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  • 1.
    Bergquist, Magnus
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Ljungberg, Jan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    The power of gifts: Organizing social relationships in open source communities2001In: Information Systems Journal, ISSN 1350-1917, E-ISSN 1365-2575, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 305-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In writings on the open source software development model, it is often argued that it is successful as a result of the gift economy that embraces activities in online communities. However, the theoretical foundations for this argument are seldom discussed and empirically tested. Starting with the 'classic' theories of gift giving, we discuss how they need to be developed in order to explain giftgiving practices in digital domains. In this paper, we argue that the gift economy is important, not only because it creates openness, but also because it organizes relationships between people in a certain way. Open source software development relies on gift giving as a way of getting new ideas and prototypes out into circulation. This also implies that the giver gets power from giving away. This power is used as a way of guaranteeing the quality of the code. We relate this practice to how gifts, in the form of new scientific knowledge, are given to the research community, and how this is done through peer review processes.

  • 2. Henfridsson, Ola
    et al.
    Lindgren, R.
    User involvement in developing mobile and temporarily interconnected systems2010In: Information Systems Journal, ISSN 1350-1917, E-ISSN 1365-2575, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 119-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information systems (IS) research on user involvement has primarily theorized relationships between developers, managers and users in systems development. However, so far, marginal attention has been paid to differences in user involvement practices between information systems. This paper explores user involvement in developing mobile and temporarily interconnected systems (MTIS). We refer to MTIS as heterogeneous systems that rely on network technologies for increasing the ubiquity of information services for users on the move. Such systems are becoming increasingly important in leveraging, e.g. car infotainment, supply chain management and wireless e-commerce. With particular emphasis on the nature of MTIS and its implications for user involvement, the paper analyses the systems development process of an action research project. The findings suggest that user involvement practices need to be adapted to accommodate features of this class of systems. Being an early attempt to trace the implications of technology features such as use context switches and temporary system relationships, the paper contributes to the development of an updated theory of the user role in an era of increased system complexity and stakeholder ambiguity.

  • 3.
    Lindgren, Rikard
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Andersson, M.
    Henfridsson, Ola
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Multi-contextuality in boundary-spanning practices2008In: Information Systems Journal, ISSN 1350-1917, E-ISSN 1365-2575, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 641-661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The capability to establish boundary-spanning practices within and across organizations has for long been recognized as a key strategic resource. As organizations are becoming distributed and dynamic, they will be increasingly populated by multiple functional, geographical, hierarchical and professional boundaries. The inherent complexity of such settings makes it difficult for organizations to leverage their boundary-spanning practices. Information technology (IT) systems have been hailed as a critical enabler of boundary spanning. However, there is little knowledge on how organizations are affected by the introduction of different types of IT systems. Building on an interpretive case study of Swedish transport organizations, this paper explores consequences of sensor technology for boundary spanning. The paper contributes with an understanding of what coexisting use contexts mean for boundary-spanning practices. A theoretical implication is that such multi-contextuality requires an integrative view on boundary spanning that combines insights from the organizational innovation and work practice literatures. © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 4.
    Selander, Lisen
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Henfridsson, O.
    Cynicism as user resistance in IT implementation2012In: Information Systems Journal, ISSN 1350-1917, E-ISSN 1365-2575, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 289-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we examine the process by which user cynicism emerges and is constituted as part of resistance in information technology (IT) implementation. We ground our process perspective in the received user resistance literature by linking cynicism to users' projections of the system's future use. Rather than attributing cynicism to perceived threats, however, we see user cynicism as cognitively distanced resistance that manifests as a perception of seeing through the espoused goals of the implementers. Based on a process analysis of a customer relationship management implementation at a customer service centre, the paper extends the user resistance model proposed by Lapointe and Rivard by identifying three dimensions of user cynicism in IT implementation. It also shows how cynicism, as a form of passive resistance, easily escalates and feeds new forms of resistance. Lastly, we introduce the cynicism literature as a new reference theory for the Information Systems (IS) audience. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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