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  • 1.
    Bergenståhl, BA
    et al.
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Alander, J
    Lipids and colloidal stability1997In: Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science, ISSN 1359-0294, E-ISSN 1879-0399, Vol. 2, p. 590-595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polar lipids have an important role as emulsifiers and stability controlling agents in the food industry. The principal effects of the emulsifiers have been found to depend on the situation in which they are applied. They may act as stabilising additives, creating repulsive interactions between droplets. They may act as emulsifying agents, or they may destabilise emulsions by reducing protein adsorption at the oil/water interface. They may also destabilise emulsions by increasing wettability of fat crystals. Furthermore, they may form micellar or liposomal aggregates in the dispersion, influencing interactions and aggregation.

  • 2.
    Corkery, RW
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Metal organic framework (MOF) liquid crystals. 1D, 2D and 3D ionic coordination polymer structures in the thermotropic mesophases of metal soaps, including alkaline earth, transition metal and lanthanide soaps2008In: Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science, ISSN 1359-0294, E-ISSN 1879-0399, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 288-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taken together, the body of existing literature on metal soap crystal structures and mesophases supports the view that much is to be gained by treating the soaps as metal organic frameworks (MOF's) when relating their structure and liquid crystallinity. We argue that metal soaps mesophases often consist of disordered metal organic (carboxylate) frameworks (MOF's). Metal atoms are linked by bridging carboxylates, and the metal–oxygen networks form semi-flexible rods, chains and sheets of M–O polyhedra within their co-bonded, mesotructured, self-assemblies of lipidic chains. The packing of the molten hydrocarbon chains allows otherwise unconnected MOF networks to coexist as spatially isolated units in the same unit cell. For instance the lamellar phases are true 2D MOF's or layers of 1-D MOF's. The phase transitions can then be regarded as coupled disordering/re-ordering transitions involving rotational and conformational disordering of the hydrocarbon chains balanced with disordering of MOF symmetries, MOF topological transformations, depolymerizations and dimensionality reductions ultimately leading to anisotropic melts. By way of demonstration, thermotropic phase transitions of homologous series of lanthanide soaps are systematically studied using a variety of experimental methods, and the data are used in a topological model for testing the consistency with the MOF concept of metal soap crystal structures and thermotropic mesophases. Finally, an interpenetrating bicontinuous MOF comprised of SrO6 polyhedral rods is presented as an atomically resolved model for the network topology of the cubic mesophase of strontium soaps. Metal soaps are therefore shown to afford a bridge between liquid crystals and metal organic framework (MOF) materials.

  • 3.
    Holmberg, K
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Surfactants with controlled half-lives1996In: Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science, ISSN 1359-0294, E-ISSN 1879-0399, Vol. 1, p. 572-579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surfactants with controlled half-lives normally contain a bond susceptible to either acid or alkaline hydrolysis. In recent years particular attention has been directed towards ester-containing quaternary ammonium surfactants, "ester quats", which readily break down under alkaline conditions. Surfactants containing acetal and ketal groups have been widely studied as acid-labile compounds.

  • 4.
    Holmberg, K
    et al.
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Laughlin, RG
    Surfactant science : Surfactant science is growing1997In: Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science, ISSN 1359-0294, E-ISSN 1879-0399, Vol. 2, p. 453-455Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Holmberg, K
    et al.
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Laughlin, RG
    Surfactant science : Trends in surfactants1996In: Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science, ISSN 1359-0294, E-ISSN 1879-0399, Vol. 1, p. 563-565Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Kronberg, B
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Surfactant mixtures1997In: Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science, ISSN 1359-0294, E-ISSN 1879-0399, Vol. 2, p. 456-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interest in mixed surfactant systems is continuously increasing. The development during the last years has mainly been focused on (i) the theoretical description of mixed micelles, (ii) the coexistence of two types of micelles, one rich in one of the surfactants and the other rich in the other surfactant, and (iii) mixtures of cationic and anionic (catanionics) surfactants forming systems in which vesicles and other intricate structures appear. This review also touches on surfactant mixtures at surfaces as well as on some examples of technical applications.

  • 7.
    Kronberg, Bengt
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Life Science.
    The hydrophobic effect2016In: Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science, ISSN 1359-0294, E-ISSN 1879-0399, Vol. 22, p. 14-22Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract This review is a brief discussion on the development of the understanding of hydrophobicity, or the hydrophobic effect. The hydrophobic effect is primarily discussed in terms of partitioning of hydrocarbons between a hydrophobic environment and water as well as solubility of hydrocarbons in water. Micellization of surfactants is only briefly reviewed. It is emphasized that (i) the cause of the hydrophobic effect, e.g. the low solubility of a hydrocarbon in water, is to be found in the high internal energy of water resulting in a high energy to create a cavity in order to accommodate the hydrophobe, (ii) the “structuring” of water molecules around a hydrophobic compound increases the solubility of the hydrophobe. The “structuring” of water molecules around hydrophobic compounds is discussed in terms of recent spectroscopic findings. It is also emphasized that (iii) the lowering of entropy due to a structuring process must be accompanied by an enthalpy that is of the same order of magnitude as the TΔS for the process. Hence, there is an entropy–enthalpy compensation leading to a low free energy change for the structuring process. The assumption of a rapid decay of the entropy with temperature provides an explanation of the enthalpy–entropy compensation so often found in aqueous systems. It is also emphasized (iv) that the free energy obtained from partitioning, or solubility limits, needs to be corrected for molecular size differences between the solute and the solvent. The Flory–Huggins expression is a good first approximation for obtaining this correction. If the effect of different molecular sizes is not corrected for, this leads to erroneous conclusions regarding the thermodynamics of the hydrophobic effect. Finally, (v) micellization and adsorption of surfactants, as well as protein unfolding, are briefly discussed in terms of the hydrophobic effect.

  • 8.
    Lindström, Tom
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy. RISE, Innventia.
    Aspects on nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) processing, rheology and NFC-film properties2017In: Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science, ISSN 1359-0294, E-ISSN 1879-0399, Vol. 29, p. 68-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This communication summarizes the salient features and mechanisms in high-pressure homogenization of wood fibres in order to make nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC). The energy-efficiency of delamination of fibres and the clogging tendency of fibres in high-pressure homogenizers/microfluidizers during delamination are critical and ways to alleviate these problems are reviewed. It is shown that the mechanical properties of NFC-films can be estimated from the Page equation. Usually, the evolution of the tensile strength properties of NFC-films increases with the extent of film delamination to reach a saturation value, which can be deduced from first principles using the Page equation. Finally, the evolution of the rheological features of NFC-gels and the barrier properties are reviewed and the estimation the nanofraction content in NFC-gels is being discussed.

  • 9.
    Tiberg, F
    et al.
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Brinck, J
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Grant, L
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Adsorption and surface-induced self-assembly of surfactants at the solid-aqueous interface1999In: Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science, ISSN 1359-0294, E-ISSN 1879-0399, Vol. 4, p. 411-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing insight into the interfacial behaviour of surfactants has emerged during the past few years. Important advances in this area are largely due to the use of surface-specific techniques like ellipsometry, neutron reflectivity, fluorescence spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) for in situ studies of surfactant layer properties. This review covers recent developments in the area which have contributed to the current understanding of adsorption mechanisms and interfacial structures.

  • 10.
    Walkenström, Pernilla
    et al.
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Hermansson, Ann-Marie
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Microstructure in relation to flow processing2002In: Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science, ISSN 1359-0294, E-ISSN 1879-0399, Vol. 7, no 42130, p. 413-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The art of structure formation by process flow control is a growing field of research. The central issue is the understanding that the rheological properties of a food substance are intimately linked to its microstructure. By carefully controlling the flow process environment, the microstructure, and thus the rheological properties, can be crafted to produce new products desired by the consumer market. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

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