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  • 1.
    Chen, Chengdong
    et al.
    Xiamen University, China; KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Hou, Ruiqing
    Xiamen University, China; Institute of Materials Research, Germany.
    Zhang, Fan
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Dong, Shigang
    Xiamen University, China.
    Claesson, Per Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials. Xiamen University, China.
    Lin, Changjian
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Heating-Induced Enhancement of Corrosion Protection of Carbon Steel by a Nanocomposite Film Containing Mussel Adhesive Protein2017In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 164, no 4, p. C188-C193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Application of protective coatings on metals may involve a thermal treatment process. In this study, the effect of thermal treatment up to 200?C on the corrosion protection was investigated for nanocomposite films composed of mussel adhesive protein (MAP), CeO2 nanoparticles and Na2HPO4 deposited on carbon steel. The morphology and microstructure of the pre-formed nanocomposite film were characterized by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The changes in the chemical structure of the nanocomposite film due to the thermal treatment were investigated by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The corrosion protection of the unheated and heated nanocomposite films on carbon steel was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and details of the corrosion process were elucidated by in-situ AFM measurements in 0.1 M NaCl solution. The results show a certain increase in the corrosion protection with time of the nanocomposite film for carbon steel. The analyses reveal that thermal treatment leads to a reduction of water molecules in the nanocomposite film, and an enhanced cross-linking and cohesion of the film due to oxidation of catechols to o-quinones. As a result, the film becomes more compact and gives improved corrosion protection for carbon steel.

  • 2.
    Claesson, Per
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Micro-galvanic corrosion effects on patterned copper-zinc samples during exposure in humidified air containing formic acid2013In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 160, no 9, p. C423-C431Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Forslund, M
    et al.
    Leygraf, C
    Claesson, Per M
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor.
    Pan, J
    Octadecanethiol as corrosion inhibitor for zinc and patterned Zinc-Copper in humified air with Formic Acid2014In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 161, no 6, p. C330-C338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The corrosion inhibition efficiency of octadecanethiol (ODT) for zinc and a zinc-copper patterned model sample (Zn-Cu) has been explored during exposure in an atmosphere that mimics indoor atmospheric corrosion containing humidified air (80% relative humidity at 20◦C) and formic acid (around 100 ppb). The corrosion kinetics were monitored in situ with infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and the local nature of corrosion effects post-analyzed with complementary scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy. ODT shows initially a corrosion inhibiting ability both on zinc and on Zn-Cu. This ability decreases with time due to local removal of ODT, which causes micro-galvanic effects that eventually result in corrosion rates that exceed those for the uncovered samples. On bare and ODT-covered samples, the presence of a copper-zinc junction results in both accelerated corrosion and in structurally more developed corrosion products. Overall, the results suggest that ODT can function as a temporary corrosion inhibitor in representative indoor environments on zinc and zinc with zinc-copper junctions.

  • 4.
    Fuertes Casals, Nuria
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, KIMAB.
    Nazarov, Andrej
    French Corrosion Institute, France.
    Vucko, Flavien
    French Corrosion Institute, France.
    Pettersson, Rachel
    Jernkontoret, Sweden.
    Thierry, Dominique
    French Corrosion Institute, France.
    Influence of mechanical stress on the potential distribution on a 301 LN stainless steel surface2015In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 162, no 9, p. C465-C472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present work was to study the influence of the stress on the electrode potential of the austenitic stainless steel 301LN using Scanning Kelvin Probe (SKP). It was found that elastic deformation reversibly ennobles the potential whereas plastic deformation decreases the potential in both tensile and compressive deformation mode and this decrease is retained even 24 h after removal of the load. To interpret the stress effects, different surface preparations were used and the composition and thickness of the passive film were determined by GDOES. Slip steps formed due to plastic deformation were observed using AFM. The effect of plastic strain on the potential is explained by the formation of dislocations, which creates more a defective passive film.

  • 5.
    Gil, H.
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    Leygraf, C.
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    Tidblad, Johan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, KIMAB.
    GILDES model simulations of the atmospheric corrosion of copper induced by low concentrations of carboxylic acids2011In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 158, no 12, p. C429-C438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A computer simulation with a GILDES-based model using the COMSOL multiphysics software was performed for copper exposed to low concentrations of carboxylic acids in humidified air at room temperature. GILDES is a six-regime computer model (Gas, the Interface between gas and liquid, the Liquid, the Deposition layer, the Electrodic region near the surface and the Solid). The simulations were compared to previously published in-situ results for copper at the same conditions analysed by a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). Experimental and calculated results agree with each other with respect to the effect of corrosion, showing formic acid as the most aggressive followed by acetic and propionic acid. This is supported by a higher ligand- and proton-promoted dissolution found in formic acid exposures, followed by acetic and propionic exposures. The dominating precipitated phases were Cu2O, Cu(OH)2, Cu(CH 3COO)2 H2O, Cu(HCOO)2 4H 2O and Cu(CH3CH2COO)2 H 2O. Besides Cu2O, the simulations suggest that the hydrated form of the respective carboxylates is the most likely compound to be formed in this type of atmospheres. © 2011 The Electrochemical Society.

  • 6.
    Gil, H.
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    Leygraf, C.
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    Tidblad, Johan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, KIMAB.
    GILDES model simulations of the atmospheric corrosion of zinc induced by low concentrations of carboxylic acids2012In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 159, no 3, p. C123-C128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The GILDES computer based model was successfully applied to the atmospheric corrosion of zinc exposed to low concentrations of carboxylic acids in humidified air at room temperature. Under these exposure conditions the expected precipitated phases are zinc oxide (ZnO), zinc hydroxide (Zn(OH) 2) and several forms of hydrated zinc carboxylate, Zn(CH 3CH 2COO) 22H 2O, Zn(CH 3COO) 22H 2O and Zn(HCOO) 22H 2O. The results were compared to those from laboratory exposures obtained in the same conditions. The model correctly predicts the trend for ZnO and zinc carboxylate formation found in experimental exposures for the three acids tested. According to the simulations, surface protonation, surface acid base reactions, as well as ligand- and proton- induced dissolution reactions play a major role in the initial atmospheric corrosion of zinc. Henrys law constant (K H) is found to be an important parameter but uncertain due to different reported literature values. When K H is increased the formation rate of zinc carboxylate also increases. K H increases in the sequence propionic acid acetic acid formic acid, the same order as found for the calculated dissolution rate. © 2012 The Electrochemical Society.

  • 7.
    Ha, H.
    et al.
    University of Virginia.
    Taxén, Claes
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea KIMAB.
    Cong, H.
    University of Virginia.
    Scully, J.R.
    University of Virginia.
    Effect of applied potential on Pit propagation in copper as function of water chemistry2012In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 159, no 2, p. C59-C73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of potential on pit propagation as a function of water chemistry was investigated using artificial pit electrodes. In both 0.01 M HCO 3 - 0.01 M SO 4 2- and 0.01 M HCO 3 - 0.01 M Cl - solutions, pits grew faster at higher applied potentials. However the magnitude of the pitting rate depends on the solution chemistry. A higher pitting rate was observed during pit growth in 0.01 M HCO 3 - 0.01 M SO 4 2- solution compared to 0.01 M HCO 3 - 0.01 M Cl - solution. The chemistry of the water determined the morphology and the molecular identity of corrosion products deposited inside and outside of the pits. Thick and porous layers of malachite and brochantiteposnjakite covered pits in 0.01 M HCO 3 - 0.01 M SO 4 2- solution. In contrast, thin and compact layers of malachite, cuprite and atacamitenantokiteeriochantite covered pits in 0.01 M HCO 3 - 0.01 M Cl - solution. Modeling successfully predicted these corrosion products. Applied potential determined the amount, the structure and the distribution of corrosion products in both experiment and model. However, the effect of potential was more pronounced in 0.01 M HCO 3 - 0.01 M SO 4 2- solution in comparison to 0.01 M HCO 3 - 0.01 M Cl - solution. © 2011 The Electrochemical Society.

  • 8.
    Kharitonov, Dmitry S.
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Belarusian State Technological University, Belarus.
    Örnek, Cem
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, KIMAB. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per M
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Sommertune, Jens
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation.
    Zharskii, Ivan M.
    Belarusian State Technological University, Belarus.
    Kurilo, Irina I.
    Belarusian State Technological University, Belarus.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloy AA6063-T5 by Vanadates: Microstructure Characterization and Corrosion Analysis2018In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 5, no 3, p. C116-C126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy AA6063-T5 by vanadates (NaVO3) in 0.05 M NaCl solution has been investigated by electrochemical and weight loss measurements, and associated with microstructure and Volta potential data. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy analyses confirmed the presence of micrometer-sized Fe-rich Al4.01MnSi0.74, Al1.69Mg4Zn2.31, and FeAl3intermetallic phases (IMPs) and nanometer-sized CuAl2, ZnAl2, and Mg2Si precipitates in the microstructure. Scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements showed Volta potential differences of up to 600 mV between the microstructure constituents indicating a high susceptibility to micro-galvanic corrosion, with interphase boundary regions exhibiting the highest propensity to corrosion. Most IMPs had cathodic character whereas some nanometer-sized Mg-rich particles exhibited anodic nature, with large Volta potential gradients within interphase regions of large cathodic particles. Electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization measurements indicated that the vanadates provided mixed corrosion inhibition effects, mitigating both oxygen reduction, occurring on cathodic IMPs, and anodic metal dissolution reaction, occurring on anodic sites, such as Mg2Si and interphase boundary regions. Electrochemical measurements indicated that the sodium metavanadate inhibitor blocks active metal dissolution, giving high inhibition efficiency (>95%) during the initial exposure, whereas long-term weight loss measurements showed that the efficacy decreases after prolonged exposure.

  • 9.
    Larsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Anderson, Johan
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Andersson, Petra
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Mellander, Bengt-Erik
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Thermal Modelling of Cell-to-Cell Fire Propagation and Cascading Thermal Runaway Failure Effects for Lithium-Ion Battery Cells and Modules Using Fire Walls2016In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 163, no 14, p. A2854-A2865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A model is presented for predicting the cell-to-cell propagation of a thermal runaway/fire in a lithium-ion battery cell to neighboring cells by simulating the temperature development in neighboring cells. The modelling work comprises of two major steps; setting up a model of the cells including the thermal properties of the cells, and then validating the model through experiments where the boundary conditions in the validation test must be determined carefully. The model is developed to allow a fast evaluation of several different preventive means of thermal insulation, it is not modelling the pack and cells to a great detail. Still the experimental validation indicates that the model is good enough to fulfil its purpose of the model. A feasibility study using the model is conducted assessing two different types of fire walls between battery modules of 10 cells. The results show that there is a substantial risk for a cascading of thermal events in a battery pack, although cooling systems and fire walls may mitigate these risks

  • 10.
    LeBozec, N
    et al.
    Institut de la Corrosion, France.
    Thierry, D
    Institut de la Corrosion, France.
    Persson, Dan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Swerea, Swerea KIMAB.
    Stoulil, J
    University of Chemistry and Technology, Czech Republic.
    Atmospheric Corrosion of Zinc-Aluminum Alloyed Coated Steel inDepleted Carbon Dioxide Environments2018In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 165, no 7, p. C343-C353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    NaCl induced corrosion of Zn-0.2Al, Zn-5Al and Zn-55Al coated steel was investigated at low and ambient CO2 levels. Weight lossmeasurements revealed an enhancement of the corrosion of Zn-0.2Al and particularly Zn-5Al in low CO2. This was connected toan increase of surface pH in a low CO2 atmosphere promoting the formation of ZnO and layered double hydroxide for Zn-5Al. ForZn-55Al, CO2 depletion did not affect the surface pH due to the acidification effect of Al3+. Preferential dissolution of zinc richphase was observed on cross-sections, particularly in depleted CO2 experiments. Different sequences of corrosion product formationwere proposed for the different Zn-Al coatings.

  • 11.
    Li, Jing
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ecco, Luiz
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Ahniyaz, Anwar
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Material och ytteknik.
    Fedel, Michele
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Material och ytteknik.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    In situ AFM and electrochemical study of a waterborne acrylic composite coating with CeO2 nanoparticles for corrosion protection of carbon steel2015In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 162, no 10, p. C610-C618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The corrosion protection of a waterborne acrylic composite coating with 1 wt% ceria nanoparticles (CeNP) coated on carbon steel in 3 wt% NaCl solution was investigated by ex-situ and in situ as well as electrochemical atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations, combined with open circuit potential (OCP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The synthesized CeNP were stabilized by acetic acid. The transmission electron microscopy characterization showed fine nano-size of as-synthesized CeNP, the ex-situ AFM imaging revealed uniform dispersion of the CeNP in the composite coating and greatly reduced nano-sized pinholes in the coating. The in situ and electrochemical (EC) AFM investigations indicate release of some CeNP and aggregates from the coating surface and then precipitation of some particles and cerium-compounds during the exposure. The OCP and EIS results demonstrated that the addition of 1 wt% CeNP leads to a significantly improved long term barrier type corrosion protection of the waterborne acrylic composite coating for carbon steel in 3 wt% NaCl solution. The beneficial effect of the CeNP is attributed to the blocking of nano-sized defects and inhibition by the cerium compounds originated from the acetic acid stabilized CeNP.

  • 12.
    Qiu, P.
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Dan
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea KIMAB.
    Leygraf, C.
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Initial atmospheric corrosion of zinc induced by carboxylic acids: A quantitative in situ study2009In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 156, no 12, p. C441-C447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The initial atmospheric corrosion of zinc induced by formic acid, acetic acid, and propionic acid has been followed in situ with infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). An optical model was applied to quantify the IRAS data, which enabled the absolute amounts of the two main species detected, ZnO and zinc carboxylate (mainly hydrated or hydroxyl zinc carboxylate), to be derived. The formation rate of zinc carboxylate increases as propionic

  • 13.
    Qiu, P.
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Dan
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea KIMAB.
    Leygraf, C.
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Initial oxidation of zinc induced by humidified air: A quantified in situ study2009In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 156, no 3, p. C81-C86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A multianalytical approach with in situ capability has been used to explore the initial oxidation of zinc in air with 90% relative humidity at 20°C. The only surface species identified were zinc oxide (ZnO) and reversibly adsorbed water. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction revealed the homogeneous nucleation of ZnO grains. The kinetics of ZnO formation was followed quantitatively by in situ IR reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) integrated with a quartz crystal microbalance up to an average film thickness of 50 nm after 72 h of exposure. The quantitative results exhibit good agreement with ex situ cathodic reduction and with optical calculations of IRAS data and provide further evidence of IRAS as an in situ analytical tool with quantification capability. The ZnO growth followed the logarithmic rate law as predicted by Fehlner and Mott [Oxid. Met., 2, 59 (1970)]. © 2008 The Electrochemical Society.

  • 14. Sababi, Majid
    et al.
    Zhang, Fan
    Krivosheeva, Olga
    Forslund, Mattias
    Pan, Jinshan
    Claesson, Per M
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Thin composite films of mussel adhesive proteins and ceria nanoparticles on carbon steel for corrosion protection2012In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 159, no 8, p. C364-C371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin composite films of the mussel adhesive proteins (Mefp-1) and ceria nanoparticles were deposited on substrate surfaces by alternating immersions. The film formation was studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring. Both the changes in frequency and dissipation recorded by QCM-D demonstrate buildup of a composite film of Mefp-1 and nanoceria. Micro-and nanostructure and composition of the film on carbon steel were characterized by optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM), electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA) and confocal Raman microspectroscopy (CRM). Optical and EPMA observations of the film show micron-sized aggregates and AFM imaging of the compact and smooth areas reveal the nanostructure. EPMA elemental mapping indicates that the micron-sized aggregates are rich in ceria and Mefp-1, whereas CRM analysis shows the presence of Mefp-1-Fe complexes in the film. Corrosion protection of the composite film on carbon steel was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization measurements in NaCl solution, and compared with Mefp-1 added in the solution as an inhibitor. The measurements show that the composite film provides a higher corrosion resistance compared with Mefp-1 added as inhibitor. The corrosion resistance increases with exposure time and approaches a high level.

  • 15.
    Zhu, Baiwei
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Fedel, Michele
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Andersson, Nils-Eric
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Leisner, Peter
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Electronics. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Deflorian, Flavio
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Zanella, Caterina
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Effect of Si content and morphology on corrosionresistance of anodized cast Al-Si alloys2017In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 164, no 7, p. C435-C441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the influence of Si content and Si particle morphology on the corrosion protection of anodized oxide layers on Al-Si alloys. Two Al alloys with low Si concentrations (2.43 wt-% and 5.45 wt-%, respectively) were studied and compared with 6082-T6 via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 3 wt-% NaCl solution prior to oxide layer sealing. Si particles were also modified by the addition of Sr to study the influence of Si particle morphology on the corrosion protection of the oxide layer. The EIS showed that the corrosion protection provided by the oxide layer on Al-Si alloys is significantly affected by the presence of Si particles. Si particles make the oxide layer locally thinner and more defective in the eutectic region, thereby increasing the ease of substrate corrosion attack. However, the addition of Sr can improve the corrosion protection of anodized Al-Si alloys significantly. Furthermore, it was proved that higher Si level influences negatively the anodized oxide corrosion protection due to the higher amount of cracks and defects, but Sr modification is efficient in preventing this negative effect.

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