Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Lescano, M R
    et al.
    INTEC Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnológico para la Industria Química, Argentina.
    Pizzul, Letizia
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Castillo, Maria del Pilar
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Zalazar, C S
    INTEC Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnológico para la Industria Química, Argentina ; Ciudad Universitaria, Argentina .
    Glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid degradation in biomixtures based on alfalfa straw, wheat stubble and river waste.2018In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 228, p. 451-457, article id S0301-4797(18)31000-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the work was to evaluate novel biomixtures for their use on biopurification systems (BPS) in Argentina also called biobeds. Glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) degradation was evaluated on biomixtures containing local materials: alfalfa straw (As), wheat stubble (Ws), river waste (Rw) and soil. Glyphosate, AMPA concentrations and biological activity were followed with time. Soil was used as control. Glyphosate initial concentration was 1000 mg kg-1. Glyphosate disappeared almost completely after 63 days in all tested biomixtures. For Ws, WsRw and AsRw glyphosate degradation was around 99% and for As 85%. The biomixture Ws showed the highest glyphosate degradation rate. In all cases AMPA was formed and degraded to concentrations between 60 and 100 mg kg-1. In the control with only soil, glyphosate was degraded 53% and AMPA concentration at the end of the test was 438 mg kg-1. We conclude that alfalfa straw, wheat stubble and river waste are local materials that can be used in the preparation of biomixtures since they showed higher glyphosate degradation capacity and less AMPA accumulation compared to the soil alone. Also, the presence of river waste did enhance the water retention capacity.

  • 2.
    Nagels, Maarten
    et al.
    KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Verhoeven, Brent
    KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Larché, Nicolas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Corrosion.
    Dewil, Raf
    KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Rossi, Barbara
    KU Leuven, Belgium; University of Oxford,UK.
    Comparative life cycle cost assessment of (lean) duplex stainless steel in wastewater treatment environments2022In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 306, article id 114375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some unit operations in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), such as settling tanks and pipes for aeration or sludge transfer, are composed of austenitic stainless steel (EN 1.4307 or EN 1.4404) instead of galvanised or painted carbon steel to reduce the maintenance costs. The sensitivity to pitting and crevice corrosion of austenitic grades in certain WWTP environments has also led to the use of duplex grades. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the maintenance of piping systems (WWTPs) and its effect on their life cycle environmental impacts and costs (LCC) for both austenitic and duplex stainless steel grades. The final objective is to aid grade selection for piping in a WWTP environment. The considered functional unit (FU) is a complete piping system. Conventional austenitic stainless steel grades (e.g., EN 1.4404) are studied alongside duplex ones (e.g., EN 1.4362 and EN 1.4462). The calculated environmental impacts are the Global Warming Potential (GWP) and Primary Energy Demand (PED). The production, manufacturing, transport, use including maintenance activities, and end-of-life (burdens and credits) phases are included in the life cycle assessment (LCA). The maintenance activities consist of the required replacements of stainless steel piping during the lifespan of the WWTP. Thus, the service lives of the pipes included in the considered WWTP environment are determined based on long-term corrosion prediction models (power law), which predict the evolution of pit or crevice depth as a function of time. The model parameters are estimated based on own experimental results, supplemented by the existing literature. The corrosion rates determine the number and frequency of replacements, i.e., define the different scenarios of maintenance. The LCA, LCC and corrosion prediction models are then combined into a user-friendly tool, which can be used in industry for an appropriate grade selection for pipes in a WWTP environment. The tool includes several degrees of freedom such as piping distribution, water pressure, chloride content, replacement criteria, etc. The results show that using duplex stainless steel grade EN 1.4462 leads to lower GWP and PED at the end of the WWTP's service life of 40 years. This is mainly due to multiple replacements of the system's parts in wastewater with high levels of chloride (>3000 ppm) if more conventional austenitic stainless steel alloys such as EN 1.4404 are used. Leaner duplex stainless steel grades were also included in this LCC assessment. The duplex grade EN 1.4062 showed the lowest total LCC, thanks to its leaner chemical composition (i.e., lower nickel content) combined with good localized corrosion resistance.

  • 3.
    Neth, Maria
    et al.
    Gryaab AB, Sweden; Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Ann
    Gryaab AB, Sweden; Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    I'Ons, David
    Gryaab AB, Sweden.
    Tumlin, Susanne
    Gryaab AB, Sweden; .
    Arnell, Magnus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Infrastructure and concrete technology. Lund University, Sweden.
    Blom, Lena
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; City of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wilén, Britt-Marie
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Modin, Oskar
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    A collaborative planning process to develop future scenarios for wastewater systems2022In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 316, article id 115202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wastewater infrastructure has a long lifetime and is subject to changing conditions and demands. When plans are made to upgrade or build new infrastructure, transdisciplinary planning processes and a robust analysis of future conditions are needed to make sustainable choices. Here, we provide a stepwise collaborative planning process in which future scenarios are developed together with local stakeholders and expert groups. The process was implemented at one of the largest wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Scandinavia. With a combination of workshops and the use of a web-based digital tool, future scenarios including flows, pollutant loads, and treatment requirements could be created. Furthermore, sustainability prioritizations affecting the WWTP, were identified. The future scenarios developed for the WWTP in the case study, predict stricter and new regulations, constant or lower future loads and ambiguous future flows. The highest ranked sustainability priority was low resource and energy consumption together with low CO2 footprint. The quantified future scenarios developed in the planning process were used as input to a process model to show the consequences they would have on the WWTP in the case study. Applying this collaborative process revealed future scenarios with many, sometimes conflicting, expectations on future WWTPs. It also highlighted needs for improvements of both the collection system and the WWTP. © 2022 The Authors

  • 4.
    Petersen, S. O.
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Ma, C.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Hilgert, J. E.
    Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Engineering and Bioeconomy, Germany.
    Mjöfors, Kristina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Sefeedpari, P.
    Wageningen University and Research, Netherlands.
    Amon, B.
    Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Engineering and Bioeconomy, Germany.
    Aarnink, A.
    Wageningen University and Research, Netherlands.
    Francó, B.
    BPC Instruments, Sweden.
    Dragoni, F.
    Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Engineering and Bioeconomy, Germany.
    Groenestein, K.
    Wageningen University and Research, Netherlands.
    Gyldenkærne, S.
    BPC Instruments, Sweden.
    Herrmann, C.
    Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Engineering and Bioeconomy, Germany.
    Hutchings, N. J.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Kristensen, I. S.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Liu, J.
    BPC Instruments, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Olesen, J. E.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Rodhe, Lena
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    In-vitro method and model to estimate methane emissions from liquid manure management on pig and dairy farms in four countries2024In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 353, article id 120233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methane (CH4) emissions from manure management on livestock farms are a key source of greenhouse gas emissions in some regions and for some production systems, and the opportunities for mitigation may be significant if emissions can be adequately documented. We investigated a method for estimating CH4 emissions from liquid manure (slurry) that is based on anaerobic incubation of slurry collected from commercial farms. Methane production rates were used to derive a parameter of the Arrhenius temperature response function, lnA', representing the CH4 production potential of the slurry at the time of sampling. Results were used for parameterization of an empirical model to estimate annual emissions with daily time steps, where CH4 emissions from individual sources (barns, outside storage tanks) can be calculated separately. A monitoring program was conducted in four countries, i.e., Denmark, Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands, during a 12-month period where slurry was sampled to represent barn and outside storage on finishing pig and dairy farms. Across the four countries, lnA' was higher in pig slurry compared to cattle slurry (p < 0.01), and higher in slurry from barns compared to outside storage (p < 0.01). In a separate evaluation of the incubation method, in-vitro CH4 production rates were comparable with in-situ emissions. The results indicate that lnA' in barns increases with slurry age, probably due to growth or adaptation of the methanogenic microbial community. Using lnA' values determined experimentally, empirical models with daily time steps were constructed for finishing pig and dairy farms and used for scenario analyses. Annual emissions from pig slurry were predicted to be 2.5 times higher than those from cattle slurry. Changing the frequency of slurry export from the barn on the model pig farm from 40 to 7 d intervals reduced total annual CH4 emissions by 46 %; this effect would be much less on cattle farms with natural ventilation. In a scenario with cattle slurry, the empirical model was compared with the current IPCC methodology. The seasonal dynamics were less pronounced, and annual CH4 emissions were lower than with the current methodology, which calls for further investigations. Country-specific models for individual animal categories and point sources could be a tool for assessing CH4 emissions and mitigation potentials at farm level. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Selvakkumaran, Sujeetha
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Ahlgren, Erik O.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Review of the use of system dynamics (SD) in scrutinizing local energy transitions2020In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 272, article id 111053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Local energy transition processes are complex socio-technical transitions requiring careful study. The use of System Dynamics (SD) in modelling and analyzing local energy transitions is especially suitable given the characteristics of SD. Our aim is to systematically categorize the different ways SD is used and useful to scrutinize local energy transitions, and to see if we can discern any common themes that can be useful to researchers looking to scrutinize local energy transitions, using SD. The study is exploratory in nature, with peer-reviewed journal and conference articles analyzed using content analysis. The six categories on which the articles are analyzed are: the sector the article studies; the transition that is studied in the article; the modelling depth in the article; the objective of the article; the justification for using SD provided in the article and the levels of interaction with ‘local’. Our findings show most of the local energy transitions have been studied using simulatable Stock and Flow Diagrams in SD methodology. The important sectors in the energy field are represented in terms of SD modelling of local energy transitions, including electricity, transport, district heating etc. Most of the local energy transitions scrutinized by SD in the articles have descriptive objectives, with some prescriptive, and just one evaluative objective. In terms of justification for using SD provided by the articles analyzed in this study, we found four major themes along which the justifications that were provided. They are dynamics, feedbacks, delays and complexity, systematic thinking, bridging disciplines and actor interactions and behaviour. The ‘dynamics, feedbacks, delays and complexity’ theme is the most cited justification for the use of SD in scrutinizing local energy transitions, followed by systematic thinking.

  • 6.
    Sjöstrand, Karin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Lindhe, Andreas
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Söderqvist, Tore
    Anthesis Enveco, Sweden.
    Rosén, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Sustainability assessments of regional water supply interventions – Combining cost-benefit and multi-criteria decision analyses2018In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 225, p. 313-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To cope with present and future challenges, a growing number of water utilities in Sweden, Europe and elsewhere initiate various forms of inter-municipal cooperations creating a new regional level of drinking water governance. In order to reach viable decisions of alternative ways forward, there is an international consensus that sustainability needs to be addressed in water supply planning, design and decision-making. There are, however, few decision aids focusing on assessing the sustainability of inter-municipal cooperations and the inter-municipal policies and interventions that regional decision-makers are faced with. This paper presents a decision support model based on a combination of cost-benefit analysis and multi-criteria decision analysis for assessing the sustainability of regional water supply interventions, including formations of inter-municipal cooperations. The proposed decision support model integrates quantitative and semi-quantitative information on sustainability criteria. It provides a novel way of presenting monetized benefits and costs, capturing utilitarian aspects of alternative interventions, with non-monetized social and environmental effects, capturing aspects based in the deontological theories of moral ethics. The model is based on a probabilistic approach where uncertainties are defined by statistical probability distributions. A case study is used to exemplify and evaluate model application in decision situations regarding regionalization, (de)centralization, source water quality and redundancy. All evaluated alternatives were expected to contribute to a slightly improved social sustainability, whereas the results were more varying in the economic and environmental domains. A structured and transparent treatment of uncertainties facilitates a better understanding of the results as well as communication between decision-makers, stakeholders and the community.

  • 7.
    Willén, Agnes
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik. SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Rodhe, Lena
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Pell, Mikael
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Håkan
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Nitrous oxide and methane emissions during storage of dewatered digested sewage sludge2016In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 184, no 3, p. 560-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effect on greenhouse gas emissions during storage of digested sewage sludge by using a cover during storage or applying sanitisation measures such as thermophilic digestion or ammonia addition. In a pilot-scale storage facility, nitrous oxide and methane emissions were measured on average twice monthly for a year, using a closed chamber technique. The thermophilically digested sewage sludge (TC) had the highest cumulative emissions of nitrous oxide (1.30% of initial total N) followed by mesophilically digested sewage sludge stored without a cover (M) (0.34%) and mesophilically digested sewage sludge stored with a cover (MC) (0.19%). The mesophilically digested sewage sludge sanitised with ammonia and stored with a cover (MAC) showed negligible cumulative emissions of nitrous oxide. Emissions of methane were much lower from TC and MAC than from M and MC. These results indicate that sanitisation by ammonia treatment eliminates the production of nitrous oxide and reduces methane emissions from stored sewage sludge, and that thermophilic digestion has the potential to reduce the production of methane during storage compared with mesophilic digestion. The results also indicate a tendency for lower emissions of nitrous oxide and higher emissions of methane from covered sewage sludge compared with non-covered.

  • 8.
    Wrange, Anna-Lisa
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Barboza, F. R.
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Germany.
    Ferreira, J.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Eriksson-Wiklund, A. -K
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ytreberg, E.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Jonsson, P. R.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Watermann, B.
    LimnoMar, Germany.
    Dahlström, Mia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Monitoring biofouling as a management tool for reducing toxic antifouling practices in the Baltic Sea2020In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 264, article id 110447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over two million leisure boats use the coastal areas of the Baltic Sea for recreational purposes. The majority of these boats are painted with toxic antifouling paints that release biocides into the coastal ecosystems and negatively impact non-targeted species. Regulations concerning the use of antifouling paints differ dramatically between countries bordering the Baltic Sea and most of them lack the support of biological data. In the present study, we collected data on biofouling in 17 marinas along the Baltic Sea coast during three consecutive boating seasons (May–October 2014, 2015 and 2016). In this context, we compared different monitoring strategies and developed a fouling index (FI) to characterise marinas according to the recorded biofouling abundance and type (defined according to the hardness and strength of attachment to the substrate). Lower FI values, i.e. softer and/or less abundant biofouling, were consistently observed in marinas in the northern Baltic Sea. The decrease in FI from the south-western to the northern Baltic Sea was partially explained by the concomitant decrease in salinity. Nevertheless, most of the observed changes in biofouling seemed to be determined by local factors and inter-annual variability, which emphasizes the necessity for systematic monitoring of biofouling by end-users and/or authorities for the effective implementation of non-toxic antifouling alternatives in marinas. Based on the obtained results, we discuss how monitoring programs and other related measures can be used to support adaptive management strategies towards more sustainable antifouling practices in the Baltic Sea. © 2020 The Authors

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf