards the values shaped by the interaction between technology and people in our everyday lives. As digital, interactive technology enters every aspect of our lives we must do justice to the full complexity of actual human lived experience, where people actively and individually construct meaningful experiences around technology. We might even have to take responsibility for how society is shaped by this second digital revolution - making values such as privacy, autonomy or trust, but also living a good, rich life, explicitly part of our design processes and study methods, creating for a sustainable, human-friendly society. In the Mobile Life centre, we work around a vision of a ludic society where work mixes with leisure, private with public – a society where enjoyment, experience and play are adopted into all aspects of life. It becomes important to recognise that private and leisure life should not have to be as polished and efficient as your work performance when practices and technology travel between these spheres of our life. In my talk, I will discuss the implications for academic research in HCI as well as how this fosters a novel work practice in industry. The ICT and telecom industry will be less focused on identifying needs and more focused on values, in particular, ludic aspects of life.

  • 29.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Move that Body! Involving users emotionally, bodily and socially2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Our approach to social computing2001In: ERCIM News, no 46Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    How can we empower people to find, choose between, and make use of the multitude of computer-, net-based- and embedded services that surround us? How can we turn human-computer interaction into a more social experience? How can we design for dynamic change of system functionality based on how the systems are used? Tackling these issues is the core of the work in the HUMLE laboratory, and our solutions are inspired by observing that much of the information seeking in everyday life is performed through watching, following, and talking to other people — what we name social computing.

  • 31.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Social navigation: from the web to the mobile2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social navigation is the alternative way of looking upon navigation in the virtual world: e g instead of navigating the web by maps and hierarchies and search engines, you would navigate it by where others have gone before you. There are several examples of where this has been successfully employed, such as amazon.com recommending books by how popular they are with respect to what you and others like you have chosen in the past. Social navigation was inspired by how people navigate the real world. Now, with the development of mobile technology, we are taking the concept back into the real world: what happens when we overlay the real world with virtual traces of where others have gone before us? Can we enhance social navigation in the real world through merging it with the virtual?

  • 32.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Steps to take before intelligent user interfaces becomes real2000In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 12, no 4, 409-426 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Steps to take before IUIs become real2000In: Journal of Interaction with Computers, Vol. 12, no 4, 409-426 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Transferring Qualities from Horseback Riding to Design2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We see more and more attempts to design for bodily experiences with digital technology, but it is a notably challenging design task. What are the possible bodily experiences we may aim to design for, and how can we characterise them? By analysing a horseback riding experience, we came to identify the following themes: (1) how certain kinds of bodily experiences are best understood through experiencing them yourself – the bodily ways of knowing, (2) how rhythm and balance create for particularly strong physical experiences of this kind, (3) how movement and emotion coincide in these experiences, (4) how the movement between seeing our own bodies as objects vs experiencing in and through our bodies is one of the ways we come to learn the language of expressing and understanding bodily action, and (5) how this in turn lets us describe the sensitive and delicate relationship of wordless signs and signals that represent, in the case described, two bodily agents – a human and a horse. When the human-horse relationship is really successful, it can be described as rare moments of becoming a centaur. We translate these themes into design considerations for bodily interactions.

  • 35.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    User-centred design and evaluation of affective interfaces2003In: From brows to trust: evaluating embodied conversational agents, Norwell, USA: Kluwer Academic Publishers , 2003, 1, , 352 p.127-160 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One obvious challenge for affective interfaces is to find ways of checking whether the expressed emotions are understood by users, and whether the sys-tem can interpret user emotions correctly. Even more challenging is whether the overall usage scenarios are achieving their purpose of being e g engaging, fun, believable, or creating a relationship with the user, and how much of this can be attributed to the emotion modeling and expression. We propose a two-tiered design and evaluation model. We exemplify this model through studies of three different affective interfaces: the Agneta & Frida system, the Influenc-ing Machine, and SenToy and FantasyA.

  • 36.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Bullock, Adrian
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Paiva, Ana
    FantasyA and SenToy2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    FantasyA is a role-playing game where emotions are part of the game logic. SenToy is a tangible interface device, used to influence emotional behaviour in FantasyA. Players in the game FantasyA have to master SenToy and exhibit a particular set of emotions and perform a set of actions in order to evolve in the game. A study was undertaken to gauge the success of the overall gaming experience, as well as the individual components, the FantasyA game with its emotional content and the SenToy control device with its gestural input.

  • 37.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Holm, Jenny
    Tullgren, Kristina
    Sjölinder, Marie
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Decisions, Networks and Analytics lab.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Persson, Per
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Spatial or narrative: a study of the Agneta and Frida system1999Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose that analysing interviews with subjects who have been exposed to anthropomorphic characters from a metaphorical point of view can provide insights into how characters in the interface are perceived. In a study of the Agneta & Frida system (two characters that comment contents of web pages in an ironic, humorous manner) we found that subjects who used Agneta & Frida used more narrative verbs and adverbs than users who only browsed the web pages. In the latter case, more spatial verbs and adverbs were used. This may imply that normal web browsing is perceived as navigation through a space, while Agneta & Frida provides for a more narrative experience.

  • 38.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Holm, Maria
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Mobile Life VINN Excellence Centre: 10 years of innovation and growth, 2007-20172017Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our overall vision for Mobile Life has been to create a society where happiness, playfulness and creativity are factors in peoples’ everyday lives. Through the ten years of research, the centre has become a strong voice advocating a human centred focus on digitalisation – focusing on what makes a good life for all. More importantly, we have provided a path to how this can be done – in our design processes, in our tools, in new business models, and in how we approach studies of life styles in change. The Mobile Life Way that is, our way of engaging in design-led exploration of novel technology, based on social science, art, design thinking, aesthetics and value-based concerns, is a unique approach that has rendered results that will continue to inspire. Our design work has often been many years ahead of the commercial front and today we see many of the design concepts from the earlier years of Mobile Life being provided as commercial products. This includes, for example, our work on wearable biosensors for wellbeing and health and tools for amateur video production. To address the vision of a good life, the centre has initiated and developed unusual and evocative research topics such as: integrating digitalisation with the fashion industry; connecting back to nature and engaging animals in interaction; designing with felt life and bodily engagement; pervasive games; or studying the life style changes that follow from the sharing economy. These research topics have changed the academic frontiers of our field. Taken together these explorations paint a broad picture of a whole society in change. A consumer-oriented Internet of Things society is no longer a prospect, but a reality. This enables a future where disruption could potentially create conflict, inequality, decrease inclusion and directly harm the success of Swedish companies and way of life. As a reaction to this negative view we have instead envisioned a positive world where digital technologies causes disruption that enhances engagement, creativity and enjoyment. In doing so, we have not shunned from the political and ethical implications of our work, dealing with topics such as the importance of empowerment of all to be makers and participants in a highly technologically-infused society. These results continue to be important – to our partners, to academic research in our field, as well as to the whole society. Ultimately, both the history of Mobile Life and the way forward can be captured in our credo: Always Explore! Always Create! Always Enjoy!

  • 39.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Isbister, Katherine
    Westerman, Steve
    Gardner, Peter
    Sutherland, Ed
    Vasalou, Asimina
    Sundström, Petra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Kaye, Joseph 'Jofish'
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Evaluation of Affective Interactive Applications2011In: Emotion-Oriented Systems: The Humaine Handbook, Springer , 2011, 10, 687-703 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods are developed for different audiences and purposes. HCI researchers develop methods to shape the future through pure, applied and blue sky research – as is still the case with most affective interactive applications. Unsurprisingly, practitioners will be more concerned that the methods they use not only are tractable but produce better and more innovative results in terms of the systems they ultimately release into the world. Researchers, on the other hand, may have other concerns, such as the novelty of their techniques. Up until recently, most HCI methods (both for researchers and practitioners) were developed for work applications and desktop situations. They focused on efficiency, learnability, transparency, control and other work-related values. They were developed in response to a theoretical orientation which viewed the user as an information processing system not so dissimilar to the computer itself. But now that HCI is concerned with technologies that enter all aspects of life, our methods have begun to change and will need to continue to change. In keeping with our changing conception of what a “user” is and a wider concern with their experience of use of new technologies, a key challenge will be to develop and expand methods for analyzing not just what people do with the technology but how it makes them feel, and not just how people understand technology but how they make sense of it as part of their lives. Methods must be concerned, not only with issues of usefulness and usability, but also with issues of aesthetics, expression, and emotion. In addition we need to focus on evaluating technology not just in the short term under controlled conditions but also in the longer term and in broader social and cultural contexts. In this section, we will therefore provide two strands of evaluation methods. The first concerns what we might see as more traditional usability evaluation: is my system usable for the purpose it was designed for? The second strand tries to get at what we have named “third wave of HCI” in the previous chapters: does my system provide for the kind of (emotional) experience that it aimed to do?

  • 40.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Some principles for route descriptions derived from human advisers1991Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need to make the interface of Route Guidence systems more flexible, so that they can adapt to the specific driver needs. Today's systems are primarily aimed at tourists, and interfaces for drivers that have more experience of a city have not been investigated. In this paper we describe a study with very experienced driver-navigators, where we have deduced principles as to how route descriptions are constructed and expressed by humans. Some of these principles are implementable, and a rough outline of a program is presented. Given a plan of how to go to A to B in a city, the program produces a verbal description of that plan. The goal is to incorporate verbal descriptions in Route Guidence systems, primarily aimed at driver-navigators with some knowledge of the city.

  • 41.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Some Principles for Route Descriptions Derived from Human Advisers1991In: Proceedings of the 13th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, 1991, 1Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Waern, Annika
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Inferring complex plans1993In: Proceedings of the International Workshop on Intelligent User Interfaces, 1993, 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the need for plan inference in intelligent help mechanisms. We argue that previous approaches have drawbacks that need to be overcome to make plan inference useful. Firstly, plans have to be inferred - not extracted from the users’ help requests. Secondly, the plans inferred must be more than a single goal or solitary user command.

  • 43.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Waern, Annika
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Dahlbäck, Nils
    Jansson, Carl Gustaf
    Karlgren, Klas
    Lemaire, Benoit
    A glass box approach to adaptive hypermedia1996In: User modeling and user-adapted interaction, ISSN 0924-1868, E-ISSN 1573-1391, Vol. 6, 157-184 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Utilising adaptive interface techniques in the design of systems introduces certain risks. An adaptive interface is not static, but will actively adapt to the perceived needs of the user. Unless carefully designed, these changes may lead to an unpredictable, obscure and uncontrollable interface. Therefore the design of adaptive interfaces must ensure that users can inspect the adaptivity mechanisms, and control their results. One way to do this is to rely on the user's understanding of the application and the domain, and relate the adaptivity mechanisms to domain-specific concepts. We present an example of an adaptive hypertext help system POP, which is being built according to these principles, and discuss the design considerations and empirical findings that lead to this design.

  • 44.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Svensson, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Waern, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Designing for Social Navigation of Food Recipes2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Svensson, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Waern, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Individual Differences in Social Navigation2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Munro, Alan
    Benyon, David
    Designing Information Spaces: The Social Navigation Approach2002 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Munro, Alan
    Benyon, David
    Workshop on personalized and social navigation in information space1998Report (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Persson, Per
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Sjölinder, Marie
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Decisions, Networks and Analytics lab.
    Evaluating users' experience of a character-enhanced information space2001In: AI Communications, ISSN 0921-7126, E-ISSN 1875-8452, Vol. 13, no 3, 195-212 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Persson, Per
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Sjölinder, Marie
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Decisions, Networks and Analytics lab.
    From task-based to fun-based design: evaluation of navigational tools1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Persson, Per
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Sjölinder, Marie
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Decisions, Networks and Analytics lab.
    Measuring experience of interactive characters2002In: Pleasure with Products: Beyond Usability, CRC Press , 2002, 1, , 10 p.262-273 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
123 1 - 50 of 115
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