Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Ikkala, O.
    et al.
    Ras, R. H. A.
    Houbenov, N.
    Ruokolainen, J.
    Pääkkö, M.
    Laine, J.
    Leskelä, M.
    Berglund, L. A.
    Lindström, Tom
    RISE, Innventia.
    Ten Brinke, G.
    Iatrou, H.
    Hadjichristidis, N.
    Faul, C. F. J.
    Solid state nanofibers based on self-assemblies: From cleaving from self-assemblies to multilevel hierarchical constructs2009In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 143, p. 95-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-assemblies and their hierarchies are useful to construct soft materials with structures at different length scales and to tune the materials properties for various functions. Here we address routes for solid nanofibers based on different forms of self-assemblies. On the other hand, we discuss rational "bottom-up" routes for multi-level hierarchical self-assembled constructs, with the aim of learning more about design principles for competing interactions and packing frustrations. Here we use the triblock copolypeptide poly(l-lysine)-b-poly(γ-benzyl-l-glutamate)-b-poly(l-lysine) complexed with 2′-deoxyguanosine 5′-monophosphate. Supramolecular disks (G-quartets) stabilized by metal cations are formed and their columnar assembly leads to a packing frustration with the cylindrical packing of helical poly(γ-benzyl-l-glutamate), which we suggest is important in controlling the lateral dimensions of the nanofibers. We foresee routes for functionalities by selecting different metal cations within the G-quartets. On the other hand, we discuss nanofibers that are cleaved from bulk self-assemblies in a "top-down" manner. After a short introduction based on cleaving nanofibers from diblock copolymeric self-assemblies, we focus on native cellulose nanofibers, as cleaved from plant cell wall fibers, which are expected to have feasible mechanical properties and to be templates for functional nanomaterials. Long nanofibers with 5-20 nm lateral dimensions can be cleaved within an aqueous medium to allow hydrogels and water can be removed to allow highly porous, lightweight, and flexible aerogels. We further describe inorganic/organic hybrids as prepared by chemical vapour deposition and atomic layer deposition of the different nanofibers. We foresee functional materials by selecting inorganic coatings. Finally we briefly discuss how the organic template can be removed e.g., by thermal treatments to allow completely inorganic hollow nanofibrillar structures.

  • 2.
    Li, Hua
    et al.
    The University of Newcastle, Australia.
    Rutland, Mark W.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Watanabe, Masayoshi
    Yokohama National University, Japan.
    Atkin, Rob
    The University of Newcastle, Australia.
    Boundary layer friction of solvate ionic liquids as a function of potential2017In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 199, p. 311-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to investigate the potential dependent boundary layer friction at solvate ionic liquid (SIL)-highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and SIL-Au(111) interfaces. Friction trace and retrace loops of lithium tetraglyme bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (Li(G4) TFSI) at HOPG present clearer stick-slip events at negative potentials than at positive potentials, indicating that a Li+ cation layer adsorbed to the HOPG lattice at negative potentials which enhances stick-slip events. The boundary layer friction data for Li(G4) TFSI shows that at HOPG, friction forces at all potentials are low. The TFSI- anion rich boundary layer at positive potentials is more lubricating than the Li+ cation rich boundary layer at negative potentials. These results suggest that boundary layers at all potentials are smooth and energy is predominantly dissipated via stick-slip events. In contrast, friction at Au(111) for Li(G4) TFSI is significantly higher at positive potentials than at negative potentials, which is comparable to that at HOPG at the same potential. The similarity of boundary layer friction at negatively charged HOPG and Au(111) surfaces indicates that the boundary layer compositions are similar and rich in Li+ cations for both surfaces at negative potentials. However, at Au(111), the TFSI- rich boundary layer is less lubricating than the Li+ rich boundary layer, which implies that anion reorientations rather than stick-slip events are the predominant energy dissipation pathways. This is confirmed by the boundary friction of Li(G4) NO3 at Au(111), which shows similar friction to Li(G4) TFSI at negative potentials due to the same cation rich boundary layer composition, but even higher friction at positive potentials, due to higher energy dissipation in the NO3 - rich boundary layer. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  • 3.
    Rutland, Mark W.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Chemical physics of electroactive materials: Concluding remarks2017In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 199, p. 615-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is an honour to be charged with providing the concluding remarks for a Faraday Discussion. As many have remarked before, it is nonetheless a prodigious task, and what follows is necessarily a personal, and probably perverse, view of a watershed event in the Chemical Physics of Electroactive materials. The spirit of the conference was captured in a single sentence during the meeting itself. "It is the nexus between rheology, electrochemistry, colloid science and energy storage". The current scientific climate is increasingly dominated by a limited number of global challenges, and there is thus a tendency for research to resemble a football match played by 6 year olds, where everyone on the field chases the (funding) ball instead of playing to their "discipline". It is thus reassuring to see how the application of rigorous chemical physics is leading to ingenious new solutions for both energy storage and harvesting, via, for example, nanoactuation, electrowetting, ionic materials and nanoplasmonics. In fact, the same language of chemical physics allows seamless transition between applications as diverse as mechano-electric energy generation, active moisture transport and plasmonic shutters-even the origins of life were addressed in the context of electro-autocatalysis!.

  • 4.
    Sullivan, James
    et al.
    Swansea University, UK.
    Cooze, Nathan
    Swansea University, UK.
    Gallagher, Callum
    Swansea University, UK.
    Lewis, Tom
    Swansea University, UK.
    Prosek, Tomas
    RISE, Swerea, KIMAB.
    Thierry, Dominique
    RISE, Swerea, KIMAB.
    In situ monitoring of corrosion mechanisms and phosphate inhibitor surface deposition during corrosion of zinc-magnesium-aluminium (ZMA) alloys using novel time-lapse microscopy2015In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 180, p. 361-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In situ time-lapse optical microscopy was used to examine the microstructural corrosion mechanisms in three zinc-magnesium-aluminium (ZMA) alloy coated steels immersed in 1% NaCl pH 7. Preferential corrosion of MgZn<inf>2</inf> lamellae within the eutectic phases was observed in all the ZMA alloys followed by subsequent dissolution of Zn rich phases. The total extent and rate of corrosion, measured using time-lapse image analysis and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) estimated mass loss, decreased as Mg and Al alloying additions were increased up to a level of 3 wt% Mg and 3.7 wt% Al. This was probably due to the increased presence of MgO and Al<inf>2</inf>O<inf>3</inf> at the alloy surface retarding the kinetics of cathodic oxygen reduction. The addition of 1 × 10-2 mol dm-3 Na<inf>3</inf>PO<inf>4</inf> to 1% NaCl pH 7 had a dramatic influence on the corrosion mechanism for a ZMA with passivation of anodic sites through phosphate precipitation observed using time-lapse image analysis. Intriguing rapid precipitation of filamentous phosphate was also observed and it is postulated that these filaments nucleate and grow due to super saturation effects. Polarisation experiments showed that the addition of 1 × 10-2 mol dm-3 Na<inf>3</inf>PO<inf>4</inf> to the 1% NaCl electrolyte promoted an anodic shift of 50 mV in open circuit potential for the ZMA alloy with a reduction in anodic current of 2.5 orders of magnitude suggesting that it was acting primarily as an anodic inhibitor supporting the inferences from the time-lapse investigations. These phosphate additions resulted in a 98% reduction in estimated mass loss as measured by SVET demonstrating the effectiveness of phosphate inhibitors for this alloy system.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.10