Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Bengtsson, A.
    et al.
    Quednau, M.
    Haska, G.
    Nilzen, P.
    Persson, A.
    Composting of oily sludges - degradation, stabilized residues, volatiles and microbial activity1998In: Waste Management & Research, ISSN 0734-242X, E-ISSN 1096-3669, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 273-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process residuals, sludge with high oil content, were treated by composting. In lab-scale (100 litre) trials initial oil concentrations (30 to 50 g kg-1 dry matter) were, depending on composting conditions, reduced 55 to 90% during a period of 60 to 120 days. Besides carbon dioxide, a significant amount of oil was converted to stabilized residuals. A minor volatile fraction (5%) evaporated. High numbers (approximately 1 x 108 per gram dry compost) of oil degrading bacteria were detected during the high rate phases. Genetic fingerprinting (randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) indicated groups of related and potentially interesting isolates from these periods. RAPD also indicated that successions of the microflora took place over time. Initial oil contents (40 to 80 g kg-1 dry compost) in outdoor pilot composts (15,000 to 20,000 kg), were reduced 86 to 94% in 10 months. Prolonged treatment (5 months) resulted in further decreases, in total a 95 to 97% reduction. In spite of increased biological activity, neither the addition of organic (manure) nor inorganic (nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium) nutrients increased the speed or amount of oil degraded during the prolonged treatment. Among potentially hazardous organics, elevated levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons were found in the original oily sludge. Composting with adequate substrate reduced most of them. With proper considerations, composting is suggested as a cost and treatment-effective way of handling these sludges.

  • 2.
    Jones, Frida
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energi och Bioekonomi, Förbrännings- och aerosolteknik. Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Blomqvist, Evalena
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energi och Bioekonomi, Förbrännings- och aerosolteknik.
    Bisaillon, Mattias
    Profu AB, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Daniel K.
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Hupa, Mikko
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Determination of fossil carbon content in Swedish waste fuel by four different methods2013In: Waste Management & Research, ISSN 0734-242X, E-ISSN 1096-3669, Vol. 31, no 10, p. 1052-1061Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to determine the content of fossil carbon in waste combusted in Sweden by using four different methods at seven geographically spread combustion plants. In total, the measurement campaign included 42 solid samples, 21 flue gas samples, 3 sorting analyses and 2 investigations using the balance method. The fossil carbon content in the solid samples and in the flue gas samples was determined using 14C-analysis. From the analyses it was concluded that about a third of the carbon in mixed Swedish waste (municipal solid waste and industrial waste collected at Swedish industry sites) is fossil. The two other methods (the balance method and calculations from sorting analyses), based on assumptions and calculations, gave similar results in the plants in which they were used. Furthermore, the results indicate that the difference between samples containing as much as 80% industrial waste and samples consisting of solely municipal solid waste was not as large as expected. Besides investigating the fossil content of the waste, the project was also established to investigate the usability of various methods. However, it is difficult to directly compare the different methods used in this project because besides the estimation of emitted fossil carbon the methods provide other information, which is valuable to the plant owner. Therefore, the choice of method can also be controlled by factors other than direct determination of the fossil fuel emissions when considering implementation in the combustion plants.

  • 3.
    Mousavi, Marjan
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment. University of Nantes, France.
    Ventura, Anne
    University of Nantes, France; University Gustave Eiffel, France; Ecole Centrale de Nantes, France.
    Nicolas, Antheaume
    University of Nantes, France; Ecole Centrale de Nantes, France.
    Decision-based territorial Life Cycle Assessment for the Management of Cement Concrete Demolition Waste2020In: Waste Management & Research, ISSN 0734-242X, E-ISSN 1096-3669, Vol. 38, no 12Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing territorial life cycle assessments (LCAs) consider all activities in a given geographical area, defined as the foreground system, but cannot lead to operational decisions. In product scale LCA, the foreground system is defined as the part of the system directly controlled by an actor and is thus more adapted to compare possible scenarios within a decision perimeter. The present paper uses that concept applied to a geographical area. The developed method consists of five steps: (a) definition of the foreground material flow analysis (MFA) or LCA system corresponding to the decision perimeter; (b) territorial MFA; (c) geo-location of activities and downscaling of territorial flows to individual activities; (d) calculation of local transport distances; and (e) calculation of LCA impact indicators. The case study concerns the management of primary and secondary resources of basic quality aggregates (BQAs) in the Loire-Atlantique department (France) in 2012. Our results show that the amount of recycled cement concrete is only 7% of total consumed BQAs, although 90% of cement concrete demolition waste (CCDW) is recycled. The environmental impacts are importantly related to off-site activities. Local impacts are mainly driven by the transport of aggregates. For land planning, a concentration of fewer recycling facilities with high authorised production capacities in main cities, close to where CCDW is mainly produced, would divide transport needs in half and thus considerably reduce environmental impacts.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Mousavi et al.
  • 4.
    Sonesson, Ulf
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Modelling of waste collection - A general approach to calculate fuel consumption and time2000In: Waste Management & Research, ISSN 0734-242X, E-ISSN 1096-3669, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 115-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A model for calculating time and energy consumption during the collection of waste with compacting trucks is presented. The model uses common statistics from a number of households in three different categories of residential area: the average distance from the residential area to treatment facility/transfer station, fuel consumption per km for the truck and average load and speed. This common and easily accessible information is completed with figures for time and energy consumption related to the extra work that is performed on account of stopping and emptying bins. Default values for those parameters are presented in this paper, estimated using data from a Swedish municipality. Data from four areas in Sweden were used for verification. The model predicts the real outcome relatively well: between 5 and 14% deviation for energy consumption and between 10 and 24% deviation for time consumption.A model for calculating time and energy consumption during the collection of waste with compacting trucks is presented. The model uses common statistics from a number of households in three different categories of residential area: the average distance from the residential area to treatment facility/transfer station, fuel consumption per km for the truck and average load and speed. This common and easily accessible information is completed with figures for time and energy consumption related to the extra work that is performed on account of stopping and emptying bins. Default values for those parameters are presented in this paper, estimated using data from a Swedish municipality. Data from four areas in Sweden were used for verification. The model predicts the real outcome relatively well: between 5 and 14% deviation for energy consumption and between 10 and 24% deviation for time consumption.The consumption of time and energy in a waste collection cycle using compacting trucks is expressed in a model. The model is based on residential data in three areas: the average distance from the neighborhood to the treatment or transfer facility, truck fuel consumption, and average load and speed. Additional calculations are made for time and energy consumption relative to the work required for stopping and emptying the waste bins. Defaults are calculated from a study on waste collection in a Swedish municipality, and verified with data from four other municipalities. The model predictions were relatively accurate, at 5-15% deviation for energy consumption, and 10-24% deviation for time consumption.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf