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  • 1.
    Aadland, Reidun C.
    et al.
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Akarri, Salem
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Heggset, Ellinor B
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Torsæter, Ole
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    A core flood and microfluidics investigation of nanocellulose as a chemical additive to water flooding for eor2020In: Nanomaterials, E-ISSN 2079-4991, Vol. 10, no 7, article id 1296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)- oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (T-CNFs) were tested as enhanced oil recovery (EOR) agents through core floods and microfluidic experiments. Both particles were mixed with low salinity water (LSW). The core floods were grouped into three parts based on the research objectives. In Part 1, secondary core flood using CNCs was compared to regular water flooding at fixed conditions, by reusing the same core plug to maintain the same pore structure. CNCs produced 5.8% of original oil in place (OOIP) more oil than LSW. For Part 2, the effect of injection scheme, temperature, and rock wettability was investigated using CNCs. The same trend was observed for the secondary floods, with CNCs performing better than their parallel experiment using LSW. Furthermore, the particles seemed to perform better under mixed-wet conditions. Additional oil (2.9–15.7% of OOIP) was produced when CNCs were injected as a tertiary EOR agent, with more incremental oil produced at high temperature. In the final part, the effect of particle type was studied. T-CNFs produced significantly more oil compared to CNCs. However, the injection of T-CNF particles resulted in a steep increase in pressure, which never stabilized. Furthermore, a filter cake was observed at the core face after the experiment was completed. Microfluidic experiments showed that both T-CNF and CNC nanofluids led to a better sweep efficiency compared to low salinity water flooding. T- CNF particles showed the ability to enhance the oil recovery by breaking up events and reducing the trapping efficiency of the porous medium. A higher flow rate resulted in lower oil recovery factors and higher remaining oil connectivity. Contact angle and interfacial tension measurements were conducted to understand the oil recovery mechanisms. CNCs altered the interfacial tension the most, while T-CNFs had the largest effect on the contact angle. However, the changes were not significant enough for them to be considered primary EOR mechanisms.

  • 2.
    Aaen, Ragnhild
    et al.
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Lehtonen, Mari
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Mikkonen, Kirsi
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Combining cellulose nanofibrils and galactoglucomannans for enhanced stabilization of future food emulsions2021In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 28, no 16, p. 10485-10500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of wood-derived cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) or galactoglucomannans (GGM) for emulsion stabilization may be a way to obtain new environmentally friendly emulsifiers. Both have previously been shown to act as emulsifiers, offering physical, and in the case of GGM, oxidative stability to the emulsions. Oil-in-water emulsions were prepared using highly charged (1352 ± 5 µmol/g) CNFs prepared by TEMPO-mediated oxidation, or a coarser commercial CNF, less charged (≈ 70 µmol/g) quality (Exilva forte), and the physical emulsion stability was evaluated by use of droplet size distributions, micrographs and visual appearance. The highly charged, finely fibrillated CNFs stabilized the emulsions more effectively than the coarser, lower charged CNFs, probably due to higher electrostatic repulsions between the fibrils, and a higher surface coverage of the oil droplets due to thinner fibrils. At a constant CNF/oil ratio, the lowest CNF and oil concentration of 0.01 wt % CNFs and 5 wt % oil gave the most stable emulsion, with good stability toward coalescence, but not towards creaming. GGM (0.5 or 1.0 wt %) stabilized emulsions (5 wt % oil) showed no creaming behavior, but a clear bimodal distribution with some destabilization over the storage time of 1 month. Combinations of CNFs and GGM for stabilization of emulsions with 5 wt % oil, provided good stability towards creaming and a slower emulsion destabilization than for GGM alone. GGM could also improve the stability towards oxidation by delaying the initiation of lipid oxidation. Use of CNFs and combinations of GGM and CNFs can thus be away to obtain stable emulsions, such as mayonnaise and beverage emulsions. © 2021, The Author(s).

  • 3.
    Abbas, S.
    et al.
    Quaid-i-Azam University, Pakistan.
    Imtiaz-ud-Din,
    Quaid-i-Azam University, Pakistan.
    Mehmood, M.
    Quaid-i-Azam University, Pakistan.
    Raheel, A.
    Quaid-i-Azam University, Pakistan.
    Ayub, Rabia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Zahid, M.
    Higher Education Department Govt. of the Punjab, Pakistan.
    Tahir, M. N.
    University of Sargodha, Pakistan.
    Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Bioactive Ferrocenyl Substituted Hydrazones2021In: Russian journal of coordination chemistry, ISSN 1070-3284, E-ISSN 1608-3318, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 891-902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of ferrocenyl substituted hydrazones (I–VII) derived from ferrocene carboxaldehyde and substituted hydrazides have been prepared and characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR spectroscopy, and crystallographic studies. The single-crystal X-ray analysis for III·0.5H2O·0.5CH3CN (CIF file CCDC no. 1968937) further authenticates the structural motif of the synthesized compounds. The C(11) of ferrocene carboxaldehyde is linked with N(1) of the hydrazide moiety with a bond length of 1.283(5) Å, confirming the binding of the two structural units present in the final product. They were preliminarily screened for their antimicrobial activity and demonstrate good results. The free radical scavenging activity for the compounds (III, IV) has been found to be more than 90% when compared with the ascorbic acid. The total antioxidant capacity and total reducing power assays for VI show significant activity whereas the data for the other compounds are also encouraging. Quantum chemical calculations at the DFT level predict that compound II is the softest while VII is the hardest within the series, resultantly II can be used as a synthon for further chemical reactions.

  • 4.
    Abbasi, Abdul G
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Industrial Systems.
    Rydberg, Anna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Altmann, Peter
    Digg Agency for Digital Government, Sweden.
    Towards a verifiable and secure data sharing platform for livestock supply chain2022In: Proceedings of the 2022 IEEE International Conference on Dependable, Autonomic and Secure Computing, International Conference on Pervasive Intelligence and Computing, International Conference on Cloud and Big Data Computing, International Conference on Cyber Science and Technology Congress, DASC/PiCom/CBDCom/CyberSciTech 2022, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The digitization of a supply chain involves satisfying several functional and non-functional context specific requirements. The work presented herein builds on efforts to elicit trust and profit requirements from actors in the Swedish livestock supply chain, specifically the beef supply chain. Interviewees identified several benefits related to data sharing and traceability but also emphasized that these benefits could only be realized if concerns around data security and data privacy were adequately addressed. We developed a data sharing platform as a response to these requirements. Requirements around verifiability, traceability, secure data sharing of potentially large data objects, fine grained access control, and the ability to link together data objects was realized using distributed ledger technology and a distributed file system. This paper presents this data sharing platform together with an evaluation of its usefulness in the context of beef supply chain traceability. 

  • 5.
    Abdelaziz, Omar
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. Lund University, Sweden.
    Capanema, Ewellyn
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Ajao, Olumoye
    Canmet ENERGY, Canada.
    Kristensen, Tove
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hosseinaei, Omid
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Benali, Marzouk
    Canmet ENERGY, Canada.
    Hulteberg, Christian
    Lund University, Sweden.
    A Rapid and Tunable Approach for the Fractionation of Technical Kraft Lignin2023In: Chemical Engineering Transactions, ISSN 1974-9791, E-ISSN 2283-9216, Vol. 99, p. 67-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reducing the heterogeneity of technical lignin is essential to obtain predictable and high-performance polymeric materials that are suitable for high-value applications. Organic solvents with different polarities and solubilities can be used to fractionate lignin and reduce the complexity and diversity of its chemical structure. Among the various solvents and solvent mixtures, acetone-water mixtures offer an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly means of lignin fractionation. In the present study, temperature-induced acetone-water fractionation was investigated to refine the properties of a technical softwood Kraft lignin, i.e., LignoBoost™ lignin. Relatively mild operating conditions were tested, namely, temperatures of 70-110°C and autogenous pressure. A factorial experimental design was developed using the Design-Expert® software, and three factors (temperature, time, and acetone concentration) were investigated. It was found that temperature-induced fractionation could increase lignin homogeneity and maintain high lignin solubilization with a short processing time (<1 h). It was also possible to tune the properties of the soluble lignin fraction (yield and weight-average molecular weight) based on the factorial models developed. The techno-economic evaluation confirmed the commercial viability of this fractionation process. 

  • 6.
    Abitbol, Tiffany
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Ahniyaz, Anwar
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Alvarez-Asencio, Ruben
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Fall, Andreas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Swerin, Agne
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Nanocellulose-Based Hybrid Materials for UV Blocking and Mechanically Robust Barriers2020In: ACS Applied Bio Materials, E-ISSN 2576-6422, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 2245-2254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocellulose (NC)-based hybrid coatings and films containing CeO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) to impart UV screening and hardness properties, respectively, were prepared by solvent casting. The NC film-forming component (75 wt % of the overall solids) was composed entirely of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) or of CNCs combined with cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs). Zeta potential measurements indicated that the four NP types (CNC, CNF, CeO2, and SiO2) were stably dispersed in water and negatively charged at pH values between 6 and 9. The combination of NPs within this pH range ensured uniform formulations and homogeneous coatings and films, which blocked UV light, the extent of which depended on film thickness and CeO2 NP content, while maintaining good transparency in the visible spectrum (∼80%). The addition of a low amount of CNFs (1%) reduced the film hardness, but this effect was compensated by the addition of SiO2 NPs. Chiral nematic self-assembly was observed in the mixed NC film; however, this ordering was disrupted by the addition of the oxide NPs. The roughness of the hybrid coatings was reduced by the inclusion of oxide NPs into the NC matrix perhaps because the spherical oxide NPs were able to pack into the spaces between cellulose fibrils. We envision these hybrid coatings and films in barrier applications, photovoltaics, cosmetic formulations, such as sunscreens, and for the care and maintenance of wood and glass surfaces, or other surfaces that require a smooth, hard, and transparent finish and protection from UV damage.

  • 7.
    Abitbol, Tiffany
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. EPFL, Switzerland.
    Kubat, Mikaela
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Brännvall, Elisabet
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Kotov, Nikolay
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Johnson, C Magnus
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Nizamov, Rustem
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Nyberg, Mikael
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Miettunen, Kati
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Nordgren, Niklas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Stevanic Srndovic, Jasna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Guerreiro, Maria Pita
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Isolation of Mixed Compositions of Cellulose Nanocrystals, Microcrystalline Cellulose, and Lignin Nanoparticles from Wood Pulps2023In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 8, no 24, p. 21474-21484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a circular economy perspective, one-pot strategies for the isolation of cellulose nanomaterials at a high yield and with multifunctional properties are attractive. Here, the effects of lignin content (bleached vs unbleached softwood kraft pulp) and sulfuric acid concentration on the properties of crystalline lignocellulose isolates and their films are explored. Hydrolysis at 58 wt % sulfuric acid resulted in both cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and microcrystalline cellulose at a relatively high yield (>55%), whereas hydrolysis at 64 wt % gave CNCs at a lower yield (<20%). CNCs from 58 wt % hydrolysis were more polydisperse and had a higher average aspect ratio (1.5-2×), a lower surface charge (2×), and a higher shear viscosity (100-1000×). Hydrolysis of unbleached pulp additionally yielded spherical nanoparticles (NPs) that were <50 nm in diameter and identified as lignin by nanoscale Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and IR imaging. Chiral nematic self-organization was observed in films from CNCs isolated at 64 wt % but not from the more heterogeneous CNC qualities produced at 58 wt %. All films degraded to some extent under simulated sunlight trials, but these effects were less pronounced in lignin-NP-containing films, suggesting a protective feature, but the hemicellulose content and CNC crystallinity may be implicated as well. Finally, heterogeneous CNC compositions obtained at a high yield and with improved resource efficiency are suggested for specific nanocellulose uses, for instance, as thickeners or reinforcing fillers, representing a step toward the development of application-tailored CNC grades. © 2023 The Authors. 

  • 8.
    Abitbol, Tiffany
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Mijlkovic, Ana
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Malafronte, Loredana
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Stevanic Srndovic, Jasna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Cellulose nanocrystal/low methoxyl pectin gels produced by internal ionotropic gelation.2021In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 260, article id 117345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The biotechnological applications of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) continue to grow due to their sustainable nature, impressive mechanical, rheological, and emulsifying properties, upscaled production capacity, and compatibility with other materials, such as protein and polysaccharides. In this study, hydrogels from CNCs and pectin, a plant cell wall polysaccharide broadly used in food and pharma, were produced by calcium ion-mediated internal ionotropic gelation (IG). In the absence of pectin, a minimum of 4 wt% CNC was needed to produce self-supporting gels by internal IG, whereas the addition of pectin at 0.5 wt% enabled hydrogel formation at CNC contents as low as 0.5 wt%. Experimental data indicate that CNCs and pectin interact to give robust and self-supporting hydrogels at solid contents below 2.5 %. Potential applications of these gels could be as carriers for controlled release, scaffolds for cell growth, or wherever else distinct and porous network morphologies are required.

  • 9.
    Abrahamsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Rissler, Jenny
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. Lund University, Sweden.
    Hedmer, Maria
    Lund University, Sweden.
    KÃ¥redal, Monica
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Isaxon, Christina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    77 Aerosolized Particulate Matter from Fragmentation of Carbon Nanotube-Enhanced Concrete2023In: Annals of Work Exposures and Health, Vol. 67, no Supplement_1, p. i94-i95Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Abrahamsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Rissler, Jenny
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. Lund University, Sweden.
    Kåredal, Monica
    Lund University, Sweden; Region Skåne, Sweden.
    Hedmer, Maria
    Lund University, Sweden; Region Skåne, Sweden.
    Suchorzewski, Jan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Infrastructure and concrete technology.
    Prieto Rábade, Miguel
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Infrastructure and concrete technology.
    Arun Chaudhari, Ojas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Infrastructure and concrete technology.
    Gudmundsson, Anders
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Isaxon, Christina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Characterization of airborne dust emissions from three types of crushed multi-walled carbon nanotube-enhanced concretes2024In: NanoImpact, ISSN 2452-0748, Vol. 34, article id 100500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dispersing Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) into concrete at low (<1 wt% in cement) concentrations may improve concrete performance and properties and provide enhanced functionalities. When MWCNT-enhanced concrete is fragmented during remodelling or demolition, the stiff, fibrous and carcinogenic MWCNTs will, however, also be part of the respirable particulate matter released in the process. Consequently, systematic aerosolizing of crushed MWCNT-enhanced concretes in a controlled environment and measuring the properties of this aerosol can give valuable insights into the characteristics of the emissions such as concentrations, size range and morphology. These properties impact to which extent the emissions can be inhaled as well as where they are expected to deposit in the lung, which is critical to assess whether these materials might constitute a future health risk for construction and demolition workers. In this work, the impact from MWCNTs on aerosol characteristics was assessed for samples of three concrete types with various amounts of MWCNT, using a novel methodology based on the continuous drop method. MWCNT-enhanced concretes were crushed, aerosolized and the emitted particles were characterized with online and offline techniques. For light-weight porous concrete, the addition of MWCNT significantly reduced the respirable mass fraction (RESP) and particle number concentrations (PNC) across all size ranges (7 nm – 20 μm), indicating that MWCNTs dampened the fragmentation process by possibly reinforcing the microstructure of brittle concrete. For normal concrete, the opposite could be seen, where MWCNTs resulted in drastic increases in RESP and PNC, suggesting that the MWCNTs may be acting as defects in the concrete matrix, thus enhancing the fragmentation process. For the high strength concrete, the fragmentation decreased at the lowest MWCNT concentration, but increased again for the highest MWCNT concentration. All tested concrete types emitted <100 nm particles, regardless of CNT content. SEM imaging displayed CNTs protruding from concrete fragments, but no free fibres were detected. 

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  • 11. Acevedo, F.
    et al.
    Pizzul, Leticia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Castillo, Maria del Pilar 
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Cuevas, R.
    Diez, M.C.
    Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by the Chilean white-rot fungus Anthracophyllum discolor2011In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 185, no 1, p. 212-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The degradation of three- and four-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Kirk medium by Anthracophyllum discolor, a white-rot fungus isolated from the forest of southern Chile, was evaluated. In addition, the removal efficiency of three-, four- and five-ring PAHs in contaminated soil bioaugmented with A. discolor in the absence and presence of indigenous soil microorganisms was investigated. Production of lignin-degrading enzymes and PAH mineralization in the soil were also determined. A. discolor was able to degrade PAHs in Kirk medium with the highest removal occurring in a PAH mixture, suggesting synergistic effects between PAHs or possible cometabolism. A high removal capability for phenanthrene (62%), anthracene (73%), fluoranthene (54%), pyrene (60%) and benzo(a)pyrene (75%) was observed in autoclaved soil inoculated with A. discolor in the absence of indigenous microorganisms, associated with the production of manganese peroxidase (MnP). The metabolites found in the PAH degradation were anthraquinone, phthalic acid, 4-hydroxy-9-fluorenone, 9-fluorenone and 4,5-dihydropyrene. A. discolor was able to mineralize 9% of the phenanthrene. In non-autoclaved soil, the inoculation with A. discolor did not improve the removal efficiency of PAHs. Suitable conditions must be found to promote a successful fungal bioaugmentation in non-autoclaved soils. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  • 12. Acevedo, F.
    et al.
    Pizzul, Leticia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Castillo, Maria del Pilar 
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Gonzalez, M.E.
    Cea, M.
    Gianfreda, L.
    Diez, M.C.
    Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by free and nanoclay-immobilized manganese peroxidase from Anthracophyllum discolor2010In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 80, no 3, p. 271-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) produced by Anthracophyllum discolor, a Chilean white rot fungus, was immobilized on nanoclay obtained from volcanic soil and its ability to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) compared with the free enzyme was evaluated. At the same time, nanoclay characterization was performed.Nanoclay characterization by transmission electronic microscopy showed a particle average size smaller than 100nm. The isoelectric points (IEP) of nanoclay and MnP from A. discolor were 7.0 and 3.7, respectively, as determined by micro electrophoresis migration and preparative isoelectric focusing. Results indicated that 75% of the enzyme was immobilized on the nanoclay through physical adsorption. As compared to the free enzyme, immobilized MnP from A. discolor achieved an improved stability to temperature and pH. The activation energy (Ea) value for immobilized MnP (51.9kJmol -1) was higher than that of the free MnP (34.4kJmol -1).The immobilized enzyme was able to degrade pyrene (>86%), anthracene (>65%), alone or in mixture, and to a less extent fluoranthene (<15.2%) and phenanthrene (<8.6%). Compared to free MnP from A. discolor, the enzyme immobilized on nanoclay enhanced the enzymatic transformation of anthracene in soil.Overall results indicate that nanoclay, a carrier of natural origin, is a suitable support material for MnP immobilization. In addition, immobilized MnP shows an increased stability to high temperature, pH and time storage, as well as an enhanced PAHs degradation efficiency in soil. All these characteristics may suggest the possible use of nanoclay-immobilized MnP from A. discolor as a valuable option for in situ bioremediation purposes. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 13. Acevedo, F.
    et al.
    Pizzul, Leticia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Castillo, Maria del Pilar 
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Rubilar, O.
    Lienqueo, M.E.
    Tortella, G.
    Diez, M.C.
    A practical culture technique for enhanced production of manganese peroxidase by Anthracophyllum discolor Sp42011In: Brazilian archives of biology and technology, ISSN 1516-8913, E-ISSN 1678-4324, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 1175-1186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, different growth conditions of Anthracophyllum discolor Sp4 including the effect of agitation, additions of lignocellulosic support, inducer and surfactant were evaluated on the MnP production in Kirk medium using a culture system made up of the tubes containing the glass bead. The highest MnP production (1,354 U/L on day 13) was obtained when the medium was supplemented with wheat grain and 0.25 mM MnSO 4 as inducer, under static conditions at 30°C. Two isoenzymes were purified (35 and 38 kDa respectively). MnP presented a maximal activity in the pH range between 4.5 and 5.5, a relatively high temperature tolerance (50°C) and a high catalytic activity for 2,6-dimethoxyphenol and hydrogen peroxide.

  • 14.
    Ahlgren, Serina
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Behaderovic, Danira
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Edman, Frida
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Wallman, Magdalena
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Berglund, Maria
    Hushållningssällskapet Halland, Sweden.
    Laurentz, Martin
    Lantmännen, Sweden.
    Abrahamsson, Susanne
    Agronod, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Anton
    Agronod, Sweden.
    Description of the Agrosfär model – a tool for climate impact assessment of crop and animal production systems in Sweden: Version 1: Crops, milk and beef2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The agricultural sector in Sweden needs to cut GHG emissions and contribute to the climate goal of net-zero emissions by 2045. The GHG reduction goal for agricultural emissions is not quantified, but the Swedish climate policy framework states that ‘the Swedish food production shall increase as much as possible with as little climate impact as possible’ and multiple key actors within the sector of food and agriculture have developed roadmaps or industry specific goals for reducing GHG emissions from the sector. Consequently, requirements of transparent GHG accounting and reporting are increasing within the agricultural sector, both at national and international level. The purpose of the Agrosfär tool is to establish an automatic data driven climate calculator used to calculate GHG emissions from agricultural products and on farm enterprise level. The automation and automatic data collection will save time, increase accuracy of the calculations, and simplify updates of the tool to keep it aligned with the most recent climate data and climate reporting methodology. It will make it possible to continuously carry out follow-ups on climate performance indicators and measure improvements from climate measures taken. A working group consisting of Swedish agricultural life cycle assessment experts have developed the framework of the tool, e.g. setting system boundaries, selecting methodologies and input data. A technical team has developed algorithms, a digital interface and coupled the tool to other existing agricultural databases providing farm specific information on crop and animal production data, soil characteristics, carbon footprints and amounts of purchased inputs etc. The tool and user interface have been developed based on input from farmers through prototyping and in-depth interviews. For general guidelines on methodology the calculation model follows the Product Environmental Footprint Category Rules (PEFCR), the International Dairy Federation (IDF)’s approach for carbon footprint for the dairy sector and FAO Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance guidelines (FAO LEAP). Where standards have diverged or where assumptions have been required the working group has made expert judgements on which method/guideline to follow or what assumptions to make. A first version of the tool, a so called minimal viable product (MVP) has been developed which will be the basis for further development. The MVP contains an animal and crop module and can calculate the carbon footprint of crops, milk and beef. Future development possibilities of the tool and calculation model is described in chapter 7, such as enabling climate calculations on enterprise level, develop modules for more animal production types, deepen the integration between the crop and animal modules, expand sources for automatic data collection, develop a carbon sequestration module and other technical and methodological improvements to ensure alignment with important climate reporting standards. The report will be repeatedly updated as the tool develops, and new versions of the tool are released.

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  • 15.
    Ahlgren, Serina
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Behaderovic, Danira
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Edman, Frida
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Wallman, Magdalena
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Laurentz, Martin
    Lantmännen, Sweden.
    Henryson, Kajsa
    Lantmännen, Sweden.
    Berglund, Maria
    Hushållningssällskapet Halland, Sweden.
    Söderberg, Vera
    Agronod, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Anton
    Agronod, Sweden.
    Abrahamsson, Susanna
    Agronod, Sweden.
    Description of the Agrosfär model – a tool for the climate impact assessment of farms, crop and animal production systems in Sweden2024Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The agricultural sector in Sweden needs to cut GHG emissions and contribute to the climate goal of net-zero emissions by 2045. The GHG reduction goal for agricultural emissions is not quantified, but the Swedish climate policy framework states that ‘Swedish food production shall increase as much as possible with as little climate impact as possible’. Multiple key actors within the sector of food and agriculture have developed roadmaps or industry specific goals for reducing GHG emissions from the sector. Consequently, requirements for transparent GHG accounting and reporting are increasing within the agricultural sector, both on a national and international level. The purpose of the Agrosfär tool is to establish an automatic data driven climate calculator used to calculate GHG emissions from agricultural products and on a farm enterprise level. Automation and automatic data collection will save time, increase the accuracy of the calculations, and simplify updates of the tool to keep it aligned with the most recent climate data and climate reporting methodology. It will make it possible to continuously carry out follow-ups on climate performance indicators and measure improvements from climate measures taken. A working group consisting of agricultural life cycle assessment experts has developed the framework of the tool (e.g., setting system boundaries, selecting methodologies and input data). A technical team has developed algorithms, a digital interface and coupled the tool to other existing agricultural databases, providing farm specific information on crop and animal production data, soil characteristics, carbon footprints and amounts of purchased inputs etc. The tool and user interface have been developed based on input from farmers through prototyping and in-depth interviews. The priority guidelines on which the calculation model is based are the Product Environmental Footprint Category Rules (PEFCR), the International Dairy Federation (IDF)’s approach for carbon footprint for the dairy sector, and FAO Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance guidelines (FAO LEAP). From the farm perspective, the Greenhouse Gas Protocol (GHG Protocol) Corporate Standard, GHG Protocol Agricultural Guidance (Scope 1 & 2) and GHG Protocol Corporate value chain (Scope 3) Accounting and Reporting Standard are guiding standards. Where standards have diverged or where assumptions have been required, the working group has made expert judgements on which method/guideline to follow or what assumptions to make. A first version of the tool, first described in report version 1, was developed as the basis for further development. The first version contains an animal and a crop module, and can calculate the carbon footprint of crops, milk and beef. This report (version 1.1) has been updated to include the most recent developments of the tool. The main change is that the tool can now also be used to calculate farm climate impact on a yearly basis. Future possibilities to develop the tool and calculation model are described in chapter 7, including suggestions for developing modules for more animal production types, deepening the integration between the crop and animal modules, expanding sources for automatic data collection, developing a carbon sequestration module, and other technical and methodological improvements to ensure alignment with important climate reporting standards. The report will be repeatedly updated as the tool develops, and new versions of the tool are released.

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  • 16.
    Ahlgren, Serina
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Behaderovic, Danira
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Wirsenius, Stefan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Hessle, Anna
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Toräng, Per
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Seeman, Anett
    Gård & Djurhälsan, Sweden.
    den Braver, Theo
    Gård & Djurhälsan, Sweden.
    Kvarnbäck, Olle
    Naturvisaren, Sweden.
    Miljöpåverkan av svensk nöt- och lammköttsproduktion2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna studie har varit att beräkna miljöpåverkan från olika svenska uppfödningsmodeller för nöt- och lammkött i produktionsområdena Götalands norra slättbygder, Götalands skogsbygder, Nedre Norrland samt del av Götalands mellanbygd (Gotland). Inom nötköttsproduktion har mjölkrastjur, mjölkrasstut, köttrastjur, köttrasstut och köttraskviga studerats. För lammkött har vårlamm, höstlamm och vinterlamm undersökts. Miljöpåverkanskategorier som ingått i studien är klimatpåverkan, markanvändning, kväveutsläpp samt påverkan på biologisk mångfald.

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  • 17.
    Ahlgren, Serina
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Behaderovic, Danira
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Wirsenius, Stefan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Hessle, Anna
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Toräng, Per
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Seeman, Anett
    Gård & Djurhälsan, Sweden.
    den Braver, Theo
    Gård & Djurhälsan, Sweden.
    Kvarnbäck, Olle
    Naturvisaren, Sweden.
    Miljöpåverkan av svensk nöt- och lammköttsproduktion - en sammanfattning2023Report (Other academic)
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  • 18.
    Ahlgren, Serina
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Behaderovic, Danira
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Woodhouse, Anna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Att räkna med markkol i livscykelanalys av nötkött2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Markanvändning och förändringar i markkol kan ha en stor påverkan på klimatpåverkan från livsmedelsproduktion. En vanlig metod för att beräkna klimatpåverkan av livsmedel är livscykelanalys (LCA). Här räknar man ihop alla utsläpp från produktionskedjan till ett tal.

    Det finns idag dock ingen konsensus kring hur vi bör räkna med markkol i LCA vilket innebär att många studier helt enkelt inte tar med markkol eller gör väldigt olika val vilket försvårar tolkning av resultaten. Det finns också en begreppsförvirring som gör det svårt att kommunicera kring markkol och dess effekter.

    I denna rapport ger vi en bakgrund till problemen, varför det är så svårt att räkna med markkol. Vi gör ett försök att reda ut begreppen, och att ge några råd för hur markkol kan inkluderas i LCA. Rapporten vänder sig till utförare av LCA men även till dig som vill veta mer om markkol i LCA på ett generellt plan och för att kunna tolka resultat.

    I rapporten delar vi upp markkolsförändringar som kan ske på fyra principiellt olika nivåer:1. Ändring mellan olika kategorier av markanvändning, till exempel från skog till jordbruksmark.2. Odling av en mark som inte är i jämvikt, till exempel att bruka en torvmark eller mark som bytt kategori för länge sen men som fortfarande inte kommit i jämnvikt.3. Ändring i marknyttjande, till exempel byte av gröda från ettåriga till fleråriga grödor.4. Att ändra eller införa skötselåtgärder, till exempel tillförsel av organiskt material.

    För att inkludera markkolsförändringar i LCA, behövs tre steg (1) uppskatta ändringen i markkol (2) fördela påverkan över tid och (3) beräkna klimatpåverkan. I rapporten går vi systematiskt igenom dessa tre steg och pekar ut vilka svårigheter som finns.Det är svårt att ge specifika råd kring markkol, då alla val är tätt kopplade till syftet med studien som ska utföras. Vi tycker att det viktigaste är, att LCA-utövaren är medveten om de olika alternativen i varje steg och tydligt beskriver och motiverar sina val, så att det för slutanvändaren av resultaten är tydligt vad som ligger grund för resultaten.

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    RISE Rapport 2020:67
  • 19.
    Ahlgren, Serina
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Einarsson, Rasmus
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Öhlund, Erika
    FOI Swedish Defence Research Agency, Sweden.
    Växtnäring till jordbruket i osäkra tider – scenarier och dokumentation från en workshop2024Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Mineralgödsel är en förutsättning för dagens konventionella jordbruk och utan mineralgödsel blir det problematiskt att få fram tillräckligt med foder och livsmedel. Sverige har ingen egen produktion av mineralgödsel och försörjningen är därför helt beroende av import. Denna rapport beskriver hur växtnäring hanteras ur beredskapssynpunkt i Sverige idag, och ger också en liten inblick i hur växtnäring har hanterats i tidigare kriser och pristoppar i andra länder. Rapporten beskriver också tre olika tänkbara krisscenarier där växtnäring behöver hanteras på olika sätt för att säkerställa livsmedelsförsörjningen i Sverige. Tidsperspektivet i scenarierna är relativt kort: ett fokuserar på hur växtnäringsförsörjningen kan lösas under den kommande växtodlingssäsongen medan de andra två scenarierna fokuserar på några år framåt i tiden. Scenarierna diskuterades på en workshop med deltagare från jordbruks- och växtnäringssektorn. I rapporten redovisas diskussionerna från workshopen. Under workshopen lyftes några brister i dagens system och förslag på vilket stöd och långsiktiga förändringar som behövs, för att säkra tillgången på växtnäring i Sverige under en kris: • I vardagen finns det ingen nationell eller regional planering av den svenska primärproduktionen och fördelningen av mineralgödsel eller andra insatsvaror till olika verksamheter, utan allt sköts av marknaden. Det finns därför ingen ansvarig offentlig aktör som har helhetsansvar för området. Vid en allvarlig brist på mineralgödsel kan det behövas någon som kliver in, säkrar leveranser och tar beslut om prioriteringar till olika verksamheter och eventuellt styrning av vem som odlar vad. Det kan även behövas någon som ansvarar för förebyggande arbete. • En trygg och resilient försörjning av växtnäring kommer att kräva en mångfald av lösningar. Dessa kräver i varierande grad samordning mellan marknadsaktörer och myndigheter. Vissa kan också kräva ny lagstiftning. Ett ”Gödselmedelskabinett” med ansvar att ta fram en strategi föreslogs. • Lagstiftning bör justeras alternativt införas för att utöka möjligheterna till miljö- och hälsomässigt säker återvinning av resurser från restflöden. Sådana ändringar skulle kunna förberedas redan nu, så att de snabbt kan träda i kraft i händelse av kris eller krig. • Sverige bör utveckla gemensamma strategier och avtal med andra länder, främst inom Norden, till exempel en nordisk strategi för växtnäringsfrågor.

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  • 20.
    Ahlgren, Serina
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Junestedt, Christian
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Ahlström, Marcus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Lundin, Emma
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Återvinning av växtnäringsämnen ur avloppsvatten – hur gör vi hållbarhetsbedömningar på bästa sätt?2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    För att kunna producera tillräckligt med mat på ett hållbart sätt behöver vi hushålla med växtnäring, och se till att den näring som redan finns i omlopp används på ett klokt sätt. Nya direktiv kring slamanvändning, krav på återförsel av växtnäring och hårdare utsläppskrav på reningsverk innebär att nya system och tekniker behöver utvecklas. Det kan dock vara svårt att veta vilket system eller vilken teknik som ger den största nyttan. Systemanalytiska metoder kan hjälpa till att tydliggöra dessa komplexa frågor.

    Målet med denna studie är att på ett övergripande sätt ge en insikt i hur arbetet kring hållbarhetsbedömningar kopplat till kommunal avloppsvattenrening och återföring av näringsämnen, med fokus på fosfor och kväve kan genomföras. Vidare har fokus legat på metodfrågor inom livscykelanalys (LCA), men en utblick kring andra hållbarhetsbedömningsmetoder ges även i en mindre omfattning. Mycket av det som behandlas inom LCA har dock bäring även för andra metoder för hållbarhetsbedömning.

    Idag finns det olika typer av standarder och riktlinjer för hur LCA-studier bör utföras, dock saknas det specifika riktlinjer för LCA-studier kopplade till näringsåtervinning ur avlopp. Det finns flera skäl till att LCA-metodfrågor kopplade till näringsåterföring behöver utredas; LCA är en metod som framförallt inriktar sig på att bedöma miljöpåverkan av en produkt, medan avloppsvattenrening ofta sker i kommunal regi och i nuläget är inriktat på att rena avloppsvatten och inte fokuserar på att producera produkter. Avloppssystem är ofta integrerade med både vattenförsörjning, energisystemet och jordbruket på ett intrikat sätt. Avlopp är också en sektor som har utsläpp både till luft och vatten, och metoder för att korrekt kunna bedöma dessa utsläpps påverkan på miljö är viktiga att utreda. Användningsområdet för LCA är väldigt brett. LCA kan dock inte svara på om det system som utvärderas är hållbart, bara om systemet har mer eller mindre påverkan än ett annat. LCA kan alltså inte svara på frågeställningar som: Vad är en hållbar återvinningsgrad för växtnäringsämnen?

    Arbetet har resulterat i en diskussion kring när LCA eller systemanalys lämpar sig och vad man bör tänka på när man genomför en LCA och vilka delar som bör ingå. Inom ramen för detta arbete anordnades även en workshop där berörda intressenter deltog från forskning, myndigheter och branschen. Syftet med workshopen var att få in synpunkter kring hur en systemanalys eller LCA bör läggas upp för att ge användbara resultat i beslutsfattande.

    I första hand vänder sig rapporten till dem som arbetar med kommunal avloppsvattenrening, teknikutveckling och myndigheter inom detta område, som har en grundförståelse för systemanalys och vill veta mer.

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  • 21.
    Ahlgren, Serina
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Morell, Karin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Hallström, Elinor
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Mapping of biodiversity impacts and hotspot products in Nordic food consumption2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The climate impact of food production has been lively debated over the last decades. It is e.g. well known that some products have a higher climate impact in comparison to other food products. The biodiversity impact of different food products is however less known. To steer the food production in a positive direction as well as to enable consumers, restaurants, public kitchens, and the food industry to make well-informed decisions, we need to address and measure this impact. The aim of this study has been to examine the biodiversity impact of Nordic and European food consumption. In this report we present (1) a brief summary of biodiversity indicators linked to food production and consumption, (2) different methods to evaluate biodiversity impact of food products and (3) a literature review of studies that assess biodiversity impacts of food products and diets. Based on the literature review, we identify food products suggested to have a higher respectively lower negative impact on biodiversity and discuss what changes that could promote a Nordic diet with lower negative impact on biodiversity. Finally, we highlight knowledge gaps and possibilities for future work. There are different methods to examine the biodiversity impact on food products, such as life cycle assessment, input-output-model, and mapping tools. Biodiversity footprints are often based on the land use (area and intensity) in combination with parameters linked to where the production takes place and thus what biodiversity values can be affected. The consumed amount of food is also often considered – a product with a low impact per kg can get a high impact when consumed to a high degree and vice versa. Our literature review shows a variety of food products with high negative biodiversity impact. Particularly, products that are known drivers of deforestation in tropical regions, such as palm oil, coffee, and cacao – as well as meat and/or animal products that have been fed with soybeans derived from tropical regions have a high negative impact on biodiversity. On the other hand, consumption of foods as vegetables, starchy roots, and pulses – ideally with domestic origin – are examples of foods indicated to have lower biodiversity impact which would be beneficial to eat more of in the Nordic diet. There are also examples of agricultural systems where human interference is crucial for maintaining a high level of biodiversity, for example keeping grazing animals on high-naturevalue-grasslands. If these lands are abandoned or planted with forest, numerous of species will be extinct. Thus, meat linked to these grasslands can also support biodiversity, especially in the Nordic countries where there are relatively many of these landscapes left (in comparison to the rest of Europe). As the studies reviewed varied in their scope, methods, and results, they are difficult to compare. More research is needed to confirm our conclusions. Furthermore, none of the methods are flawless and there are obvious difficulties with finding a transferable and scalable unit – like CO2-equivalents – since biodiversity impacts are highly dynamic and sitespecific. Additionally, most of the reviewed studies do not consider transformation of natural areas driven by food production, e.g., deforestation, and may therefore be underestimating the impacts. In future studies, the reference systems may also be discussed and further developed, and more taxonomic groups (e.g., arthropods such as insects) should preferably be included.

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  • 22.
    Ahlgren, Serina
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Morell, Karin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lundmark, Viktor
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Landquist, Birgit
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Biodiversitetsdatabas för livsmedel v1.0: metodrapport2023Report (Other academic)
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  • 23.
    Ahlinder, Astrid
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Höglund, Evelina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Miljkovic, Ana
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Towards attractive texture modified foods with increased fiber content for dysphagia via 3D printing and 3D scanning2023In: Frontiers in Food Science and Technology, E-ISSN 2674-1121, Vol. 2, article id 1058641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As life expectancy increases so do age related problems such as swallowing disorders, dysphagia, which affects 10%–30% of people over 65 years old. For dysphagia patients the texture and rheological properties of the food, and the bolus, is critical to avoid choking and pneumonia. Texture modified foods, timbals, are often served to these patients due to their ease of swallowing. The main concern with these foods is that they do not look visually alike the food they replace, which can decrease the patient’s appetite and lead to reduced food intake and frailty. This study aims to improve both the visual appearance of texturized food as well as the energy density and fiber content of the timbal formulation. 3D scanning and additive manufacturing (3D Printing) were used to produce meals more reminiscent of original food items, increasing their visual appeal. Rheology was used to ensure the original flow profile was maintained as the timbal was reformulated by reducing starch contents and partially replacing with dietary fibers. The amount of starch was reduced from 8.7 wt% in the original formulation to 3.5 wt% and partially replaced with 3 wt% citrus fiber, while maintaining properties suitable for both swallowing and 3D printing. The resulting formulation has improved nutritional properties, while remaining suitable for constructing visually appealing meals, as demonstrated by 3Dprinting a chicken drumstick from a model generated with 3D scanning.

  • 24.
    Ahlström, Johan
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Corrosion.
    Jafri, Yawer
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Wetterlund, Elisabeth
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden; International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Austria.
    Furusjö, Erik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Sustainable aviation fuels – Options for negative emissions and high carbon efficiency2023In: International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, ISSN 1750-5836, E-ISSN 1878-0148, Vol. 125, article id 103886Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitigating the climate impact from aviation remains one of the tougher challenges in adapting society to fulfill stated climate targets. Long-range aviation cannot be electrified for the foreseeable future and the effects of combusting fuel at high altitude increase the climate impact compared to emissions of green-house gasses only, which further limits the range of sustainable fuel alternatives. We investigate seven different pathways for producing aviation biofuels coupled with either bio-energy carbon capture and storage (BECCS), or bio-energy carbon capture and utilization (BECCU). Both options allow for increased efficiency regarding utilization of feedstock carbon. Our analysis uses process-level carbon- and energy balances, with carbon efficiency, climate impact and levelized cost of production (LCOP) as primary performance indicators. The results show that CCS can achieve a negative carbon footprint for four out of the seven pathways, at a lower cost of GHG reduction than the base process option. Conversely, as a consequence of the electricity-intensive CO2 upgrading process, the CCU option shows less encouraging results with higher production costs, carbon footprints and costs of GHG reduction. Overall, pathways with large amounts of vented CO2, e.g., gasification of black liquor or bark, as well as fermentation of forest residues, reach a low GHG reduction cost for the CCS option. These are also pathways with a larger feedstock and corresponding production potential. Our results enable a differentiated comparison of the suitability of various alternatives for BECCS or BECCU in combination with aviation biofuel production. By quantifying the relative strengths and weaknesses of BECCS and BECCU and by highlighting cost, climate and carbon-efficient pathways, these results can be a source of support for both policymakers and the industry. © 2023 The Author(s)

  • 25.
    Ahmed, Fareed
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Ding, Penghui
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Ail, Ujwala
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Warczak, Magdalena
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Grimoldi, Andrea
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Karl
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Gueskine, Viktor
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Manufacturing Poly(3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene) Electrocatalytic Sheets for Large-Scale H2O2 Production2022In: Advanced Sustainable Systems, ISSN 2366-7486, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 2100316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Producing thick films of conducting polymers by a low-cost manufacturing technique would enable new applications. However, removing huge solvent volume from diluted suspension or dispersion (1–3 wt%) in which conducting polymers are typically obtained is a true manufacturing challenge. In this work, a procedure is proposed to quickly remove water from the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:poly(4-styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) suspension. The PEDOT:PSS suspension is first flocculated with 1 m H2SO4 transforming PEDOT nanoparticles (≈50–500 nm) into soft microparticles. A filtration process inspired by pulp dewatering in a paper machine on a wire mesh with apertures dimension between 60 µm and 0.5 mm leads to thick free-standing films (≈0.5 mm). Wire mesh clogging that hinders dewatering (known as dead-end filtration) is overcome by adding to the flocculated PEDOT:PSS dispersion carbon fibers that aggregate and form efficient water channels. Moreover, this enables fast formation of thick layers under simple atmospheric pressure filtration, thus making the process truly scalable. Thick freestanding PEDOT films thus obtained are used as electrocatalysts for efficient reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide, a promising green chemical and fuel. The inhomogeneity of the films does not affect their electrochemical function. © 2021 The Authors. 

  • 26.
    Ahniyaz, Anwar
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    de Meatza, Iratxe
    CIDETEC, Spain.
    Kvasha, Andriy
    CIDETEC, Spain.
    Garcia-Calvo, Oihane
    CIDETEC, Spain.
    Ahmed, Istaq
    Volvo Group Trucks Technology, Sweden.
    Sgroi, Mauro Francesco
    C.R.F. S.C.p.A, Italy.
    Giuliano, Mattia
    C.R.F. S.C.p.A, Italy.
    Dotoli, Matteo
    C.R.F. S.C.p.A, Italy.
    Dumitrescu, Mihaela-Aneta
    Faam Research Center, Italy.
    Jahn, Marcus
    AIT, Austria.
    Zhang, Ningxin
    AIT, Austria.
    Progress in solid-state high voltage lithium-ion battery electrolytes2021In: Advances in Applied Energy, ISSN 2666-7924, Vol. 4, article id 100070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing high specific energy Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries is of vital importance to boost the production of efficient electric vehicles able to meet the customers’ expectation related to the electric range of the vehicle. One possible pathway to high specific energy is to increase the operating voltage of the Li-ion cell. Cathode materials enabling operation above 4.2 V are available. The stability of the positive electrode-electrolyte interface is still the main bottleneck to develop high voltage cells. Moreover, important research efforts are devoted to the substitution of graphite anodes with Li metal: this would improve the energy density of the cell dramatically. The use of metallic lithium is prevented by the dendrite growth during charge, with consequent safety problems. To suppress the formation of dendrites solid-state electrolytes are considered the most promising approach. For these reasons the present review summarizes the most recent research efforts in the field of high voltage solid-state electrolytes for high energy density Li-ion cells.

  • 27.
    Albolafio, Sofia
    et al.
    CEBAS-CSIC, Spain.
    Gil, Maria
    CEBAS-CSIC, Spain.
    Allende, Ana
    CEBAS-CSIC, Spain.
    Xanthakis, Epameinondas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Potential of Wastewater Valorization after Wet Extraction of Proteins from Faba Bean and Pea Flours2021In: Recent Progress in Materials, E-ISSN 2689-5846, Vol. 3, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aimed to characterize wastewater fractions obtained after the wet extraction of proteins from legumes. In addition, the suitability of wastewater fractions for the potential recovery of high value-added compounds was also examined, and consequently, the prevention of the environmental impact of these wastes was explored. Similar to the industrial production of proteins, wet alkaline and acidic extractions of proteins from faba bean and pea flours were performed in two stages of extraction. The different wastewater fractions were characterized by measuring their organic matter content, total solids (TS), total dissolved solids (TDS), electrical conductivity (EC), pH, and turbidity. The value-added compounds from these wastewater fractions were quantified, which included the protein content, carbohydrate content, phenolic content, and antioxidant activity. In addition, the phenolic compounds in these factions were identified and quantified. It was observed that the fractions obtained in the first extraction stage had 60%–90% higher organic matter content, measured as the chemical oxygen demand (COD), compared to the second fractions, indicating a higher environmental impact of the former in case of disposal. The results obtained for COD, TS, TDS, EC, pH, and turbidity demonstrated that microfiltration reduced only the turbidity (85%), and consequently, a decrease was observed in the particulate matter, while there was a practically negligible reduction in the soluble matter. Wastewater from faba exhibited the highest polyphenol content and antioxidant activity, and was, therefore, considered the most valuable fraction for potential valorization.

  • 28.
    Aldaeus, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Larsson, Karolina
    RISE, Innventia.
    Stevanic Srndovic, Jasna
    RISE, Innventia.
    Kubat, Mikaela
    RISE, Innventia. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Karlström, Katarina
    RISE, Innventia.
    Norberg, Lars
    RISE, Innventia.
    Anadolyan, Shant
    RISE, Innventia.
    Peciulyte, Ausra
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Olsson, Lisbeth
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    RISE, Innventia.
    The supramolecular structure of cellulose-rich wood and wheat straw pulps can be a determinative factor for enzymatic hydrolysability2016In: The 7th Workshop on cellulose, regenerated cellulose and cellulose derivatives, 2016, p. 39-39, article id 11Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Conversion of biomass to biofuels and other products is a research area that is currently attracting a great amount of interest, particularly because such production may be envisaged as a key part of any bio-based economy. Lignocellulosic biomass is abundant and sustainable, and can therefore potentially support large-scale production of biofuel as an alternative to petroleum-based fuel.

    The enzymatic hydrolysability of three industrial pulps, five lab made pulps, and one microcrystalline cellulose powder was assessed using commercial cellulolytic enzymes. To gain insight into the factors that influence the hydrolysability, a thorough characterization of the samples was done, including their chemical properties (cellulose content, hemicellulose content, lignin content, and kappa number), their macromolecular properties (peak molar mass, number-average molar mass, weight-average molar mass, polydispersity, and limiting viscosity) and their supramolecular properties (fibre saturation point, specific surface area, average pore size, and crystallinity). The hydrolysability was assessed by determination of initial conversion rate and final conversion yield, with conversion yield defined as the amount of glucose in solution per unit of glucose in the substrate. Multivariate data analysis revealed that for the investigated samples the conversion of cellulose to glucose was mainly dependent on the supramolecular properties, such as specific surface area and average pore size. The molar mass distribution, the crystallinity, and the lignin content of the pulps had no significant effect on the hydrolysability of the investigated samples.

    In addition, experiments were carried out aiming at identifying suitable conditions for pre-treatment of wheat straw, for the purpose of making cellulose rich pulps with improved enzymatic reactivity. Two sets of conditions for pre-treatment of wheat straw were identified; a combination of low temperature alkaline washing and acid pre-hydrolysis, or high temperature acid pre-hydrolysis. Both bleached wheat straw pulps showed similar enzymatic reactivity. However, the enzymatic reactivity of both bleached wheat straw pulps was found to be significantly less than what has been achieved for wood pulps. A probable explanation for the low enzymatic reactivity of the bleached wheat straw pulp can be the small pore size, limiting the access for enzymes to the cellulose surfaces in the fibre wall interior.Text, figures and tables in an extended abstract (< 4 pages with title and references).

  • 29.
    Aldaeus, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Larsson, Karolina
    RISE, Innventia.
    Stevanic Srndovic, Jasna
    RISE, Innventia.
    Kubat, Mikaela
    RISE, Innventia. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Karlström, Katarina
    RISE, Innventia.
    Peciulyte, Ausra
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Olsson, Lilsbeth
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    RISE, Innventia.
    The supramolecular structure of cellulose-rich wood pulps can be a determinative factor for enzymatic hydrolysability2015In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 3991-4002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The enzymatic hydrolysability of three industrial pulps, five lab made pulps, and one microcrystalline cellulose powder was assessed using commercial cellulolytic enzymes. To gain insight into the factors that influence the hydrolysability, a thorough characterization of the samples was done, including their chemical properties (cellulose content, hemicellulose content, lignin content, and kappa number), their macromolecular properties (peak molar mass, number-average molar mass, weight-average molar mass, polydispersity, and limiting viscosity) and their supramolecular properties (fibre saturation point, specific surface area, average pore size, and crystallinity). The hydrolysability was assessed by determination of initial conversion rate and final conversion yield, with conversion yield defined as the amount of glucose in solution per unit of glucose in the substrate. Multivariate data analysis revealed that for the investigated samples the conversion of cellulose to glucose was mainly dependent on the supramolecular properties, such as specific surface area and average pore size. The molar mass distribution, the crystallinity, and the lignin content of the pulps had no significant effect on the hydrolysability of the investigated samples.

  • 30.
    Aldaeus, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Larsson, Karolina
    RISE, Innventia.
    Stevanic Srndovic, Jasna
    RISE, Innventia.
    Kubat, Mikaela
    RISE, Innventia. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Karlström, Katarina
    RISE, Innventia.
    Peciulyte, Ausra
    Olsson, Lisbeth
    The influence of various pulp properties on the enzymatic hydrolyzability2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Alftan, Johan
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Tillander, Olof
    RISE, Innventia.
    Trost, Thomas
    RISE, Innventia.
    Tysen, Aron
    RISE, Innventia.
    Kihlstedt, Annika
    RISE, Innventia. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Failure due to perforation in corrugated board boxes2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corrugated board boxes are often used as secondary packaging to protect consumer goods during transport. In shelf ready packaging, the boxes are perforated so that the front and top of the box can be easily removed and the remainder of the box can be used to store and display the goods. The perforations however also make the box weaker and less efficient for protection. The balance between the require-ments is today found by trial and error, but could benefit from a more systematic approach. In this study, we started with one of the basic tests of corrugated board boxes, the box compression test. A reference box without perforation and three boxes with different perforation were tested. During the box compression test, a pressure sensitive film registered the distribution of load, an IR camera registered heat from dissipa-tive processes such as plasticity and fracture, and a displacement transducer was used to measure out-of-plane deflection of box panels. All boxes, independent of perforation, failed at similar compression forces, suggesting that the box compression test alone is not an adequate test for performance of the perforated boxes. It was however observed that the perforation did influence the failure of the boxes. The proximity to perforation affected where the panels failed. Analysis of displacement indicated that the perforations main-ly were loaded in compression or shear. During transport and handling, more severe loading situations for the perforations would occur which other tests can capture. Vibration tests can be used to study fatigue. Box compression tests with misaligned stacked boxes, loading of the whole box in other modes such as shear, or drop tests will all introduce complex loading were also tension and out-of-plane shear will occur. Climate tests can give effects similar to fatigue. Climate variations also has a large effect on creep.

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  • 32.
    Ali, A.
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden; Speximo AB, Sweden.
    Ringstad, L
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health.
    Skedung, Lisa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Falkman, P.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Wahlgren, M.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Engblom, J.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Tactile friction of topical creams and emulsions: Friction measurements on excised skin and VitroSkin® using ForceBoard™2022In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics, ISSN 0378-5173, E-ISSN 1873-3476, Vol. 615, article id 121502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tactile perception can be investigated through ex vivo friction measurements using a so–called ForceBoard™, providing objective assessments and savings in time and money, compared to a subjective human panel. In this work we aim to compare excised skin versus VitroSkin® as model substrates for tactile friction measurements. A further aim is to detect possible differences between traditional surfactant-based creams, and a particle-stabilized (Pickering) cream and investigate how the different substrates affect the results obtained. It was found that the difference in tactile friction between excised skin and VitroSkin® was small on untreated substrates. When topical creams were applied, the same trends were observed for both substrates, although the frictional variation over time relates to the difference in surface structure between the two substrates. The results also confirmed that there is a difference between starch-based Pickering formulations and surfactant-based creams after application, indicating that the latter is greasier than Pickering cream. It was also shown that the tactile friction of Pickering emulsions was consistently high even with high amounts of oil, indicating a non-greasy, and non-sticky formulation. The characteristics of starch-stabilized Pickering formulations make them promising candidates in the development of surfactant-free topical formulations with unique tactile properties. © 2022 The Authors

  • 33.
    Ali, A
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden; Speximo AB, Sweden.
    Skedung, Lisa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Burleigh, S
    Lund University, SWeden.
    Lavant, E
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Ringstad, L
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Anderson, CD
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Wahlgren, M
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Engblom, J
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Relationship between sensorial and physical characteristics of topical creams: A comparative study on effects of excipients2022In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics, ISSN 0378-5173, E-ISSN 1873-3476, Vol. 613, article id 121370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rising consumer demands for safer, more natural, and sustainable topical products have led to increased interest in finding alternative excipients, while retaining functionality and cosmetic appeal. Particle-stabilized Pickering creams have emerged as possible alternatives to replace traditional surfactant-stabilized creams and are thus one of the focuses in this study. The aim of this paper was to study relationships between sensorial characteristics and physical properties to understand how different excipients affect these aspects, comparing one starch particle–stabilized and three surfactant-stabilized formulations. A human panel was used to evaluate sensorial perception, while physical properties were deduced by rheology and tactile friction, together with in vivo and ex vivo skin hydration measurements. The results show that sensorial attributes related to the application phase can be predicted with rheology, while afterfeel attributes can be predicted with tactile friction studies. Differences in rheological and sensory properties among surfactant-based creams could mainly be attributed to the type of emollients used, presence of thickeners and surfactant composition. Differences between surfactant-based creams and a Pickering cream were more evident in relation to the afterfeel perception. Presence of starch particles in the residual film on skin results in high tactile friction and low perception of residual coating, stickiness, greasiness, and slipperiness in sensorial afterfeel. © 2021 The Authors

  • 34.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Wójcik, Natalia A.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden; Gdańsk University of Technology, Poland.
    Hakeem, Abbas Saeed
    King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Saudi Arabia.
    Gueguen, Yann
    Université de Rennes, France.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Effect of composition on the thermal properties and structure of M-Al-Si-O-N glasses, M = Na, Mg, Ca2024In: Progress in Solid State Chemistry, ISSN 0079-6786, E-ISSN 1873-1643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary objective of this study is to explore the relationship between the composition, structure, and thermal characteristics of M-Al-Si-O-N glasses, with M representing sodium (Na), magnesium (Mg), or calcium (Ca). The glasses were prepared by melting in a quartz crucible at 1650 °C and AlN precursor (powder) was utilized as a nitrogen source. The measured thermal properties studied were glass transition temperature (Tg), crystallization temperature (Tc), glass stability, viscosity, and thermal expansion coefficient (α). The findings indicate that increasing the aluminum content leads to higher glass transition, crystallization temperatures, and viscosities. In contrast, fragility values increase with the Al contents, while modifier elements and silicon content influence thermal expansion coefficient values. FTIR analysis revealed that in all glasses, the dominant IR bands are attributed to the presence of Q2 and Q3 silicate units. The effect of Al is observed as a progressive polymerization of the silicate network resulting from the glass-forming role of Al2O3. In most samples, the Q4 silicate mode was also observed, strongly related to the high Al content. Overall, the study shows that the complexity of composition-property correlations where the structural changes affect the properties of Mg/Ca-based oxynitride glasses has potential implications for their use in various technological fields.

  • 35.
    Al-Rekabi, Zeinab
    et al.
    NPL National Physical Laboratory, UK.
    Dondi, Camilla
    NPL National Physical Laboratory, UK.
    Faruqui, Nilofar
    NPL National Physical Laboratory, UK.
    Siddiqui, Nazia S.
    University College London, UK; Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, UK.
    Elowsson, Linda
    Lund university, Sweden.
    Rissler, Jenny
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. Lund university, Sweden.
    Kåredal, Monica
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Mudway, Ian
    Imperial College, UK; National institute of health protection, UK; Asthma UK, UK.
    Larsson-Callerfelt, Anna-Karin
    Lund university, Sweden.
    Shaw, Michael
    NPL National Physical Laboratory, UK; University College London, UK.
    Uncovering the cytotoxic effects of air pollution with multi-modal imaging of in vitro respiratory models2023In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 10, no 4, article id 221426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Annually, an estimated seven million deaths are linked to exposure to airborne pollutants. Despite extensive epidemiological evidence supporting clear associations between poor air quality and a range of short- and long-term health effects, there are considerable gaps in our understanding of the specific mechanisms by which pollutant exposure induces adverse biological responses at the cellular and tissue levels. The development of more complex, predictive, in vitro respiratory models, including two- and three-dimensional cell cultures, spheroids, organoids and tissue cultures, along with more realistic aerosol exposure systems, offers new opportunities to investigate the cytotoxic effects of airborne particulates under controlled laboratory conditions. Parallel advances in high-resolution microscopy have resulted in a range of in vitro imaging tools capable of visualizing and analysing biological systems across unprecedented scales of length, time and complexity. This article considers state-of-the-art in vitro respiratory models and aerosol exposure systems and how they can be interrogated using high-resolution microscopy techniques to investigate cell-pollutant interactions, from the uptake and trafficking of particles to structural and functional modification of subcellular organelles and cells. These data can provide a mechanistic basis from which to advance our understanding of the health effects of airborne particulate pollution and develop improved mitigation measures. 

  • 36.
    Amiandamhen, Stephen
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Adl-Zarrabi, Bijan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Yin, Haiyan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Norén, Joakim
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Building and Real Estate.
    Recycling sawmilling wood chips, biomass combustion residues, and tyre fibres into cement-bonded composites: Properties of composites and life cycle analysis2021In: Construction and Building Materials, ISSN 0950-0618, E-ISSN 1879-0526, Vol. 297, article id 123781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the properties and sustainability of cement-bonded composites containing industrial residues such as wood chips, tyre fibres and biomass combustion residues, i.e. bottom ash (BA) and fly ash (FA). The effect of cement-to-raw material (wood/tyre fibre) ratio (C/RM) and the aggregate content (BA and FA) on thermal and mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and life cycle analysis (LCA) were also conducted. The results revealed that as the aggregate content increased in wood composites, the mechanical properties also increased. The mean thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of tyre composite samples were 0.37 W/mK and 1.2 MJ/m3K respectively, while the respective values for wood composite samples were 0.29 W/mK and 0.81 MJ/m3K. SEM analysis showed adequate bonding between wood/tyre fibres and cement matrix. LCA revealed that the materials share of the total primary energy use was about 60% for all analysed composites. © 2021 The Author(s)

  • 37.
    Andersson Ersman, Peter
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Freitag, Kathrin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Nilsson, Marie
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Åhlin, Jessica
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Brooke, Robert
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Nordgren, Niklas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Aulin, Christian
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Fall, Andreas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Nevo, Yuval
    Melodea Ltd, Israel.
    Beni, Valerio
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Electrochromic Displays Screen Printed on Transparent Nanocellulose-Based Substrates2023In: Advanced Photonics Research, ISSN 2699-9293, article id 2200012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing of electronic devices via printing techniques is often considered to be an environmentally friendly approach, partially due to the efficient utilization of materials. Traditionally, printed electronic components (e.g., sensors, transistors, and displays) are relying on flexible substrates based on plastic materials; this is especially true in electronic display applications where, most of the times, a transparent carrier is required in order to enable presentation of the display content. However, plastic-based substrates are often ruled out in end user scenarios striving toward sustainability. Paper substrates based on ordinary cellulose fibers can potentially replace plastic substrates, but the opaqueness limits the range of applications where they can be used. Herein, electrochromic displays that are manufactured, via screen printing, directly on state-of-the-art fully transparent substrates based on nanocellulose are presented. Several different nanocellulose-based substrates, based on either nanofibrillated or nanocrystalline cellulose, are manufactured and evaluated as substrates for the manufacturing of electrochromic displays, and the optical and electrical switching performances of the resulting display devices are reported and compared. The reported devices do not require the use of metals and/or transparent conductive oxides, thereby providing a sustainable all-printed electrochromic display technology.

  • 38.
    Andersson, I. M.
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Bergenståhl, B.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Millqvist-Fureby, Anna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Chemical Process and Pharmaceutical Development.
    Alexander, M.
    Arla Foods Ingredients Group P/S, Denmark.
    Paulsson, M.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Glantz, M.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Particle morphology and rehydration properties of spray-dried microgels and fractal aggregates with varying fractions of native milk serum proteins2021In: International Dairy Journal, ISSN 0958-6946, E-ISSN 1879-0143, Vol. 112, article id 104862Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To keep their functional properties, it is crucial that protein aggregates maintain their structure after spray drying and that the powders can be fully rehydrated. In this study, microgels and fractal aggregates were prepared by heating a mixture of milk serum protein concentrate and lactose (40/60; %, w/w) at 85 °C for 15 min by varying the pH. Various fractions of native proteins were added to the systems prior to spray drying. This study showed that microgels and fractal aggregates kept their structure after spray drying and reconstitution. The particle morphology could be correlated to the stiffness of the interface of the feed droplet. The forced imbibition rate showed a negative correlation with increasing amount of aggregated proteins in the powders that seems to be a result of denatured/aggregated proteins present at the surface. These findings are of importance for the formulation of spray-dried powders with improved rehydration characteristics. © 2020 The Author(s)

  • 39.
    Andersson, Johan
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Ahlström, Johan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Corrosion.
    Berg, Karin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Olsson, Henrik
    Karlsson, Lars-Evert
    Wärtsilä Sweden AB. Sweden.
    Niinipuu, Mirva
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Pizzul, Leticia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Biologisk metanisering av syngas från förgasning och pyrolys - lovande koncept mot implementering2024Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Biological methanation of syngas from pyrolysis and gasification – promising concepts for implementation The need for increased biogas production is significant, and in the EU, there are plans for a substantial expansion in the coming years through the RePowerEU initiative. Part of the increase will come from the expansion of conventional digestion technology, where organic materials such as food waste, manure, and crop residues are used for biogas production. However, to meet the future increased demand, it is also necessary to utilize more difficult-to-digest substrates, such as biomass rich in lignocellulose, for biogas production. This could be forest residues such as branches and tops, sawdust, or bark. This type of substrates cannot be used in a conventional digestion process, and other technology chains are therefore required to convert such biomass into biomethane. This can be done by first converting the biomass into syngas through a thermochemical process such as gasification or pyrolysis. This is followed by a methanation process where the syngas is converted into biogas, and finally, the gas is upgraded to reach biomethane quality. These types of technology chains are not currently available on a commercial scale, but they have been demonstrated, for example, through the Gobigas project, where gasification was followed by catalytic methanation for biomethane production. As full-scale implementation of catalytic methanation of bio-syngas has not yet been achieved, thereis a need to develop alternative conversion technologies that can more cost-effectively achieve the methanation of woody biomass. One possible opportunity for to this is to apply biological methanation instead of a catalytic process. A biological process comes with several advantages, including a greater ability to handle contaminants, higher selectivity in the conversion of syngas, and operation at relatively low temperature and pressure, which simplifies material selection and reactor design. RISE, together with its partners, are developing a concept based on biological methanation of syngas. This project has examined the biological process's ability to handle contaminants in syngas through continuous experiments in carrier-filled trickle bed reactors with an active volume of 5 liters. The process's ability to handle and break down contaminants is an important parameter that can affect and simplify the design of the gas cleaning that occurs after gasification or pyrolysis. Another aspect of the project has been to put the experimental results into context at the concept and system level. Different production techniques for syngas have been mapped out, which could be combined with biological methanation. Based on the mapping, three types of plants have been selected for more detailed analyses of techno-economics, carbon footprint, and opportunities for increased carbon efficiency. The methanation experiments lasted for 552 days, and overall, it was a stable process with high turnover of syngas and high methane production over a long time. There have been some operational disturbances, mainly related to the supply of gas to the process (i.e. delivery of gas cylinders). However, biochemical inhibition or disturbances have been rare, demonstrating a high robustness for biological methanation of syngas. The breakdown of contaminants has been excellent in the process, with levels decreasing below the detection limit. At the same time, as contaminants have been continuously added to the process, microbiology has been able to maintain high turnover of hydrogen and carbon monoxide to methane. The specific methane production was high both during the reference period without contaminants and during the experimental periods with added contaminants. During long periods, the specific methane production has been around 4 L CH4/Lbed volume /day, which is about 4 times higher than our previously achieved results. The transition to thermophilic temperature and using carriers with higher effective surface area has contributed to this increase. During the project, three types of plants have been selected for more detailed analysis: 1) Gasification with Cortus process, which generates a relatively clean syngas with minimal purification needs before biological methanation. There is no need for co-location with a heating plant, but it is an advantage if there is access to the district heating network to sell waste heat. 2) Gasification with Bioshares' concept, where the gasifier is integrated into a larger cogeneration plant and where the produced syngas is purified with an RME-scrubber before biological methanation. Co-location with a larger cogeneration plant provides interesting synergies and integration opportunities, but also sets the boundaries for where the plants can be located. 3) Slow pyrolysis according to Envigas' concept, where the primary product is biochar and where the produced syngas is seen as a by-product. The syngas contains some impurities but generally requires no other purification than cooling to the right temperature (condensing out tars) before being added to biological methanation. This type of plant differs from plant types 1-2 in that the syngas formed is not the primary product, and the syngas has a relatively low energy value compared to the others. Syngas from plant types 2 and 3 contains some hydrocarbons (C1-C3) that are considered inert over the methanation step and therefore do not negatively affect the process. This means that heavier hydrocarbons do not need to be removed upstream, which would likely have been required with catalytic methanation. This leads to a higher system efficiency, and the need for reactor capacity for biological methanation decreases since there is less gas to be processed (more of the end-product consists of hydrocarbons already formed during the thermochemical conversion upstream). For all plant types, downstream of the methanation step, there is a need for further gas purification and upgrading. During the upgrading step carbon dioxide is separated to reach the product specification required by the end user. If long distance distribution is required a final process step consisting of a liquefaction plant for the production of liquid biogas (LBG) can be added to the concept. As another option, the systems can be supplemented with treatment of the carbon dioxide flow out of the upgrading plant, where the flow is processed by drying, compression, and cooling to produce liquid carbon dioxide. For plant type 2, where benzene is present in the syngas, this gas is expected to be separated with relatively high precision in the system and thereby generate a small flow of liquid benzene as a side product. The carbon dioxide emissions for the final product LBG are in the range of 1.6 to 2.6 gCO2-eq/MJLBG, which compares favorably to other types of second-generation biofuels. Compared to fossil gas, the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions is 96-97%. The carbon efficiency of the systems can be significantly increased if excess carbon dioxide is utilized either through BECCS or BECCU. If the carbon dioxide stream from the upgrading plant is processed into liquid carbon dioxide, the production cost is estimated to be 187-204 SEK/ton. If the product is to be sent to permanent storage the cost for transportation and storage would need to be added to estimate total cost of BECCS, but this is out of scope for the current project.. Assuming that BECCS is applied and that the entire carbon sink is allocated to the final product LBG, this will result in negative emissions in the range of -35 to -104 gCO2-eq/MJLBG. An alternative is to utilize excess carbon dioxide directly in the methanation process by boosting incoming gas with extra hydrogen. Hydrogen and carbon dioxide are then converted by methanogens, which generates extra methane. Since the addition of extra hydrogen is assumed to come from electrolysis, the additional methane production can likely be classified as electrofuel, so-called e-methane. The techno-economic evaluation results in a production cost ranging from 740 to 1300 SEK/MWhLBG, including all sensitivity scenarios. The lower price scenarios include a lower investment cost, which can be assumed to represent cases with public investment support. Overall, a large part of the scenarios are considered to be within the range of what can be considered market relevant production costs. This leads to the conclusion that there is techno-economic potential at this stage to justify continued development of concepts based on biological methanation of syngas. With scaling up and continued development in the right direction, the concepts may eventually lead to cost-effective utilization of forest residues for the production of biomethane at a commercially relevant scale. The next step in the development is scaling up to pilot scale, which will take place during 2023-2025 through an EU-funded project and will be carried out by RISE, Wärtsilä, Cortus and Swedish Gas Association. A pilot plant for biological methanation will then be operated with syngas from Cortus' gasifier in Höganäs.

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  • 40.
    Andersson, Johan
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Tamm, Daniel
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Berg, Karin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Bio-CCS från biogasanläggningar2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BECCS from biogas production

    Global CO₂ emissions amount to about 40 Gtonnes/year and they need to be rapidly reduced if we are to meet adopted climate targets. To achieve this, a variety of measures is needed, such as more electrification, reduced use of fossil energy, more renewable energy, energy efficiency improvements and CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage). However, this will not be enough, but will also require so-called negative emissions, which means that CO₂ is removed from the atmosphere through, for example, increased afforestation, increased carbon storage in soil (e.g. biochar), or by capturing and storing CO₂ of biogenic origin in geological formations, also known as bio-CCS or BECCS. At global level, the need for negative emissions is estimated to be in the order of several billion tonnes of CO₂ per year if it shall be possible to reach the 1.5-degree target and net zero emissions by 2050. At national level, Sweden’s target is to achieve net zero emissions by 2045 and from then on to be climate positive. This means that territorial emissions from the 1990 level must be reduced by at least 85% by 2045 and that the remaining 15 % will be eliminated by means of so-called supplementary measures including bio-CCS as an important measure.

    The need for bio-CCS is significant and the actors who can deliver biogenic CO₂ at the right quality and at low cost will have good business opportunities in an expected future global marketplace for negative emissions. With this project, we have investigated the opportunities CO₂ from biogas production has to contribute to bio-CCS in Sweden. At biogas plants that produce vehicle gas, there is already equipment to separate CO₂ from biogas, so-called upgrading technologies. By modifying and extending this technology, pure liquid CO₂ can be generated. The CO₂ is then transported to terminals in Swedish ports while waiting for transport by ship to the place for permanent storage.

    The project has studied gas purification and liquefaction based on the four most common upgrading techniques: water scrubber, PSA (pressure swing adsorption), membrane separation and amine scrubber. The residual gas (the CO₂-rich gas leaving the upgrading equipment) differs between different upgrading technologies, which affects the need for subsequent purification steps. Results from modelling and simulation have led to two proposed technology chains. For amine scrubbers, a simple process of compression, drying and liquefaction is sufficient to achieve the CCS specification of the liquid CO₂. PSA, membranes and water scrubbers require more advanced gas purification including a two-phase separation and recirculation of gases with low dew point, such as O₂ and CH4. The recirculated gas is recycled to the inlet of the upgrading process, leading to the double benefit of increased amount of valuable CH₄ product and further reduction of greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere. A side effect is that the need for conventional residual gas management is eliminated.

    Cost calculations have been carried out for biogas plants with a production capacity of 20, 50 and 120 GWh/year. With an availability of 95% and a CO₂ content of 39% in raw biogas (gas before upgrading), this equates to a CO₂ production of 2,400, 5,900 and 14,200 tons/year, respectively. A starting point for the study has been that systems for large-scale bio-CCS/CCS will be established and that this will lead to the construction of several CO₂ terminals in Swedish ports. Furthermore, it is assumed that these terminals allow third-party access where a supplementary volume of biogenic CO₂ from biogas plants can constitute a portion of the total managed amount. Around each terminal, clusters of biogas plants are estimated to emerge, which each can deliver approximately 20,000–100,000 tons CO₂ per year. The distribution from biogas plants to port terminals may be done by truck transport where the loading capacity amounts to 34 tons of CO₂. After the terminal, CO₂ is transported by ship to the place for permanent storage.

    The cost of producing liquid CO₂ from biogas depends on local conditions such as CO₂ flow, O₂ content, upgrading technology, new or existing plant, transport distance to terminal, etc. In order to determine what the cost will be for each individual biogas plant, it is necessary to adapt the calculations to local conditions. Through the project, generic calculations have been carried out which show that large biogas plants have good opportunities to produce liquid CO₂ at competitive costs, but also that there is a strong scaling effect. For example, the cost is about SEK 200–300/tonne CO₂ for new plants with 120 GWh in annual biogas production. With investment support, the cost drops to about SEK 150–200/tonne. For new plants in the intermediate segment (50 GWh/year), the cost is slightly higher, SEK 300–450/tonne (without capital grants) and SEK 190–275/tonne (with capital grants). For smaller plants (20 GWh/year), the cost rises significantly, especially for water scrubbers.

    The transport cost up to the terminal is affected by the distance and amount of CO₂ handled. For example, the cost of truck transport from larger biogas plants is about SEK 200/tonne at 100 km one-way to terminal. The total cost of bio-CCS from biogas including terminal handling, ship transport and final storage is affected by many parameters and there are uncertainties in cost estimates along the entire chain. In a calculation example for a biogas plant with membrane upgrading, 100 km of truck transport one way to terminal in Gothenburg and transport and final storage according to Northern Light's concept, the total cost was estimated at SEK 830–1020/tonne CO₂ for larger biogas plants (120 GWh/year).

    When the bio-CCS from biogas is introduced, negative emissions arise from two sources, firstly from the final storage itself, which is the main part, and secondly by reducing CH₄ emissions from the upgrading plants, which is a smaller, but not negligible part. The total CO₂ efficiency of the value chain is determined by energy consumption, transport distance, selected storage solution and CH₄ slip before the introduction of bio-CCS. Emissions from truck transport are small in this context. In total, CO₂ efficiency in many cases amounts to close to 100%, i.e. net emissions in the value chain up to final storage are close to zero. For plants that initially had relatively high CH₄ emissions from the upgrading unit, the climate benefit is even greater, with CO₂ efficiency throughout the chain being well over 100%.

    A driving hypothesis in the project has been that CO₂ from biogas can be the CO₂ stream in society that is one of the lowest-hanging fruits and that the value chain is well placed to be more cost-effective than other concepts for bio-CCS. Based on the results of the project, we can conclude that the hypothesis is likely to hold. The cost up to the terminal will in many cases likely be lower compared to capture and liquefaction from large point sources. With efficient technology and distribution solutions, biogas producers should be able to contribute to bio-CCS to a fairly large extent, up to about 10% of Sweden's need for negative emissions. For biogas operators, this would mean a broadening of the business where CO₂ is seen as a valuable product which complements the revenues from the production of biomethane. 

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  • 41.
    Andersson, Johanna
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Garrido Banuelos, Gonzalo
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Bergdoll, Marion
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Menzel, Carolin
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Mihnea, Mihaela
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Comparison of steaming and boiling of root vegetables for enhancing carbohydrate content and sensory profile2022In: Journal of Food Engineering, ISSN 0260-8774, E-ISSN 1873-5770, Vol. 312, p. 110754-110754, article id 110754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Root vegetables have unique techno-functional and nutritional properties however, their use in processed foods is limited to a few species, partially due to a lack of knowledge related to the impact of thermal treatments on the sensory properties. This study investigated the effect of steaming and boiling on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and sensory profile of three model root vegetables with distinct carbohydrate composition: Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.), parsnip (Pastinaca sativa), and beetroot (Beta vulgaris). Thermally treated Jerusalem artichoke and parsnip showed higher content of cell wall polysaccharides, particularly β-glucans (e.g. cellulose) and pectic components, compared to raw. Steaming produced more cell shrinkage and loss of cell-cell adhesion than boiling, leading to softer vegetables. Processed beetroot showed loss of cell turgor and drastic softening but not clear changes in overall carbohydrate content. The scores for several flavour and in-mouth attributes were higher for steamed vegetables compared to boiled. Our results give insights on the processability of root vegetables towards products with enhanced sensory and nutritional properties.

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  • 42.
    Andersson, Johanna
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Kwang Tan, Chun
    University of Tsukuba, Japan.
    Dushyantha, Jayatilake
    PLIMES Inc, Japan.
    Suzuki, Kenji
    University of Tsukuba, Japan.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Sound analysis of swallowing a shear-thinning fluid2021In: Annual Transactions of the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 29, p. 47-50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Andersson, Johanna
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Kwang Tan, Chun
    University of Tsukuba, Japan.
    Matsuo, Koichiro
    Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.
    Suzuki, Kenji
    University of Tsukuba, Japan; PLIMES Inc, Japan.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Investigating swallowing sounds of viscous fluid of optimized food of dysphagia management2023In: Annals Transactions of the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 31, p. 161-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problems with swallowing or dysphagia is an increasing problem due to the ageing population. Investigation methods commonly require clinical techniques which are tedious and costly. An alternative analysis is to measure the swallowing time non-invasively through monitoring of swallowing sounds. GOKURI is an AI-powered, smartphone-based, neckband- type device for the assessment of the swallowing function. The present study investigated swallow sounds of food in comparison to those of water swallows. In total 19 healthy subjects were eating a full meal while their swallowing was recorded via the swallowing sensor. The results show that the time it takes for a person to swallow varies greatly. Nevertheless, the length of swallowing solid food differed significantly from water, which were slightly shorter to swallow (0.702s vs. 0.668 s respectively). This correlates well with our previous study where swallowing of water took shorter time compared to thicker Newtonian and a shear-thinning fluids.

  • 44.
    Andersson, Johanna
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Compression of plant seeds assuming soft spheres2021In: Annual Transactions of the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 29, p. 103-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Andersson, Karin
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Linköping University, Sweden.
    Eklund, J.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Linköping University, Sweden.
    Anna, Rydberg
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Lean-inspired development work in agriculture: Implications for the work environment2020In: Agronomy Research, ISSN 1406-894X, E-ISSN 2228-4907, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 324-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Farmers operate in a turbulent environment that includes international competition, weather conditions and animal behaviour, for example, and is difficult for them to control. However, economy and productivity always have a high priority. As a consequence, farms have started to implement lean-inspired work systems. At the same time, health and safety are of urgent concern in the sector. This article explores how famers apply lean-inspired work processes. It identifies work environment changes during and after a lean implementation, as well as possible developments in the work environment following implementation of the lean philosophy. Data were collected from three groups: lean, lean-light and development-inclined reference farms (in total 54 farms), using a questionnaire and interviews. The results indicate that a majority of the lean farms were applying several lean principles and tools, and the lean philosophy. The lean-light farms applied parts of the lean concept, while the reference farms applied some of the more general tools, used in lean and elsewhere, such as visualisation in various forms and to various extents. The results showed positive effects of lean on the psychosocial work environment, better work structure and improved information, communication and co-operation. The physical work environment was improved to some extent by lean, where advantages such as a more structured and practical work environment with less physical movements and locomotion could be noticed. The lean concept provided a more structured and systematic approach to dealing with work and production environmental issues, for managers as well as for employees.

  • 46.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Norinder, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Chavan, Swapnil
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Chemical and Pharmaceutical Toxicology.
    Cotgreave, Ian
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Chemical and Pharmaceutical Toxicology.
    In Silico Prediction of Eye Irritation Using Hansen Solubility Parameters and Predicted pKa Values2023In: ATLA (Alternatives to Laboratory Animals), ISSN 0261-1929, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 204-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An in silico method has been developed that permits the binary differentiation between pure liquids causing serious eye damage or eye irritation, and pure liquids with no need for such classification, according to the UN GHS system. The method is based on the finding that the Hansen Solubility Parameters (HSP) of a liquid are collectively important predictors for eye irritation. Thus, by applying a two-tier approach in which in silico predicted pKa values (firstly) and a trained model based solely on in silico-predicted HSP data (secondly) were used, we have developed, and validated, a fully in silico approach for predicting the outcome of a Draize test (in terms of UN GHS Cat. 1/Cat. 2A/Cat. 2B or UN GHS No Cat.) with high validation set performance (sensitivity = 0.846, specificity = 0.818, balanced accuracy = 0.832) using SMILES only. The method is applicable to pure non-ionic liquids with molecular weight below 500 g/mol, fewer than six hydrogen bond donors (e.g. nitrogen–hydrogen or oxygen–hydrogen bonds) and fewer than eleven hydrogen bond acceptors (e.g. nitrogen or oxygen atoms). Due to its fully in silico characteristics, this method can be applied to pure liquids that are still at the desktop design stage and not yet in production.

  • 47.
    André, Alann
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Polymeric Materials and Composites.
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Polymeric Materials and Composites.
    Bru, Thomas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Polymeric Materials and Composites.
    Wästerlid, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Infrastructure and concrete technology.
    Lorentzon, Katarina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Lindh, E Mattias
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Hallquist, Lukas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Thidevall, Niklas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Cirkulärt omhändertagande av solcellspaneler och vindturbinblad för vindkraftverk2024Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I regleringsbrevet för 2023 fick Energimyndigheten i uppdrag av regeringen att utreda hur solcellspaneler och vindturbinblad till vindkraftverk i högre utsträckning ska kunna tas om hand på ett giftfritt och cirkulärt sätt i enlighet med avfallshierarkin. Redovisningen av detta regeringsuppdrag, rapporten Från avfall till resurs – Förslag för en mer cirkulär hantering av solcellspaneler och vindturbinblad, ER 2024:11, baseras på denna underlagsrapport som har tagits fram av forskningsinstitutet RISE på uppdrag av Energimyndigheten. Analyser, slutsatser och förslag/rekommendationer som framförs i rapporten är författarnas egna.En fortsatt utbyggnad av fossilfri elproduktion är av stor vikt för att vi ska kunna nå Sveriges energi- och klimatmål. För att utbyggnaden i sig ska vara hållbar är det viktigt att vi redan nu planerar för hur avfallet från dessa elproduktionsanläggningar ska förebyggas, minimeras och sedan hanteras.Det finns redan i dagsläget aktörer som har utvecklat och håller på att utveckla ett flertal olika lösningar för ökad cirkularitet. Dessa möjligheter kan tas tillvara och främjas genom regelbunden kartläggning och genom att arbeta gemensamt inom EU. Genom ett sådant arbete finns det också större möjligheter att etablera industriella värdekedjor i Sverige för hanteringen av avfallet från solcellspaneler och vindturbinblad.En cirkulär hantering av avfall ger ett betydligt mindre avtryck på miljön än det som en linjär hantering ger upphov till. Det är viktigt att de aktörer som tillhandahåller fossilfri elproduktion tar ansvar under hela livscykeln och att det finns goda förutsättningar för aktörerna att göra det.

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  • 48.
    Anheden, Marie
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Kulander, Ida
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Pettersson, Karin
    Wallinder, Johan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Vamling, Lennart
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Carl Johan
    F Industri, Sweden.
    Fugelsang, Malin
    F Industri, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Åsa
    Preem, Sweden.
    Evaluation of alternative routes for production of bio-oil from forest residues and kraft lignin2018In: The 8th Nordic Wood Biorefinery Conference: NWBC 2018 : proceedings / [ed] Hytönen Eemeli, Vepsäläinen Jessica, Espoo: VTT , 2018, p. 85-89Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Ankerfors, Caroline
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Pulp, Paper and Packaging.
    Gimåker, Magnus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Pulp, Paper and Packaging.
    Glad Nordmark, Gunborg
    A comparative study of polyelectrolyte multilayers and other chemical dosage strategies: Effect on properties of paper sheets produced in laboratory scale using tap and mill process waters2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the addition of up to four layers of PEM was studied and compared with the use of single-additions or dual-additions of the same chemicals with respect to their effect on strength and bulk properties of paper sheets produced in the laboratory. First, this was made under clean conditions, i.e. in tap water, to set a baseline for the performance. The systems studied were cationic/anionic polyacrylamide (CPAM/APAM), polyvinylamine/carboxymethyl cellulose (PVAm/CMC) and cationic starch/anionic polyacrylamide (CS/APAM).One of the main findings of the study was that with single-additions with increasing dosage levels of PVAm, CPAM or CS, the tensile strength index of the produced sheets increased at first, but the effect seemed to level off at higher dosages. By comparing the effect from single-addition of each cationic component to the effect of a polyelectrolyte multilayer (1-4 layers) of the same component together with an anionic component, it was found that significantly higher tensile strength could be reached with the PEM strategy for the combinations PVAm/CMC and CS/APAM. For CPAM/APAM, however, very little advantage of using a multilayering approach was seen.All measured variations in sheet density were small, although with some indications that the density was lower for sheets with PEM, medium for sheets made with a single-dosage strategy and highest for sheets made with the dual-addition strategies.The later part of this activity also addressed the influence from dissolved and colloidal substances (DCS) to investigate the possibilities of implementing the polyelectrolyte multilayering technique in practice by repeating some of the trial points of the CS/APAM system in mill process water. Firstly, this part of the study showed that PEMs can be successfully built in mill process waters. Further, it was found that although the adsorbed amounts might differ compared to in the cleaner system, the trends for the dosage strategies and their strengthening effects remained.

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  • 50.
    Ankerfors, Caroline
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Pulp, Paper and Packaging.
    Östlund, Ida
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Pulp, Paper and Packaging.
    Gimåker, Magnus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Pulp, Paper and Packaging.
    Krochak, Paul
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Pulp, Paper and Packaging.
    Östlund, Catherine
    Hansen, Peter
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Pulp, Paper and Packaging.
    Holmqvist, Claes
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Pulp, Paper and Packaging.
    Johansson, Klas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Pulp, Paper and Packaging.
    Final Report for the Source-Efficient Paper and Board Making Research Programme Area2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the final report for the Innventia/RISE Bioeconomy research programme area “Source-Efficient Paper and Board Making”, which was executed 2015-2017.The overall aim of the Source Efficient Paper and Board Making was to improve the resource efficiency in paper and board production. This was achieved by combining paper chemistry, paper physics and process technology. A particular goal was to reduce raw material consumption through the use of stronger materials or creation of bulk, which are needed to maintain bending stiffness and mechanical properties if the grammage is reduced. The work in the project has been carried out in laboratory scale and in pilot scale using the FEX pilot paper machine and the dynamic flow loop.

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