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  • 1.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, SICOMP.
    Hagström, Bengt
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Långström, Runar
    RISE, Swerea, SICOMP.
    Fernberg, Patrik
    RISE, Swerea, SICOMP.
    Novel reactive bicomponent fibres: Material in composite manufacturing2012In: Journal of Nanostructured Polymers and Nanocomposites, ISSN 1790-4439, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 5-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hypotheses that reactive uncured, thermoset bicomponent fibres can be prepared and mixed with reinforcing fibres and ultimately used in preparation of a composite was tested and is described. It is thought that such fibres have the two potential advantages: (1) to enable manufacturing with particle doped resins e.g. nanocomposites which add functionality to composites and (2) increased efficiency of structural composite manufacturing by increasing the level of automation. The structure of the thermoset fibres comprises of a sheath of thermoplastic and a core of uncured thermoset resin. Once manufactured, the fibres were wound with a reinforced fibre onto a plate, consolidated and cured. The resulting composite was examined and compared to other composites made with the same manufacturing method from commercially available materials. The results show that a laminate can be produced using these reactive bicomponent fibres. The resin system successfully impregnates the reinforcing carbon fibres and that the thermoplastic separates from the epoxy resin system during consolidation. In comparison to reference material, the bicomponent laminate shows promising characteristics. However, the processes developed are currently on a lab-scale and considerable improvement of various bicomponent fibre properties, such as the strength, are required before the technology can be used on a larger scale.

  • 2. Bellgran, M
    et al.
    Gullander, Per
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Towards Improvement of Production Efficiency and Effectivenessfrom a Life-Cycle Perspective2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low operation equipment efficiency, OEE, in manufacturing industry indicates a potential for improvements by reducing production disturbances during the life cycle of a production system. Here, the question of preventing and handling production disturbances in the production system during its design, start-up, ramp-up and full production phases is concerned. It requires measurement of performance, and utilisation of process data and information of production disturbances appearing during the different life cycle phases. It also requires a focus on eliminating production disturbances already during the production system design process. The objective of the research project presented in this paper is to develop a methodology for analysing and dealing with production disturbances on both a short-term and long-term basis, including also the utilisation of software support. The ongoing development of the methodology is based on, and will be applied in extensive case studies at Swedish manufacturing companies. Keywords Production efficiency, effectiveness, production disturbances, production system, life-cycle perspective, methodology development.

  • 3. Berglund, M
    et al.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Stahre, J
    VERTICAL INFORMATION TRANSFER IN KNOWLEDGE INTENSE MANUFACTURING2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to highlight vertical information transfer in relation to operator involvement in development work and to analyze the information channels utilized. A special focus is put on product, production, organisation and information system development. Data were collected in 14 Swedish companies through interviews with operators, production support, and production management. The study indicated a need of strategies for vertical information distribution. Verbal information channels are mostly used. However, formalized information transfer is needed to better utilize the operators’ knowledge and experience for development work as well as to provide personnel with relevant knowledge required for their work. Information flow may be simplified through IT-systems, intranet, documents and instructions, but it implies strong support from management and adapted working methods.

  • 4.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköpiing University, Sweden.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Knowledge transfer during personnel changes in manufacturing2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case based research addresses knowledge transfer when employees change positions or roles during planned changes within manufacturing. The studies demonstrate that these changes are common. Knowledge needed to transfer includes technical, human and organizational issues. Furthermore, there is a need to transfer knowledge during formal changes of position as well as temporary changes of roles. Organizational structures for knowledge transfer must therefore be developed for transfer of explicit and implicit knowledge in formal and informal settings. This may be achieved through a combination of codified explicit knowledge, organized networks and by creating opportunities for learning from work in practice.

  • 5.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE, Swerea, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Gullander, Per
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Challenges in a product introduction in a cross-cultural work system – a case study involving a Swedish and a Chinese company2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this case study is to gain deeper insights in how cultural aspects influence a product introduction with product development carried out in Sweden and industrialization in China. Data were collected through semi-structured individual and group interviews and workshops. The study showed that the companies faced a number of challenges during the product introduction, such as problems with the product design, updating versions of drawings, infrastructure for communication, and quality issues. There were, however, a number of issues that were directly or indirectly influenced by cultural aspects and lack of understanding about cultural differences. Challenges included interpersonal communication related to language barriers and differences in degree of direct communication of needs, demands and own capabilities. Based on literature on cultural dimensions and actual challenges during a specific product introduction when two national cultures interact/collaborate, this paper results in an initial approach for further model development and research on how to link cultural dimensions to product development models in a systematic and prioritized way. This is needed to develop organizational support to increase knowledge of cultural strengths and differences, how to manage these issues and further facilitate organizational learning for increased efficiency of product introductions.

  • 6. Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Knowledge gained from product introduction and implications for organizational learning2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical findings from the automotive industry demonstrate that knowledge gained during a product introduction is mainly related to work procedures, personnel resources, education and training, verification, and responsibilities. However, this is to a large extent individually based. Examples of means to make this knowledge accessible to others include integrated work procedures and networking when knowledge is developed in a person-to-person situation as well codification of some knowledge. This is achieved through allocation of personnel resources and emphasis on organizational learning on the company agenda as well as in design of work procedures, which are management tasks and responsibilities.

  • 7.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Jönsson, C.
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Individuals’ perception of which materials are most important to recycle2015In: IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems, APMS 2015, Springer New York LLC , 2015, p. 723-729Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we have asked respondents to rank ten different waste fractions that are both common in manufacturing industry and easily recognizable. The purpose of the study has been to clarify to what extent individuals are able to identify the waste fractions that are most important to recycle from an environmental perspective. The individuals’ perception has then been correlated with a life cycle assessment of the ten materials. In addition, the respondents were also asked to rank the fractions according to cost. The results show that metals are consistently considered most important to recycle, and plastics are commonly among the top five amongst the ten waste fractions together with glass. The cellulose based fractions, cotton, and compost are commonly rated low. In addition, there is a perceived correlation between the environmental and economic impact.

  • 8.
    Bregner, Anders
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Swerea Lättvikt: Tekniska textilier2013Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Carlsson, Håkan
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    SAFELOC: Computer based personal safety system with distributed I/O1997Report (Other academic)
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  • 10.
    Dang, Binh T.
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Brelid, Harald
    Södra Innovation, Sweden.
    Köhnke, Tobias
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Theliander, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Effect of sodium ion concentration profile during softwood kraft pulping on delignification rate, xylan retention and reactions of hexenuronic acids2014In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 604-611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this investigation was to study how different concentration profiles of sodium ions influence the delignification rate, hexenuronic acid formation/degradation and xylan retention under kraft cooking conditions. The concentration of sodium ions was varied in time between 0.52 and 3.00 mol/kg solvent, taking two different routes by the controlled addition of sodium carbonate. The reaction rates of hexenuronic acid were found to increase when the sodium ion concentration was at the higher level. Furthermore, the results implied that the kinetics of hexenuronic acid reactions responds rapidly to changes in sodium ion concentration. Delignification and the removal rates of xylan decreased rapidly after the sodium ion concentration was increased. However, when the sodium ion concentration was decreased, the response to the change was delayed. These findings indicate that effects of ionic strength on the rate of delignification and removal of xylan arise as a consequence of changes in solubility and on mass transport phenomena rather than from the rates of chemical reaction. Furthermore, the results suggest that non-dissolved xylan located in the fibre wall matrix may also sorb on cellulose surfaces relatively early on in the cook if the concentration of sodium ions is at high level.

  • 11.
    Dang, Binh T.
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Brelid, Harald
    Södra Innovation, Sweden.
    Köhnke, Tobias
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Theliander, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Impact of ionic strength on delignification and hemicellulose removal during kraft cooking in a small-scale flow-through reactor2013In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 28, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of ionic strength/sodium ion concentration and type of anions on the delignification rate, the retention of xylan and the reactions of hexenuronic acid during kraft cooking has been investigated. A novel, small, flow-through digester was used in the cooking experiments in order to prevent the resorption of lignin and xylan and to maintain a constant concentration of active chemicals throughout the kraft cook. An increase in ionic strength/sodium ion concentration in the cooking liquor decreases the removal rate of both lignin and xylan during kraft cooking. In general, the removal rate of xylan tends to correlate with the delignification rate. However, the present investigation finds that the retention of xylan at a given degree of delignification increases at high ionic strength/sodium ion concentration. The addition of sodium salts of carbonate or chloride to the cooking liquor was shown to increase the rate of formation/degradation reactions of hexenuronic acids and the total amount of uronic acids substituted on the xylan backbone decreases when the concentration of sodium ions increases in the cooking liquor. This promotes a decrease in the dissolution of xylan and consequently an increase in the retention of xylan in the wood residues. The obtained results demonstrate that the xylan content in the fiber wall increases at higher ionic strength/sodium ion concentration, which leads to a slight increase in pulp yield.

  • 12.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, IVF. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Engström, Dan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Lennartsson, Martin
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Linderoth, Henrik
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Design Thinking as Facilitator for Sustainable Innovation: Exploring Opportunities at SMEs in the Swedish Wood Products Industry2015In: Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Sustainable Innovation, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design thinking (DT) is the application of design practice as an approach to innovate and initiate change. Recently, DT has received increasing attention as an approach to address sustainability challenges. However, this area is less studied. The purpose of this study was to explore how DT could enable small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the Swedish wood products industry to create more sustainable offers. Various actors from this industry have identified the need to develop sustainable offers, although few discuss how this is realized. Interviews have been conducted with six SMEs to increase understanding on challenges they perceive with developing sustainable products. Current practice is compared to potential benefits of DT described in literature. Three main benefits of DT for SMEs have been identified. It could enable SMEs [1] to redefine the purpose of their offers, [2] to better address needs and [3] to address conflicting requirements regarding sustainability.

  • 13.
    Fasth Berglund, Åsa
    et al.
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF. Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Mattsson, Sandra
    RISE, Swerea, IVF. Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Groth, Cecilia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Åkerman, Magnus
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Gullander, Per
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Creatinga structured MEETing arena for knowledge-sharing2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to describe how to create and structure a meeting arena bycombining organisation structure and information structure; this will be used in orderto create an innovative and creative arena for knowledge sharing and problemsolving within the company. The model is exemplified by four industrial casestudies.Results reveal that most of the companies do not have any standards forinformation- or knowledge sharing, most improvement potentials are seen instructuring and storing the right information (IS), aiming from tacit towards explicitknowledge (OS) and this could be done by structuring the questions in the OS-M-ISmodel and by creating innovative and creative meeting arenas.

  • 14.
    Fässberg, T
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Garmer, K.
    Gullander, P.
    Fasth, Å
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Mattsson, S
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Dencker, K.
    Davidsson, A.
    Volvo Cars Corporation, Sweden.
    Stahre, J
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    An empirical study towards a definition of production complexity2011In: 21st International Conference on Production Research: Innovation in Product and Production, ICPR 2011 - Conference Proceedings, Fraunhofer-Verlag , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass customisation increases the number of product variants, shortens product cycles, and results in increasingly complex production systems. The complexity needs to be defined, and further operationalized to support management of production complexity. This paper's contribution is the empirical findings of perceived production complexity at three manufacturing companies, from the perspective of different functions/roles within the production systems; production engineers, operative personnel, internal logistics, and in one company also man-hour planning. Data was collected through observations, interviews, and cross-functional workshops. Results show that mass customisation is the greatest driver and cause of complexity. The increase of product variants affects complexity for all three investigated roles in the production system.

  • 15.
    Færevik, H.
    et al.
    SINTEF, Norway.
    Gersching, D.
    TITK, Germany.
    Hagström, Bror
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Novel temperature regulating fibers and garments2013In: Chemical Fibers International, ISSN 1434-3584, Vol. 63, no 2, p. 89-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the EU-funded research project Noterefiga was to develop novel temperature regulating fibers and innovative textile products for thermal management and improved comfort. The temperature regulating effect was achieved by novel methods of incorporating large amounts of phase changing materials (PCM) in textile fibers. The PCM melted and absorbed the heat from the body in the form of latent heat when the body temperature increased. The PCM crystallized and the stored heat was released again when the temperature dropped. It was assumed that clothes with built-in thermo-regulating properties would provide maintained thermal comfort in difficult thermal environments and physical activity situations. The thermophysiological effect of the developed PCM garments were evaluated on 24 human subjects in controlled environmental conditions under the Noterefiga project.

  • 16.
    Færevik, Hilde
    et al.
    SINTEF, Norway.
    Gersching, Detlef
    TITK, Germany.
    Hagström, Bengt
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Novel temperature regulating fibers and garments2013In: Chemical Fibers International, ISSN 1434-3584, Vol. 63, no 2, p. 89-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the EU-funded research project Noterefiga was to develop novel temperature regulating fibers and innovative textile products for thermal management and improved comfort. The temperature regulating effect was achieved by novel methods of incorporating large amounts of phase changing materials (PCM) in textile fibers. The PCM melted and absorbed the heat from the body in the form of latent heat when the body temperature increased. The PCM crystallized and the stored heat was released again when the temperature dropped. It was assumed that clothes with built-in thermo-regulating properties would provide maintained thermal comfort in difficult thermal environments and physical activity situations. The thermophysiological effect of the developed PCM garments were evaluated on 24 human subjects in controlled environmental conditions under the Noterefiga project.

  • 17.
    Gong, Guan
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, SICOMP.
    Olofsson, Kurt
    RISE, Swerea, SICOMP.
    Nyström, Birgitha
    RISE, Swerea, SICOMP.
    Juntikka, Magdalena
    RISE, Swerea, SICOMP.
    Oxfall, Henrik
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Lindqvist, Karin
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Experimental verification of Re-Fib method for recycling fibres from composites2016In: Advanced Manufacturing: Polymer and Composites Science, ISSN 2055-0359, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 27-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new concept, Re-Fib, was developed within an EU project, REFORM, to recycle carbon and glass fibres from polymeric composite structures, aiming to reduce energy consumption and degradation of fibre properties during recycling. The optimized thermolysis treatment, 24 h at 380 °C, was verified able to recover clean fibres from most tested composite structures containing different thermoset resins (epoxy, vinyl ester, and polyester) and various core materials such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyurethane (PU), and wood. Single-fibre test was performed in dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The reduction of strength was found around 26% for carbon fibres and 34–40% for glass fibres. Thermally recycled glass fibres were melt-compounded with recycled polypropylene (rPP); the resultant composites showed promising mechanical properties.

  • 18.
    Gullander, Per
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Davidsson, Anna
    Dencker, Kerstin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Fasth Berglund, Åsa
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Fässberg, Tommy
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE, Swerea, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Stahre, Johan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Towards a Production Complexity Model that Supports Operation, Re-balancing and Man-hour Planning2011In: Proceedings of the 4th Swedish Production Symposium (SPS): Lund, Sweden, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass customization and more variants, components, and frequent changes increase production complexity. This paper presents research project aimed at developing a feasible definition of complexity, a method for measuring complexity, which supports line rebalancing, man-hour planning, and complexity management, competence, and information support. The project is done in collaboration between Swerea IVF, Chalmers, Volvo Cars, Electrolux, Stoneridge, Electronics, and AB Volvo. Industrial studies were carried out to understand the needs for handling complexity. In parallel, a literature study was conducted over research on definitions, models and methods for complexity. In literature, complexity is commonly modelled by information and entropy of the system (randomness); and categorized into static/dynamic and subjective/objective. The research further concludes: unknown events increase with complexity, making management of uncertainty increasingly important, not only reducing but also coping with complexities; the role of humans and technology in work systems is crucial for coping with uncertainties; complexity models and methods must be easy to understand and use; and must take a holistic view of production; and include different user’s perspective and the subjective complexity.

  • 19.
    Gullander, Per
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Fast- Berglund, Åsa
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Mattsson, Sandra
    RISE, Swerea, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology.
    Groth, Cecilia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Åkerman, Magnus
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Stahre, Johan
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    The innovative glue between the organization system and information system2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Gullander, Per
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Mattsson, Sandra
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Fässberg, Tommy
    Van Landeghem, Hendrik
    Zeltzer, Luiza
    Limère, Veronique
    Aghezzaf, El-Houssaine
    Stahre, Johan
    Comparing Two Methods to Measure Assembly Complexity From An Operator Perspective2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Hagnell, M. K.
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Langbeck, Björn
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Åkermo, M.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Cost efficiency, integration and assembly of a generic composite aeronautical wing box2016In: Composite structures, ISSN 0263-8223, E-ISSN 1879-1085, Vol. 152, p. 1014-1023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a cost-efficiency study of part integration with respect to reduced assembly effort within aeronautical composite structures. The study is performed through the use, and continuous improvement upon, a previously developed cost model. Focus are on the assembly and basic inspection a wing box, part of a section of a full wing, where involved parts are all considered to be manufactured from carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP). Treated cases range from traditional, mechanical joining, to high integration either through co-curing or co-bonding of composite structures. The outcome of presented cost study shows that increased integration decreases the overall production cost of said considered wing box. In general it is shown that co-curing or co-bonding reduces a number of cost-expensive assembly steps in comparison to mechanical joining

  • 22.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Analysis based on Disturbances in Automated Manufacturing Systems1998Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automated manufacturing and assembly systems pile upon the operator enormous amounts of information which must be quickly sorted out. It is important that the operator is furnished with the right decision support at the right time, by means of a well-considered execution of the human – machine interface, adapted to human requirements. This paper suggests a further development of the TEAM methodology with focus on maintenance and disturbance-handling. The aim is to improve the human – machine interface when redesigning or designing automated manufacturing systems by integrating end-user experience of disturbance-handling. The recommended approach is based on two methodologies: the TEAM methodology and the Human – Machine Analysis. Together they include maintenance operators’ information requirements, communication patterns, work task evaluation, information sources, disturbance-handling (especially in production change-over situations), etc. A pilot application of the methods at an automated assembly line for car bodies is described.

  • 23.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Berglund, M.
    Linköpings universitet, Sweden.
    Operator competence and contribution in advanced manufacturing2003In: IFAC Proceedings Volumes (IFAC-PapersOnline), IFAC Secretariat , 2003, no 22, p. 53-58Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Operators' competence and capabilities are important disturbance abatement factors to achieve manufacturing system robustness. Empirical studies carried out at 14 manufacturing companies included a comparison of different actors' opinion of operator work tasks, competence requirements, and in what sense operator contribution is crucial in development work. The results indicate several contradictions between different actors e.g. that continuous competence development is needed, especially within production scheduling, but that it has low priority due to high production pressure, temporary personnel etc. Several benefits for operator contribution in development work is identified. However, a major hindrance is lack of strategies in how to involve operators in a manufacturing dynamic situation.

  • 24.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Berglund, M
    Gullander, P
    Stahre, J
    INFORMATION AND KNOWLEDGE RELATED TO PRODUCTION REQUIREMENTS DURING CHANGES2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing systems are increasingly subject to changes. Information and knowledge are therefore essential for the ability to predict potential problems. Results are presented from 16 companies with focus on how production requirements, as perceived from production personnel´s perspective, are considered when changes are planned and realized. A gap between production and information system development is identified according to less competence and authority within the latter area. To improve preparedness, information access in a structured but rapid way, not always dependent on individuals or formalized meetings, is desired. Even though there are advantages with formalized information transfer through e.g. structured work procedures, it is not obvious that user requirements in production are fulfilled. This indicates a need of further research on efficient information system strategies regarding the degree of formal and/or informal information transfer.

  • 25.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Berglund, M
    Gullander, Per
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    CRITICAL EVENTS AND FACILITATING FACTORS FORREALIZATION OF PLANNED CHANGES IN PRODUCTION2006In: Proceedings of the Swedish Production Symposium, SPS, Gothenburg, August 28-30, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper seeks to identify critical events and factors that facilitate realization of changes in production. Major planned changes were studied in two industrial cases. The results showed a large number of unpredicted critical events which require development of strategies for both minimizing and coping with uncertainties. The most important facilitators for realization of planned changes in production were related to organizational and human aspects, and to a lower degree technology aspects. In the transition from the preparation phase to the implementation phase of the planned change, factors related to organizational aspects dominated, while factors related to human aspects had increased significance for the overall realization.

  • 26.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Berglund, M
    Stahre, J
    Towards a Methodology for Assessment of Operator Involvement in Manufacturing Development2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industry is facing global competition and high demands on flexibility, customer adaptation, fast product realization, and rapid industrialization. Consequently, there is a significant pressure on manufacturing systems which requires increasing skill and competence at many levels in the company. This also requires organizations with high involvement of different actors in manufacturing development, why assessment of operator involvement is needed. An issue of growing importance is what strategy Swedish manufacturing industry should develop for the future. In this paper a methodology is presented including an approach for investigating how knowledge-intensive manufacturing can be described, identified and facilitated in 14 Swedish companies. Furthermore, the methodology includes investigation of operator involvement within product, production, organization, and information system development. As this is an ongoing project, the paper presents preliminary results from individual company analyses. However, conceivable results from the proposed approach include characteristics of companies with a great deal of operator involvement in development work, descriptions of implications for operator involvement, the need and use of information as facilitator for development, as well as hindrances and prerequisites for development. Finally, the project can be expected to result in a deeper understanding of how to identify and facilitate development work, in which the manufacturing system operator is well integrated.

  • 27.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Frohm, J.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Berglund, M.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Stahre, J.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Towards efficient automation implementation2006In: IFAC Proc. Vol. (IFAC-PapersOnline), IFAC Secretariat , 2006, no PART 1, p. 71-76Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New technology may contribute to several advantages, but shop-floor requirements need to be considered to achieve expected benefits. Results are based on an industrial study, where new machinery was implemented. Identified critical aspects include transfer of new knowledge related to the modified production system, scenario building, and situation awareness both within and outside the company. These critical aspects may also be relevant during planned changeovers between different levels of automation. An initial model is proposed, describing effects of varying the levels of automation and the potential of automation if critical aspects are sufficiently regarded.

  • 28.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Moestam Ahlström, Lena
    Medbo, Lars
    Svenningstorp, Johan
    A Production System Assessment Approach within Swedish Automotive Industry2008In: proceedings of The Swedish Production Symposium, SPS 2008., 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing interest of assessment approaches in manufacturing companies, and a wide range of assessments of progress and performance of production systems are found in literature and industry. The purpose of this paper is to investigate potentials of an assessment approach for production systems, developed within a larger automotive company in Sweden. The approach presented include assessors and practitioners experiences involved in the development process, during a pre-development phase and their reflections from sharp runs at plants in Europe, North America, South America, and South East Asia. The methodology studied is regarded as a self-assessment on a higher organizational level. Results identify benefits of the assessment approach according to its contribution to global cross-organizational learning and potential learning within individual plants. However, the assessment process highly effect the type of outcome and benefits.

  • 29.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Ylipää, T
    Analysis of disturbance handling in automated manufacturing systems1999Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Errors and production disturbances in advanced manufacturing systems (AMS) can result in large production losses, deteriorated quality, and lower safety. As disturbance handling is of increasing importance in AMS, the aim of this paper is to identify problem areas related to the involvement of different actors in disturbance handling. Results from a case study at an automated car-body assembly manufacturer point out unstructured work procedures, limitations in IT-support tools, lack of co-operation between personnel, etc. In disturbance handling, it is found that the operator has an increasingly important role and needs continuous training and support to be able to up-date the situation awareness and to efficiently co-ordinate with specialised trouble-shooters. Also, strategies for IT support are necessary as the dynamic features require user-adapted information and co-ordinated IT-support tools.

  • 30.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Ylipää, Torbjörn
    FJÄLLSTRÖM, SABINA
    Production Disturbance Handling from an Operative Perspective in Advanced Manufacturing Systems2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robustness is a feature that concerns the ability of a system to adapt to changing conditions while being robust in its performance with respect to disturbances. However, several industrial studies show that advanced manufacturing systems become vulnerable to various types of production disturbances. This paper contributes to the understanding of production disturbance handling on operative level as a basis for the development of a methodology for analysing and production disturbance handling from a holistic perspective. A present state analysis has been carried out at an automated engine plant. Results indicate a need of consistency related to production disturbances, e.g. how they are classified, measured and followed up, as it forms the basis for the efficiency measurements and for the key values that are aimed to promote improvement work.

  • 31.
    Hedlund, Artur
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Köhnke, Tobias
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Theliander, H.
    Chalmers University of Engineering, Sweden.
    Coagulation of EmimAc-cellulose solutions: Dissolution-precipitation disparity and effects of non-solvents and cosolvent2015In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 32-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coagulation values (CVs) of cellulose/1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EmimAc)/dimethyl-sulfoxide (DMSO) solutions for water, ethanol (EtOH) and 2-propanol (2-PrOH) were measured by using a light-scattering technique. Expressed in moles per mole, CVs of H2O were roughly twice as high as the CVs of EtOH and 2-PrOH at equal cellulose concentration for EmimAc solutions without the addition of a cosolvent. We explain this observation mainly in terms of alcohol alkyl chains efficiently obstructing EmimAc anions, preventing anions from simultaneously interacting with cellulose hydroxyls. DMSO was found to mitigate the coagulating effect of water and, to a lesser extent, the effect of alcohols. The explanation may be the different enthalpies of mixing for water and alcohols, with DMSO. An explanation on a more practical level, is based on how the solvatochromic α and β parameters change due to small amounts of the different non-solvents. Small additions of methanol induce disproportionately large changes from basic towards acidic properties for DMSO, meanwhile, the same stoichiometric addition of water induces only minor changes. Precipitation occurred at concentrations of non-solvent much higher than the concentrations that limit dissolution. The most likely explanation for this is a metastable region in the phase diagram. It was also seen that the typically observed inhibitive effect of high Mw on solubility during dissolution did not apply to precipitation. 

  • 32.
    Hedlund, Artur
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Köhnke, Tobias
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Theliander, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Coagulation of cellulose-EmimAc-DMSO solutions studied in order to control properties of wet-spun cellulose fibers2016In: The 7th Workshop on cellulose, regenerated cellulose and cellulose derivatives, 2016, p. 49-52, article id 15Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Hjort, Stefan
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Folksams färgtest - 4: En undersökning av funktionen hos 45 vanliga utomhusfärger2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under 2000-talet har försäkringsbolaget Folksam bidragit till att tre stora oberoende studier av utomhusfärger för träfasader genomförts i Sverige. Resultatet har varit nedslående med en övervägande del ”dåliga” färger. Testprogrammet har fortsattunder ytterligare en tvåårsperiod och presenteras nu i rapporten ”Folksams färgtest – 4”. Studien omfattar 45 av våra vanligaste utomhusfärger och panelerna har exponerats under två års tid på fyra teststationer i landet. De flesta färgerna har varit vattenburna och miljöanpassade. Många lasyrfärger har testats och denna gång har en rödbrun kulör valts (den vanligast förekommande kulören) till skillnad mot tidigare år då en vit kulör användes. Övriga färger har haft en vit kulör förutom slamfärg och trätjära som var rödaktiga. Alla färger har köpts in över disk och beträffande priset har det varierat från lågprisfärger till dyra linoljefärger. Färgerna har applicerats i enlighet med färgtillverkarnas rekommendationer. Syftet med undersökningen är att ge konsumenter och andra intressenter information om hur de vanligaste färgerna fungerar i vårt klimat. I studien undersöks flera parametrar och kriteriet för att få det samlade omdömet ”Färger med bäst resultat” är att färgsystemet ska klara två års utomhusexponering utan alltför grava anmärkningar.

    För bedömning av färgernas funktion har nedanstående kriterier använts.

    Färger med bäst resultat: Färger med betyg 0 och 1, dvs inga allvarliga anmärkningar.Färger med dåligt resultat: Färger med minst betyg 3 på minst två exponeringsstationer. Färger med tveksamt resultat: Här hamnar alla färger som inte hamnat i någon av ovanstående grupper. Av förklarliga skäl är spannet stort och några färger som ligger på gränsen till ”färger med bäst resultat” skulle säkert fungera bra i många tillämpningar.

    I tabellen på nästa sida rangordnas resultatet som respektive färgsystem har erhållit. Jämfört med tidigare tester har fler färger fått betyget ”bäst resultat” samtidigt som andelen färger som fått betyget ”sämst resultat” har minskat. Att det skulle bero på att klimatet har blivit ”snällare” mot färgerna är inte troligt. Exempelvis visar en jämförelse av klimatet mellan perioden 2008–2010 och 2010–2012 på ungefär likvärdigt klimat enligt SMHIs mätningar. En troligare förklaring till resultatförbättringen är istället att färgtillverkarna har förbättrat sina färger, vilket är en positiv utveckling för Sveriges färgkonsumenter. Att rangordna färger är vanskligt men underlättar för färgkonsumenten som vill ha ett ”snabbt svar”. I detta test har samma kriterier använts som i tidigare test och just uppdelningen i tre grupper innebär kanske att vissa färger bedöms orättvist. Därför är rådet att komplettera informationen i tabellen på nästa sida med den i bilaga D.

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  • 34.
    Idström, Alexander
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Gentile, Luigi
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Gubitosi, Marta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Olsson, Carina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Materials and Production, IVF.
    Stenqvist, Björn
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lund, Mikael
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Karl Erik
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Olsson, Ulf
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Köhnke, Tobias
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Wernersson, Erik
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Dissolution of cellulose in tetrabutylammonium acetate/dimethyl sulfoxide2016In: The 7th Workshop on cellulose, regenerated cellulose and cellulose derivatives, 2016, p. 15-18, article id 1Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The dissolution of cellulose in tetrabutylammonium acetate (TBAAc)/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was studied combining experimental and simulation techniques. It was found that the dissolution limit at 40 °C corresponded to a molar ratio close to one acetate per cellulose anhydroglucose units. MD simulations suggested that the acetate ions bind to cellulose by dual hydrogen bonds. This effectively turns cellulose into a polyelectrolyte, attracting the bulky tetrabutylammonium (TBA+ ) counter ions, which prevent close contact between chains in the dissolved state. This hypothesis was tested by 1 Hand 13C-NMR spectroscopy, which confirmed that acetate forms hydrogen bonds to cellulose, and by diffusion NMR spectroscopy, which demonstrated a strong dynamic correlation between bound acetate and tetrabutylammonium in near-quantitative agreement with simulation. The present results suggest that offering hydrogen bonding to the acetate ions is the main driving force for dissolving cellulose and that the TBA+ counter ions form a diffuse layer around the acetate-decorated cellulose chains.

  • 35. Ingemansson, Arne
    et al.
    Bolmsjö, Gunnar
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    A survey of the use of the discrete-event simulation in manufacturing industry2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Discrete-event simulation improves the possibility to study manufacturing systems. The use is increasing compared to previous studies and 15% of 80 companies investigated are using the tool and of these four companies extensively. The main advantage according to the survey beside the visualization part is that the knowledge about a system is investigated and documented. Other benefits can be basis for new investments and improvements of existing manufacturing lines. Of the companies that have adopted the technology, 79% answered that discrete-event simulation facilitates the decision-making process. Finally, the findings indicate that the potential of the software would be further increased if combined with adequate production improvement techniques to increase overall efficiency of a manufacturing system. Key words: Discrete-event simulation; survey; manufacturing industry

  • 36. Johansson, Anna
    et al.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Balancing human aspects in dynamic automated manufacturing systems1998Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When system designers, developers, and programmers shape human – machine interfaces in automated manufacturing systems (AMS), they will to a large extent define working conditions for future operators. To be able to shape systems in such a way that both human and technical resources are combined and used in an optimal way, a thorough understanding of the balance between technical and human aspects is needed. This paper suggests that continuous present-state analyses together with scenario development is an approach to integrate human aspects continuously in the development process. Three case studies that focus on detecting and solveing existing problems as well as forseeing and preventing problems in new and redesigned systems are described. Results show that dynamic AMSs require procedures and support systems also for interventions, not only for the normal production, as these activities become more and more frequent. Both in terms of troubleshooting and maintenance and in terms of information to all involved when changes are taking place. The results also indicate that the suggested approach is useful for the difficult goal.

  • 37.
    Jäger, Henrik
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, KIMAB. University West, Sweden.
    Alagan, N. T.
    University West, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Jonas
    RISE, Swerea, IVF. University West, Sweden.
    Beno, T.
    University West, Sweden.
    Wretland, A.
    EDS Analysis of Flank Wear and Surface Integrity in Machining of Alloy 718 with Forced Coolant Application2016In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier B.V. , 2016, p. 271-274Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been extensive research on forced coolant application, usually known as high pressure coolant, in machining heat resistant super alloys. This technology has shown to improve the tool life, chip segmentation, surface integrity and reduce the temperature in the cutting zone. A number of studies have been done on hydraulic parameters of the coolant. This study has been focused on residues on the flank face of the insert and residual stress on the workpiece surface generated by regular and modified cutting inserts. To identify any residual elements, analysis were done by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, EDS, on regular as well as modified inserts in combination with forced coolant application on both rake and flank face. The investigations have shown that the temperature gradient in the insert has changed between the regular and modified cutting inserts and that the tool wear and surface roughness is significantly affected by the modified cutting tool. © 2016 The Authors.

  • 38.
    Kilbo, Per
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Produktionslogik för företag efter en tredje industriell revolution2001Report (Other academic)
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  • 39.
    Lindell, Hans
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Redesign of hand-held impact machines to reduce hand-arm vibration2011In: Canadian Acoustics, ISSN 0711-6659, E-ISSN 2291-1391, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 80-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A project included redesign the tools to achieve low vibration, improved ergonomics, dust removal, and reduced noise while maintaining productivity, improving work environment. The first part of the project was a survey of vibration exposure to workers in the stone industry. The results from the survey showed that three work operations contributed to more than 90% of the vibration exposure. The second part of the project, the redesign of the tools was carried out using three approaches such as analytical calculation, multi-body simulation, and experimental study. Care has been taken to reduce friction in the system and the damping coefficient is estimated to be below 2 % of critical damping. Vibration isolation between the suspended mass and the housing is applied in the axial, radial and rotational directions in order to handle the vibrations that still remain after the tuned absorber.

  • 40.
    Lindell, Hans
    RISE, Swerea, IVF. IVF, Sweden.
    Vibration reduction on hand-held grinders by automatic balancing1996In: Central European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1210-7778, E-ISSN 1803-1048, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 43-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By automatically balanced hand held grinders, vibrations are reduced to at least half and thereby reducing the estimated risk for vibration injuries by a factor of four. Simultaneously less grinding disc consumption and better grinding results are obtained. Vibration from grinders originates mainly from unbalance in the grinding wheel. Grinding wheels are low-price products, with uneven distribution of mass and coarse tolerances. This gives rise to out-of-balance, which changes as the wheel wears. By fitting an automatic balancer, that consists of steel balls contained in a cylindrical ball race on the shaft of the grinder, unbalances will be compensate for in the machine during grinding. The time it takes for an automatic balancer to stabilize is only a few tenths of a second. When grinding, the balancer is stable, even during substantial changes in speed. The technique is applicable to almost all grinding machines on the market and the first grinders using the technique have just been put on the market.

  • 41.
    Lindell, Hans
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Gretarsson, Snaevar
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Machems, Michael
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    High frequency shock vibrations and implications of ISO 5349 – Measurement of vibration, simulating pressure propagation, risk assessment and preventive measures2017Report (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Lindell, Hans
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Lönnroth, I
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ottertun, H
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Transient vibration from impact wrenches:  Vibration negative effect on blood cells and standards for measurements1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Lund, Anja
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; University of Borås, Sweden.
    Hagström, Bengt
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Melt spinning of poly(vinylidene fluoride) fibers and the influence of spinning parameters on β‐phase crystallinity2010In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 116, no 5, p. 2685-2693Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Lund, Anja
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; University of Borås, Sweden.
    Hagström, Bengt
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Melt spinning of β‐phase poly(vinylidene fluoride) yarns with and without a conductive core2010In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 120, no 2, p. 1080-1089Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Lund, Anja
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; University of Borås, Sweden.
    Jonasson, Christian
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Johansson, Christer
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Haagensen, Daniel
    RISE, Swerea, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Hagström, Bengt
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Piezoelectric polymeric bicomponent fibers produced by melt spinning2012In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 126, no 2, p. 490-500Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Lund, Anja
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; University of Borås, Sweden.
    Rundqvist, Karin
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Erik
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Yu, Liyang
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Hagström, Bengt
    RISE, Swerea, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Müller, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Energy harvesting textiles for a rainy day: woven piezoelectrics based on melt-spun PVDF microfibres with a conducting core2018In: npj Flexible Electronics, E-ISSN 2397-4621, Vol. 2, no 1, article id 9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Mahlamaki, K.
    et al.
    Helsinki University of Technology, Finland.
    Ström, Mikael
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Eisto, T.
    Helsinki University of Technology, Finland.
    Holtta, V.
    Helsinki University of Technology, Finland.
    Lean product development point of view to current challenges of engineering change management in traditional manufacturing industries2016In: 2009 IEEE International Technology Management Conference, ICE 2009, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering change management causes many challenges in product development. For example, the impacts of a change can delay the whole product development project, and failed communication of changes can cause rework and scrap in production. Lean product development is one possibility to organize product development efficiently. We have conducted four case studies in heavy machinery, mechatronics and automotive industries in Finland and in Sweden to identify the current challenges in engineering change management. The challenges are categorized according to the lean product development principles they break. The results show that most challenges are related to processes and technology used in engineering change management. We suggest that implementing lean product development principles at the case companies could help in overcoming the challenges discovered.

  • 48. Mellby, C
    et al.
    Harlin, Ulrika
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    IN SEARCH FOR PROGRESS – SIGNIFICANT BRICKS WHEN DESIGNING A LONG-TERMSTRATEGY TOWARDS LEAN PRODUCTION2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Results are presented from a pre-study discussing significant bricks needed to be considered when designing a long-term strategy for production systems based upon Lean production. A conclusion is that when developing a Lean organization it has to be managed as a complex evolving system (CES). Appropriate aspects suggested in a forth-coming survey within Swedish automotive industry, is to investigate if there is a common description of the Lean concept which is aligned with own visions and basic values, focus a collage of interactive or isolated bricks, and how learning, developing people, complexity issues and contextual factors are regarded.

  • 49.
    Mellin, Pelle
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, KIMAB.
    Lyckfeldt, Ola
    RISE, Swerea, IVF.
    Harlin, P.
    Sandvik Materials Technology, Sweden.
    Brodin, H.
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Blom, H.
    Carpenter Powder Products, Sweden.
    Strondl, Annika
    RISE, Swerea, KIMAB.
    Evaluating flowability of additive manufacturing powders, using the gustavsson flow meter2016In: World PM 2016 Congress and Exhibition, European Powder Metallurgy Association (EPMA) , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Gustavsson flow meter (including standard ISO-13517) is in this paper used to measure flow rate of fine AM powders. In the current paper, the results are compared to the Hall flow meter and a Freeman FT4 powder rheometer in terms of success of measuring these AM powders. The robustness is clearly superior to the Hall flow meter. Compared to using the rheometer, the Gustavsson flow meter is faster and simpler to use; however, other powder-aspects are evaluated since little correlation was found. All methods of characterizing the flowability could distinguish between (1) two alloys, and (2) if the alloys were new or used (in SLM), and (3) if they were dried or non-dried.

  • 50.
    Nilsson, Erik
    et al.
    RISE, Swerea, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Lund, Anja
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; University of Borås, Sweden.
    Jonasson, Christian
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Johansson, Christer
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Hagström, Bengt
    RISE, Swerea, IVF. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Poling and characterization of piezoelectric polymer fibers for use in textile sensors2013In: Sensors and Actuators A-Physical, ISSN 0924-4247, E-ISSN 1873-3069, Vol. 201, p. 477-486Article in journal (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 70
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