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  • 1.
    Haglund Stignor, Caroline
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Tiljander, Pia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Lidbom, Peter
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Axell, Monica
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Masgrau, M.
    Airec, Sweden.
    New type of energy efficient heat exchanger for indirectly cooled display cabinets - Laboratory and field tests2018In: Refrigeration Science and Technology, 2018, p. 206-214Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, a completely new type of air-to-liquid heat exchanger, adapted for obtaining good heat transfer performance even at a laminar flow regime on the liquid side has been evaluated in a display cabinet application. The heat exchanger consists of parallel plates, with liquid in every second passage and air in the other passages. Tests were performed with a traditional open vertical display cabinet, first with a traditional finned-tube coil and thereafter with the new type of heat exchanger, both in a climate chamber and thereafter in the field. The results from both tests showed that the liquid inlet temperature could be increased by around 6°C, from the range -8°C - -7°C with the traditional coil to the range -2°C -1°C with the new type of heat exchanger, which can lead to considerable energy savings and operation without the need for defrosting of the heat exchanger.

  • 2.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Borgqvist, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Certified energy consultant for increasednumber of retail grocery stores with low energy use, safe operation and low environmental impact2018In: Refrigeration Science and Technology, 2018, p. 376-384Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the framework for a proposed certification for energy consultants targeting the grocery sector, i.e. supermarkets. Thecertificationshould cover necessary knowledge and requirements, with the overall aim of increasing energy efficiency and reducing related costs for the store at the system level. Within the retail sector, supermarkets are the most energy-intensive buildings. Buildings intended for food sector applications need to be of a special design, with requirements that differ from other premises. Half of the electricity used is employed to keep food cold. However, energy efficiency can be improved through efficient equipment and increased knowledge, sometimes by 30-50% or more. This paper presents different skills and requirements needed by a certified energy consultant, CEC, working with energy efficiency in supermarket, from the retailer's perspective. Thus, the specifications can be used to further develop the certification area; energy consulting for supermarkets and good practice approaches targeting this area.

  • 3.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy. University of Borås, Sweden ; Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Fahlén, Per
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Axell, Monica
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Fransson, Niklas
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thermal comfort in the supermarketenvironment – multiple enquiry methods and simultaneous measurements of the thermal environment2017In: International journal of refrigeration, ISSN 0140-7007, E-ISSN 1879-2081, Vol. 82, p. 426-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the supermarket environment three factors must be considered: food (food quality), personnel (working conditions), and customers.The customers do not remain in this environment very long but are of particular interest since they constitute the supermarket’s commercial basis. However, there are no recommendations on the indoor environment based on this category. This study compares the perceived indoor thermal environment with simultaneous objective measurements of the thermal environment and includes multiple enquiry methods. These methods have been used for this specific environment in order to understand how customers perceive, evaluate, and prefer variations in the thermal environment.

    Measurements were performed in summer and winter in front of twelve display cabinets, over 1100 questionnaires have been received.To provide recommendations, this study presents measured and perceived comfort in supermarkets, information which can be used for prescribing suitable thermal environments for customers.

  • 4.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Rolfsman, Lennart
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Swartz, H.
    Energy agreements regarding grocery stores for a sustainable society - Lessons learned2018In: Refrigeration Science and Technology, 2018, p. 152-159Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we aim to shed light on waste heat from commercial refrigeration, which is common but unnecessary. Excess heat is the heat which is not recovered, although it is possible to do so. We include heating for existing buildings: grocery stores as stand-alone, or within another building. VariousSwedish perspectives of the parties involved, tenant and landlord, are discussed. Theoretically and technically, it is not difficult to distributeexcess energy from a tenant to another receiver, which in turn uses the energy. However, to meet energy goals regarding energy consumption for heating buildings requires new and efficient approaches. The technique is already known and availableon the market. We suggest that availableenergy and heat recovery projects, contracts and agreements maysignificantly enhance the possibility of creating viable energy efficiency projects, and include excess heat. Results include lessons learned from the parties.

  • 5.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Salomonson, Nicklas
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Sundström, Malin
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Wendin, Karin
    Kristianstad University, Sweden ; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Consumer perception and behavior in the retail foodscape – A study of chilled groceries2018In: Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, ISSN 0969-6989, E-ISSN 1873-1384, Vol. 40, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the retail grocery business, new competitors such as pure e-commerce players are growing fast, and, in order to compete, ‘brick and mortar’ stores such as supermarkets need to become more professional at providing excellent customer service, and to use the physical servicescape as the main competitive advantages. However, supermarkets also face a challenge to offer consumers high quality products while at the same time providing a pleasant and functional servicescape. Products like groceries often need to be stored in cabinets due to strict regulations and in order to maintain correct temperatures. Some of these cabinets have doors which make them more energy-efficient (Evans et al., 2007 ;  Faramarzi et al., 2002), reduces costs, and contributes to grocery quality, but it can also affect the perceived servicescape, and risk a negative impact on sales (Waide, 2014; Kauffeld, 2015). For example, moisture from the atmosphere that condenses on the inside of the door glass (Fricke and Bansal, 2015) may make the cabinets less transparent, and doors can obstruct consumers from passing by. Thus, having chilled groceries in cabinets with doors can be both beneficial and problematic. However, no studies have been conducted on how open (no doors) or closed (with doors) cabinets for chilled groceries impact consumer perception and behavior. Hence, the purpose of the study is to contribute to an understanding of how consumers behave and what they perceive when shopping chilled groceries from cabinets with doors and without doors in the supermarket.

    Based on a qualitative research approach, combining in-store observations and focus group interviews, and focusing on Bitner's (1992) three environmental variables in the servicescape, i.e. (1) ambient condition, (2) space and functions, and (3) signs, symbols and artifacts, the study investigates the question: do open or closed cabinets for chilled groceries in the supermarket impact consumer perception and behavior, and if so, how?

    Our results indicate that consumers’ behavior and perceptions of the foodscape differ when there are doors or no doors on the cabinets. The paper thereby contributes to servicescape research by focusing on a particular part of supermarkets – the foodscape for chilled groceries–and by enhancing the understanding of environmental variables in the servicescape. The results further show how doors lead to different forms of approach or avoidance behavior in terms of accessibility and that consumers’ vision, olfaction and tactility all influence consumers’ perceptions of freshness and cleanliness in relation to doors or no doors. Our results also have practical implications for retailers who are designing new stores or considering changes in existing store layouts.

1 - 5 of 5
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