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  • 1.
    Bender, P.
    et al.
    University of Cantabria, Spain .
    Bogart, L. K.
    University College London, UK .
    Posth, O.
    Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany .
    Szczerba, W.
    BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung Und-prüfung, Germany ; AGH University of Science and Technology, Poland .
    Rogers, S. E.
    ISIS-STFC Neutron Scattering Facility, UK.
    Castro, A.
    SOLVE Research and Consultancy AB, Sweden .
    Nilsson, L.
    SOLVE Research and Consultancy AB, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Zeng, L. J.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Sugunan, Abhilash
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Sommertune, Jens
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Fornara, A.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    González-Alonso, D.
    University of Cantabria, Spain .
    Fernández Barquín, L.
    University of Cantabria, Spain.
    Johansson, Christer
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Acreo.
    Structural and magnetic properties of multi-core nanoparticles analysed using a generalised numerical inversion method2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 45990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structural and magnetic properties of magnetic multi-core particles were determined by numerical inversion of small angle scattering and isothermal magnetisation data. The investigated particles consist of iron oxide nanoparticle cores (9 nm) embedded in poly(styrene) spheres (160 nm). A thorough physical characterisation of the particles included transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Their structure was ultimately disclosed by an indirect Fourier transform of static light scattering, small angle X-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering data of the colloidal dispersion. The extracted pair distance distribution functions clearly indicated that the cores were mostly accumulated in the outer surface layers of the poly(styrene) spheres. To investigate the magnetic properties, the isothermal magnetisation curves of the multi-core particles (immobilised and dispersed in water) were analysed. The study stands out by applying the same numerical approach to extract the apparent moment distributions of the particles as for the indirect Fourier transform. It could be shown that the main peak of the apparent moment distributions correlated to the expected intrinsic moment distribution of the cores. Additional peaks were observed which signaled deviations of the isothermal magnetisation behavior from the non-interacting case, indicating weak dipolar interactions.

  • 2.
    Escamez, Sacha
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Latha Gandla, Madhavi
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Derba-Maceluch, Marta
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Sven-Olof
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy. RISE, Innventia.
    Mellerowicz, Ewa J.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Leif J.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    A collection of genetically engineered Populus trees reveals wood biomass traits that predict glucose yield from enzymatic hydrolysis2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 15798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood represents a promising source of sugars to produce bio-based renewables, including biofuels. However, breaking down lignocellulose requires costly pretreatments because lignocellulose is recalcitrant to enzymatic saccharification. Increasing saccharification potential would greatly contribute to make wood a competitive alternative to petroleum, but this requires improving wood properties. To identify wood biomass traits associated with saccharification, we analyzed a total of 65 traits related to wood chemistry, anatomy and structure, biomass production and saccharification in 40 genetically engineered Populus tree lines. These lines exhibited broad variation in quantitative traits, allowing for multivariate analyses and mathematical modeling. Modeling revealed that seven wood biomass traits associated in a predictive manner with saccharification of glucose after pretreatment. Four of these seven traits were also negatively associated with biomass production, suggesting a trade-off between saccharification potential and total biomass, which has previously been observed to offset the overall sugar yield from whole trees. We therefore estimated the "total-wood glucose yield" (TWG) from whole trees and found 22 biomass traits predictive of TWG after pretreatment. Both saccharification and TWG were associated with low abundant, often overlooked matrix polysaccharides such as arabinose and rhamnose which possibly represent new markers for improved Populus feedstocks.

  • 3.
    Etcheverry, Sebastian
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Acreo. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Faridi, A.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ramachandraiah, H.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Kumar, T.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Margulis, Walter
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Acreo. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Laurell, F.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Russom, A.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    High performance micro-flow cytometer based on optical fibres2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 5628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flow cytometry is currently the gold standard for analysis of cells in the medical laboratory and biomedical research. Fuelled by the need of point-of-care diagnosis, a significant effort has been made to miniaturize and reduce cost of flow cytometers. However, despite recent advances, current microsystems remain less versatile and much slower than their large-scale counterparts. In this work, an all-silica fibre microflow cytometer is presented that measures fluorescence and scattering from particles and cells. It integrates cell transport in circular capillaries and light delivery by optical fibres. Single-stream cell focusing is performed by Elasto-inertial microfluidics to guarantee accurate and sensitive detection. The capability of this technique is extended to high flow rates (up to 800 μl/min), enabling a throughput of 2500 particles/s. The robust, portable and low-cost system described here could be the basis for a point-of-care flow cytometer with a performance comparable to commercial systems. © 2017 The Author(s).

  • 4.
    Ivarsson, M.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Broman, C.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Sturkell, E.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ormö, J.
    Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial, Spain.
    Siljeström, Sandra
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut / Funktionella material (KMf).
    Van Zuilen, M.
    Université Sorbonne Paris Cité, France.
    Bengtson, A.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Fungal colonization of an Ordovician impact-induced hydrothermal system2013In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 3, no Dec, p. 3487-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Impacts are common geologic features on the terrestrial planets throughout the solar system, and on at least Earth and Mars impacts have induced hydrothermal convection. Impact-generated hydrothermal systems have been suggested to possess the same life supporting capability as hydrothermal systems associated with volcanic activity. However, evidence of fossil microbial colonization in impact-generated hydrothermal systems is scarce in the literature. Here we report of fossilized microorganisms in association with cavity-grown hydrothermal minerals from the 458â.Ma Lockne impact structure, Sweden. Based on morphological characteristics the fossilized microorganisms are interpreted as fungi. We further infer the kerogenization of the microfossils, and thus the life span of the fungi, to be contemporaneous with the hydrothermal activity and migration of hydrocarbons in the system. Our results from the Lockne impact structure show that hydrothermal systems associated with impact structures can support colonization by microbial life.

  • 5.
    Lindgren, Johan
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kuriyama, Takeo
    Lund University, Sweden; University of Hyogo, Japan; Wildlife Management Research Center, Japan.
    Madsen, Henrik
    Mo-clay Museum, Denmark.
    Sjövall, Peter
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Zheng, Wenxia
    North Carolina State University, USA; North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, USA.
    Uvdal, Per
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Engdahl, Anders
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Moyer, Alison E.
    North Carolina State University, USA.
    Gren, Johan A.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kamezaki, Naoki
    Okayama University of Science, Japan.
    Ueno, Shintaro
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Schweitzer, Mary H.
    Lund University, Sweden; North Carolina State University, USA; North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, USA.
    Biochemistry and adaptive colouration of an exceptionally preserved juvenile fossil sea turtle2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 13324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The holotype (MHM-K2) of the Eocene cheloniine Tasbacka danica is arguably one of the best preserved juvenile fossil sea turtles on record. Notwithstanding compactional flattening, the specimen is virtually intact, comprising a fully articulated skeleton exposed in dorsal view. MHM-K2 also preserves, with great fidelity, soft tissue traces visible as a sharply delineated carbon film around the bones and marginal scutes along the edge of the carapace. Here we show that the extraordinary preservation of the type of T. danica goes beyond gross morphology to include ultrastructural details and labile molecular components of the once-living animal. Haemoglobin-derived compounds, eumelanic pigments and proteinaceous materials retaining the immunological characteristics of sauropsid-specific β-keratin and tropomyosin were detected in tissues containing remnant melanosomes and decayed keratin plates. The preserved organics represent condensed remains of the cornified epidermis and, likely also, deeper anatomical features, and provide direct chemical evidence that adaptive melanism - a biological means used by extant sea turtle hatchlings to elevate metabolic and growth rates - had evolved 54 million years ago. © 2017 The Author(s).

  • 6.
    Lindgren, Johan
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Sjövall, Peter
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Medicinteknik.
    Carney, Ryan M.
    Brown University, US.
    Cincotta, Aude
    Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences; Belgium; University of Namur, Belgium.
    Uvdal, Per
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hutcheson, Steven W.
    University of Maryland, US.
    Gustafsson, Ola
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lefèvre, Ulysse
    Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Belgium; Liège University, Belgium.
    Escuillié, Francois
    Eldonia, France.
    Heimdal, Jimmy
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Engdahl, Anders
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Gren, Johan A.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wakamatsu, Kazumasa
    Fujita Health University, Japan.
    Yans, Johan
    University of Namur, Belgium.
    Godefroit, Pascal
    Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Belgium.
    Molecular composition and ultrastructure of Jurassic paravian feathers2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 13520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feathers are amongst the most complex epidermal structures known, and they have a well-documented evolutionary trajectory across non-avian dinosaurs and basal birds. Moreover, melanosome-like microbodies preserved in association with fossil plumage have been used to reconstruct original colour, behaviour and physiology. However, these putative ancient melanosomes might alternatively represent microorganismal residues, a conflicting interpretation compounded by a lack of unambiguous chemical data. We therefore used sensitive molecular imaging, supported by multiple independent analytical tests, to demonstrate that the filamentous epidermal appendages in a new specimen of the Jurassic paravian Anchiornis comprise remnant eumelanosomes and fibril-like microstructures, preserved as endogenous eumelanin and authigenic calcium phosphate. These results provide novel insights into the early evolution of feathers at the sub-cellular level, and unequivocally determine that melanosomes can be preserved in fossil feathers.

  • 7.
    Nielsen, Karsten H.
    et al.
    University of Jena, Germany.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, Glafo Glasforskningsinstitutet. University of Jena, Germany.
    Limbach, Rene
    University of Jena, Germany.
    Wondraczek, Lothar
    University of Jena, Germany.
    Quantitative image analysis for evaluating the abrasion resistance of nanoporous silica films on glass2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 17708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The abrasion resistance of coated glass surfaces is an important parameter for judging lifetime performance, but practical testing procedures remain overly simplistic and do often not allow for direct conclusions on real-world degradation. Here, we combine quantitative two-dimensional image analysis and mechanical abrasion into a facile tool for probing the abrasion resistance of anti-reflective (AR) coatings. We determine variations in the average coated area, during and after controlled abrasion. Through comparison with other experimental techniques, we show that this method provides a practical, rapid and versatile tool for the evaluation of the abrasion resistance of sol-gel-derived thin films on glass. The method yields informative data, which correlates with measurements of diffuse reflectance and is further supported by qualitative investigations through scanning electron microscopy. In particular, the method directly addresses degradation of coating performance, i.e., the gradual areal loss of antireflective functionality. As an exemplary subject, we studied the abrasion resistance of state-of-the-art nanoporous SiO2 thin films which were derived from 5–6 wt% aqueous solutions of potassium silicates, or from colloidal suspensions of SiO2 nanoparticles. It is shown how abrasion resistance is governed by coating density and film adhesion, defining the trade-off between optimal AR performance and acceptable mechanical performance.

  • 8.
    Nordenström, Malin
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; WWSC Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Sweden.
    Riazanova, Anastasia V
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; WWSC Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Sweden.
    Järn, Mikael
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation.
    Paulraj, Thomas
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; WWSC Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Sweden.
    Turner, Charlotta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ström, Valter
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Olsson, Richard T
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; WWSC Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Sweden.
    Svagan, Anna J
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; WWSC Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Sweden.
    Superamphiphobic coatings based on liquid-core microcapsules with engineered capsule walls and functionality2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 3647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microcapsules with specific functional properties, related to the capsule wall and core, are highly desired in a number of applications. In this study, hybrid cellulose microcapsules (1.2 ± 0.4 µm in diameter) were prepared by nanoengineering the outer walls of precursor capsules. Depending on the preparation route, capsules with different surface roughness (raspberry or broccoli-like), and thereby different wetting properties, could be obtained. The tunable surface roughness was achieved as a result of the chemical and structural properties of the outer wall of a precursor capsule, which combined with a new processing route allowed in-situ formation of silica nanoparticles (30-40 nm or 70 nm in diameter). By coating glass slides with "broccoli-like" microcapsules (30-40 nm silica nanoparticles), static contact angles above 150° and roll-off angles below 6° were obtained for both water and low surface-tension oil (hexadecane), rendering the substrate superamphiphobic. As a comparison, coatings from raspberry-like capsules were only strongly oleophobic and hydrophobic. The liquid-core of the capsules opens great opportunities to incorporate different functionalities and here hydrophobic superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPIONs) were encapsulated. As a result, magnetic broccoli-like microcapsules formed an excellent superamphiphobic coating-layer on a curved geometry by simply applying an external magnetic field.

  • 9.
    Sani, Negar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Wang, Xin
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE, Innventia.
    Andersson Ersman, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Dyreklev, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Göran
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Flexible lamination-fabricated ultra-high frequency diodes based on self-supporting semiconducting composite film of silicon micro-particles and nano-fibrillated cellulose2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 28921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low cost and flexible devices such as wearable electronics, e-labels and distributed sensors will make the future "internet of things" viable. To power and communicate with such systems, high frequency rectifiers are crucial components. We present a simple method to manufacture flexible diodes, operating at GHz frequencies, based on self-adhesive composite films of silicon micro-particles (Si-ÎŒPs) and glycerol dispersed in nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC). NFC, Si-ÎŒPs and glycerol are mixed in a water suspension, forming a self-supporting nanocellulose-silicon composite film after drying. This film is cut and laminated between a flexible pre-patterned Al bottom electrode and a conductive Ni-coated carbon tape top contact. A Schottky junction is established between the Al electrode and the Si-ÎŒPs. The resulting flexible diodes show current levels on the order of mA for an area of 2 mm2, a current rectification ratio up to 4 × 103 between 1 and 2 V bias and a cut-off frequency of 1.8 GHz. Energy harvesting experiments have been demonstrated using resistors as the load at 900 MHz and 1.8 GHz. The diode stack can be delaminated away from the Al electrode and then later on be transferred and reconfigured to another substrate. This provides us with reconfigurable GHz-operating diode circuits.

  • 10.
    Sjövall, Peter
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Skedung, Lisa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation.
    Gregoire, Sébastien
    L’OREAL Research and Innovation, France.
    Biganska, Olga
    L’OREAL Research and Innovation, France.
    Clément, Franck
    L’OREAL Research and Innovation, France.
    Luengo, Gustavo S
    L’OREAL Research and Innovation, France.
    Imaging the distribution of skin lipids and topically applied compounds in human skin using mass spectrometry2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 16683Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The barrier functions of skin against water loss, microbial invasion and penetration of xenobiotics rely, in part, on the spatial distribution of the biomolecular constituents in the skin structure, particularly its horny layer (stratum corneum). However, all skin layers are important to describe normal and dysfunctional skin conditions, and to develop adapted therapies or skin care products. In this work, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) combined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to image the spatial distribution of a variety of molecular species, from stratum corneum down to dermis, in cross-section samples of human abdominal skin. The results demonstrate the expected localization of ceramide and saturated long-chain fatty acids in stratum corneum (SC) and cholesterol sulfate in the upper part of the viable epidermis. The localization of exogenous compounds is demonstrated by the detection and imaging of carvacrol (a constituent of oregano or thyme essential oil) and ceramide, after topical application onto ex vivo human skin. Carvacrol showed pronounced accumulation to triglyceride-containing structures in the deeper parts of dermis. In contrast, the exogenous ceramide was found to be localized in SC. Furthermore, the complementary character of this approach with classical ex vivo skin absorption analysis methods is demonstrated.

  • 11.
    Skedung, Lisa
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    El Rawadi, Charles
    L Oreal Research and Innovation, France.
    Arvidsson, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Farcet, Celine
    L Oreal Research and Innovation, France.
    Luengo, Gustavo S
    L Oreal Research and Innovation, France.
    Breton, Lionel
    L Oreal Research and Innovation, France.
    Rutland, Mark W.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Mechanisms of tactile sensory deterioration amongst the elderly2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 5303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is known that roughness-smoothness, hardness-softness, stickiness-slipperiness and warm-cold are predominant perceptual dimensions in macro-, micro- and nano- texture perception. However, it is not clear to what extent active tactile texture discrimination remains intact with age. The general decrease in tactile ability induces physical and emotional dysfunction in elderly, and has increasing significance for an aging population. We report a method to quantify tactile acuity based on blinded active exploration of systematically varying micro-textured surfaces and a same-different paradigm. It reveals that elderly participants show significantly reduced fine texture discrimination ability. The elderly group also displays statistically lower finger friction coefficient, moisture and elasticity, suggesting a link. However, a subpopulation of the elderly retains discrimination ability irrespective of cutaneous condition and this can be related to a higher density of somatosensory receptors on the finger pads. Skin tribology is thus not the primary reason for decline of tactile discrimination with age. The remediation of cutaneous properties through rehydration, however leads to a significantly improved tactile acuity. This indicates unambiguously that neurological tactile loss can be temporarily compensated by restoring the cutaneous contact mechanics. Such mechanical restoration of tactile ability has the potential to increase the quality of life in elderly. 

  • 12.
    Skedung, Lisa
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Life Science.
    Rutland, Mark
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Feeling small: Exploring the tactile perception limits2013In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 3, p. 2617-Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 12 of 12
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