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  • 1. Holmqvist, Magnus
    et al.
    Pessi, K.
    Agility through scenario development and continuous implementation: A global aftermarket logistics case2006In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 146-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines a business and ISIT initiative at Volvo that involves managing the development and implementation of an agile aftermarket supply chain. The case is based on Volvo's global initiative to create a platform, Web services, and a Web portal for selling spare parts over the Internet. Creating and integrating a new platform is difficult, and establishing new relations in global aftermarket logistics is even more challenging. Agility relates to an organisation's ability to sense and respond rapidly to unpredictable events in order to satisfy changing customer demands. Volvo's effort illustrates agility as achieved by working continuously with scenario development and keeping implementation projects to a comprehendible size in order to nurture learning. The effort involved direct actions to manage both the technology and the relations among supply chain actors. As this case shows, continuous implementation projects can deliver innovation in new relations and through new channels - particularly if projects address agility from the start.

  • 2.
    Lindgren, Rikard
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Stenmark, Dick
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Ljungberg, Jan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Rethinking competence systems for knowledge-based organizations2003In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 18-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing competence systems are based on a rationalistic view of competence. While these competence systems might work in job-based organizations, we argue that in more dynamic settings, such as in knowledge-based organizations, the interest-informed actions that capture the emergent competencies of tomorrow require different types of information technology support. The main objective of this paper is to elaborate on the possibilities and implications of using interest-activated technology as a design rationale for competence systems. This paper is based on an action case study of an implemented interest-activated Intranet recommender system prototype at Volvo Information Technology AB in Gothenburg, Sweden. On the basis of how organizational members used this prototype to find information they were interested in, our research team was able to inquire into how personal interest, embodied in information-seeking activities, could be a means for identifying competence. Building on the relation between personal interest and competence, we discuss competence systems design and spell out explicit implications for managerial practice in knowledge-based organizations.

  • 3.
    Ljungberg, J.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Open source movements as a model for organising2000In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 208-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Open source software such as the operating system Linux has in a few years created much attention as an alternative way to develop and distribute software. Open source is to let anyone have access to the source code, so that they can modify it. Open source can be seen as a movement, where communities of highly skilled programmers collectively develop software, often of a quality that outperforms commercial proprietary software. These movements are based on virtual networking on the Internet and the web. They are loosely coupled communities kept together by strong common values related to hacker culture. Work seems to be totally distributed, delegated and loosely coupled. The highly skilled members contribute to the collective effort of free software development. In this paper the open source phenomenon is investigated from different perspectives. It is claimed that the open source movement is one key to the understanding of future forms of organizations, information work and business.

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