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  • 1.
    James, Alana
    et al.
    Northumbria University, Newcastle.
    Reitsma, Lizette
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Aftab, Mersha
    Northumbria University, Newcastle.
    Bridging the double-gap in circularity. Addressing the intention-behaviour disparity in fashion2019In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 22, no sup1, p. 901-914Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contemporary fashion industry is a broken system in need of reform,moving away from a dated linear model to adopt principles reflective of modernsocietal challenges. Through initial explorative studies and a thorough literaturesearch, a fundamental engagement gap with principles of circularity has beenidentified, which continues to challenge the application of sustainable innovationmethods. This paper focuses on the role design can play in the application of a circularmodel through product-life extension strategies. A multiple-stakeholder perspectivewas adopted during data collection, with a range of qualitative methods utilisedthrough the engagement with both consumers and companies. Conclusions supportthe need to consider design as a key tool for change, with methods such as cocreationand participatory design facilitating greater awareness levels in consumers.A holistic approach to responsible action and an increase in product value canfacilitate a move towards a circular model for fashion

  • 2.
    Reitsma, Lizette
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Light, Ann
    University of Sussex, UK; Malmö University, Sweden.
    Zaman, Tariq
    CECOS University of IT & Emerging Sciences, Pakistan.
    Rodgers, Paul
    Lancaster University, UK.
    A Respectful Design Framework Incorporating indigenous knowledge in the design process2019In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 22, no sup1, p. 1555-1570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To stay within the planetary boundaries, we have to take responsibility, andthis includes designers. This requires new perspectives on design. In this work, wefocus on a co-design project with indigenous communities. Within such communities,indigenous knowledge is central. Indigenous knowledge acknowledges that the worldis alive and that we, as humans, are merely a small part. Central in our approach isSheehan’s respectful design, which ensures a central place for indigenous knowledgein the design process. However, Sheehan’s approach does not state in pragmaticterms how such a design approach can be achieved. Some of the co-design processeswe engaged in led to respectful design spaces, others did not. This helped us toidentify patterns of dynamics that are essential for respectful design. At the core ofour findings lies the observation that in order to reach a respectful design space, inwhich indigenous knowledge is embedded, a shared dialogical space betweencommunity and designer is essential.

  • 3.
    Reitsma, Lizette
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Wessman, Stina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Nyström, Sofie
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Spilltime: Designing for the relationship between QS, CO2e and climate goals2019In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 22, no sup1, p. 1087-1100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to deal with major climate challenges, different climate goals havebeen set. These goals are on an abstract, political level, making them difficult tounderstand for citizens. This is a problem, since in order to reach a sustainablesociety, all layers in society should be involved. We present a design process, in whichwe made invisible carbon emission goals tangible so that citizens can relate to them.By extracting different modes of carbon footprint feedback and translating those intoa network of objects, we have provided an alternative viewpoint on how to involvepeople into understanding complex data. By giving different modes of feedback,people can find different ways to relate to the data. This way, the designer providesthe tools, but people can use it to shape their own understanding. We consider thisapproach relevant in empowering citizens to voice their concerns in the climatedebate.

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