Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Lin, Yi
    et al.
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    Mouratidou, Theodora
    University of Zaragoza, Spain.
    Vereecken, Carine
    Ghent University, Belgium; FWO Research Foundation – Flanders, Belgium.
    Kersting, Mathilde
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Bolca, Selin
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    de Moraes, Augusto César F.
    University of Zaragoza, Spain; University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Cuenca-García, Magdalena
    Granada University, Spain.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    University of Zaragoza, Spain; University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    González-Gross, Marcela
    Technical University of Madrid, Spain.
    Valtueña, Jara
    Technical University of Madrid, Spain.
    Labayen, Idoia
    University of the Basque Country, Spain.
    Grammatikaki, Evangelia
    Ghent University, Belgium; Harokopio University, Greece.
    Hallström, Lena
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Leclercq, Catherine
    Agricultural Research Council, Italy.
    Ferrari, Marika
    Agricultural Research Council, Italy.
    Gottrand, Frederic
    University of Lille, France; Centre d’Investigation Clinique, France.
    Beghin, Laurent
    University of Lille, France; Centre d’Investigation Clinique, France.
    Manios, Yannis
    Harokopio University, Greece.
    Ottevaere, Charlene
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    Van Oyen, Herman
    Scientific Institute of Public Health, Belgium.
    Molnar, Denes
    University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Kafatos, Anthony
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Widhalm, Kurt
    Private Medical University, Austria.
    Gómez-Martinez, Sonia
    CSIC Spanish National Research Council, Spain.
    Díaz Prieto, Ligia Esperanza
    CSIC Spanish National Research Council, Spain.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Ghent University, Belgium; University College Ghent, Belgium.
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Ghent University, Belgium; International Agency for Research on Cancer, France.
    Hall, Gunnar
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Flavour.
    Åström, Annika
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Flavour.
    Broberg, Agneta
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Flavour.
    Dietary animal and plant protein intakes and their associations with obesity and cardio-metabolic indicators in European adolescents: The HELENA cross-sectional study2015In: Nutrition Journal, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 14, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies suggest that dietary protein might play a beneficial role in combating obesity and its related chronic diseases. Total, animal and plant protein intakes and their associations with anthropometry and serum biomarkers in European adolescents using one standardised methodology across European countries are not well documented. Objectives: To evaluate total, animal and plant protein intakes in European adolescents stratified by gender and age, and to investigate their associations with cardio-metabolic indicators (anthropometry and biomarkers). Methods: The current analysis included 1804 randomly selected adolescents participating in the HELENA study (conducted in 2006-2007) aged 12.5-17.5 y (47% males) who completed two non-consecutive computerised 24-h dietary recalls. Associations between animal and plant protein intakes, and anthropometry and serum biomarkers were examined with General linear Model multivariate analysis. Results: Average total protein intake exceeded the recommendations of World Health Organization and European Food Safety Authority. Mean total protein intake was 96 g/d (59% derived from animal protein). Total, animal and plant protein intakes (g/d) were significantly lower in females than in males and total and plant protein intakes were lower in younger participants (12.5-14.9 y). Protein intake was significantly lower in underweight subjects and higher in obese ones; the direction of the relationship was reversed after adjustments for body weight (g/(kg.d)). The inverse association of plant protein intakes was stronger with BMI z-score and body fat percentage (BF%) compared to animal protein intakes. Additionally, BMI and BF% were positively associated with energy percentage of animal protein. Conclusions: This sample of European adolescents appeared to have adequate total protein intake. Our findings suggest that plant protein intakes may play a role in preventing obesity among European adolescents. Further longitudinal studies are needed to investigate the potential beneficial effects observed in this study in the prevention of obesity and related chronic diseases.

  • 2.
    Maringer, Marcus
    et al.
    Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands.
    Van'T Veer, Pieter
    Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands.
    Klepacz, Naomi
    University of Surrey, UK.
    Verain, Muriel C. D.
    Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands.
    Normann, Anne
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Ekman, Susanne
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Timotijevic, Lada
    University of Surrey, UK.
    Raats, Monique M.
    University of Surrey, UK.
    Geelen, Anouk
    Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands.
    User-documented food consumption data from publicly available apps: An analysis of opportunities and challenges for nutrition research2018In: Nutrition Journal, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The need for a better understanding of food consumption behaviour within its behavioural context has sparked the interest of nutrition researchers for user-documented food consumption data collected outside the research context using publicly available nutrition apps. The study aims to characterize the scientific, technical, legal and ethical features of this data in order to identify the opportunities and challenges associated with using this data for nutrition research. Method: A search for apps collecting food consumption data was conducted in October 2016 against UK Google Play and iTunes storefronts. 176 apps were selected based on user ratings and English language support. Publicly available information from the app stores and app-related websites was investigated and relevant data extracted and summarized. Our focus was on characteristics related to scientific relevance, data management and legal and ethical governance of user-documented food consumption data. Results: Food diaries are the most common form of data collection, allowing for multiple inputs including generic food items, packaged products, or images. Standards and procedures for compiling food databases used for estimating energy and nutrient intakes remain largely undisclosed. Food consumption data is interlinked with various types of contextual data related to behavioural motivation, physical activity, health, and fitness. While exchange of data between apps is common practise, the majority of apps lack technical documentation regarding data export. There is a similar lack of documentation regarding the implemented terms of use and privacy policies. While users are usually the owners of their data, vendors are granted irrevocable and royalty free licenses to commercially exploit the data. Conclusion: Due to its magnitude, diversity, and interconnectedness, user-documented food consumption data offers promising opportunities for a better understanding of habitual food consumption behaviour and its determinants. Non-standardized or non-documented food data compilation procedures, data exchange protocols and formats, terms of use and privacy statements, however, limit possibilities to integrate, process and share user-documented food consumption data. An ongoing research effort is required, to keep pace with the technical advancements of food consumption apps, their evolving data networks and the legal and ethical regulations related to protecting app users and their personal data.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf