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  • 1.
    Akner Koler, Cheryl
    et al.
    University for Arts, Crafts and Design, Sweden.
    Kosmack Vaara, Elsa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Göran Rodell, Annika
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Bjørnstad, Nina
    Oslo School of Architecture and Design, Norway.
    Aesthetic driven Co-creative writing method for short videos2018In: Design Microconference, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Burden, Håkan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Carlgren, Lisa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Lundahl, Jenny
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Schnurr, Maria
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Sobiech, Cilli
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Stenberg, Susanne
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Thidevall, Niklas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    RISE Policylabb – de första fem åren2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this report, we have compiled our learnings and experiences of working with Policy Lab. Policy Labs have come about as an answer to the question "Can you work with policy and regulatory development in a better way than today?". Our answer to the question is a yes. Our hope with the report is that others will become interested and start their own Policy Lab. Abroad, there are many Policy Labs, but in Sweden there are only a few, which is why we believe there is room for more. There is not a given way to work with Policy Labs once and for all, but each Policy Lab is unique based on its context. Sweden's innovation agency Vinnova defines Policy Labs as follows: "Policy Labs can be explained as a group of actors with different competencies who want to develop a regulatory framework. In the Policy Lab, they use a set of user-centric methods and competencies to test, experiment, and learn in policy development."1 In our Policy Lab, we have worked in various research projects to: 1. analyse challenges/problems that arise between innovations, technology, market, and regulations, 2. develop one or more workable solutions and 3. interact with relevant actors to determine the next steps. What distinguishes our Policy Lab is that we never “own” the issue or solution. We must therefore always work with other actors who can take the results further. Our goal is to enable and skill people. This means that for us it is important to work concretely with real problems and needs owners and preferably test different solutions. We focus on the here and now perspective and not on what the future will look like in 10 years. It is about taking the next step forward towards the future, not creating the best rule, but instead creating the next rule. We also work consistently agile and use design as a method for problem solving. This means that the way we organize our work in the Policy Lab is circular and not linear. When it comes to using design as a method for problem solving, we use the concepts of "design thinking" and "double diamond". For us, it is also important that the members of the Policy Lab have different backgrounds and skills depending on what is needed in the individual project....

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  • 3.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Västmanlands County Museum .
    Komazec, Ksenija
    Mälardalen University, Sweden .
    Kosmack Vaara, Elsa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Strineholm, Andreea
    Mälardalen University, Sweden .
    Tobiasson, Helena
    Mälardalen University, Sweden .
    Whose place is it?: Enacted territories in the museum2022In: DRS2022, DRS Conference Proceedings, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     There is a growing trend to embrace the idea of public participation in the work of museums, from exhibition design to collections. To further develop participatory cultures in museums, these negotiations and emerging practices should be examined more closely. This paper explores a museum’s whole-hearted attempt to engage with the societal issue of climate change and work with a high degree of participationfrom civic society when staging a temporary exhibition. We investigate experiences inthe process of building, measuring, separating and transgressing during the collaboration. Based on these explorations the paper presents three emerging and interconnected territories in the staging of participatory temporary exhibitions, the territory of aesthetics, the territory of action (autonomy), and the territory of unpredictability. The result contributes to research on public participatory practices mainly in museum context

  • 4.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Mjuk digital infrastruktur: Utmaningar som finns inom offentlig sektor2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här rapporten riktar sig till dig som arbetar med digitaliseringsinitiativ inom den svenska offentliga sektorn och har ett intresse för mjuk digital infrastruktur. Syftet med denna studie är att undersöka hur kommuner och offentliga organisationer genomför digitaliseringsinitiativ inom olika områden av sin verksamhet och vilka utmaningar som skapas av mjuk digital infrastruktur i denna process. Rapporten innehåller också möjliga vägar framåt och rekommendationer kring olika aspekter av mjuk digital infrastruktur till RISE, kommuner och myndigheter.

    I rapporten beskriver vi åtta fallstudier och identifierar skillnader och gemensamma drag mellan dem.

    Analysen bygger på intervjuer med forskare från olika avdelningar på RISE som har arbetat med mjuk digital infrastruktur inom smarta städer och IoT-data, öppna och delade data, eHälsa och omsorg, smarta fastigheter, mobilitet och transport, jordbruk samt vatten och avlopp.

    Analysen visade att kommuner och offentliga organisationer inom olika områden upplever precis samma tekniska, organisatoriska och affärsrelaterade utmaningar relaterade till mjuk digital infrastruktur. Den organisatoriska delen och brist på samordning kring ett gemensamt nationellt ramverk skapar de största utmaningarna. Dessutom visade analysen på behovet av nationell samordning och samverkan kring mjuk digital infrastruktur.

    Studien och rapporten är delar av ett internt RISE projekt med namnet ’TI Mjuk digital infrastruktur’. Författaren vill rikta ett speciellt tack till alla involverade och intervjuade RISE-forskare och experter.

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  • 5.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Samhällsekonomisk analys av öppna leverantörsreskontradata: Handledning2021Report (Other academic)
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  • 6.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Socio-economic effects and the value of open data: A case from Sweden2021In: Proc. of 23rd ITS Biennial Conference, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Governmental and public organisations have historically been generating and accumulating vast amounts of data which could provide many potential benefits for society and national economies. One example of an important dataset is accounts payable providing information about purchases and expenditures of the governmental sector. Academic research in the area of open data is rather new and fragmented. There is a gap in understanding socio-economic impact of open government data ex post at organisational level. This research aims to understand what kind of socio-economic impact a municipality gains by publishing accounts payable as open data, and how municipalities perceive the major benefits, challenges and risks related to open publishing of this dataset. For analysis, we use the example of Swedish municipalities that are already publishing or preparing to publish accounts payable dataset as open data. We discuss costs related to open data initiative, and benefits related to open publishing of analysed dataset. We also provide more insights into benefits and challenges perceived by municipalities in relation to open publishing of accounts payable.

  • 7.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Socio-economic effects of opening government accounts payable (Leverantörsreskontra) data2021Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this study were to analyse: (i) efficiency gains that a municipality would gain by publishing accounts payable data as open data; and (ii) socio-economic effects with a major focus on democracy aspects. Summarising, we can state that potential efficiency gains related to opening accounts payable data can be significant, which was also confirmed by previous studies. Based on experience of Swedish municipalities publishing accounts payable as open data, we have made an estimation of potential efficiency gains due to reduced time to answer inquiries coming from citizens, journalists, and organisations. Based on these assessments, the potential efficiency gains may reach approximately 2 million kr per year for large municipalities. Additionally, availability of open data on accounts payable may result in further reduction of time needed to handle an inquiry due to opportunity to direct a person to thee open data file, a more exact and specific question formulation, and reduced number of inquiries. It was found that democratic aspects in publishing accounts payable were perceived as more important than potential time savings and efficiency gains. This is especially important for smaller municipalities, which do not get that many inquiries and cannot expect the same level of savings effect. Democracy aspects are closely related to transparency, openness, and opportunity to push procurement prices down. All this leads to even greater savings for municipalities. Another important aspect is finding mistakes and discovery of corruption cases. Elimination of such cases in the future would result in considerable savings at national level. One of the important findings of this research is the fact that municipalities already publishing open data do not see any related risks, while municipalities that are only preparing to publish open data see a number of risks related to open data publishing. The major concerns are related to confidentiality, privacy, and secrecy risks, unclear quality of data, and increased workload for some units. We also make a number of recommendations from different perspectives, which could accelerate the process of open data publishing. This analysis was carried out by Tatjana Apanasevic from RISE Research Institutes of Sweden as a part of Nationell Skalning Öppna Data (NSÖD) project, financed by Vinnova. The analysis is based on primary data collected through interviews with seven municipalities (the City of Gothenburg, the City of Lidingö, Skövde, Varberg, Karlskrona, Uppsala, and Skellefteå), a service provider, consultants working with open data, and three (data) journalists.

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  • 8.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Öppna data publicerings process : Leverantörsreskontra, Varberg kommun. Uppföljningsstudie2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Nationell Skalning Öppna Data (NSÖD) projektet syftar till att utveckla specifikationer för öppna data och hjälpa kommuner att publicera vissa datamängder som öppna data. Inom projektet har vi analyserat samhällsekonomiska effekter av öppna data. Under år 2020 har vi genomfört studien inriktad mot samhällsekonomiska effekter av publicering av leverantörsreskontra som öppna data (Apanasevic, 2020). Under projektets gång har vi fått en unik möjlighet att följa arbetet med införandet av publiceringsprocessen för leverantörsreskontran i Varbergs kommun. Syftet med denna uppföljningsstudie är att beskriva hur Varbergs kommun införde en öppen datapubliceringsprocess och vilka lärdomar kommunen har dragit. Uppföljningsstudien genomfördes år 2021 och bestod av tre semistrukturerade intervjuer med ledaren för öppna data projekt (för leverantörsreskontra) i Varbergs kommun.

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  • 9.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Rudmark, Daniel
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Crowdsourcing and Public Transportation: Barriers and Opportunities2021In: Proc of 23rd ITS Biennial Conference, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decade, private companies have successfully used crowdsourcing to revolutionise mobility, while public transport companies are still mostly failing to utilise the benefits of crowdsourcing. The application of crowdsourcing in public transport is a new area of academic research, and research on crowdsourcing en route in real-time is missing. This research aims to address this gap, explore opportunities and challenges of this type of crowdsourcing, and conceptualise this phenomenon. The research is based on empirical data collected in five Northern European countries. Our research findings help identify areas where crowdsourcing en route can add value to public transport: new forms of communication, opportunities to communicate with third parties, and improved transit planning and optimisation. Identified challenges are related to behavioural change for users, a need to develop infrastructure to enable crowdsourcing en route, and financial rationalities.

  • 10.
    Aranda Muñoz, Alvaro
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Industrial Systems. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Bozic Yams, Nina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Carlgren, Lisa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    CO-DESIGNING TECHNOLOGICAL EXPLORATIONS IN DEVELOPING FUTURES LITERACY THROUGH SPECULATIVE DESIGN AND AN ARTISTIC INTERVENTION2023In: Proc. Des. Soc., Cambridge University Press , 2023, p. 957-966Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Futures Literacy is the capability to imagine and understand potential futures to prepare ourselves to act and innovate in the present. This pilot study aims to understand how artistic methodologies and speculative design can support the collaborative exploration of futures in the context of work and contribute to developing peoples' capability of futures literacy. Our premise is that technologies such as Artificial Intelligence and the Internet of things can augment people and support their needs at work. To illustrate this process, we have presented a collaborative method that integrates an artistic intervention with speculative design activities. We tested the method in a full-day workshop with seventeen (17) participants from a Swedish academy responsible for enabling learning and competence development at work in the healthcare sector. The results indicate that the artistic intervention, combined with the speculative design activities, can challenge current participants' perspectives and offer them new ways of seeing futures with technologies. These new ways of seeing reveal underlying premises crucial in developing the capability of futures literacy. © The Author(s)

  • 11.
    Arnell, Magnus
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Infrastructure and concrete technology.
    Ahlström, Marcus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Infrastructure and concrete technology.
    Wärff, Christoffer
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Infrastructure and concrete technology.
    Miltell, Maya
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Vahidi, Arash
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Data Science.
    Digitalisering av den svenska VA-branschen2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The report provides a knowledge base on the digital transformation in the water industry, its visionand potential. Key success factors are pointed out and challenges with workforce competence,data management and cybersecurity is outlined. A catalogue with ten examples of successful digitalapplications is provided for inspiration.

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    Rapport
  • 12.
    Bernsland, Melina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Moshfegh, Arvin
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Lindén, Kevin
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Bajin, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Quintero, Luis
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Solsona Belenguer, Jordi
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Rostami, Asreen
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    CS:NO: an Extended Reality Experience for Cyber Security Education2022In: ACM International Conference on Interactive Media Experiences, Association for Computing Machinery , 2022, p. 287-292Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work-in-progress presents the design of an XR prototype for the purpose of educating basic cybersecurity concepts. We have designed an experimental virtual reality cyberspace to visualise data traffic over network, enabling the user to interact with VR representations of data packets. Our objective was to help the user better conceptualise abstract cybersecurity topics such as encryption and decryption, firewall and malicious data. Additionally, to better stimuli the sense of immersion we have used Peltier thermoelectric modules and Arduino Uno to experiment with multisensory XR. Furthermore, we reflect on early evaluation of this experimental prototype and present potential paths for future improvements.

  • 13.
    Björkdahl, Joakim
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Fallahi, Sara
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Holmén, Magnus
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Explaining business model innovation processes: A problem formulation and problem solving perspective2022In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 105, p. 223-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explains the business model innovation processes in industrial firms. Drawing on three case studies of leading business-to-business firms shifting from product-based to service-based business models, it introduces problems as a theoretical concept to explain business model innovation processes. We show how formulating and solving problems guide the search for a viable business model and why some problem formulation and solving activities lead firms to shift between backward-looking and forward-looking searches. The decision to shift to a forward-looking search is triggered by the perception of failure to continue with an established way of working, while the shift to a backward-looking search is based on the perception of high alternative costs. We contribute to the business model innovation and servitization literature by theorizing the process of business model innovation and providing implications for managers.

  • 14.
    Blomqvist, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Alirezaie, Marjan
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Santini, Marina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Towards causal knowledge graphs - position paper2020In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, CEUR-WS , 2020, p. 58-62Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this position paper, we highlight that being able to analyse the cause-effect relationships for determining the causal status among a set of events is an essential requirement in many contexts and argue that cannot be overlooked when building systems targeting real-world use cases. This is especially true for medical contexts where the understanding of the cause(s) of a symptom, or observation, is of vital importance. However, most approaches purely based on Machine Learning (ML) do not explicitly represent and reason with causal relations, and may therefore mistake correlation for causation. In the paper, we therefore argue for an approach to extract causal relations from text, and represent them in the form of Knowledge Graphs (KG), to empower downstream ML applications, or AI systems in general, with the ability to distinguish correlation from causation and reason with causality in an explicit manner. So far, the bottlenecks in KG creation have been scalability and accuracy of automated methods, hence, we argue that two novel features are required from methods for addressing these challenges, i.e. (i) the use of Knowledge Patterns to guide the KG generation process towards a certain resulting knowledge structure, and (ii) the use of a semantic referee to automatically curate the extracted knowledge. We claim that this will be an important step forward for supporting interpretable AI systems, and integrating ML and knowledge representation approaches, such as KGs, which should also generalise well to other types of relations, apart from causality. © 2020 for this paper by its authors. Use permitted under Creative Commons License Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0).

  • 15.
    Boyer, Robert
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Mellquist, Ann-Charlotte
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Williander, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Fallahi, Sara
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Nyström, Thomas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Linder, Marcus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Algurén, Peter
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Vanacore, Emanuela
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Hunka, Agnieszka
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Rex, Emma
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Whalen, Katherine
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Three-dimensional product circularity2021In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 824-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Understanding product circularity as ?three-dimensional? could anchor the Circular Economy to common principles while affording its followers flexibility about how to measure it in their specific sectors and disciplines and within their organization's means. Inspired by a heuristic developed for the urban planning profession to cope with the inherent conflicts of Sustainable Development, this article argues that measuring product-level circularity should consider ways to achieve (1) high material recirculation, (2) high utilization, and (3) high endurance in products and service offerings. Achieving all three dimensions ensures that material flowing through the economy is recovered from prior use phases, that it is used intensely, and that it retains its value in spite of exogenous changes. The article argues further that these three dimensions ought to be measured and reported separately rather than as a composite metric and that certain applications will have opportunities to improve circularity through certain dimensions better than others. The article also explains how researchers at RISE (Research Institutes of Sweden AB) are working with industry and government partners to measure the three dimensions and how diverse actors interested in the Circular Economy can use the three dimensions to take the first steps in their transition to circularity.

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  • 16.
    Brown, Barry
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Vigren, Minna
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Rostami, Asreen
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Glöss, Mareike
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Why Users Hack: Conflicting Interests and the Political Economy of Software2022In: Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction. November 2022, 2022, Vol. 6, no CSCW2, article id 354Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is often assumed that the interests of users and developers coincide, sharing a common goal of good design. Yet users often desire functionality that goes beyond what designers, and the organisations they work in, are willing to supply. Analysing online forums, complemented with interviews, we document how users, hackers and software developers worked together to discover and apply system exploits in hardware and software. We cover four cases: users of CPAP breathing assistance machines getting access to their own sleep data, 'hacking' the Nintendo switch game console to run non-authorised software, end-users building their own insulin supply system, and farmers repairing their own agriculture equipment against suppliers terms and conditions. We propose the concept of the 'gulf of interests' to understand how differing interests can create conflicts between end-users, designers, and the organisations they work in. This points us in the direction of researching further the political and economic situations of technology development and use.

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  • 17.
    Brunnström, Kjell
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Industrial Systems.
    Andrén, Börje
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Industrial Systems.
    Schenkman, Bo
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Industrial Systems.
    Djupsjöbacka, Anders
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Industrial Systems.
    Hamsis, Omar
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Recommended precautions because of Covid-19 for perceptual, behavioural,quality and user experience experimentswith test persons in indoor labs2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the recommendations from the Public Health Agency of Sweden(Folkhälsomyndigheten; FHM) and a set of internal rules from RISE, the followingrules are published for how to conduct experiments involving test persons in the timesof the pandemic Covid-19. The recommendations are for non-invasive and non-medicaltests, e.g. perceptual, consumer, ergonomic and human-computer interaction teststaking place in an indoor laboratory.

    Specifically, in this document we are specifying how experiments with test personstargeting audio and visual presentations should be done considering necessaryprecautions imposed by the Covid-19 pandemic. Laboratory experiments with testpersons, as it involves inviting people to the lab, require particular planning and carefulconsideration, if they are to be carried out safely because of the risks imposed by theCovid-19 pandemic. The safety aspects are valid for both the invited test persons andare equally important for the health of the test leaders.

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  • 18.
    Brännvall, Rickard
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Data Science.
    Forsgren, Henrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Data Science.
    Linge, Helena
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Data Science.
    Santini, Marina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Salehi, Alireza
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Rahimian, Fatemeh
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Data Science.
    Homomorphic encryption enables private data sharing for digital health: Winning entry to the Vinnova innovation competition Vinter 2021-222022In: 34th Workshop of the Swedish Artificial Intelligence Society, SAIS 2022, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People living with type 1 diabetes often use several apps and devices that help them collect and analyse data for a better monitoring and management of their disease. When such health related data is analysed in the cloud, one must always carefully consider privacy protection and adhere to laws regulating the use of personal data. In this paper we present our experience at the pilot Vinter competition 2021-22 organised by Vinnova. The competition focused on digital services that handle sensitive diabetes related data. The architecture that we proposed for the competition is discussed in the context of a hypothetical cloud-based service that calculates diabetes self-care metrics under strong privacy preservation. It is based on Fully Homomorphic Encryption (FHE)-a technology that makes computation on encrypted data possible. Our solution promotes safe key management and data life-cycle control. Our benchmarking experiment demonstrates execution times that scale well for the implementation of personalised health services. We argue that this technology has great potentials for AI-based health applications and opens up new markets for third-party providers of such services, and will ultimately promote patient health and a trustworthy digital society.

  • 19.
    Burden, Håkan
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Stenberg, Susanne
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Carlgren, Lisa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Sjöblom, Ted
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Maritime department.
    Policylabb Smarta Fartyg2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish Shipping Policy Lab

    Smart ships, or Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships as they are also known, have a great potential to advance shipping and sustainable development through optimisation of operations and maintenance. In situations that pose a risk to humans or where humans tend to lose their concentration, smart ships can also contribute to increased safety onboard and for the environment. In short, smart ships are suitable for operations that are dirty, dull and dangerous. The Swedish Shipping Policy Lab was an initiative to support on-going projects within smart shipping with policy-developing activities with the ambition to strengthen Swedish competitiveness. The project has actively strived for a systematic approach to how shipowners, technology developers and authorities among others can foster policy development and innovation in relation to smart ships. As an outcome the project has identified three policies related to the investigated cases (see Appendix G for more details): 1. Navigational assistance from land – A shared statement by the Swedish Maritime Administration and the Swedish Transport Agency on the role of navigational assistance from land and the need to further investigate the service before it can be regulated in more detail. 2. The Ljusterö Ferry – Certification of ferries is commonly done in relation to an established and consistent set of technical requirements. For smart ships such as the new road ferries procured for the Ljusterö-connection it is reasonable to complement traditional certification with a safety case to ensure that the ship is seaworthy. 3. Smart maritime drones – Ships less than five meters long that do not carry passengers are excluded from national rules regulating the supervision performed by the Swedish Transport Agency. As long as there is no explicit need to inspect a specific ship, the probability of a supervision is low. If an inspection were to incur, it is necessary to show how the smart ship and its operation complies to applicable regulation in terms of laws and collision avoidance. Despite the maritime sector having a long tradition of international governance there are still no international instruments explicitly for smart ships. A conclusion from the policy lab is that while such work is ongoing, there is room for the flag states and their authorities to develop and operate smart ships in accordance with national policies. Or, to paraphrase, smart ships seem suitable for operations that are dirty, dull, dangerous and domestic.

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  • 20.
    Burden, Håkan
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Stenberg, Susanne
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Carlgren, Lisa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Sjöblom, Ted
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Maritime department.
    The Swedish policy lab for maritime autonomous surface ships2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish policy lab for maritime autonomous surface ships, or smart ships, explored three use cases for developing policy in practice. The policies regard smart ships on national waters: one short-term written policy identifying the next shared step for two authorities to position remote navigational assistance as a new service, giving the maritime ecosystem one official position to relate to; one informal policy relying on a mutual trust, where information sharing between an operator of small, unmanned ships and the supervisory authority enables critical competence building; and one evolving policy on the process of certifying autonomous or remote operated functions using non-standardized technology. In conclusion, despite shipping being explicitly regulated internationally we found that there is substantial leeway for national policies regarding smart ships on national waters.

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  • 21.
    Burden, Håkan
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Stenberg, Susanne
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Carlgren, Lisa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Sjöblom, Ted
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Maritime department.
    The Swedish policy lab for maritime autonomous surface ships2023In: Transportation Research Procedia, ISSN 2352-1457, Vol. 72, p. 1840-1847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish policy lab for maritime autonomous surface ships, or smart ships, explored three use cases for developing policy in practice. The policies regard smart ships on national waters: one short-term written policy identifying the next shared step for two authorities to position remote navigational assistance as a new service, giving the maritime ecosystem one official position to relate to; one informal policy relying on a mutual trust, where information sharing between an operator of small, unmanned ships and the supervisory authority enables critical competence building; and one evolving policy on the process of certifying autonomous or remote operated functions using non-standardized technology. In conclusion, despite shipping being explicitly regulated internationally we found that there is substantial leeway for national policies regarding smart ships on national waters.

  • 22.
    Capshaw, Riley
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Blomqvist, Eva
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Santini, Marina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Alirezaie, Marjan
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    BERT is as Gentle as a Sledgehammer: Too Powerful or Too Blunt? It Depends on the Benchmark2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this position statement, we wish to contribute to the discussion about how to assess quality and coverage of a model.

    We believe that BERT's prominence as a single-step pipeline for contextualization and classification highlights the need for benchmarks to evolve concurrently with models. Much recent work has touted BERT's raw power for solving natural language tasks, so we used a 12-layer uncased BERT pipeline with a linear classifier as a quick-and-dirty model to score well on the SemEval 2010 Task 8 dataset for relation classification between nominals. We initially expected there to be significant enough bias from BERT's training to influence downstream tasks, since it is well-known that biased training corpora can lead to biased language models (LMs). Gender bias is the most common example, where gender roles are codified within language models. To handle such training data bias, we took inspiration from work in the field of computer vision. Tang et al. (2020) mitigate human reporting bias over the labels of a scene graph generation task using a form of causal reasoning based on counterfactual analysis. They extract the total direct effect of the context image on the prediction task by "blanking out" detected objects, intuitively asking "What if these objects were not here?" If the system still predicts the same label, then the original prediction is likely caused by bias in some form. Our goal was to remove any effects from biases learned during BERT's pre-training, so we analyzed total effect (TE) instead. However, across several experimental configurations we found no noticeable effects from using TE analysis. One disappointing possibility was that BERT might be resistant to causal analysis due to its complexity. Another was that BERT is so powerful (or blunt?) that it can find unanticipated trends in its input, rendering any human-generated causal analysis of its predictions useless. We nearly concluded that what we expected to be delicate experimentation was more akin to trying to carve a masterpiece sculpture with a self-driven sledgehammer. We then found related work where BERT fooled humans by exploiting unexpected characteristics of a benchmark. When we used BERT to predict a relation for random words in the benchmark sentences, it guessed the same label as it would have for the corresponding marked entities roughly half of the time. Since the task had nineteen roughly-balanced labels, we expected much less consistency. This finding repeated across all pipeline configurations; BERT was treating the benchmark as a sequence classification task! Our final conclusion was that the benchmark is inadequate: all sentences appeared exactly once with exactly one pair of entities, so the task was equivalent to simply labeling each sentence. We passionately claim from our experience that the current trend of using larger and more complex LMs must include concurrent evolution of benchmarks. We as researchers need to be diligent in keeping our tools for measuring as sophisticated as the models being measured, as any scientific domain does.

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  • 23.
    Danielsson, Benjamin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Santini, Marina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Al-Abasse, Yosef
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Arne
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Eneling, Emma
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Stridsman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Classifying Implant-Bearing Patients via their Medical Histories: a Pre-Study on Swedish EMRs with Semi-Supervised GAN-BERT2022In: 2022 Language Resources and Evaluation Conference, LREC 2022, European Language Resources Association (ELRA) , 2022, p. 5428-5435Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we compare the performance of two BERT-based text classifiers whose task is to classify patients (more precisely, their medical histories) as having or not having implant(s) in their body. One classifier is a fully-supervised BERT classifier. The other one is a semi-supervised GAN-BERT classifier. Both models are compared against a fully-supervised SVM classifier. Since fully-supervised classification is expensive in terms of data annotation, with the experiments presented in this paper, we investigate whether we can achieve a competitive performance with a semi-supervised classifier based only on a small amount of annotated data. Results are promising and show that the semi-supervised classifier has a competitive performance when compared with the fully-supervised classifier. © licensed under CC-BY-NC-4.0.

  • 24.
    Dexe, Jacob
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Franke, Ulrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Nordic lights? National AI policies for doing well by doing good2020In: Journal of Cyber Policy, ISSN 2373-8871, Vol. 5, p. 332-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Getting ahead on the global stage of AI technologies requires vast resources or novel approaches. The Nordic countries have tried to find a novel path, claiming that responsible and ethical AI is not only morally right but confers a competitive advantage. In this article, eight official AI policy documents from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden are analysed according to the AI4People taxonomy, which proposes five ethical principles for AI: beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy, justice and explicability. The principles are described in terms such as growth, innovation, efficiency gains, cybersecurity, malicious use or misuse of AI systems, data use, effects on labour markets, and regulatory environments. The authors also analyse how the strategies describe the link between ethical principles and a competitive advantage, and what measures are proposed to facilitate that link. Links such as a first-mover advantage and measures such as influencing international standards and regulations are identified. The article concludes by showing that while ethical principles are present, neither the ethical principles nor the links and measures are made explicit in the policy documents.

  • 25.
    Dexe, Jacob
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Franke, Ulrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Nordic lights? National AI policies for doing well by doing good2020In: Journal of Cyber Policy, ISSN 2373-8871, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 332-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Getting ahead on the global stage of AI technologies requires vast resources or novel approaches. The Nordic countries have tried to find a novel path, claiming that responsible and ethical AI is not only morally right but confers a competitive advantage. In this article, eight official AI policy documents from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden are analysed according to the AI4People taxonomy, which proposes five ethical principles for AI: beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy, justice and explicability. The principles are described in terms such as growth, innovation, efficiency gains, cybersecurity, malicious use or misuse of AI systems, data use, effects on labour markets, and regulatory environments. The authors also analyse how the strategies describe the link between ethical principles and a competitive advantage, and what measures are proposed to facilitate that link. Links such as a first-mover advantage and measures such as influencing international standards and regulations are identified. The article concludes by showing that while ethical principles are present, neither the ethical principles nor the links and measures are made explicit in the policy documents.

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  • 26.
    Dexe, Jacob
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Franke, Ulrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Nöu, Anneli Avatare
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Rad, Alexander
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Towards increased transparency with value sensitive design2020In: Lect. Notes Comput. Sci. volume 12217, Springer , 2020, Vol. 12217, p. 3-15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few years, the ethics and transparency of AI and other digital systems have received much attention. There is a vivid discussion on explainable AI, both among practitioners and in academia, with contributions from diverse fields such as computer science, human-computer interaction, law, and philosophy. Using the Value Sensitive Design (VSD) method as a point of departure, this paper explores how VSD can be used in the context of transparency. More precisely, it is investigated (i) if the VSD Envisioning Cards facilitate transparency as a pro-ethical condition, (ii) if they can be improved to realize ethical principles through transparency, and (iii) if they can be adapted to facilitate reflection on ethical principles in large groups. The research questions are addressed through a two-fold case study, combining one case where a larger audience participated in a reduced version of VSD with another case where a smaller audience participated in a more traditional VSD workshop. It is concluded that while the Envisioning Cards are effective in promoting ethical reflection in general, the realization of ethical values through transparency is not always similarly promoted. Therefore, it is proposed that a transparency card be added to the Envisioning Card deck. It is also concluded that a lightweight version of VSD seems useful in engaging larger audiences. The paper is concluded with some suggestions for future work. © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020.

  • 27.
    Dexe, Jacob
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Franke, Ulrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Rad, Alexander
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Transparency and insurance professionals: a study of Swedish insurance practice attitudes and future development.2021In: Geneva papers on risk and insurance. Issues and practice, ISSN 1018-5895, E-ISSN 1468-0440, Vol. 46, p. 547-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The insurance industry is being challenged by increased adoption of automated decision-making. AI advances could conceivably automate everything: marketing, customer service, underwriting and claims management alike. However, such automation challenges consumer trust, as there is considerable public and scholarly debate over the 'black box' character of many algorithms. Insurance being a business of trust, this suggests a dilemma. One suggested solution involves adopting algorithms in a transparent manner. This article reports a study of how Swedish insurers deal with this dilemma, based on (i) eight interviews with insurance professionals representing four companies with a joint market share of 45-50% of the Swedish property insurance market and (ii) a questionnaire answered by 71 professionals in a Swedish insurance company. The results show that while transparency is seen as potentially valuable, most Swedish insurers do not use it to gain a competitive advantage or identify clear limits to transparency and are not using AI extensively.

  • 28.
    Dexe, Jacob
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Franke, Ulrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Rad, Alexander
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Transparency and insurance professionals: a study of Swedish insurance practice attitudes and future development2021In: Geneva papers on risk and insurance. Issues and practice, ISSN 1018-5895, E-ISSN 1468-0440, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 547-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The insurance industry is being challenged by increased adoption of automated decision-making. AI advances could conceivably automate everything: marketing, customer service, underwriting and claims management alike. However, such automation challenges consumer trust, as there is considerable public and scholarly debate over the ‘black box’ character of many algorithms. Insurance being a business of trust, this suggests a dilemma. One suggested solution involves adopting algorithms in a transparent manner. This article reports a study of how Swedish insurers deal with this dilemma, based on (i) eight interviews with insurance professionals representing four companies with a joint market share of 45–50% of the Swedish property insurance market and (ii) a questionnaire answered by 71 professionals in a Swedish insurance company. The results show that while transparency is seen as potentially valuable, most Swedish insurers do not use it to gain a competitive advantage or identify clear limits to transparency and are not using AI extensively.

  • 29.
    Dexe, Jacob
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Franke, Ulrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Söderlund, Kasia
    Lund University, Sweden.
    van Berkel, Niels
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Jensen, Rikke Hagensby
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Lepinkäinen, Nea
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Vaiste, Juho
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Explaining automated decision-making: a multinational study of the GDPR right to meaningful information2022In: Geneva papers on risk and insurance. Issues and practice, ISSN 1018-5895, E-ISSN 1468-0440, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 669-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) establishes a right for individuals to get access to information about automated decision-making based on their personal data. However, the application of this right comes with caveats. This paper investigates how European insurance companies have navigated these obstacles. By recruiting volunteering insurance customers, requests for information about how insurance premiums are set were sent to 26 insurance companies in Denmark, Finland, The Netherlands, Poland and Sweden. Findings illustrate the practice of responding to GDPR information requests and the paper identifies possible explanations for shortcomings and omissions in the responses. The paper also adds to existing research by showing how the wordings in the different language versions of the GDPR could lead to different interpretations. Finally, the paper discusses what can reasonably be expected from explanations in consumer oriented information.

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  • 30.
    Dexe, Jacob
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ledendal, Jonas
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Franke, Ulrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    An Empirical Investigation of the Right to Explanation Under GDPR in Insurance2020In: 17th International Conference on Trust, Privacy and Security in Digital Business, TrustBus 2020 (Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 12395)), Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2020, p. 125-139Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The GDPR aims at strengthening the rights of data subjects and to build trust in the digital single market. This is manifested by the introduction of a new principle of transparency. It is, however, not obvious what this means in practice: What kind of answers can be expected to GDPR requests citing the right to “meaningful information”? This is the question addressed in this article. Seven insurance companies, representing 90–95% of the Swedish home insurance market, were asked by consumers to disclose information about how premiums are set. Results are presented first giving descriptive statistics, then characterizing the pricing information given, and lastly describing the procedural information offered by insurers as part of their answers. Overall, several different approaches to answering the request can be discerned, including different uses of examples, lists, descriptions of logic, legal basis as well as data related to the process of answering the requests. Results are analyzed in light of GDPR requirements. A number of potential improvements are identified—at least three responses are likely to fail the undue delay requirement. The article is concluded with a discussion about future work.

  • 31.
    Diener, Derek
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Fallahi, Sara
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Mellquist, Ann-Charlotte
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Vanacore, Emanuela
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Ways of operating in business ecosystems to drive circular transitions2021In: New Business Models in a Decade of Action:  Sustainable • Evidence-based • Impactful. Full Conference Proceedings. New Business Models 2021, Halmstad, Sweden, 2021, p. 150-156Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The circular economy megatrend demands that manufacturing firms change their business model, implying that great changes must happen in business ecosystems. This short paper is based on observations from research in three ecosystems and identifies avenues firms can take in business ecosystems when orchestrating implementation of circular economy goals.

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  • 32.
    Eriksson, Magnus
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Lundälv, Johan
    Gothenburg University, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Elisabet M
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Challenging norms of crisis communication and preparedness by listening to voices from the (dis)ability movement in Sweden2021In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRISIS AND RISK COMMUNICATION CONFERENCE, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the result of a survey study where representing members of the disability movement in Sweden have shared their experiences of living and acting during the first year of the Covid-19-pandemic. The aim was to identify crisis communication challenges and where additional communication material and methods are needed for supporting people in going from knowledge to taking action for achieving a higher level of crisis preparedness. The paper also includes a brief summary of a literature review of previous international research on disabilities and the Covid-19 pandemic. Three categories of crisis communication challenges were identified displaying a vulnerability in society and pointing towards several important knowledge gaps that ought to be addressed in order to achieve crisis preparedness among all people. The results indicate that there is a need for additional communication materials and methods that can be appropriated to individual needs, and dialogue methods between authorities and people in order to counteract normative assumptions in crisis communication aimed at different target groups.

  • 33.
    Eriksson, Magnus
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Lundälv, Jörgen
    Gothenburg University, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Elisabet M
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Challenging norms of crisis communication and preparedness by listening to voices from the (dis)ability movement in Sweden2021In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRISIS AND RISK COMMUNICATION CONFERENCE MARCH 8-10, 2021. ORLANDO FL, USA, 2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the result of a survey study where representing members of the disability movement in Sweden have shared their experiences of living and acting during the first year of the Covid-19-pandemic. The aim was to identify crisis communication challenges and where additional communication material and methods are needed for supporting people in going from knowledge to taking action for achieving a higher level of crisis preparedness. The paper also includes a brief summary of a literature review of previous international research on disabilities and the Covid-19 pandemic. Three categories of crisis communication challenges were identified displaying a vulnerability in society and pointing towards several important knowledge gaps that ought to be addressed in order to achieve crisis preparedness among allpeople. The results indicate that there is a need for additional communication materials and methods that can be appropriated to individual needs, and dialogue methods between authorities and people in order to counteract normative assumptions in crisis communication aimed at different target groups.

  • 34.
    Eriksson, Magnus
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Nilsson, Elisabet M
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Lundälv, Jörgen
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A Scoping Review of Research Exploring Working Life Practices of People with Disabilities During the COVID-19 Pandemic2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 241-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There have been numerous research studies stating the fact that the pandemic affected people with disabilities’ working lives. Less research has been conducted on how people with disabilities coped with and learned from these challenges. This scoping review maps research conducted in the field of disability research and multidisciplinary research, published from the outbreak of the pandemic until October 31, 2022. The focus is on how people with disabilities adapted their working lives to the conditions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and what working practices and strategies they applied to manage the situation. From an extensive search in bibliographic databases, eight research articles were identified. The review results reveal both challenges and new openings for the working life of people with disabilities post-pandemic. Implications for future research are identified, addressing intersectionality, hybrid work environments, digital gaps and increased participation of people with disabilities in research. 

  • 35.
    Eriksson, Yvonne
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Skagert, Katrin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Ekwall, Per-Erik
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Design process of live-action video instructions2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this design project is to explore ways of co-designing instructional videos, together with representatives from the elderly care sector, that show how to use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) related to the Covid-19 pandemic and how to follow basic hygiene routines. We have used Design Thinking (DT) and Research through design (RtD) methodology. The results show that the main improvements derived from using a co-design process were input on the details needed to make the video more realistic and reflective of real-world scenarios.

  • 36.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Larsson, P.
    Volvo Car Group, Sweden.
    Maculewicz, J.
    Volvo Car Group, Sweden.
    The sound of trust: Sonification of car intentions and perception in a context of autonomous drive2020In: International Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics, ISSN 2045-7804, E-ISSN 2045-7812, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 343-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A main challenge to the successful wide scale introduction of self-driving vehicles is users' trust in automation technology. This study's primary aim was to investigate whether auditory displays can enhance users' trust when they ride in self-driving cars. Twenty-eight subjects participated in an experiment utilising a virtual reality simulation. All subjects rode in a virtual vehicle with and without an auditory display. The display contained signals that provided information about the intentions of the car, as well as other road users that the car focused on. Participants' responses were collected during and after the rides. The results suggest that auditory displays can be useful to improve users' trust. Furthermore, the designed auditory display received high scores in terms of user acceptance. These results have implications for the interaction design of self-driving cars and can guide future auditory display research.

  • 37.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Sirkka, Anna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Orrell, Lina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Zhang, Yanqing
    RCDH, Sweden.
    Larsson, Stefan
    RCDI, Sweden.
    Tybring, Elin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Rönntoft, Hanna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Designing Collaboration between Human Beings and Self-driving Heavy Vehicles with Emerging Interaction Technologies2021In: AutomotiveUI '21 Adjunct: 13th International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications, 2021, p. 123-127Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work-in-progress paper describes the development ofnovel user interface concepts that allow human operators to collaborate with self-driving heavy vehicles in a mining context. Conceptdevelopment was performed within a user-centered design processcontaining three main steps. First, a study was performed to identifyinteraction points between heavy vehicle drivers and other humanoperators in mines. Second, potential interaction technologies wereinvestigated. Finally, suggestions for interaction models were designed and implemented in 3D animated movies. The concepts weredesigned to support human operators performing loading tasks together with self-driving vehicles and utilize voice interaction and anaugmented reality head-up-display to facilitate the interaction. Inaddition to the mining context, similar concepts were developed tosupport forklift drivers performing loading tasks in logistic centers.In the next step of this project, the suggested interaction modelswill be evaluated with mine workers and forklift drivers.

  • 38.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Zhang, Yanqing
    Scania AB, Sweden.
    Orrell, Lina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Rönntoft, Hanna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Collaboration with Highly Automated Vehicles via Voice Interaction and Augmented Reality2023In: Prooc. of HRI '23, 2023, p. 540-544Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In future confined industrial contexts (hubs), highly automated vehicles and human operators may work in shared spaces and collaborate on joint tasks. This will probably generate a demand for new user interfaces between humans and machines that need to be designed to facilitate high levels of safety and efficiency as well as a positive user experience (UX). The present work investigates the potential of using a combination of voice interaction (VI) and visual augmented reality (AR) to support collaboration between automated vehicles and humans manually operating a machine. A concept using VI and AR for a loading scenario in a logistic center was created and evaluated using a VR headset to provide an immersive experience. A user study with 18 forklift drivers was conducted. Our study shows that the concept generated high scores in terms of usability and UX, which indicates a promising potential to use VI and AR to facilitate interaction between human machine operators and unmanned highly automated vehicles when performing collaborative tasks. Our study also implies a need to explore the design and implementation of more complex and social VI for users in logistic centers.

  • 39.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Zhang, Yanqing
    Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Orrell, Lina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Rönntoft, Hanna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Facilitating collaboration between humans and unmanned heavy vehicles using verbal interaction and augmented reality2022In: Human Factors in Robots, Drones and Unmanned Systems, 2022, 57, p. 54-62Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Fagerlönn, Johan
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Zhang, Yanqing
    Scania AB, Sweden.
    Orrell, Lina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Rönntoft, Hanna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Interaction with Automated Heavy Vehicles Using Gestures and External Interfaces in Underground Mines2023In: Proceedings of HCII 2023 (Part of Lecture Notes in Computer Science; 14048), 2023, p. 255-267Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated the potential of using gestures to guide and control unmanned automated heavy vehicles in underground mine contexts, as well as the effects of adding external human-machine interfaces (eHMIs) to provide feedback during the gesture interaction. A study with 12 professional operators was conducted in a simulated mine environment, utilizing a Wizard of Oz methodology. The subjects used gestures to guide and control a heavy vehicle in three different scenarios in the mine, and different aspects of the user experience (UX) were assessed. The results support the notion that there is high potential in using gestures when operators stand in close proximity to the vehicles. Moreover, the results suggest that eHMI solutions can enhance the operator’s acceptance and feelings of safety. The selected gestures seemed appropriate for the investigated scenarios, which should be valuable insights for practitioners intending to develop and implement gesture interaction for similar applications.

  • 41.
    Fallahi, Sara
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Jersler Fransson, Cajsa
    Sjöfartsverket, Sweden.
    Sandberg Jadaan, Taline
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Nordström, Eva
    Sjöfartsverket, Sweden.
    Carlgren, Lisa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Lindberg, Jouni
    Sjöfartsverket, Sweden.
    Recruitment Equality & Diversity Opportunities: Slutrapport för forskningsprojektet ’Rekrytering till sjöfarten – måste sjömän vara män?’2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When the #metoo movement became viral in the world, women in shipping in Sweden started their own appeal that raised a large number of issues concerning the social work environment on board which became the starting point for the initiative Fair Winds in 2018.

    Fair Winds is a collaboration between collaboration between industry association/ employers´organisation, trade unions, academia, authorities, student associations and non-profit organisations in the Swedish shipping sector with an objective to create a shipping sector with world class work environment with a zero vision of harassment and discrimination for everyone working in the shipping sector in Sweden.

    Supported by the Fair Winds, research project REDO (Recruitment Equality & Diversity Opportunities) started in January 2020 in a collaboration between RISE Research Institutes of Sweden and the Swedish Maritime Administration with a vision to improve the social work environment from a gender equality perspective.

    The purpose of REDO is to create a safe and inclusive shipping industry where more women will want to apply for jobs at sea, and feel motivated and inspired to stay. It is an approach that needs to include everyone, from top management to every employee.

    In this project, we have applied ‘Design Thinking’ as the overarching, user-centered problem formulation and solving approach. To identify driving forces and obstacles for increasing diversity and recruitment of more women in the shipping industry, we have conducted surveys, interviews, and workshops with women that are currently or have previously worked in the shipping industry at different roles. A benchmark study of other male-dominated industries and their diversity strategies through marketing and communication, mentorship and networks, and challenging existing norms and work cultures has provided inspiration for how the shipping industry can address equality and diversity to improve the social work environment.

    This report intends to summarize the results and insights generated through the course of this project and to offer recommendations for how the shipping industry can continue to promote diversity by offering a social work environment which is built on three cornerstones of safety, inclusion, and motivation. More detailed documentations of results from the different studies conducted are supplemented to this report as four appendices. 

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  • 42.
    Fallahi, Sara
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Mellquist, Ann-Charlotte
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Mogren, Olof
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Data Science.
    Listo Zec, Edvin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Data Science.
    Algurén, Peter
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Hallquist, Lukas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Financing solutions for circular business models: Exploring the role of business ecosystems and artificial intelligence2023In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The circular economy promotes a transition away from linear modes of production and consumption to systems with circular material flows that can significantly improve resource productivity. However, transforming linear business models to circular business models posits a number of financial consequences for product companies as they need to secure more capital in a stock of products that will be rented out over time and therefore will encounter a slower, more volatile cash flow in the short term compared to linear direct sales of products. This paper discusses the role of financial actors in circular business ecosystems and alternative financing solutions when moving from product-dominant business models to Product-as-a-Service (PaaS) or function-based business models. Furthermore, the paper demonstrates a solution where state-of-the-art artificial intelligence (AI) modeling can be incorporated for financial risk assessment. We provide an open implementation and a thorough empirical evaluation of an AI-model, which learns to predict residual value of stocks of used items. Furthermore, the paper highlights solutions, managerial implications, and potentials for financing circular business models, argues the importance of different forms of data in future business ecosystems, and offers recommendations for how AI can help mitigate some of the challenges businesses face as they transition to circular business models. © 2022 The Authors. 

  • 43.
    Flintberg, Björn
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Nylander, Johanna
    Dataspelsbranschen, Sweden.
    Kraftsamling Dataspelsbranschen : En rapport om svensk spelindustri2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Spel är inte bara underhållning och nöje, utan också en framgångsrik och stark näringsverksamhet med en total export på över 27 miljarder kronor i svenska bolag. Siffran stiger till nästan 60 miljarder inräknat dotterbolag i de 45 länder där svenska spelbolag har etablerat sig. Den svenska spelbranschen är stark, framgångsrik och har gott rykte internationellt. Sverige brukar räknas till ett av världens tio främsta länder inom spelutveckling. Men spelindustrin har växt upp som en maskros genom asfalten utan någon nationell strategi eller större offentliga satsningar. I projektet Kraftsamling Dataspelsbranschen har Vinnova uppdragit åt RISE att undersöka samverkan och synergier mellan regional, nationell och internationell nivå, samt stärka och utveckla processer och metoder för att stärka dessa. Den här rapporten identifierar totalt åtta områden med utmaningar för spelindustrin. Den gemensamma nämnaren är ett behov av utökad samverkan och ett behov av att det offentliga ekosystemet upprättar en nationell strategi och en satsning på branschens tillväxt. Spelbranschen är en kreativ näring med högutbildad personal, där svensk innovationskraft, tekniskt kunnande och kreativitet sammanstrålar. Men det behöver finnas en solid innovationsinfrastruktur för att skapa långsiktig hållbarhet och tillväxt, vilket saknas i dagsläget och riskerar göra att Sverige tappar mark mot andra länder. Spelbranschens största utmaning är tillgången på kompetens, både i form av fler framtida anställda, möjligheter till fortbildning och tillgång till fler lärare. I Sverige finns idag närmare 8000 anställda i branschen – ett antal som behöver växa till 41 000 fram till 2031 om branschen fortsätter utvecklas i samma takt som tidigare, med årlig tillväxt på över 20%. Antalet utbildningsplatser behöver öka dramatiskt och reglerna för arbetskraftsinvandring, som de ser ut i dagsläget, är ett direkt hinder för internationell rekrytering. Inom högre utbildning utmanas lärosätena av ett bristande tillflöde av nya lärare på grund av få doktorander. Det finns också ett utflöde av befintliga lärare som går till arbeten i branschen. Spelforskning är ett tydligt underfinansierat forskningsfält. Den sedan decennier aktiva spelforskning som pågår har istället fått söka medel inom andra områden och associera spelforskningen i relation till vilken nytta spel gör i andra syften. Även om spelbranschen kan göra stor nytta även för andra branscher har den i kraft av sin storlek och tillväxt ett berättigande i sig själv. Andra utmaningar handlar om tillgången till exportstöd, som är utformat för traditionell industri och inte anpassat för ”born global”-bolag.Värdekedjan och affärsutvecklingsarbetet måste ges rätt förutsättningar och områden som hållbarhet, jämställdhet och utveckling av mindre företag behöver kunna stärkas. Nästan all utveckling via offentliga medel sker på regional och lokal nivå genom inkubatorer, spelhubbar och industrikluster. Här har orter som Skövde, Skellefteå och Malmö gått före och skapat levande och dynamiska ekosystem, trots avsaknaden av en stark nationell satsning. Istället får de regionala aktörerna arbeta med små medel i jakten på projektmedel för att stärka ekosystemet runt den växande branschen. I grannlandet Finland satsade statliga offentliga aktörer förra året över 130 miljoner kronor på att utveckla den finska spelbranschen. Men spel är inte bara näringsverksamhet utan också en central del av svensk kultur. I de flesta ålderskategorier spelar mer än 50% någon form av spel och i åldersgruppen 18-30 är det över 70%. Spel är en kulturform som inte bara konsumeras utan där användaren också blir medskapare, precis den deltagarkultur som redan 1974 års kulturreform eftersträvade med demokratisering av kulturen. Samtidigt finns spel fortfarande inte tydliggjort i Kulturrådets styrdokument som en uttalad kulturform. Europaparlamentet antog i november 2022 en resolution om att hela Europa behöver genomföra en strategisk satsning på spelindustrin både ur ett näringsperspektiv och ett kulturperspektiv, och utredningen SOU 2022:44 om kreativa näringar bekräftar samma sak. Den svenska spelbranschen har stor potential både i sin egen rätt och genom att bidra till transformationen av mer traditionell industri. Spelteknologier ligger i framkant av användningen av både XR och AI, och kompetens- och tekniköverföringspotentialen är stor. Men då måste också utmaningarna adresseras och det närmast styvmoderliga synsättet på spelbranschen förändras. RISE analys av läget i spelbranschen är att Sverige sitter på en kreativ guldreserv, som fortfarande bryts för hand och inte alltid tas på allvar. Det är nödvändigt och angeläget att man från nationell nivå tillhandahåller rätt verktyg och strukturellt stöd genom de offentliga stödstrukturerna för forskning, tillväxt och innovation, precis som för andra framgångsrika branscher. Spelbranschen har växtvärk, och de komponenter som behövs för en långsiktigt hållbar innovationsinfrastruktur saknas. Utbildningsplatser, forskningsmedel och branschutvecklingsstöd är alla centrala komponenter i detta. En svensk nationell satsning är viktig och nödvändig om Sverige ska inneha en position som en spelnation i yttersta världsklass.

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  • 44.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society. Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Barth, Henrik
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Gullbrand, Jeanette
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Holmén, Magnus
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Additive manufacturing technologies and business models – a systematic literature review2020In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 136-155Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper reviews research on the intersection between additive manufacturing technologies (AMTs) and business models (BM). The purpose of the review is to synthesize past research for the benefit of researchers, to describe the dominant research themes and aggregated research questions and to identify research gaps in the literature. Design/methodology/approach: A systematic literature review of secondary data was conducted. The 288 publications in the review appeared in peer-reviewed journal articles, conference proceedings papers and book chapters. All publications are listed in this paper by publication year and publication source. The review also distinguishes between empirical and non-empirical studies, describes methodological approaches and categorizes the publications by unit of analysis and by theme. Findings: Research on the intersection between AMT and BM, which has increased significantly in the last three years, reflects firms' and industries' growing interest in digital manufacturing processes. This review identifies twelve dominant themes in the literature that contribute important insights to the field. Aggregated research questions are identified in each theme. Research advances and gaps are presented. Four themes relate directly to BM: (1) BM types, (2) BM and technology, (3) BM design and processes and (4) BM value and supply chains. Originality/value: This review is the first systematic literature review on the intersection between AMT and BM. As such, the review provides a guide for researchers as they explore gaps in the research and develop research questions on an aggregated level. The review also supports users of such technologies as they review their business practices and models in the so-called Digital Revolution. 

  • 45.
    Fuchsberger, Verena
    et al.
    University of Salzburg, Austria.
    Smit, Dorothé
    University of Salzburg, Austria.
    Campreguer França, Nathalia
    University of Salzburg, Austria.
    Regal, Georg
    Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Austria.
    Wuschitz, Stefanie
    Mz* Baltazar's Lab, Austria.
    Huber, Barbara
    Mz* Baltazar's Lab, Austria.
    Kowolik, Joanna
    Happylab, Austria.
    Devendorf, Laura
    University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Giaccardi, Elisa
    Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society. Umeå University, Sweden .
    Making Access: Increasing Inclusiveness in Making2022In: Extended Abstracts of the 2022 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery , 2022, article id 89Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this one-day workshop we are going to make access. We aim to counteract the phenomenon that access to making (e.g., in makerspaces, fablabs, etc.) is not equally distributed, with certain groups of people being underrepresented (e.g., women*1). After brief introductions from participants and a set of three impulse keynotes, we will envision and make interventions together, such as speculative or provocative objects and actions. The workshop takes a constructive stance with the goal to not rest on empirical and theoretical findings or individual experiences, but to translate those into viable interventions. These serve as exemplars of findings with the clear goal of being deployed soon after.

  • 46.
    Geuens, Sam
    et al.
    University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium.
    Lemiere, Jurgen
    University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium.
    Nijs, Jessica
    University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium.
    Treunen, Marlies
    University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium.
    Aertsen, Michael
    University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium.
    Toelen, Jaan
    University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium.
    Pauwels, Greet
    AZ Sint-Jan, Belgium.
    Sauer, Kate
    AZ Sint-Jan, Belgium.
    Potoms, Marlies
    Jessa Ziekenhuis, Belgium.
    Van Cauter, Sofie
    Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg, Belgium.
    Wouters, Leen
    Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg,.
    Hohlbaum, Kathrin
    RWTH Aachen University, Germany.
    Sjölinder, Marie
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Ståhl, Olov
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Buyse, Gunnar
    University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium.
    Demaerel, Philippe
    University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium.
    Weyn, Barbara
    KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Testing a Home Solution for Preparing Young Children for an Awake MRI: A Promising Smartphone Application2023In: Children, E-ISSN 2227-9067, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 1866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thanks to its non-invasive nature and high-resolution imaging capabilities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a valuable diagnostic tool for pediatric patients. However, the fear and anxiety experienced by young children during MRI scans often result in suboptimal image quality and the need for sedation/anesthesia. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a smartphone application called COSMO@home to prepare children for MRI scans to reduce the need for sedation or general anesthesia. The COSMO@home app was developed incorporating mini-games and an engaging storyline to prepare children for learning goals related to the MRI procedure. A multicenter study was conducted involving four hospitals in Belgium. Eligible children aged 4–10 years were prepared with the COSMO@home app at home. Baseline, pre-scan, and post-scan questionnaires measured anxiety evolution in two age groups (4–6 years and 7–10 years). Eighty-two children participated in the study, with 95% obtaining high-quality MRI images. The app was well-received by children and parents, with minimal technical difficulties reported. In the 4–6-year-old group (N = 33), there was a significant difference between baseline and pre-scan parent-reported anxiety scores, indicating an increase in anxiety levels prior to the scan. In the 7–10-year-old group (N = 49), no significant differences were observed between baseline and pre-scan parent-reported anxiety scores. Overall, the COSMO@home app proved to be useful in preparing children for MRI scans, with high satisfaction rates and successful image outcomes across different hospitals. The app, combined with minimal face-to-face guidance on the day of the scan, showed the potential to replace or assist traditional face-to-face training methods. This innovative approach has the potential to reduce the need for sedation or general anesthesia during pediatric MRI scans and its associated risks and improve patient experience.

  • 47.
    Hagström, Björn
    et al.
    Hagström Consulting, Sweden.
    Rudmark, Daniel
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Östling, Johan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Hjelmestam, Eric
    Axell, Mattias
    Kolsjö, Magnus
    Popp Larsen, Claus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Rapport och rekommendationer från NSÖD2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Inom Nationell Skalning Öppna Data (NSÖD) har vi både genererat kunskap men också analyserat dokumenterade erfarenheter och råd från genomförda projekt och andra organisationer. I denna rapport har vi sammanställt dessa samlade erfarenheter och gör rekommendationer till andra om hur resultatet kan och bör hanteras vidare. De två huvudsakliga tilltänkta mottagarna av resultatet från NSÖD är DIGG och projektet Nationell dataverkstad för kommunal och regional datadelning (Dataverkstad) som samordnas av Västra Götalandsregionen (VGR). Det finns andra mindre användare av resultatet (t.ex. enskilda kommuner) och det kommer troligtvis finnas ännu fler längre fram men det är också troligt att DIGG och Dataverkstaden då har utvecklat arbetet och stödet ännu mer. Den viktigaste anledningen till att DIGG är mottagare är att undvika “projektdöden”, d.v.s. att projektets resultat riskerar bli bortglömt samt oförändrat efter projekttiden (och med tiden därför blir allt mindre relevant). Genom att DIGG tar emot material från NSÖD och gör det till en del av sitt befintliga stöd kan det leva vidare och uppdateras (särskilt vägledningar och rekommendationer). DIGG och NSÖD har dessutom arbetat nära tillsammans kring flera viktiga projektleveranser så att resultatet direkt ägs och förvaltas av DIGG. Leveranserna från NSÖD har alltså varit anpassade för att enkelt kunna tas över och förvaltas av DIGG. Den främsta anledningen till Dataverkstaden som mottagare är att det projektet kan och bör fortsätta det mer praktiska arbete som NSÖD har bedrivit. Det finns praktiska lärdomar och erfarenheter som är direkt relevanta för Dataverkstaden. I viss mån finns också formellt stöd som VGR borde ta över och förvalta och utveckla. Det gäller framför allt vägledningar och specifikationer för hur specifika mängder av öppna data bör formateras och publiceras.

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  • 48.
    Hamilton, Virginia
    et al.
    California Workforce Association, United States.
    Carlgren, Lisa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    An army of one: How one person set off a grassroots movement at the US Department of Labor2023In: Transform with Design: Creating New Innovation Capabilities with Design Thinking / [ed] Jochen Schweitzer, Sihem BenMahmoud-Jouini & Sebastian Fixson, University of Toronto Press , 2023Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Williamsson, Anna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH Royal Institute of Technololgy, Sweden.
    Berglund, Martina
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    The dialogue tool Work Balance in practice : A learning evaluation for sustainable work2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to respond to the challenges in the organisational and social work environment area and to promote a sustainable working life, Scania has developed the dialogue tool called Work Balance (WB) It is research-based and intended to provide support and structure for managers to maintain an in-depth and regular dialogue with employees about their experiences of work situations. The dialogue is structured using four elements – Manageability, Comprehensibility, Meaningfulness and Recovery – and is intended to be used on a voluntary basis in groups or individually. In cooperation with Scania, HELIX has conducted a learning evaluation for Work Balance. The purpose of this learning evaluation was to identify enablers and obstacles to the use of Work Balance and to produce improvement proposals as a basis for Scania’s further development of the dialogue tool. HELIX researchers interviewed 44 employees, first- and second-line managers from production and office environments, from six production units in four countries. These employees used or had chosen not to use the dialogue tool. The results show an overall positive view of Work Balance, of the voluntary use, relevance, adaptability, flexibility and the varied mode of application. However, its use has been discontinued at one production unit where the tool did not work as desired. The implementation varied in terms of clarity of information and training in the tool. The conditions of use varied greatly depending on previous experience, culture and maturity of teams and managers in terms of being open and putting feelings into words. Use also varied between production units. Those who used it regularly were very satisfied, while others who did not see the benefit stopped using Work Balance. In production, the teams were larger, time was more limited, language and questions felt more abstract, and use was perceived as more difficult than in an office environment. Senior managers requesting that it be used tended to result in more sustained use. Perceived effects were: a more open atmosphere, better communication, increased consensus and earlier identification of problems. Many believed in an indirect positive link between Work Balance and key performance indicators. A simpler version of Work Balance was requested, but also better handling of identified problems, where more support and training for managers and teams are needed. A well-developed culture of improvement should be a good basis for a developed dialogue where Work Balance is linked to other tools or methods used in the team’s core processes.

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  • 50.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Renström, Sara
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Håkansson, Maria
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Resources.
    Strömberg, Helena
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Exploring Renewable Energy Futures through Household Energy Resilience2022In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery , 2022, article id 333Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A transition to renewable energy increases the risks of disruptions when electricity supply does not meet demand. HCI has explored how digital technologies can mitigate such problems in households through support for reducing or shifting electricity use. However, faster transitions may be possible if some disturbances can be acceptable and households are supported in adapting to them. In this paper, we present a study of 21 Swedish households and their experiences of and ideas on how to manage disruptions in electricity supply. We call this perspective household energy resilience and identify three strategies for resilience: (1) response diversity, i.e., diversity in ways of carrying out normally electricity-dependent practices, (2) creating opportunities to develop resilience, and (3) building community energy resilience. Furthermore, we suggest how HCI can support these strategies, both by providing tools to increase resilience and by carefully designing technology and services to be more resilient in themselves. © 2022 Owner/Author.

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