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  • 1.
    Rees, Adam
    et al.
    Swansea University, UK.
    Powell, Lydia C.
    Swansea University, UK; Cardiff University, UK.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Gethin, David T.
    Swansea University, UK.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Hill, Katja E.
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Thomas, David W.
    Cardiff University, UK.
    3D bioprinting of carboxymethylated-periodate oxidized nanocellulose constructs for wound dressing applications2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2015, article id 925757Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocellulose has a variety of advantages, which make the material most suitable for use in biomedical devices such as wound dressings. The material is strong, allows for production of transparent films, provides a moist wound healing environment, and can form elastic gels with bioresponsive characteristics. In this study, we explore the application of nanocellulose as a bioink for modifying film surfaces by a bioprinting process. Two different nanocelluloses were used, prepared with TEMPO mediated oxidation and a combination of carboxymethylation and periodate oxidation. The combination of carboxymethylation and periodate oxidation produced a homogeneous material with short nanofibrils, having widths <20 nm and lengths <200 nm. The small dimensions of the nanofibrils reduced the viscosity of the nanocellulose, thus yielding a material with good rheological properties for use as a bioink. The nanocellulose bioink was thus used for printing 3D porous structures, which is exemplified in this study. We also demonstrated that both nanocelluloses did not support bacterial growth, which is an interesting property of these novel materials.

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