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  • 1.
    Amorebieta, Josu
    et al.
    University of the Basque Country, Spain.
    Pereira, Joao
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Durana, Gaizka
    University of the Basque Country, Spain.
    Franciscangelis, Carolina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Ortega-Gomez, Angel
    University of the Basque Country, Spain.
    Zubia, Joseba
    University of the Basque Country, Spain.
    Villatoro, Joel
    University of the Basque Country, Spain; Ikerbasque-Basque Foundation for Science, Spain.
    Margulis, Walter
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Twin-core fiber sensor integrated in laser cavity2022In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 11797Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, we report on a twin-core fiber sensor system that provides improved spectral efficiency, allows for multiplexing and gives low level of crosstalk. Pieces of the referred strongly coupled multicore fiber are used as sensors in a laser cavity incorporating a pulsed semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). Each sensor has its unique cavity length and can be addressed individually by electrically matching the periodic gating of the SOA to the sensor’s cavity roundtrip time. The interrogator acts as a laser and provides a narrow spectrum with high signal-to-noise ratio. Furthermore, it allows distinguishing the response of individual sensors even in the case of overlapping spectra. Potentially, the number of interrogated sensors can be increased significantly, which is an appealing feature for multipoint sensing. © 2022, The Author(s).

  • 2.
    Andersson Ersman, Peter
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Freitag, Kathrin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Kawahara, Jun
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware. Lintec Corporation, Japan.
    Åhlin, Jessica
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    The rise of electrochromics through dynamic QR codes and grayscale images in screen printed passive matrix addressed displays2022In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 10959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electronic matrix addressed displays capable of presenting arbitrary grayscale images typically require complex device architectures including switching components to provide unique pixel addressability. Here, we demonstrate high-yield manufacturing of passive matrix addressed electrochromic displays on flexible substrates by solely using screen printing. The simple pixel architecture, obtained by printing only three active layers on top of each other, concurrently provides both the electrochromic functionality and the critical non-linear pixel switching response that enables presentation of arbitrary grayscale images in the resulting passive matrix addressed displays. The all-printed display technology exhibits unprecedented performance and is further verified by dynamic QR codes, to exemplify utilization within authentication, packaging, or other emerging Internet of Things applications requiring a low-cost display for data visualization. © 2022, The Author(s).

  • 3.
    Armgarth, Astrid
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Pantzare, Sandra
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Smart Hardware.
    Arven, Patrik
    J2 Holding AB, Sweden.
    Lassnig, Roman
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Jinno, Hiroaki
    RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science, Japan; University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Gabrielsson, Erik
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Kifle, Yonatan
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Cherian, Dennis
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Arbring Sjöström, Theresia
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Berthou, Gautier
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Dowling, Jim
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Data Science. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Someya, Takao
    RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science, Japan; University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Wikner, Jacob
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Göran
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    A digital nervous system aiming toward personalized IoT healthcare2021In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 7757Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Body area networks (BANs), cloud computing, and machine learning are platforms that can potentially enable advanced healthcare outside the hospital. By applying distributed sensors and drug delivery devices on/in our body and connecting to such communication and decision-making technology, a system for remote diagnostics and therapy is achieved with additional autoregulation capabilities. Challenges with such autarchic on-body healthcare schemes relate to integrity and safety, and interfacing and transduction of electronic signals into biochemical signals, and vice versa. Here, we report a BAN, comprising flexible on-body organic bioelectronic sensors and actuators utilizing two parallel pathways for communication and decision-making. Data, recorded from strain sensors detecting body motion, are both securely transferred to the cloud for machine learning and improved decision-making, and sent through the body using a secure body-coupled communication protocol to auto-actuate delivery of neurotransmitters, all within seconds. We conclude that both highly stable and accurate sensing—from multiple sensors—are needed to enable robust decision making and limit the frequency of retraining. The holistic platform resembles the self-regulatory properties of the nervous system, i.e., the ability to sense, communicate, decide, and react accordingly, thus operating as a digital nervous system. © 2021, The Author(s).

  • 4.
    Arrhenius, Karine
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Büker, Oliver
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Measurement Technology.
    Comparison of different models to calculate the viscosity of biogas and biomethane in order to accurately measure flow rates for conformity assessment2021In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 1660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study presents an optimised method to correct flow rates measured with a LFE flowmeter pre-set on methane while used for gas mixtures of unknown composition at the time of the measurement. The method requires the correction of the flow rate using a factor based on the viscosity of the gas mixtures once the composition is accurately known. The method has several different possible applications inclusive for the sampling of biogas and biomethane onto sorbent tubes for conformity assessment for the determination of siloxanes, terpenes and VOC in general. Five models for the calculation of the viscosity of the gas mixtures were compared and the models were used for ten binary mixtures and four multi-component mixtures. The results of the evaluation of the different models showed that the correction method using the viscosity of the mixtures calculated with the model of Reichenberg and Carr showed the smallest biases for binary mixtures. For multi-component mixtures, the best results were obtained when using the models of Lucas and Carr. 

  • 5.
    Baison, J.
    et al.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Sweden.
    Zhou, Linghua
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Nils
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Sweden.
    Mörling, Tommy
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Sweden.
    Grahn, Thomas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Pulp, Paper and Packaging.
    Olsson, Lars
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Building and Real Estate.
    Karlsson, Bo
    Skogforsk, Sweden----.
    Wu, Harry
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Sweden.
    Mellerowicz, Ewa
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Sven-Olof
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. IIC, Sweden.
    García-Gil, Maria
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Sweden.
    Genetic control of tracheid properties in Norway spruce wood2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 18089Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through the use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) mapping it is possible to establish the genetic basis of phenotypic trait variation. Our GWAS study presents the first such effort in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L). Karst.) for the traits related to wood tracheid characteristics. The study employed an exome capture genotyping approach that generated 178 101 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) from 40 018 probes within a population of 517 Norway spruce mother trees. We applied a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) based association mapping method using a functional multi-locus mapping approach, with a stability selection probability method as the hypothesis testing approach to determine significant Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs). The analysis has provided 30 significant associations, the majority of which show specific expression in wood-forming tissues or high ubiquitous expression, potentially controlling tracheids dimensions, their cell wall thickness and microfibril angle. Among the most promising candidates based on our results and prior information for other species are: Picea abies BIG GRAIN 2 (PabBG2) with a predicted function in auxin transport and sensitivity, and MA_373300g0010 encoding a protein similar to wall-associated receptor kinases, which were both associated with cell wall thickness. The results demonstrate feasibility of GWAS to identify novel candidate genes controlling industrially-relevant tracheid traits in Norway spruce. © 2020, The Author(s).

  • 6.
    Bender, P.
    et al.
    University of Cantabria, Spain .
    Bogart, L. K.
    University College London, UK .
    Posth, O.
    Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany .
    Szczerba, W.
    BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung Und-prüfung, Germany ; AGH University of Science and Technology, Poland .
    Rogers, S. E.
    ISIS-STFC Neutron Scattering Facility, UK.
    Castro, A.
    SOLVE Research and Consultancy AB, Sweden .
    Nilsson, L.
    SOLVE Research and Consultancy AB, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Zeng, L. J.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Sugunan, Abhilash
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Sommertune, Jens
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Fornara, A.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    González-Alonso, D.
    University of Cantabria, Spain .
    Fernández Barquín, L.
    University of Cantabria, Spain.
    Johansson, Christer
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Acreo.
    Structural and magnetic properties of multi-core nanoparticles analysed using a generalised numerical inversion method2017In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 45990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structural and magnetic properties of magnetic multi-core particles were determined by numerical inversion of small angle scattering and isothermal magnetisation data. The investigated particles consist of iron oxide nanoparticle cores (9 nm) embedded in poly(styrene) spheres (160 nm). A thorough physical characterisation of the particles included transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Their structure was ultimately disclosed by an indirect Fourier transform of static light scattering, small angle X-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering data of the colloidal dispersion. The extracted pair distance distribution functions clearly indicated that the cores were mostly accumulated in the outer surface layers of the poly(styrene) spheres. To investigate the magnetic properties, the isothermal magnetisation curves of the multi-core particles (immobilised and dispersed in water) were analysed. The study stands out by applying the same numerical approach to extract the apparent moment distributions of the particles as for the indirect Fourier transform. It could be shown that the main peak of the apparent moment distributions correlated to the expected intrinsic moment distribution of the cores. Additional peaks were observed which signaled deviations of the isothermal magnetisation behavior from the non-interacting case, indicating weak dipolar interactions.

  • 7.
    De La Garza, R. G.
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Madsen, H.
    Mo-clay Museum, Denmark.
    Sjövall, Peter
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Osbӕck, F.
    Fur Museum, Denmark.
    Zheng, W.
    North Carolina State University, USA.
    Jarenmark, M.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Schweitzer, M. H.
    Lund University, Sweden; North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, USA.
    Engdahl, A.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Uvdal, P.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, M. E.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lindgren, J.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    An ancestral hard-shelled sea turtle with a mosaic of soft skin and scutes2022In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 22655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition from terrestrial to marine environments by secondarily aquatic tetrapods necessitates a suite of adaptive changes associated with life in the sea, e.g., the scaleless skin in adult individuals of the extant leatherback turtle. A partial, yet exceptionally preserved hard-shelled (Pan-Cheloniidae) sea turtle with extensive soft-tissue remains, including epidermal scutes and a virtually complete flipper outline, was recently recovered from the Eocene Fur Formation of Denmark. Examination of the fossilized limb tissue revealed an originally soft, wrinkly skin devoid of scales, together with organic residues that contain remnant eumelanin pigment and inferred epidermal transformation products. Notably, this stem cheloniid—unlike its scaly living descendants—combined scaleless limbs with a bony carapace covered in scutes. Our findings show that the adaptive transition to neritic waters by the ancestral pan-chelonioids was more complex than hitherto appreciated, and included at least one evolutionary lineage with a mosaic of integumental features not seen in any living turtle. © 2022, The Author(s).

  • 8.
    Eriksson, Mimmi
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Claesson, Per M
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Järn, Mikael
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Wallqvist, Viveca
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Tuominen, Mikko
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Kappl, Michael
    Max Planck Institute, Germany.
    Teisala, Hannu
    Max Planck Institute, Germany.
    Vollmer, Doris
    Max Planck Institute, Germany.
    Schoelkopf, Joachim
    Omya International AG, Switzerland.
    Gane, Patrick
    Aalto University, Finland; University of Belgrade, Serbia.
    Mäkelä, Jyrki
    Tampere University, Finland.
    Swerin, Agne
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Effects of liquid surface tension on gas capillaries and capillary forces at superamphiphobic surfaces2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 6794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of a bridging gas capillary between superhydrophobic surfaces in water gives rise to strongly attractive interactions ranging up to several micrometers on separation. However, most liquids used in materials research are oil-based or contain surfactants. Superamphiphobic surfaces repel both water and low-surface-tension liquids. To control the interactions between a superamphiphobic surface and a particle, it needs to be resolved whether and how gas capillaries form in non-polar and low-surface-tension liquids. Such insight will aid advanced functional materials development. Here, we combine laser scanning confocal imaging and colloidal probe atomic force microscopy to elucidate the interaction between a superamphiphobic surface and a hydrophobic microparticle in three liquids with different surface tensions: water (73 mN m−1), ethylene glycol (48 mN m−1) and hexadecane (27 mN m−1). We show that bridging gas capillaries are formed in all three liquids. Force-distance curves between the superamphiphobic surface and the particle reveal strong attractive interactions, where the range and magnitude decrease with liquid surface tension. Comparison of free energy calculations based on the capillary menisci shapes and the force measurements suggest that under our dynamic measurements the gas pressure in the capillary is slightly below ambient. © 2023, The Author(s).

  • 9.
    Escamez, Sacha
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Latha Gandla, Madhavi
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Derba-Maceluch, Marta
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Sven-Olof
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioeconomy. RISE, Innventia.
    Mellerowicz, Ewa J.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Leif J.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    A collection of genetically engineered Populus trees reveals wood biomass traits that predict glucose yield from enzymatic hydrolysis2017In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 15798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood represents a promising source of sugars to produce bio-based renewables, including biofuels. However, breaking down lignocellulose requires costly pretreatments because lignocellulose is recalcitrant to enzymatic saccharification. Increasing saccharification potential would greatly contribute to make wood a competitive alternative to petroleum, but this requires improving wood properties. To identify wood biomass traits associated with saccharification, we analyzed a total of 65 traits related to wood chemistry, anatomy and structure, biomass production and saccharification in 40 genetically engineered Populus tree lines. These lines exhibited broad variation in quantitative traits, allowing for multivariate analyses and mathematical modeling. Modeling revealed that seven wood biomass traits associated in a predictive manner with saccharification of glucose after pretreatment. Four of these seven traits were also negatively associated with biomass production, suggesting a trade-off between saccharification potential and total biomass, which has previously been observed to offset the overall sugar yield from whole trees. We therefore estimated the "total-wood glucose yield" (TWG) from whole trees and found 22 biomass traits predictive of TWG after pretreatment. Both saccharification and TWG were associated with low abundant, often overlooked matrix polysaccharides such as arabinose and rhamnose which possibly represent new markers for improved Populus feedstocks.

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  • 10.
    Etcheverry, Sebastian
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Acreo. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Faridi, A.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ramachandraiah, H.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Kumar, T.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Margulis, Walter
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Acreo. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Laurell, F.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Russom, A.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    High performance micro-flow cytometer based on optical fibres2017In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 5628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flow cytometry is currently the gold standard for analysis of cells in the medical laboratory and biomedical research. Fuelled by the need of point-of-care diagnosis, a significant effort has been made to miniaturize and reduce cost of flow cytometers. However, despite recent advances, current microsystems remain less versatile and much slower than their large-scale counterparts. In this work, an all-silica fibre microflow cytometer is presented that measures fluorescence and scattering from particles and cells. It integrates cell transport in circular capillaries and light delivery by optical fibres. Single-stream cell focusing is performed by Elasto-inertial microfluidics to guarantee accurate and sensitive detection. The capability of this technique is extended to high flow rates (up to 800 μl/min), enabling a throughput of 2500 particles/s. The robust, portable and low-cost system described here could be the basis for a point-of-care flow cytometer with a performance comparable to commercial systems. © 2017 The Author(s).

  • 11.
    Ghirmai, Semhar
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Krona, Annika
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Wu, H.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Whalin, James
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Michael
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Undeland, Ingrid
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Relationship between hemolysis and lipid oxidation in red blood cell-spiked fish muscle; dependance on pH and blood plasma2024In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 1943Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between hemolysis and lipid oxidation was explored in red blood cell (RBCs)-spiked washed cod mince (WCM). At pH 6.8 and 3 ± 1 °C, intact RBCs (71 µM Hb) delayed lipid oxidation by 1 day compared to WCM with partly or fully lysed RBCs which oxidized immediately. Intact RBCs also lowered peak peroxide value (PV) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) with up to 59.5% and 48.1%, respectively. Adding 3% (v/w) blood plasma to RBC-spiked WCM delayed the lipid oxidation onset from 1 to 3–4 days without delaying hemolysis. At pH 6.4 the oxidation onset in RBC-WCM was the same as for pH 6.8 while at pH 7.2–7.6 lipid oxidation was suppressed for 7 days. Micrographs revealed RBC-lysis from day 2 at pH 6.4 but at pH 7.6, RBC stayed intact for ≥ 7 days. Thus, assuring presence of plasma-derived antioxidants and/or elevating muscle pH to avoid hemolysis can aid valorization of blood rich underutilized fish raw materials. 

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  • 12.
    Greco, Ines
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Molchanova, Natalia
    Roskilde University, Denmark; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA.
    Holmedal, Elin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Jenssen, Håvard
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    Hummel, Bernard D
    Zoetis Inc, USA.
    Watts, Jeffrey L
    Zoetis Inc, USA.
    Håkansson, Joakim
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Hansen, Paul R
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Svenson, Johan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles. Cawthron Institute, New Zealand; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Correlation between hemolytic activity, cytotoxicity and systemic in vivo toxicity of synthetic antimicrobial peptides.2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 13206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of non-standard toxicity models is a hurdle in the early development of antimicrobial peptides towards clinical applications. Herein we report an extensive in vitro and in vivo toxicity study of a library of 24 peptide-based antimicrobials with narrow spectrum activity towards veterinary pathogens. The haemolytic activity of the compounds was evaluated against four different species and the relative sensitivity against the compounds was highest for canine erythrocytes, intermediate for rat and human cells and lowest for bovine cells. Selected peptides were additionally evaluated against HeLa, HaCaT and HepG2 cells which showed increased stability towards the peptides. Therapeutic indexes of 50-500 suggest significant cellular selectivity in comparison to bacterial cells. Three peptides were administered to rats in intravenous acute dose toxicity studies up to 2-8 × MIC. None of the injected compounds induced any systemic toxic effects in vivo at the concentrations employed illustrating that the correlation between the different assays is not obvious. This work sheds light on the in vitro and in vivo toxicity of this class of promising compounds and provides insights into the relationship between the different toxicity models often employed in different manners to evaluate the toxicity of novel bioactive compounds in general.

  • 13.
    Hjorth, Therese
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Huseinovic, Ena
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hallström, Elinor
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Strid, Anna
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Sonesson, Ulf
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Winkvist, Anna
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Changes in dietary carbon footprint over ten years relative to individual characteristics and food intake in the Västerbotten Intervention Programme2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective was to examine 10-year changes in dietary carbon footprint relative to individual characteristics and food intake in the unique longitudinal Västerbotten Intervention Programme, Sweden. Here, 14 591 women and 13 347 men had been followed over time. Food intake was assessed via multiple two study visits 1996–2016, using a 64-item food frequency questionnaire. Greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE) related to food intake, expressed as kg carbon dioxide equivalents/1000 kcal and day, were estimated. Participants were classified into GHGE quintiles within sex and 10-year age group strata at both visits. Women and men changing from lowest to highest GHGE quintile exhibited highest body mass index within their quintiles at first visit, and the largest increase in intake of meat, minced meat, chicken, fish and butter and the largest decrease in intake of potatoes, rice and pasta. Women and men changing from highest to lowest GHGE quintile exhibited basically lowest rates of university degree and marriage and highest rates of smoking within their quintiles at first visit. Among these, both sexes reported the largest decrease in intake of meat, minced meat and milk, and the largest increase in intake of snacks and, for women, sweets. More research is needed on how to motivate dietary modifications to reduce climate impact and support public health. © 2020, The Author(s).

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  • 14.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Broman, Curt
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Sturkell, Erik F. F.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ormö, Jens O.
    Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial, Spain.
    Siljeström, Sandra
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut / Funktionella material (KMf). Carnegie Institution of Washington, USA.
    Van Zuilen, Mark A.
    Université Sorbonne Paris Cité, France.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Fungal colonization of an Ordovician impact-induced hydrothermal system2013In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 3, no Dec, article id 3487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Impacts are common geologic features on the terrestrial planets throughout the solar system, and on at least Earth and Mars impacts have induced hydrothermal convection. Impact-generated hydrothermal systems have been suggested to possess the same life supporting capability as hydrothermal systems associated with volcanic activity. However, evidence of fossil microbial colonization in impact-generated hydrothermal systems is scarce in the literature. Here we report of fossilized microorganisms in association with cavity-grown hydrothermal minerals from the 458â.Ma Lockne impact structure, Sweden. Based on morphological characteristics the fossilized microorganisms are interpreted as fungi. We further infer the kerogenization of the microfossils, and thus the life span of the fungi, to be contemporaneous with the hydrothermal activity and migration of hydrocarbons in the system. Our results from the Lockne impact structure show that hydrothermal systems associated with impact structures can support colonization by microbial life.

  • 15.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Andersson, Petter
    Calluna AB, Sweden.
    Nilsson Tengelin, Maria
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Measurement Technology.
    Dose–effects in behavioural responses of moths to light in a controlled lab experiment2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 10339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insects play a critical role in providing numerous ecosystem services. However, insect diversity and biomass have been declining dramatically, with artificial light being suggested as a contributing factor. Despite the importance of understanding the dose–effect responses of insects to light emissions, these responses have been rarely studied. We examined the dose–effect responses of the greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella L.) to different light intensities (14 treatments and a dark control) by observing their behavioural responses in a light-tight box equipped with a LED light source (4070 K) and infrared cameras. Our findings reveal dose–effect responses to light, as the frequency of walking on the light source increased with higher light intensity. Additionally, moths exhibited jumps in front of the light source and jump frequency increased with light intensity. No direct flight-to-light behaviour or activity suppression in response to light was observed. Based on our analysis of the dose–effect responses, we identified a threshold value of 60 cd/m2 for attraction (walking on the light source) and the frequency of jumps. The experimental design in this study offers a valuable tool for investigating dose–effect relationships and behavioural responses of various species to different light levels or specific light sources. © 2023, The Author(s).

  • 16.
    Karim, Zoheb
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Svedberg, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Lee, Koon-Yang
    Imperial College London, UK.
    Khan, Mohd
    Jawaharlal Nehru University, India.
    Processing-Structure-Property Correlation Understanding of Microfibrillated Cellulose Based Dimensional Structures for Ferric Ions Removal2019In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 10277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this research article, wood based microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) was studied to gain a better understanding of the process of dependent network formation. Networking potential and obtained properties of the produced dimensional structures could be controlled using opted processing routes. The fabricated dimensional structure, using freeze-drying (FD) is a highly open and porous network (98% porosity) compared to slightly tight, dense and less porous network produced after pressing at 200kN (96% porosity), followed by vacuum-filtered (VF) networks (33% porosity). The porosity (17%) was further decreased when the casting (CS) method was used, further producing a highly dense and compressed network. High water flux (180.8 ± 11 L/m2h) of pressed freeze-dried (PFD) followed by vacuum-filtered (VF) (11.4 ± 1.9 L/m2h) and casting CS (0.7 ± 0.01 L/m2h) were calculated using device. Furthermore, increased water flux (1.4 fold) of Experimental Paper Machine (XPM) based structures was reported in comparison with CS structures. Pore-sized distribution and surface area were measured using Hg porosimetry; they showed an average pore size of 16.5 μm for FD, followed by PFD (8.2 μm) structures. A 27-fold decrease in average pore-size was observed for CS structure in comparison with the FD structures. Highest tensile strength (87 ± 21 MPa) was recorded for CS structures, indicating a more highly compacted network formation compared to VF (82 ± 19 MPa) and PFD (1.6 ± 0.06 MPa). Furthermore, an attempt was made to upscale the VF structures using traditional paper making approach on XMP. Improved tensile strength (73 ± 11 MPa) in machine produced structures is due to alignment of fibers towards machine direction compared to cross directional (43 ± 9 MPa) fractured structures as shown in our Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis. Surface functionalization of MFC using enzyme (hexokinase) was performed to increase the adsorption efficiency towards ferric ions removal. All fabricated structures were further evaluated for Fe(iii) removal and it was summarized that charge densities of functional groups, produced ζ-potential and networking potential were dominating influential factors for adsorption fluctuation of ferric ions. © 2019, The Author(s).

  • 17.
    Khort, Alexander
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; National University of Science and Technology, Russia.
    Hedberg, Jonas
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Western University, Canada.
    Mei, Nanxuan
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Romanovski, Valentin
    National University of Science and Technology, Russia; National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Belarus.
    Blomberg, Eva
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Odnevall, Inger
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Karolinska Insitute, Sweden.
    Corrosion and transformation of solution combustion synthesized Co, Ni and CoNi nanoparticles in synthetic freshwater with and without natural organic matter2021In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 7860Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pure metallic Co, Ni, and their bimetallic compositions of Co3Ni, CoNi, and CoNi3 nanomaterials were prepared by solution combustion synthesis. Microstructure, phase composition, and crystalline structure of these nanoparticles (NPs) were characterized along with studies of their corrosion and dissolution properties in synthetic freshwater with and without natural organic matter (NOM). The nanomaterials consisted of aggregates of fine NPs (3–30 nm) of almost pure metallic and bimetallic crystal phases with a thin surface oxide covered by a thin carbon shell. The nanomaterials were characterized by BET surface areas ranging from ~ 1 to 8 m2/g for the Ni and Co NPs, to 22.93 m2/g, 14.86 m2/g, and 10.53 m2/g for the Co3Ni, CoNi, CoNi3 NPs, respectively. More Co and Ni were released from the bimetallic NPs compared with the pure metals although their corrosion current densities were lower. In contrast to findings for the pure metal NPs, the presence of NOM increased the release of Co and Ni from the bimetallic NPs in freshwater compared to freshwater only even though its presence reduced the corrosion rate (current density). It was shown that the properties of the bimetallic nanomaterials were influenced by multiple factors such as their composition, including carbon shell, type of surface oxides, and the entropy of mixing. © 2021, The Author(s).

  • 18. Kim, K. H.
    et al.
    Lara-Avila, S.
    He, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Kang, H.
    Hong, S. J.
    Park, M.
    Eklöf, J.
    Moth-Poulsen, K.
    Matsushita, S.
    Akagi, K.
    Kubatkin, S.
    Park, Y. W.
    Probing variable range hopping lengths by magneto conductance in carbonized polymer nanofibers2018In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using magneto transport, we probe hopping length scales in the variable range hopping conduction of carbonized polyacetylene and polyaniline nanofibers. In contrast to pristine polyacetylene nanofibers that show vanishing magneto conductance at large electric fields, carbonized polymer nanofibers display a negative magneto conductance that decreases in magnitude but remains finite with respect to the electric field. We show that this behavior of magneto conductance is an indicator of the electric field and temperature dependence of hopping length in the gradual transition from the thermally activated to the activation-less electric field driven variable range hopping transport. This reveals magneto transport as a useful tool to probe hopping lengths in the non-linear hopping regime. 

  • 19. Kim, K. H.
    et al.
    Lara-Avila, S.
    Kang, H.
    He, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Eklöf, J.
    Hong, S. J.
    Park, M.
    Moth-Poulsen, K.
    Matsushita, S.
    Akagi, K.
    Kubatkin, S.
    Park, Y. W.
    Apparent Power Law Scaling of Variable Range Hopping Conduction in Carbonized Polymer Nanofibers2016In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We induce dramatic changes in the structure of conducting polymer nanofibers by carbonization at 800 °C and compare charge transport properties between carbonized and pristine nanofibers. Despite the profound structural differences, both types of systems display power law dependence of current with voltage and temperature, and all measurements can be scaled into a single universal curve. We analyze our experimental data in the framework of variable range hopping and argue that this mechanism can explain transport properties of pristine polymer nanofibers as well. 

  • 20.
    Larsson, Helene
    et al.
    NU Hospital Group, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Albinsson Högberg, Sofie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lind, Markus
    NU Hospital Group, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rabe, Hardis
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lingblom, Christine
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Investigating immune profile by CyTOF in individuals with long-standing type 1 diabetes2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 8171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease caused by T-cell mediated destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Eosinophils are found in pancreatic tissue from individuals with T1D. Eosinophilic suppression of T cells is dependent of the protein galectin-10. Little is known when it comes to the role of eosinophil granulocytes in type 1 diabetes. Here we show that individuals with long-standing T1D had lower levels of galectin-10hi eosinophils and a subgroup of galectin-10hi eosinophils were entirely absent in all T1D patients. In addition, 7% immature eosinophils were present in the circulation of T1D patients whereas 0.8% in healthy individuals. Furthermore, higher levels of CD4+CD8+ T cells and Th17 cells were observed in patients with T1D. Blood samples from 12 adult individuals with long-standing T1D and 12 healthy individuals were compared using cytometry by time-of-flight. Lower levels of galectin-10hi eosinophils, which are potent T cell suppressors, in individuals with T1D could indicate that activated T cells are enabled to unrestrictedly kill the insulin producing beta cells. This is the first study showing absence of galectin-10hi eosinophilic subgroup in individuals with T1D compared with healthy controls. This study is a first important step toward unraveling the role of the eosinophils in patients with T1D. 

  • 21.
    Lindgren, Johan
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kuriyama, Takeo
    Lund University, Sweden; University of Hyogo, Japan; Wildlife Management Research Center, Japan.
    Madsen, Henrik
    Mo-clay Museum, Denmark.
    Sjövall, Peter
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Zheng, Wenxia
    North Carolina State University, USA; North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, USA.
    Uvdal, Per
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Engdahl, Anders
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Moyer, Alison E.
    North Carolina State University, USA.
    Gren, Johan A.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kamezaki, Naoki
    Okayama University of Science, Japan.
    Ueno, Shintaro
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Schweitzer, Mary H.
    Lund University, Sweden; North Carolina State University, USA; North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, USA.
    Biochemistry and adaptive colouration of an exceptionally preserved juvenile fossil sea turtle2017In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 13324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The holotype (MHM-K2) of the Eocene cheloniine Tasbacka danica is arguably one of the best preserved juvenile fossil sea turtles on record. Notwithstanding compactional flattening, the specimen is virtually intact, comprising a fully articulated skeleton exposed in dorsal view. MHM-K2 also preserves, with great fidelity, soft tissue traces visible as a sharply delineated carbon film around the bones and marginal scutes along the edge of the carapace. Here we show that the extraordinary preservation of the type of T. danica goes beyond gross morphology to include ultrastructural details and labile molecular components of the once-living animal. Haemoglobin-derived compounds, eumelanic pigments and proteinaceous materials retaining the immunological characteristics of sauropsid-specific β-keratin and tropomyosin were detected in tissues containing remnant melanosomes and decayed keratin plates. The preserved organics represent condensed remains of the cornified epidermis and, likely also, deeper anatomical features, and provide direct chemical evidence that adaptive melanism - a biological means used by extant sea turtle hatchlings to elevate metabolic and growth rates - had evolved 54 million years ago. © 2017 The Author(s).

  • 22.
    Lindgren, Johan
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Sjövall, Peter
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Medicinteknik.
    Carney, Ryan M.
    Brown University, US.
    Cincotta, Aude
    Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences; Belgium; University of Namur, Belgium.
    Uvdal, Per
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hutcheson, Steven W.
    University of Maryland, US.
    Gustafsson, Ola
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lefèvre, Ulysse
    Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Belgium; Liège University, Belgium.
    Escuillié, Francois
    Eldonia, France.
    Heimdal, Jimmy
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Engdahl, Anders
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Gren, Johan A.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wakamatsu, Kazumasa
    Fujita Health University, Japan.
    Yans, Johan
    University of Namur, Belgium.
    Godefroit, Pascal
    Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Belgium.
    Molecular composition and ultrastructure of Jurassic paravian feathers2015In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 13520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feathers are amongst the most complex epidermal structures known, and they have a well-documented evolutionary trajectory across non-avian dinosaurs and basal birds. Moreover, melanosome-like microbodies preserved in association with fossil plumage have been used to reconstruct original colour, behaviour and physiology. However, these putative ancient melanosomes might alternatively represent microorganismal residues, a conflicting interpretation compounded by a lack of unambiguous chemical data. We therefore used sensitive molecular imaging, supported by multiple independent analytical tests, to demonstrate that the filamentous epidermal appendages in a new specimen of the Jurassic paravian Anchiornis comprise remnant eumelanosomes and fibril-like microstructures, preserved as endogenous eumelanin and authigenic calcium phosphate. These results provide novel insights into the early evolution of feathers at the sub-cellular level, and unequivocally determine that melanosomes can be preserved in fossil feathers.

  • 23.
    Melin, Jeanette
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Measurement Technology.
    Cano, S. J.
    Modus Outcomes Ltd, UK.
    Gillman, A.
    Modus Outcomes Ltd, UK.
    Marquis, S.
    Modus Outcomes LCC, UK.
    Flöel, A.
    University Medicine Greifswald, Germany; DZNE German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Germany.
    Göschel, L
    Freie Universität Berlin, Germany; Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany.
    Pendrill, Leslie
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Measurement Technology.
    Traceability and comparability through crosswalks with the NeuroMET Memory Metric2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 5179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accurate assessment of memory ability for persons on the continuum of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is vital for early diagnosis, monitoring of disease progression and evaluation of new therapies. However, currently available neuropsychological tests suffer from a lack of standardization and metrological quality assurance. Improved metrics of memory can be created by carefully combining selected items from legacy short-term memory tests, whilst at the same time retaining validity, and reducing patient burden. In psychometrics, this is known as “crosswalks” to link items empirically. The aim of this paper is to link items from different types of memory tests. Memory test data were collected from the European EMPIR NeuroMET and the SmartAge studies recruited at Charité Hospital (Healthy controls n = 92; Subjective cognitive decline n = 160; Mild cognitive impairment n = 50; and AD n = 58; age range 55–87). A bank of items (n = 57) was developed based on legacy short-term memory items (i.e., Corsi Block Test, Digit Span Test, Rey’s Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Word Learning Lists from the CERAD test battery and Mini Mental State Examination; MMSE). The NeuroMET Memory Metric (NMM) is a composite metric that comprises 57 dichotomous items (right/wrong). We previously reported on a preliminary item bank to assess memory based on immediate recall, and have now demonstrated direct comparability of measurements generated from the different legacy tests. We created crosswalks between the NMM and the legacy tests and between the NMM and the full MMSE using Rasch analysis (RUMM2030) and produced two conversion tables. Measurement uncertainties for estimates of person memory ability with the NMM across the full span were smaller than all individual legacy tests, which demonstrates the added value of the NMM. Comparisons with one (MMSE) of the legacy tests showed however higher measurement uncertainties of the NMM for people with a very low memory ability (raw score ≤ 19). The conversion tables developed through crosswalks in this paper provide clinicians and researchers with a practical tool to: (i) compensate for ordinality in raw scores, (ii) ensure traceability to make reliable and valid comparisons when measuring person ability, and (iii) enable comparability between test results from different legacy tests. © 2023, The Author(s).

  • 24.
    Munavirov, Bulat
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Black, Jeffrey
    Shah, Faiz
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Leckner, Johan
    Axel Christiernsson International AB, Sweden.
    Rutland, Mark W.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Harper, Jason
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Glavatskih, Sergei
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; University of New South Wales, Australia; Ghent University, Belgium.
    The effect of anion architecture on the lubrication chemistry of phosphonium orthoborate ionic liquids2021In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 24021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphonium ionic liquids with orthoborate anions have been studied in terms of their interfacial film formation, both physisorbed and sacrificial from chemical breakdown, in sheared contacts of varying harshness. The halogen-free anion architecture was varied through (i) the heteronuclear ring size, (ii) the hybridisation of the constituent atoms, and (iii) the addition of aryl functionalities. Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry analysis revealed the extent of sacrificial tribofilm formation allowing the relative stability of the ionic liquids under tribological conditions to be determined and their breakdown mechanisms to be compared to simple thermal decomposition. Overall, ionic liquids outperformed reference oils as lubricants; in some cases, sacrificial films were formed (with anion breakdown a necessary precursor to phosphonium cation decomposition) while in other cases, a protective, self-assembly lubricant layer or hybrid film was formed. The salicylate-based anion was the most chemically stable and decomposed only slightly even under the harshest conditions. It was further found that surface topography influenced the degree of breakdown through enhanced material transport and replenishment. This work thus unveils the relationship between ionic liquid composition and structure, and the ensuing inter- and intra-molecular interactions and chemical stability, and demonstrates the intrinsic tuneability of an ionic liquid lubrication technology. © 2021, The Author(s).

  • 25.
    Naranjo, Teresa
    et al.
    IMDEA Nanociencia, Spain.
    Álvarez-Asencio, Ruben
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Chemical Process and Pharmaceutical Development.
    Pedraz, Patricia
    IMDEA Nanociencia, Spain.
    Nieto-Ortega, Belen
    IMDEA Nanociencia, Spain.
    Silva, Sara
    IMDEA Nanociencia, Spain.
    Burzurí, Enrique
    IMDEA Nanociencia, Spain.
    Rutland, Mark W.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Pérez, Emilio
    IMDEA Nanociencia, Spain.
    Hydrogen-bonded host–guest systems are stable in ionic liquids2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, article id 15414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show that H-bonded host–guest systems associate in ionic liquids (ILs), pure salts with melting point below room temperature, in which dipole–dipole electrostatic interactions should be negligible in comparison with dipole-charge interactions. Binding constants (Ka) obtained from titrations of four H-bonded host–guest systems in two organic solvents and two ionic liquids yield smaller yet comparable Ka values in ionic liquids than in organic solvents. We also detect the association event using force spectroscopy, which confirms that the binding is not solely due to (de)solvation processes. Our results indicate that classic H-bonded host–guest supramolecular chemistry takes place in ILs. This implies that strong H-bonds are only moderately affected by surroundings composed entirely of charges, which can be interpreted as an indication that the balance of Coulombic to covalent forces in strong H-bonds is not tipped towards the former. © 2020, The Author(s).

  • 26.
    Nielsen, Karsten H.
    et al.
    University of Jena, Germany.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, Glafo Glasforskningsinstitutet. University of Jena, Germany.
    Limbach, Rene
    University of Jena, Germany.
    Wondraczek, Lothar
    University of Jena, Germany.
    Quantitative image analysis for evaluating the abrasion resistance of nanoporous silica films on glass2015In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 17708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The abrasion resistance of coated glass surfaces is an important parameter for judging lifetime performance, but practical testing procedures remain overly simplistic and do often not allow for direct conclusions on real-world degradation. Here, we combine quantitative two-dimensional image analysis and mechanical abrasion into a facile tool for probing the abrasion resistance of anti-reflective (AR) coatings. We determine variations in the average coated area, during and after controlled abrasion. Through comparison with other experimental techniques, we show that this method provides a practical, rapid and versatile tool for the evaluation of the abrasion resistance of sol-gel-derived thin films on glass. The method yields informative data, which correlates with measurements of diffuse reflectance and is further supported by qualitative investigations through scanning electron microscopy. In particular, the method directly addresses degradation of coating performance, i.e., the gradual areal loss of antireflective functionality. As an exemplary subject, we studied the abrasion resistance of state-of-the-art nanoporous SiO2 thin films which were derived from 5–6 wt% aqueous solutions of potassium silicates, or from colloidal suspensions of SiO2 nanoparticles. It is shown how abrasion resistance is governed by coating density and film adhesion, defining the trade-off between optimal AR performance and acceptable mechanical performance.

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  • 27.
    Nordenström, Malin
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; WWSC Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Sweden.
    Riazanova, Anastasia V
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; WWSC Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Sweden.
    Järn, Mikael
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation.
    Paulraj, Thomas
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; WWSC Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Sweden.
    Turner, Charlotta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ström, Valter
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Olsson, Richard T
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; WWSC Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Sweden.
    Svagan, Anna J
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; WWSC Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Sweden.
    Superamphiphobic coatings based on liquid-core microcapsules with engineered capsule walls and functionality2018In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 3647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microcapsules with specific functional properties, related to the capsule wall and core, are highly desired in a number of applications. In this study, hybrid cellulose microcapsules (1.2 ± 0.4 µm in diameter) were prepared by nanoengineering the outer walls of precursor capsules. Depending on the preparation route, capsules with different surface roughness (raspberry or broccoli-like), and thereby different wetting properties, could be obtained. The tunable surface roughness was achieved as a result of the chemical and structural properties of the outer wall of a precursor capsule, which combined with a new processing route allowed in-situ formation of silica nanoparticles (30-40 nm or 70 nm in diameter). By coating glass slides with "broccoli-like" microcapsules (30-40 nm silica nanoparticles), static contact angles above 150° and roll-off angles below 6° were obtained for both water and low surface-tension oil (hexadecane), rendering the substrate superamphiphobic. As a comparison, coatings from raspberry-like capsules were only strongly oleophobic and hydrophobic. The liquid-core of the capsules opens great opportunities to incorporate different functionalities and here hydrophobic superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPIONs) were encapsulated. As a result, magnetic broccoli-like microcapsules formed an excellent superamphiphobic coating-layer on a curved geometry by simply applying an external magnetic field.

  • 28.
    Parker, Helen
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Heriot-Watt University, UK.
    Sengupta, Sanghamitra
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; AMOLF, Netherlands.
    Harish, Achar
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Soares, Ruben
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Joensson, Haakan
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Margulis, Walter
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Laurell, Fredrik
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden: Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    A Lab-in-a-Fiber optofluidic device using droplet microfluidics and laser-induced fluorescence for virus detection2022In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 3539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microfluidics has emerged rapidly over the past 20 years and has been investigated for a variety of applications from life sciences to environmental monitoring. Although continuous-flow microfluidics is ubiquitous, segmented-flow or droplet microfluidics offers several attractive features. Droplets can be independently manipulated and analyzed with very high throughput. Typically, microfluidics is carried out within planar networks of microchannels, namely, microfluidic chips. We propose that fibers offer an interesting alternative format with key advantages for enhanced optical coupling. Herein, we demonstrate the generation of monodisperse droplets within a uniaxial optofluidic Lab-in-a-Fiber scheme. We combine droplet microfluidics with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection achieved through the development of an optical side-coupling fiber, which we term a periscope fiber. This arrangement provides stable and compact alignment. Laser-induced fluorescence offers high sensitivity and low detection limits with a rapid response time making it an attractive detection method for in situ real-time measurements. We use the well-established fluorophore, fluorescein, to characterize the Lab-in-a-Fiber device and determine the generation of ∼ 0.9 nL droplets. We present characterization data of a range of fluorescein concentrations, establishing a limit of detection (LOD) of 10 nM fluorescein. Finally, we show that the device operates within a realistic and relevant fluorescence regime by detecting reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) products in the context of COVID-19 diagnostics. The device represents a step towards the development of a point-of-care droplet digital RT-LAMP platform. © 2022, The Author(s).

  • 29.
    Rabel, Kerstin
    et al.
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Kohal, Ralf Joachim
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Steinberg, Thorsten
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Rolauffs, Bernd
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Adolfsson, Erik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Altmann, Brigitte
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Human osteoblast and fibroblast response to oral implant biomaterials functionalized with non-thermal oxygen plasma2021In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 17302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasma-treatment of oral implant biomaterials prior to clinical insertion is envisaged as a potential surface modification method for enhanced implant healing. To investigate a putative effect of plasma-functionalized implant biomaterials on oral tissue cells, this investigation examined the response of alveolar bone osteoblasts and gingival fibroblasts to clinically established zirconia- and titanium-based implant surfaces for bone and soft tissue integration. The biomaterials were either functionalized with oxygen-plasma in a plasma-cleaner or left untreated as controls, and were characterized in terms of topography and wettability. For the biological evaluation, the cell adhesion, morphogenesis, metabolic activity and proliferation were examined, since these parameters are closely interconnected during cell-biomaterial interaction. The results revealed that plasma-functionalization increased implant surface wettability. The magnitude of this effect thereby depended on surface topography parameters and initial wettability of the biomaterials. Concerning the cell response, plasma-functionalization of smooth surfaces affected initial fibroblast morphogenesis, whereas osteoblast morphology on rough surfaces was mainly influenced by topography. The plasma- and topography-induced differential cell morphologies were however not strong enough to trigger a change in proliferation behaviour. Hence, the results indicate that oxygen plasma-functionalization represents a possible cytocompatible implant surface modification method which can be applied for tailoring implant surface wettability. © 2021, The Author(s).

  • 30.
    Rabel, Kerstin
    et al.
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Kohal, ralf
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Steinberg, Thorsten
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Tomakidi, Pascal
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Rolauffs, Bernd
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Adolfsson, Erik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Manufacturing Processes.
    Palmero, Paola
    Politecnico Di Torino, Italy.
    Fürderer, Tobias
    MOESCHTER GROUP Holding GmbH, Germany.
    Altmann, Brigitte
    University of Freiburg, Germany; .
    Controlling osteoblast morphology and proliferation via surface micro-topographies of implant biomaterials2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 12810Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current research on surface modifications has yielded advanced implant biomaterials. Various implant surface modifications have been shown to be promising in improving bone target cell response, but more comprehensive studies whether certain implant surface modifications can directly target cell behavioural features such as morphogenesis and proliferation are needed. Here, we studied the response of primary alveolar bone cells on various implant surface modifications in terms of osteoblast morphology and proliferation in vitro. Analyses of surface modifications led to surface-related test parameters including the topographical parameters micro-roughness, texture aspect and surface enlargement as well as the physicochemical parameter surface wettability. We compared osteoblast morphology and proliferation towards the above-mentioned parameters and found that texture aspect and surface enlargement but not surface roughness or wettability exhibited significant impact on osteoblast morphology and proliferation. Detailed analysis revealed osteoblast proliferation as a function of cell morphology, substantiated by an osteoblast size- and morphology-dependent increase in mitotic activity. These findings show that implant surface topography controls cell behavioural morphology and subsequently cell proliferation, thereby opening the road for cell instructive biomaterials. © 2020, The Author(s).

  • 31.
    Rao, Komal Umashankar
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Henderson, Domhnall Iain
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Krishnan, Nitya
    Imperial College, UK.
    Puthia, Manoj
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Glegola-Madejska, Izabela
    Imperial College, UK.
    Brive, Lena
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Manufacturing Processes.
    Bjarnemark, Fanny
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Applied Mechanics.
    Millqvist-Fureby, Anna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Chemical Process and Pharmaceutical Development.
    Hjort, Karin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Dan I.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Tenland, Erik
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Sturegård, Erik
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Robertson, Brian D.
    Imperial College, UK.
    Godaly, Gabriela
    Lund University, Sweden.
    A broad spectrum anti-bacterial peptide with an adjunct potential for tuberculosis chemotherapy2021In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, article id 4201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alternative ways to prevent and treat infectious diseases are needed. Previously, we identified a fungal peptide, NZX, that was comparable to rifampicin in lowering M. tuberculosis load in a murine tuberculosis (TB) infection model. Here we assessed the potential synergy between this cationic host defence peptide (CHDP) and the current TB drugs and analysed its pharmacokinetics. We found additive effect of this peptide with isoniazid and ethambutol and confirmed these results with ethambutol in a murine TB-model. In vivo, the peptide remained stable in circulation and preserved lung structure better than ethambutol alone. Antibiotic resistance studies did not induce mutants with reduced susceptibility to the peptide. We further observed that this peptide was effective against nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), such as M. avium and M. abscessus, and several Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In conclusion, the presented data supports a role for this CHDP in the treatment of drug resistant organisms.

  • 32.
    Röding, Magnus
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ma, Zheng
    Princeton University, USA.
    Torquato, Salvatore
    Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, USA; Princeton University, USA .
    Predicting permeability via statistical learning on higher-order microstructural information2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 15239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantitative structure-property relationships are crucial for the understanding and prediction of the physical properties of complex materials. For fluid flow in porous materials, characterizing the geometry of the pore microstructure facilitates prediction of permeability, a key property that has been extensively studied in material science, geophysics and chemical engineering. In this work, we study the predictability of different structural descriptors via both linear regressions and neural networks. A large data set of 30,000 virtual, porous microstructures of different types, including both granular and continuous solid phases, is created for this end. We compute permeabilities of these structures using the lattice Boltzmann method, and characterize the pore space geometry using one-point correlation functions (porosity, specific surface), two-point surface-surface, surface-void, and void-void correlation functions, as well as the geodesic tortuosity as an implicit descriptor. Then, we study the prediction of the permeability using different combinations of these descriptors. We obtain significant improvements of performance when compared to a Kozeny-Carman regression with only lowest-order descriptors (porosity and specific surface). We find that combining all three two-point correlation functions and tortuosity provides the best prediction of permeability, with the void-void correlation function being the most informative individual descriptor. Moreover, the combination of porosity, specific surface, and geodesic tortuosity provides very good predictive performance. This shows that higher-order correlation functions are extremely useful for forming a general model for predicting physical properties of complex materials. Additionally, our results suggest that artificial neural networks are superior to the more conventional regression methods for establishing quantitative structure-property relationships. We make the data and code used publicly available to facilitate further development of permeability prediction methods.

  • 33.
    Röding, Magnus
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wåhlstrand Skärström, Victor
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Loren, Niklas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Inverse design of anisotropic spinodoid materials with prescribed diffusivity2022In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 17413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The three-dimensional microstructure of functional materials determines its effective properties, like the mass transport properties of a porous material. Hence, it is desirable to be able to tune the properties by tuning the microstructure accordingly. In this work, we study a class of spinodoid i.e. spinodal decomposition-like structures with tunable anisotropy, based on Gaussian random fields. These are realistic yet computationally efficient models for bicontinuous porous materials. We use a convolutional neural network for predicting effective diffusivity in all three directions. We demonstrate that by incorporating the predictions of the neural network in an approximate Bayesian computation framework for inverse problems, we can in a computationally efficient manner design microstructures with prescribed diffusivity in all three directions. © 2022, The Author(s).

  • 34.
    Sani, Negar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Wang, Xin
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE, Innventia.
    Andersson Ersman, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Dyreklev, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Göran
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Flexible lamination-fabricated ultra-high frequency diodes based on self-supporting semiconducting composite film of silicon micro-particles and nano-fibrillated cellulose2016In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 28921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low cost and flexible devices such as wearable electronics, e-labels and distributed sensors will make the future "internet of things" viable. To power and communicate with such systems, high frequency rectifiers are crucial components. We present a simple method to manufacture flexible diodes, operating at GHz frequencies, based on self-adhesive composite films of silicon micro-particles (Si-ÎŒPs) and glycerol dispersed in nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC). NFC, Si-ÎŒPs and glycerol are mixed in a water suspension, forming a self-supporting nanocellulose-silicon composite film after drying. This film is cut and laminated between a flexible pre-patterned Al bottom electrode and a conductive Ni-coated carbon tape top contact. A Schottky junction is established between the Al electrode and the Si-ÎŒPs. The resulting flexible diodes show current levels on the order of mA for an area of 2 mm2, a current rectification ratio up to 4 × 103 between 1 and 2 V bias and a cut-off frequency of 1.8 GHz. Energy harvesting experiments have been demonstrated using resistors as the load at 900 MHz and 1.8 GHz. The diode stack can be delaminated away from the Al electrode and then later on be transferred and reconfigured to another substrate. This provides us with reconfigurable GHz-operating diode circuits.

  • 35.
    Sjövall, Peter
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Skedung, Lisa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation.
    Gregoire, Sébastien
    L’OREAL Research and Innovation, France.
    Biganska, Olga
    L’OREAL Research and Innovation, France.
    Clément, Franck
    L’OREAL Research and Innovation, France.
    Luengo, Gustavo S
    L’OREAL Research and Innovation, France.
    Imaging the distribution of skin lipids and topically applied compounds in human skin using mass spectrometry2018In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 16683Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The barrier functions of skin against water loss, microbial invasion and penetration of xenobiotics rely, in part, on the spatial distribution of the biomolecular constituents in the skin structure, particularly its horny layer (stratum corneum). However, all skin layers are important to describe normal and dysfunctional skin conditions, and to develop adapted therapies or skin care products. In this work, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) combined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to image the spatial distribution of a variety of molecular species, from stratum corneum down to dermis, in cross-section samples of human abdominal skin. The results demonstrate the expected localization of ceramide and saturated long-chain fatty acids in stratum corneum (SC) and cholesterol sulfate in the upper part of the viable epidermis. The localization of exogenous compounds is demonstrated by the detection and imaging of carvacrol (a constituent of oregano or thyme essential oil) and ceramide, after topical application onto ex vivo human skin. Carvacrol showed pronounced accumulation to triglyceride-containing structures in the deeper parts of dermis. In contrast, the exogenous ceramide was found to be localized in SC. Furthermore, the complementary character of this approach with classical ex vivo skin absorption analysis methods is demonstrated.

  • 36.
    Skedung, Lisa
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Life Science. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Chung, Jun-Young
    National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA; Harvard University, USA.
    Stafford, Christopher M.
    National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA.
    Berglund, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Rutland, Mark
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Feeling small: Exploring the tactile perception limits2013In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 3, article id 2617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human finger is exquisitely sensitive in perceiving different materials, but the question remains as to what length scales are capable of being distinguished in active touch. We combine material science with psychophysics to manufacture and haptically explore a series of topographically patterned surfaces of controlled wavelength, but identical chemistry. Strain-induced surface wrinkling and subsequent templating produced 16 surfaces with wrinkle wavelengths ranging from 300a nm to 90a μm and amplitudes between 7a nm and 4.5a μm. Perceived similarities of these surfaces (and two blanks) were pairwise scaled by participants, and interdistances among all stimuli were determined by individual differences scaling (INDSCAL). The tactile space thus generated and its two perceptual dimensions were directly linked to surface physical properties - the finger friction coefficient and the wrinkle wavelength. Finally, the lowest amplitude of the wrinkles so distinguished was approximately 10a nm, demonstrating that human tactile discrimination extends to the nanoscale.

  • 37.
    Skedung, Lisa
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    El Rawadi, Charles
    L Oreal Research and Innovation, France.
    Arvidsson, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Farcet, Celine
    L Oreal Research and Innovation, France.
    Luengo, Gustavo S
    L Oreal Research and Innovation, France.
    Breton, Lionel
    L Oreal Research and Innovation, France.
    Rutland, Mark W.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Mechanisms of tactile sensory deterioration amongst the elderly2018In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 5303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is known that roughness-smoothness, hardness-softness, stickiness-slipperiness and warm-cold are predominant perceptual dimensions in macro-, micro- and nano- texture perception. However, it is not clear to what extent active tactile texture discrimination remains intact with age. The general decrease in tactile ability induces physical and emotional dysfunction in elderly, and has increasing significance for an aging population. We report a method to quantify tactile acuity based on blinded active exploration of systematically varying micro-textured surfaces and a same-different paradigm. It reveals that elderly participants show significantly reduced fine texture discrimination ability. The elderly group also displays statistically lower finger friction coefficient, moisture and elasticity, suggesting a link. However, a subpopulation of the elderly retains discrimination ability irrespective of cutaneous condition and this can be related to a higher density of somatosensory receptors on the finger pads. Skin tribology is thus not the primary reason for decline of tactile discrimination with age. The remediation of cutaneous properties through rehydration, however leads to a significantly improved tactile acuity. This indicates unambiguously that neurological tactile loss can be temporarily compensated by restoring the cutaneous contact mechanics. Such mechanical restoration of tactile ability has the potential to increase the quality of life in elderly. 

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  • 38.
    Torstensen, Jonathan
    et al.
    Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Ottesen, Vegar
    NTNU, Norway.
    Rodriguez Fabia, Sandra
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. NTNU, Norway.
    Johansson, Lars
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Lervik, Anders
    NTNU, Norway.
    The influence of temperature on cellulose swelling at constant water density2022In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 20736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have in this paper investigated how water sorbs to cellulose. We found that both cellulose nanofibril (CNF) and cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) films swell similarly, as they are both mainly composed of cellulose. CNF/CNC films subjected to water at 0.018 kg/m3 at 25 °C and 39 °C, showed a decrease in swelling from ~ 8 to 2%. This deswelling increased the tensile index of CNF-films by ~ 13%. By molecular modeling of fibril swelling, we found that water sorbed to cellulose exhibits a decreased diffusion constant compared to bulk water. We quantified this change and showed that diffusion of sorbed water displays less dependency on swelling temperature compared to bulk water diffusion. To our knowledge, this has not previously been demonstrated by molecular modeling. The difference between bulk water diffusion (DWW) and diffusion of water sorbed to cellulose (DCC) increased from DWW − DCC ~ 3 × 10–5 cm/s2 at 25 °C to DWW − DCC ~ 8.3 × 10–5 cm/s2 at 100 °C. Moreover, water molecules spent less successive time sorbed to a fibril at higher temperatures. © 2022, The Author(s).

  • 39.
    Tot, Aleksandar
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Zhang, Leiting
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Berg, Erik
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Svensson, Per H.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Chemical Process and Pharmaceutical Development.
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Water-in-salt electrolytes made saltier by Gemini ionic liquids for highly efficient Li-ion batteries2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 2154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The water-in-salt electrolytes have promoted aqueous Li-ion batteries to become one of the most promising candidates to overcome safety concerns/issues of traditional Li-ion batteries. A simple increase of Li-salt concentration in electrolytes can successfully expand the electrochemical stability window of aqueous electrolytes beyond 2 V. However, necessary stability improvements require an increase in complexity of the ternary electrolytes. Here, we have explored the effects of novel, Gemini-type ionic liquids (GILs) as a co-solvent systems in aqueous Li[TFSI] mixtures and investigated the transport properties of the resulting electrolytes, as well as their electrochemical performance. The devices containing pyrrolidinium-based GILs show superior cycling stability and promising specific capacity in the cells based on the commonly used electrode materials LTO (Li4Ti5O12) and LMO (LiMn2O4). © 2023, The Author(s).

  • 40.
    Udayakumar, Mahitha
    et al.
    University of Miskolc, Hungary.
    Tóth, Pal
    University of Miskolc, Hungary.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Singh Malhotra, Jaskaran
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy. DTU Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Likozar, Blaz
    National Institute of Chemistry, Slovenia.
    Gyergyek, Saso
    National Institute of Chemistry, Slovenia.
    Leskó, Anett Katalin
    University of Miskolc, Hungary.
    Thangaraj, Ravikumar
    University of Miskolc, Hungary.
    Németh, Zoltan
    University of Miskolc, Hungary.
    Hierarchical porous carbon foam electrodes fabricated from waste polyurethane elastomer template for electric double-layer capacitors2022In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 11786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plastic waste has become a major global environmental concern. The utilization of solid waste-derived porous carbon for energy storage has received widespread attention in recent times. Herein, we report the comparison of electrochemical performance of porous carbon foams (CFs) produced from waste polyurethane (PU) elastomer templates via two different activation pathways. Electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) fabricated from the carbon foam exhibited a gravimetric capacitance of 74.4 F/g at 0.1 A/g. High packing density due to the presence of carbon spheres in the hierarchical structure offered excellent volumetric capacitance of 134.7 F/cm3 at 0.1 A/g. Besides, the CF-based EDLCs exhibited Coulombic efficiency close to 100% and showed stable cyclic performance for 5000 charge–discharge cycles with good capacitance retention of 97.7% at 3 A/g. Low equivalent series resistance (1.05 Ω) and charge transfer resistance (0.23 Ω) due to the extensive presence of hydroxyl functional groups contributed to attaining high power (48.89 kW/kg). Based on the preferred properties such as high specific surface area, hierarchical pore structure, surface functionalities, low metallic impurities, high conductivity and desirable capacitive behaviour, the CF prepared from waste PU elastomers have shown potential to be adopted as electrodes in EDLCs. © 2022, The Author(s).

  • 41. Zorzano, Maria-Paz
    et al.
    Siljeström, Sandra
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Martínez-Frías, Jesus
    Instituto de Geociencias, Spain.
    Present-day thermal and water activity environment of the Mars Sample Return collection2024In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 7175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mars Sample Return mission intends to retrieve a sealed collection of rocks, regolith, and atmosphere sampled from Jezero Crater, Mars, by the NASA Perseverance rover mission. For all life-related research, it is necessary to evaluate water availability in the samples and on Mars. Within the first Martian year, Perseverance has acquired an estimated total mass of 355 g of rocks and regolith, and 38 μmoles of Martian atmospheric gas. Using in-situ observations acquired by the Perseverance rover, we show that the present-day environmental conditions at Jezero allow for the hydration of sulfates, chlorides, and perchlorates and the occasional formation of frost as well as a diurnal atmospheric-surface water exchange of 0.5–10 g water per m2 (assuming a well-mixed atmosphere). At night, when the temperature drops below 190 K, the surface water activity can exceed 0.5, the lowest limit for cell reproduction. During the day, when the temperature is above the cell replication limit of 245 K, water activity is less than 0.02. The environmental conditions at the surface of Jezero Crater, where these samples were acquired, are incompatible with the cell replication limits currently known on Earth. 

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