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  • 1. Butchosa, N.
    et al.
    Brown, C.
    Larsson, P.T.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Berglund, L.A.
    Bulone, V.
    Zhou, Q.
    Nanocomposites of bacterial cellulose nanofibers and chitin nanocrystals: Fabrication, characterization and bacterial activity2013In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, no 12, p. 3404-3413Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Gao, Yu
    et al.
    Washington University, USA.
    Walker, Michael J
    Washington University, USA.
    Barrett, Jacob A
    University of California, USA.
    Hosseinaei, Omid
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Harper, David P
    University of Tennessee, USA.
    Ford, Peter C
    University of California, USA.
    Williams, Brent J
    Washington University, USA.
    Foston, Marcus B
    Washington University, USA.
    Analysis of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry data for catalytic lignin depolymerization using positive matrix factorization2018In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 20, no 18, p. 4366-4377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various catalytic technologies are being developed to efficiently convert lignin into renewable chemicals. However, due to its complexity, catalytic lignin depolymerization often generates a wide and complex distribution of product compounds. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a common analytical technique to profile the compounds that comprise lignin depolymerization products. GC-MS is applied not only to determine the product composition, but also to develop an understanding of the catalytic reaction pathways and of the relationships among catalyst structure, reaction conditions, and the resulting compounds generated. Although a very useful tool, the analysis of lignin depolymerization products with GC-MS is limited by the quality and scope of the available mass spectral libraries and the ability to correlate changes in GC-MS chromatograms to changes in lignin structure, catalyst structure, and other reaction conditions. In this study, the GC-MS data of the depolymerization products generated from organosolv hybrid poplar lignin using a copper-doped porous metal oxide catalyst and a methanol/dimethyl carbonate co-solvent was analyzed by applying a factor analysis technique, positive matrix factorization (PMF). Several different solutions for the PMF model were explored. A 13-factor solution sufficiently explains the chemical changes occurring to lignin depolymerization products as a function of lignin, reaction time, catalyst, and solvent. Overall, seven factors were found to represent aromatic compounds, while one factor was defined by aliphatic compounds.

  • 3.
    Gellerstedt, G.
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Tomani, P.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Axegård, P.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Backlund, B.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lignin recovery and lignin-based products2013In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, p. 180-210Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Gunnarsson, Maria
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Bernin, Diana
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden ; Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Östlund, Åsa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Hasani, Merima
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    The CO2 capturing ability of cellulose dissolved in NaOH(aq) at low temperature2018In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 20, no 14, p. 3279-3286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, we explore the intrinsic ability of cellulose dissolved in NaOH(aq) to reversibly capture CO2. The stability of cellulose solutions differed significantly when adding CO2 prior to or after the dissolution of cellulose. ATR-IR spectroscopy on cellulose regenerated from the solutions, using ethanol, revealed the formation of a new carbonate species likely to be cellulose carbonate. To elucidate the interaction of cellulose with CO2 at the molecular level, a 13C NMR spectrum was recorded on methyl α-d-glucopyranoside (MeO-Glcp), a model compound, dissolved in NaOH(aq), which showed a difference in chemical shift when CO2 was added prior to or after the dissolution of MeO-Glcp, without a change in pH. The uptake of CO2 was found to be more than twice as high when CO2 was added to a solution after the dissolution of MeO-Glcp. Altogether, a mechanism for the observed CO2 capture is proposed, involving the formation of an intermediate cellulose carbonate upon the reaction of a cellulose alkoxide with CO2. The intermediate was observed as a captured carbonate structure only in regenerated samples, while its corresponding NMR peak in solution was absent. The reason for this is plausibly a rather fast hydrolysis of the carbonate intermediate by water, leading to the formation of CO3 2-, and thus increased capture of CO2. The potential of using carbohydrates as CO2 capturing agents in NaOH(aq) is shown to be simple and resource-effective in terms of the capture and regeneration of CO2.

  • 5.
    Hillerström, A
    et al.
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    van Stam, J
    Andersson, M
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Ibuprofen loading into mesostructured silica using liquid carbon dioxide as a solvent2009In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 662-667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been demonstrated that the pharmaceutical molecule, Ibuprofen, can be loaded into mesoporous silica using liquid (near-critical) carbon dioxide as the solvent, and that the resulting material had a high Ibuprofen content (300 mg Ibuprofen/g SiO2). A high enrichment (300 times) of Ibuprofen in the pores was observed in comparison to the Ibuprofen concentration in the solution. When similar experiments were performed in CO2 (l) mixed with minor amounts (5 mol-%) of other organic cosolvents (cyclohexane, acetone or methanol), a significantly lower loading capacity of Ibuprofen into the mesoporous material was achieved. The drug-loaded mesoporous silica material was analyzed with Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), confocal Raman microscopy, X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). It was found that the Ibuprofen loaded into the mesoporous silica host was amorphous and that Ibuprofen was present both at the surface and in the centre of the mesoporous silica particles. Furthermore, the SEM images did not reveal any large flakes of Ibuprofen molecules outside the mesoporous silica particles.

  • 6.
    Rasheed, Faiza
    et al.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Kuktaite, Ramune
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Gällstedt, Mikael
    RISE, Innventia.
    Plivelic, Tomás S.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Eva
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; CSIRO Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia.
    The use of plants as a "green factory" to produce high strength gluten-based materials2016In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 2782-2792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to develop an understanding of how wheat plants can be used as a "green factory" by the modulation of genotype (G) and environmental (E) interactions to fine-tune the structure and increase the strength of gluten based materials. Two wheat genotypes (5 + 10 and 2 + 12) were grown under four nitrogen and two temperature regimes to obtain gluten of various characteristics. Protein microstructure morphology revealed by confocal laser scanning microscopy suggested a higher polymerisation of proteins in glycerol plasticized films from the 5 + 10 compared to the 2 + 12 genotype. Also, films with the highest Young’s modulus and maximum stress were obtained from the 5 + 10 genotype, which might be explained by the higher number of cysteine residues and consequently more disulphide crosslinks in this genotype compared to the 2 + 12 one. The presence of two nano-scaled morphologies, hexagonal and lamellar structures and their internal relations were found to be of relevance for formation of β-sheets and also to be related to performance (strength) of the material. Thus, plants could be used as a "green factory", avoiding the use of chemicals, to tune the tensile properties of the materials. Structural properties such as relatively low protein aggregation, high β-sheet content and a high hexagonal to lamellar structural ratio at the nano-scale were found to yield films with high stiffness and strength.

  • 7.
    Toth, Pal
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center. University of Miskolc, Hungary.
    Vikström, Therese
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Molinder, Roger
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Structure of carbon black continuously produced from biomass pyrolysis oil2018In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 20, no 17, p. 3981-3992Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Renewable-based carbon black was produced using pyrolysis oil derived from pine and spruce stem wood as feedstock in a continuous, high-temperature spray process. The particle size, micro- and nanostructure of the carbon black particles were investigated using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. The effect of process parameters on the structural properties of the product was studied. Conditions that yielded products structurally similar to commercial carbon black were identified. The results indicate that biomass pyrolysis oil can be used as a feedstock to produce renewable-based carbon black in a continuous process that is flexible and scalable. The structural properties of the products depended on process temperature and were consistent with those of commercial carbon black.

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