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  • 1. Andersson, P
    et al.
    Nilsson, D
    Svensson, P-O
    Chen, M
    Malmström, A
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Remonen, T
    Kugler T, Berggren
    Active Matrix Displays Based on All-Organic Electrochemical Smart Pixels Printed on Paper2002In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 14, no 20, p. 1460-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An organic electronic paper display technology is presented. The electrochromic display cell together with the addressing electrochemical transistor form simple smart pixels that are included in matrix displays, which are achieved on coated cellulose-based paper using printing techniques. The ion-electronic technology presented offers an opportunity to extend existing use of ordinary paper._x000D_

  • 2.
    Anusuyadevi, Prasaanth
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Shanker, Ravi
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Cui, Yuxiao
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Riazanova, Anastasia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Järn, Mikael
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Svagan, Anna
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Photoresponsive and Polarization-Sensitive Structural Colors from Cellulose/Liquid Crystal Nanophotonic Structures2021In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 33, no 36, article id 2101519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) possess the ability to form helical periodic structures that generate structural colors. Due to the helicity, such self-assembled cellulose structures preferentially reflect left-handed circularly polarized light of certain colors, while they remain transparent to right-handed circularly polarized light. This study shows that combination with a liquid crystal enables modulation of the optical response to obtain light reflection of both handedness but with reversed spectral profiles. As a result, the nanophotonic systems provide vibrant structural colors that are tunable via the incident light polarization. The results are attributed to the liquid crystal aligning on the CNC/glucose film, to form a birefringent layer that twists the incident light polarization before interaction with the chiral cellulose nanocomposite. Using a photoresponsive liquid crystal, this effect can further be turned off by exposure to UV light, which switches the nematic liquid crystal into a nonbirefringent isotropic phase. The study highlights the potential of hybrid cellulose systems to create self-assembled yet advanced photoresponsive and polarization-tunable nanophotonics. © 2021 The Authors.

  • 3.
    Berggren, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Simon, Daniel T.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, David
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Dyreklev, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Norberg, Petronella
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Nordlinder, Staffan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Andersson Ersman, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Gustafsson, Göran
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Wikner, J. Jacob
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Hederen, Jan
    Ericsson AB, Sweden.
    Hentzell, Hans
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Browsing the Real World using Organic Electronics, Si-Chips, and a Human Touch2016In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 28, no 10, p. 1911-1916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two different e-labels were developed to explore the feasibility and to identify scientifi c and engineering challenges of the Real-World-Web platform. First was a printed biosensor e-label, comprising Si-chips with an array of different printegrated devices, and second, an e-label to explore the feasibility of transferring data, through the human body, between a mobile device and different distributed e-labels, adhered onto the body or onto dedicated devices and surfaces of one's ambience. The silicon chips utilized in e-labels, include analogue and digital circuitry to receive and handle sensory input, to perform signal processing, and to transmit information to antennas and displays. When used, the e-label is turned on, and a sample is then added onto the sensor area. The display provides simple instructions and updated information to the user. All data handling, electrical probing, and analysis of the sensor is performed by the Si-chips, and the sensing data is finally shown in the printed display. The second e-label exemplifies an ID-tag for body area networks (BAN) communication applications, which, in part, is manufactured and integrated in the same way as the first e-label, but with another choice of Si-chips and capacitive antennas.

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  • 4. Bolin, M
    et al.
    Svennersten, K
    Nilsson, D
    Sawatdee, A
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Jager, E W H
    Richter-Dahlfors, A
    Berggren, M
    Active Control of Epithelial Cell-Density Gradients Grown Along the Channel of an Organic Electrochemical Transistor2009In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 21, p. 4379-82Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Chen, Shangzhi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Rossi, Stefano
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Shanker, Ravi
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Cincotti, Giancarlo
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Gamage, Sampath
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Kühne, Philipp
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Stanishev, Vallery
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Edberg, Jesper
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Darakchieva, Vanya
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Magnus P
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Tunable Structural Color Images by UV-Patterned Conducting Polymer Nanofilms on Metal Surfaces.2021In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 33, no 33, article id 2102451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Precise manipulation of light-matter interactions has enabled a wide variety of approaches to create bright and vivid structural colors. Techniques utilizing photonic crystals, Fabry-Pérot cavities, plasmonics, or high-refractive-index dielectric metasurfaces have been studied for applications ranging from optical coatings to reflective displays. However, complicated fabrication procedures for sub-wavelength nanostructures, limited active areas, and inherent absence of tunability of these approaches impede their further development toward flexible, large-scale, and switchable devices compatible with facile and cost-effective production. Here, a novel method is presented to generate structural color images based on monochromic conducting polymer films prepared on metallic surfaces via vapor phase polymerization and ultraviolet (UV) light patterning. Varying the UV dose enables synergistic control of both nanoscale film thickness and polymer permittivity, which generates controllable structural colors from violet to red. Together with grayscale photomasks this enables facile fabrication of high-resolution structural color images. Dynamic tuning of colored surfaces and images via electrochemical modulation of the polymer redox state is further demonstrated. The simple structure, facile fabrication, wide color gamut, and dynamic color tuning make this concept competitive for applications like multifunctional displays.

  • 6. Fu, Yifeng
    et al.
    Carlberg, Björn
    Lindahl, Niklas
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Lindvall, Niclas
    Bielecki, Johan
    Matic, Aleksandar
    Song, Yuxin
    Hu, Zhili
    Lai, Zonghe
    Ye, Lilei
    Sun, Jie
    Zhang, Yahui
    Zhang, Yan
    Liu, Johan
    Templated Growth of Covalently Bonded Three-Dimensional Carbon Nanotube Networks Originated from Graphene2012In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 1576-1581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A template-assisted method that enables the growth of covalently bonded three-dimensional carbon nanotubes (CNTs) originating from graphene at a large scale is demonstrated. Atomic force microscopy-based mechanical tests show that the covalently bonded CNT structure can effectively distribute external loading throughout the network to improve the mechanical strength of the material.

  • 7.
    Herlogsson, Lars
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Crispin, X
    Robinson, N D
    Sandberg, Mats
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Hagel, O
    Gustafsson, G
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Berggren, M
    Low-Voltage Polymer Field-Effect Transistors Gated Via a Proton Conductor2007In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 97-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low operating voltages for p-channel organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) can be achieved by using an electrolyte as the gate insulator. However, mobile anions in the electrolyte can lead to undesired electrochemistry in the channel. In order to avoid this, a polyanionic electrolyte is used as the gate insulator. The resulting OFET has operating voltages of less than 1€‰V (see figure) shows fast switching (less than 0.3€‰ms) in ambient atmosphere._x000D_

  • 8.
    Kaschuk, Joice
    et al.
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Al Haj, Yanan
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Rojas, Orlando
    Aalto University, Finland; University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Miettunen, Kati
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Abitbol, Tiffany
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Vapaavuori, Jaana
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Plant-Based Structures as an Opportunity to Engineer Optical Functions in Next-Generation Light Management2022In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 34, no 6, article id 2104473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review addresses the reconstruction of structural plant components (cellulose, lignin, and hemicelluloses) into materials displaying advanced optical properties. The strategies to isolate the main building blocks are discussed, and the effects of fibrillation, fibril alignment, densification, self-assembly, surface-patterning, and compositing are presented considering their role in engineering optical performance. Then, key elements that enable lignocellulosic to be translated into materials that present optical functionality, such as transparency, haze, reflectance, UV-blocking, luminescence, and structural colors, are described. Mapping the optical landscape that is accessible from lignocellulosics is shown as an essential step toward their utilization in smart devices. Advanced materials built from sustainable resources, including those obtained from industrial or agricultural side streams, demonstrate enormous promise in optoelectronics due to their potentially lower cost, while meeting or even exceeding current demands in performance. The requirements are summarized for the production and application of plant-based optically functional materials in different smart material applications and the review is concluded with a perspective about this active field of knowledge. © 2021 The Authors.

  • 9.
    Khan, Zia Ullah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Edberg, Jesper
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Hamedi, Mahiar Max
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE, Innventia.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Thermoelectric Polymers and their Elastic Aerogels2016In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 28, no 22, p. 4556-4562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electronically conducting polymers constitute an emerging class of materials for novel electronics, such as printed electronics and flexible electronics. Their properties have been further diversified to introduce elasticity, which has opened new possibility for "stretchable" electronics. Recent discoveries demonstrate that conducting polymers have thermoelectric properties with a low thermal conductivity, as well as tunable Seebeck coefficients - which is achieved by modulating their electrical conductivity via simple redox reactions. Using these thermoelectric properties, all-organic flexible thermoelectric devices, such as temperature sensors, heat flux sensors, and thermoelectric generators, are being developed. In this article we discuss the combination of the two emerging fields: stretchable electronics and polymer thermoelectrics. The combination of elastic and thermoelectric properties seems to be unique for conducting polymers, and difficult to achieve with inorganic thermoelectric materials. We introduce the basic concepts, and state of the art knowledge, about the thermoelectric properties of conducting polymers, and illustrate the use of elastic thermoelectric conducting polymer aerogels that could be employed as temperature and pressure sensors in an electronic-skin.

  • 10.
    Nilsson, D
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Chen, M
    Kugler, T
    Remonen, T
    Bi-Stable Dynamic Current Modulation in Electrochemical Organic Transistors2002In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 51-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel electrochemical transistors, based on the conductive polymer PEDOT, operating at driving voltages of only a few volts in bulk material, with little demon substrate planarity, are described by the authors. The underlying polymer ion pair PEDOT:PSS is conductive in both oxidized reduced state. Two transistor architectures, a bi-stable a dynamic transistor (the first electrochemical specimen of its kind) with an on/off ratio of 105 200 Hz modulation speed, were realized._x000D_

  • 11.
    Rostami, J.
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Benselfelt, T.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Maddalena, L.
    Politecnico di Torino-Alessandria Campus, Italy.
    Avci, C.
    Sorbonne Université, France.
    Sellman, F. A.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Cinar Ciftci, Goksu
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Larsson, P. A.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Carosio, F.
    Politecnico di Torino-Alessandria Campus, Italy.
    Akhtar, F.
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Tian, W.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Ocean University of China, China.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; .
    Shaping 90 wt% NanoMOFs into Robust Multifunctional Aerogels Using Tailored Bio-Based Nanofibrils2022In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 34, no 38, article id 2204800Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are hybrid porous crystalline networks with tunable chemical and structural properties. However, their excellent potential is limited in practical applications by their hard-to-shape powder form, making it challenging to assemble MOFs into macroscopic composites with mechanical integrity. While a binder matrix enables hybrid materials, such materials have a limited MOF content and thus limited functionality. To overcome this challenge, nanoMOFs are combined with tailored same-charge high-aspect-ratio cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) to manufacture robust, wet-stable, and multifunctional MOF-based aerogels with 90 wt% nanoMOF loading. The porous aerogel architectures show excellent potential for practical applications such as efficient water purification, CO2 and CH4 gas adsorption and separation, and fire-safe insulation. Moreover, a one-step carbonization process enables these aerogels as effective structural energy-storage electrodes. This work exhibits the unique ability of high-aspect-ratio CNFs to bind large amounts of nanoMOFs in structured materials with outstanding mechanical integrity—a quality that is preserved even after carbonization. The demonstrated process is simple and fully discloses the intrinsic potential of the nanoMOFs, resulting in synergetic properties not found in the components alone, thus paving the way for MOFs in macroscopic multifunctional composites. © 2022 The Authors. 

  • 12.
    Ràfols-Ribé, Joan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Zhang, X.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Larsen, Christian
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Petter
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Lindh, E. Mattias
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Mai, Cuc
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Mindemark, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gracia-Espino, Eduardo
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Edman, Ludvig
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Controlling the Emission Zone by Additives for Improved Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells2022In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 34, no 8, article id 2107849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The position of the emission zone (EZ) in the active material of a light-emitting electrochemical cell (LEC) has a profound influence on its performance because of microcavity effects and doping- and electrode-induced quenching. Previous attempts of EZ control have focused on the two principal constituents in the active material—the organic semiconductor (OSC) and the mobile ions—but this study demonstrates that it is possible to effectively control the EZ position through the inclusion of an appropriate additive into the active material. More specifically, it is shown that a mere modification of the end group on an added neutral compound, which also functions as an ion transporter, results in a shifted EZ from close to the anode to the center of the active material, which translates into a 60% improvement of the power efficiency. This particular finding is rationalized by a lowering of the effective electron mobility of the OSC through specific additive: OSC interactions, but the more important generic conclusion is that it is possible to control the EZ position, and thereby the LEC performance, by the straightforward inclusion of an easily tuned additive in the active material. © 2022 The Authors.

  • 13.
    Topolniak, Ievgeniia
    et al.
    BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung, Germany.
    Elert, Anna-Maria
    BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung, Germany.
    Knigge, Xenia
    BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung, Germany.
    Ciftci, Göksu Cinar
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Radnik, Jörg
    BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung, Germany.
    Sturm, Heinz
    BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung, Germany; TU Berlin, Germany.
    High-Precision Micropatterning of Polydopamine by Multiphoton Lithography2022In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 34, no 18, article id 2109509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA) initiates a multifunctional modification route that leads to the generation of novel advanced materials and their applications. However, existing PDA deposition techniques still exhibit poor spatial control, have a very limited capability of micropatterning, and do not allow local tuning of the PDA topography. Herein, PDA deposition based on multiphoton lithography (MPL) is demonstrated, which enables full spatial and temporal control with nearly total freedom of patterning design. Using MPL, 2D microstructures of complex design are achieved with pattern precision of 0.8 µm without the need of a photomask or stamp. Moreover, this approach permits adjusting the morphology and thickness of the fabricated microstructure within one deposition step, resulting in a unique tunability of material properties. The chemical composition of PDA is confirmed and its ability for protein enzyme immobilization is demonstrated. This work presents a new methodology for high-precision and complete control of PDA deposition, enabling PDA incorporation in applications where fine and precise local surface functionalization is required. Possible applications include multicomponent functional elements and devices in microfluidics or lab-on-a-chip systems. © 2022 The Authors

  • 14. Tybrandt, K
    et al.
    Larsson, K C
     Kurup, S
    Simon, D T
    Kjäll, P
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Isaksson, J
    Sandberg, Mats
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Jager, E W H
    Dahlfors, Richter
    Berggren, M
    Translating Electronic Currents to Precise Acetylcholine-Induced Neuronal Signaling Using an Organic Electrophoretic Delivery Device2009In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 21, p. 4442-4446Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Zhang, X.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ràfols-Ribé, J.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Mindemark, J.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Tang, S.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Lindh, E Mattias
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Gracia-Espino, E.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Larsen, C.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Edman, L.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Efficiency Roll-Off in Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells2024In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 36, no 15, article id 2310156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding “efficiency roll-off” (i.e., the drop in emission efficiency with increasing current) is critical if efficient and bright emissive technologies are to be rationally designed. Emerging light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) can be cost- and energy-efficiently fabricated by ambient-air printing by virtue of the in situ formation of a p-n junction doping structure. However, this in situ doping transformation renders a meaningful efficiency analysis challenging. Herein, a method for separation and quantification of major LEC loss factors, notably the outcoupling efficiency and exciton quenching, is presented. Specifically, the position of the emissive p-n junction in common singlet-exciton emitting LECs is measured to shift markedly with increasing current, and the influence of this shift on the outcoupling efficiency is quantified. It is further verified that the LEC-characteristic high electrochemical-doping concentration renders singlet-polaron quenching (SPQ) significant already at low drive current density, but also that SPQ increases super-linearly with increasing current, because of increasing polaron density in the p-n junction region. This results in that SPQ dominates singlet-singlet quenching for relevant current densities, and significantly contributes to the efficiency roll-off. This method for deciphering the LEC efficiency roll-off can contribute to a rational realization of all-printed LEC devices that are efficient at highluminance.

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  • 16. Zirkl, M
    et al.
    Sawatdee, A
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Helbig, U
    Krause, M
    Scheipl, G
    Kraker, E
    Andersson Ersman, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Nilsson, D
    Platt, D
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Bodö, P
    Bauer, S
    Domann, G
    Stadlober, B
    An All-Printed Ferroelectric Active Matrix Sensor Network Based on Only Five Functional Materials Forming a Touchless Control Interface2011In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 23, p. 2069-74Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 16 of 16
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