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  • 1.
    Ali, Muneeb
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Umar, Saif
    Dunkels, Adam
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Voigt, Thiemo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Römer, Kay
    Langendoen, Koen
    Polastre, Joseph
    Uzmi, Zartash Afzal
    Medium access control issues in sensor networks2006In: Computer communication review, ISSN 0146-4833, E-ISSN 1943-5819, Vol. 36, p. 33-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medium access control for wireless sensor networks has been a very active research area for the past couple of years. The sensor networks literature presents an alphabet soup of medium access control protocols with almost all of the works focusing only on energy efficiency. There is much more innovative work to be done at the MAC layer, but current efforts are not addressing the hard unsolved problems. Majority of the works appearing in the literature are "least publishable incremental improvements" over the popular S-MAC [1] protocol. In this paper we present research directions for future medium access research. We identify some open issues and discuss possible solutions.

  • 2.
    Lindgren, Anders
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Decisions, Networks and Analytics lab.
    Hui, Pan
    ExtremeCom: To Boldly Go Where No One Has Gone Before2011In: Computer communication review, ISSN 0146-4833, E-ISSN 1943-5819, Vol. 41, p. 54-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on networks for challenged environments has become a major research area recently. There is however a lack of true understanding among networking researchers about what such environments really are like. In this paper we give an introduction to the ExtremeCom series of workshops that were created to overcome this limitation. We will discuss the motivation behind why the workshop series was created, give some summaries of the two workshops that have been held, and discuss the lessons that we have learned from them.

  • 3.
    Lundén, Marcus
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS. Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Dunkels, Adam
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS. Computer Systems Laboratory.
    The Politecast Communication Primitive for Low-Power Wireless2011In: Computer communication review, ISSN 0146-4833, E-ISSN 1943-5819, Vol. 41, p. 32-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In low-power wireless networks, nodes need to duty cycle their radio transceivers to achieve a long system lifetime. Counter-intuitively, in such networks broadcast becomes expensive in terms of energy and bandwidth since all neighbors must be woken up to receive broadcast messages. We argue that there is a class of traffic for which broadcast is overkill: periodic redundant transmissions of semi-static information that is already known to all neighbors, such as neighbor and router advertisements. Our experiments show that such traffic can account for as much as 20% of the network power consumption. We argue that this calls for a new communication primitive and present politecast, a communication primitive that allows messages to be sent without explicitly waking neighbors up. We have built two systems based on politecast: a low-power wireless mobile toy and a full-scale low-power wireless network deployment in an art gallery and our experimental results show that politecast can provide up to a four-fold lifetime improvement over broadcast.

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